Levels of Service

snowpeaschocolateManagement

Nov 18, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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1

Levels of Service


-
Standards for Buildings

Kathy Dever
-
Tod NAMS Group

John O’Brien
-

Auckland City Council

2

Asset Management Processes

Existing

Asset Knowledge

Existing

Module 1

Identify

Levels of Service

Identify

Module 2

Predict

Demand

Predict

Demand

Module 3

Define

Lifecycle

Management

Define

Lifecycle

Management

Module 4

Implement Plan

Measure

Performance

Implement Plan

Measure

Performance

Identify

Improvements

& Monitoring

Identify

Improvements

& Monitoring

Module 7

Projections

Develop Financial

Projections

Module 6

Risk

Assessments &

Prioritisation

Risk

Assessments &

Prioritisation

Module 5

Existing

Existing

Asset Knowledge

Step 1

Identify

Identify

Levels of Service

Step 2

Predict

Demand

Predict

Demand

Step 3

Define

Lifecycle

Management

Define

Lifecycle

Management

Step 4

Implement Plan

Measure

Performance

Implement Plan

Measure

Performance

Identify

Improvements

& Monitoring

Identify

Improvements

& Monitoring

Step 7

Projections

Develop Financial

Projections

Step 6

Risk

Assessments &

Prioritisation

Risk

Assessments &

Prioritisation

Step 5

3

Knowing what you need


Levels of Service

Process lead by high
level strategies

Four levels

Statement, measures,
targets

Address the shortfalls
by scoping projects
aligned with budgeted
programmes

Prioritise and make a
decision

4

Levels of service
are output descriptions supported by
quantifiable performance measures


The performance measure
indicates how the organisation is
performing in relation to that level of service


Customer performance measures
measure how the customer
receives the service (“what the customer gets”).


Technical performance measures
are focused more on
technical criteria that demonstrate effective organisational
performance (“what we do”).

Some definitions

5

Performance versus condition

Performance


Performance

relates to the ability of the asset to provide the
required level of service

to the customer



Undertaken to compare actual performance against
service standards or design criteria



Condition


Condition

relates to the
structural integrity

of an asset


6

Which relates to Levels of service?


Condition can only ever tell us what state the asset is
in physically
-

it can not tell us how well the asset
delivers an agreed level of service to the user.


Monitoring condition will help us to understand how
the asset is physically declining or improving.


Monitoring performance tells us how levels of service
are declining and or improving


The performance of an asset goes well beyond its
condition and for assets such as property, condition
is not directly related to levels of service

7



Example
-
Community Housing

Intended level of service and key performance indicators


User Group

Current Target Level of Service

Elderly and
Special
needs
Tenants

Units are designed and maintained to meet tenants needs
and tenants consider the unit they occupy to be their
home.

Tenant’s
family/
support
persons

Tenants are well supported by Council’s tenancy services

8

Example
-

biennial housing survey

Community Housing Residents Survey
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
Overall Satisfaction
Rent and Safety
Maintenance
Design/Parking/Location
Housing Liaison
Service
Recreation
Very/Quite Satisfied
1997
1999
2002
2004
9

Public Toilets
-
which would you prefer?

Both are in sound physical
condition, but one offers a far
better levels of service than the
other

10

Measuring performance

We need to consider:


What customers value about the services we provide
-

what is important to them?


How can we reliably measure performance on an
ongoing basis based on the outcomes the buildings
deliver?


What technical measures can be used to manage
performance?


How does current capacity compare to future
demand?

11

Public Toilet case study


Equality


Disabled facilities
provided


Standards Met


Accessible approach


Disabled signage
appropriate


Safety /Security


Passing activity


Entrapment


External lighting


Natural lighting


Artificial lighting


Lighting
effectiveness


Hygiene


Basins


Soap


Hand drying


Sanitary bins


Womens/ unisex


Mens


Water


Odour


Maintenance


Vandalism risk


Cleaning standards

12

Grading Scale

Overall condition grade
Passing activity
Lighting effectiveness
(external)
Entrapment
potential
Vandalism risk
Directional signage
Operational
signage
5
Very poor
Failure or failure imminent /
safety risk.
Major work or replacement
required urgently
No passing
activity.
No artificial lighting at
night for toilet open
before / after dark.
High potential for
entrapment.
Subject to
frequent
vandalism.
No signage where it
would be useful
Missing / incorrect /
damaged
4
Poor
Failure likely in short term
Substantial work required in
short term, asset barely
serviceable
Away from
footpath or road -
little passing
activity.
Inadequate light, poor
artificial lighting, areas
not illuminated. Some
lights broken.
Potential for
entrapment.
Subject to
regular
vandalism.
Poor, inaccurate,
difficult to see, follow
directions
Poor, difficult to
interpret
3
Average
Significant deterioration evident,
failure unlikely in near future but
further deterioration likely
Work required but asset is still
serviceable
Some activity in
area.
Adequately lit, lights in
working order.
Low entrapment
risk.
Infrequent
vandalism.
Average
Average
2
Good
Acceptable physial condition;
minimal short term failure risk
but potential for deterioration
Only minor work required (if
any)
Frequent passing
activity.
Well lit, lights in working
order.
Low entrapment
risk.
Rare vandalism
Good
Good
1
Excellent
Sound physical condition
No work required
Frequent passing
activity.
No lighting concerns,
artificial lighting good, all
lights in working order.
Very low
entrapment risk.
Vandalism not
an issue.
Size, accuracy,
visibility, location
excellent - e.g. sign
from street clearly
showing where toilet is
located
Size, accuracy,
visibility, location
excellent - e.g.
operating
instructions clear
and readable for all
users
0
Non-
existent
Asset absent or no longer exists
Not required
13

Condition vs performance grade

0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
Condition
Performance
14

Another solution


Incorporating weighted criteria into a ‘Star
rating’ for each service/facility 1
-
5


Star ratings have traditionally been used in
the accommodation industry, now there is a
growing number of products and services
using them


Useful where there are a variety of
interrelated factors that make up the product
or service


15

Example Criteria


Comfort & Amenity


Weather protection


CPTED


Cleanliness


Level of internal finish


Ventilation


Lighting


Function & usability


Capacity space


Compatibility


Accessibility


Site accessibility


Condition


Internal


External


Environment


Water usage

Consistent evaluation is key

16

Example


Star Rating

17

Example


Public Toilets

Provision of facilities to provide comfort, amenity and access to the
whole community


LOS Quality

Star rating, facilities condition,
amenity, aesthetics, design,
location and disabled
accessibility.

1 Star 5no

1.5 Star 3no

2 Star 21no

2.5 Star 13no

3 Star 28no

3.5 Star 10no

4 Star 5no

4.5 Star 3no

5 Star 0no

LOS Quantity

88 Public Toilets

LOS Location

Parks throughout the shire on tourist drive routes or
destinations of historic high use and some sporting
venues

Popular beaches and river tourist areas, some of
which are equipped with showers and change
rooms

General community requirements in town centres

LOS Timebound

All open 24/7

Cost

$1.4M pa

18

How do we develop a star rating system?

Public Halls example: 1
st

identify the things that are valued
about the service

Values

Sustainability

Maximise the life of the buildings.

Quality

Good appearance, clean and tidy.


Health & Safety

Buildings safe to use.

Cost effectiveness

Charges are affordable and equitable

Accessibility

Suitable buildings provided to meet demand.

Reliability

Building available when needed.

19

Summary


To measure levels of service we need to measure the
performance of our assets in delivering the desired
outcomes


this is more than the condition of the
assets themselves


Performance measurement needs to be based on the
aspects of the service the customer values


A performance based rating system allows us to
measure qualitative aspects of a service in a
quantifiable manner


A star rating system allows us not only to determine
current levels of service, but has the potential to be
developed into industry standards for a range of
asset types.