Appendix II Faculty Data Sheet - Marshall University

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1

Program Review




Bachelor of Science in

Mathematics and Applied Mathematics












College of Science






November 20
11








MARSHALL UNIVERSITY


Program Review

Marshall University


2

Date:

September 30, 2011



Program:

Bachelors Programs in
Mathematics and Applied Mathematics


Degree and Title


Date of Last Review:

October 30, 2006



Recommendation

Marshall University is obligated to recommend continuance or discontinuance of a program and to
provide a brief rationale for the recommendation.


Recommendation


Code (#):

1.

Continuation of the program at the current level of activity; or


2.

Conti
nuation of the program
at a reduced level of activity or
with
corrective action
: Corrective action
will apply to programs that have deficiencies that the program itself can address and correct.
Progress
report due b
y November 1 next academic year;

or


3.

Continuation of the program with i
dentification of the program for
resource development
:


Resource
development will apply to already viable programs that require additional resources from the
Administration to help achieve their full potential. This desig
nation is considered an investment in a
viable program as opposed to addressing issues of a weak program.
Progress report due by
November 1 next academic year
; or


4.

Development of a cooperative program with another institution,

or

sharing of courses, facilities, faculty,
and the like; or


5.

Discontinuation of the program


Rationale for Recommendation
: (Deans, please submit the rationale as a separate document. Beyond
the College level, any office that disagrees with the previou
s recommendation must submit a separate
rationale and append it to this document with appropriate signature.)



1


Ariyadasa Aluthge







10/14/11


Recommendation:

Signature of pe
rson preparing the report:




Date:



1


Alf
red Akinsete







10/14/2011


Recommendation:

Si
gnature of Program Chair:






Date:



1


Charles C. Somerville






15 October 2011


Recommendation:

S
ignature of Academic Dean:







Date:


________


_________________________________________
_________


____________
__

Recommendation:

Signature of Chair, Academic Planning Committee: (Bacc
alaureate pgms only)

Date:


________


______________________________
___________________


______________

Recommendation
:

Signature of President, Faculty Senate/ Chair
, Graduate Council:


Date:


________


_________________________________________________


______________

Recommendation:

Signature of the Provost and Senior Vice P
resident for Academic Affairs:

Date:



_______


__________________________________________________


______________


Recommendation:

Signature of the President:






Date:


________


_________________________________________________


______________

Recommendation:

Signature of C
hair, Board of Governors
:





Date:



3

College/School Dean’s Recommendation


Recommendation:
Continuation of the program at the current level of activity
(Recommendation Code #1).



Rationale:
The Department of Mathematics is among very few departments on
campus with true
university
-
wide impact. Nearly every undergraduate student at
Marshall, regardless of their college or their major, will take at least one class in this
department, and several majors require multiple classes. The degree of a student’s
proficiency in mat
hematics is, in many instances, strongly correlated to successful
completion of other key courses in his or her curriculum. A strong and well
-
supported
Department of Mathematics is vital to the success of the university.


The Department of Mathematics has

a large and dedicated faculty, including some of
the best teachers on campus, as determined by university
-
wide awards. However, the
demand for math courses across campus is greater than the permanent faculty can
meet. As the following report indicates,
only about 40% of freshman
-
level math courses
were taught by tenured or tenure
-
track faculty members during the review period. It is
troublesome to me that there are currently 10 math instructors who work on one
-
year
temporary contracts. Because the vett
ing of temporary faculty hires is less stringent
than that of tenure
-
track hires, and because their connection to campus and students is
less than that of the permanent faculty, it is clearly desirable to reduce the number of
temporary positions in favor o
f tenure
-
track, or at minimum term, lines. It is because
math proficiency is so highly correlated with academic success, that we must place a
higher priority on attracting the best mathematics instructors possible.


There has been strong growth in the num
ber of Mathematics majors during the review
period, and a remarkable growth in faculty research activity. The department maintains
a very high service load for the college and the university, but has also done a very
good job at understanding the needs of

potential majors, and creating programs that
meet those needs. I believe that the success of the department can be attributed to a
very talented faculty who are among the most progressive in the college in the use of
new teaching technologies, the creati
on of online coursework, engaging students in
scholarly activities, and the establishment of collaborative research partnerships.


The one clear weakness of the department has been its failure to complete an annual
assessment report since 2008. My recomme
ndation to continue this program at the
current level of activity does not excuse that failure, but does recognize that the
department has a new chair, who understands the importance of assessment and has
already taken corrective action. Even in the absen
ce of assessment reports, the
department has been using the nationally benchmarked Major Fields Test (MFT) in
Mathematics as an objective measure of student learning.





4

Student performance was very good in the final year of the review period, and we wi
ll
continue
to
use the MFT to monitor achievement in future years to see if this level of
performance is sustained or can be improved upon.


Another weakness, though not of the department’s making, is the current low level of
departmental operating funds.

This level of funding makes it very difficult for the
department to support faculty development, and places demands on departmental lab
fees that might otherwise be used to increase student access to technology, e.g. the
refurbishing of classroom space, a
nd the development of a dedicated computer
laboratory. Fortunately, student enrollment in math classes has increased enough in
recent years that the department has seen notable increases in its lab fee allocations.
The college will work to make sure that

a higher percentage of fees are returned to the
department in support of their vital teaching mission.


In summary, this is clearly a department that is performing at a high level, and providing
a great deal of benefit to the college and the university.
The department has too many
term and temporary instructors, and a strong case can be made for resource
development to increase the contact of freshman students with career faculty members.
The department and the college will aggressively work to upgrade t
emporary faculty
positions to tenure
-
track status. The college will also support the new chair’s current
efforts to establish a culture of assessment that will lead to improved outcomes for all
the Marshall students who are impacted by this program.



























Charles C. Somerville







15 October 2011















Signature of Dean






Date



5

Marshall University

Program Review



Program: Mathematics (
B.S. in Mathematics and B.S. in Applied Mathematics)


College: College of Science


Date

of Last Review: October, 2006



I

CONSISTENCY WITH UNIVERSITY MISSION


The B.S. in Mathematics with majors in Mathematics and Applied Mathematics is
a strong and viable degree program, designed
to be

consistent with the mission
of Marshall University. The mission of Marshall University is to provide
“innovative undergraduate and graduate education that contributes to the
development of society and the individual. The University actively facilitates
le
arning through the preservation, discovery, synthesis, a
nd dissemination of
knowledge”
(2011


2012 Marshall University Undergraduate Catalog). The
mission of the College of Science is to provide scientific and technological
knowledge and training to its s
tudents. People with this type of training are
essential to our nation’s health and prosperity in a rapidly expanding global
economy. Students majoring in baccalaureate degree programs in the College of
Science receive a broad education conducive to pursui
ng a wide range of career
options.


Basic knowledge of mathematics, especially quantitative literacy, is essential to
the realization of the mission of the college in particular, and the mission of the
university in general.
The mission of the department
of mathematics is to
prepare
students for a vast variety of careers in the mathematical sciences and in
numerous related disciplines. The Department of Mathematics offers two majors,
Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, leading to the Bachelor of Science
d
egree. Graduating students will have a solid foundation that enables them to
perform successfully in industry, business, government, and further studies.
Graduates may pursue advanced degrees in any areas of mathematical and
statistical sciences, or relate
d areas such as engineering and economics. They
may also prepare for secondary mathematics certification or for professional
degree programs such as law and medicine.


The Department of Mathematics also offers a minor in mathematics available to
all studen
ts at Marshall University. Students choosing this minor will find
expanded job opportunities in business, education, government, and industry.





6


This minor can be helpful to students in pre
-
professional programs in the health
sciences. A solid grounding

in the fundamentals of mathematics is needed in
order to perform satisfactorily on aptitude examinations that must be taken prior
to admission to a professional degree

program
. This minor can
also
be used as
an important component of a student’s preparati
on for admission to law school.
Double majors are quite common and recommended especially for graduates
who do not plan to go to graduate school. Traditionally, mathematics graduates
can s
tep into virtually any career.
The key features of the program are




two majors: pure mathematics and applied mathematics



a small common core for great flexibility



four (4) choices for two (2) required sequences for additional flexibility



conformity with outside majors and minors for maximal flexibility


Mathematics is a po
rtal to vast opportunities and serves as an essential t
ool for
many other majors. I
t
also
plays an important role in the general education of all
students.
For example,
the Department is the custodian of all mathematics
courses required
by students
. It
also has one of the highest number of Critical
Thinking courses.

The Department therefore plays a major role in Marshall
General Education Requirements
.
The Department of Mathematics at Marshall
University makes every effort to help students learn valuable

critical thinking and
problem
-
solving skills. The department has an excellent track record in promoting
student learning through innovative teaching
and a

strong curriculum. Graduates
of the program are highly employable and many of our graduates pursue f
urther
education in mathematical and statistical sciences or in other fields such as
science, education, and engineering. They also pursue careers in medicine, law,
and business.


The Department of Mathematics has highly qualified and motivated faculty wh
o
are at the cutting edge in their various specializations, and are
advanced

in
the
use of

instructional technology. Our award
-
winning faculty provides frequent and
easy access to course assistance, academic advising and career planning to our
students. Th
e department has a culture of assisting faculty in reaching the
pinnacle of professional development, by supporting their involvement in various
academic activities.


The program has seen significant growth in many areas as compared to the
previous
review
period (2001


2006):



Enrollment in the calculus sequence (MTH 229, 230, 231) is up 21%.



Enrollment in MTH 300


Introduction to Higher Mathematics up 44%



Enrollment in 300 level courses up 57%



Enrollment in the two degree programs (and the minor) up 27%




7

II

ACCREDITATION INFORMATION

There is no accreditation organization for mathematics.


I
I
I

PROGRAM STATEMENT on Adequacy, Viability, Necessity and

Consistency with
University/College Mission



A.

ADEQUACY



1.

Curricul
um
: The B.S. degree program is outlined in the Undergraduate Catalog.

Both
majors, mathematics and applied mathematics, require the following six courses totaling
23 credit hours: MTH

229

(Calculus with Analytical Geometry)
, MTH 230

(Calculus with
Analytical Geometry II)
, MTH 231

(Calculus with Analytical Geometry III)
, MTH 300

(Intro to Higher Mathematics)
, MTH 331

(Linear Algebra)
, and MTH 490 or MTH 491.
The last two courses are cap
stone courses. MTH 490 is Internship, and MTH 491 is
Senior Seminar. These courses, in addition to other required courses form the core of
both

majors. Each major requires a choice of two out of four sequences, with each
sequence consisting of two courses;

this totals either 12 or 13 credit hours depending
on the choices. Beyond these 35 or 36 credit hours, students may choose to double
major, take a minor in another department, or take an additional four mathematics
courses. The flexibility of this program

greatly enhances the utility and diversity of the
majors. Students are encouraged to pursue interdisciplinary studies and to tailor their
studies towards their future career or educational goals. Our applied mathematics major
has become very popular since

its inceptio
n in 2005. Double majors (with
one major
outside the department) also constitute a
significant percentage

of our graduates.
During this review period, the department has awarded:




Eighteen (18) Mathematics degrees



Twenty
-
one (21) Applied
Mathematics degrees



Five (5) double majors in Mathematics and Applied Mathematics degrees



Sixty (60) graduated with a minor in mathematics. These graduates earned their
degrees from more than 15 majors from four different colleges.



Twelve (12) double deg
rees with one m
ajor outside of the department,
including
majors from Chemistry, Physics, Economics, History, Computer Science, and
Mathematics Education.



Twenty
-
nine (29) Mathematics and/or Applied Mathematics graduates earned
minors outside the department

including Biology, Chemistry, Physics,
Economics, History, Computer Science, Spanish, French, Sociology, and Sport
Studies.


Curriculum is a dynamic exercise requiring changes to address the needs and demands
either in the workplace or
in the
pursuance o
f higher degrees. In the past few years,
there have been great demands for statistics courses by students majoring in the M.A.


8

degree program more than those currently available in the catalog. And few faculty
members had to offer special topics to meet th
e needs of these students. Hence, the
department had approved proposals for statistics programs that offer a major and a
minor in statistics and a double major in statistics with any of the mathematics majors. It
is
anticipated

that the program
will begin

in fall 2012, and
it is expected

to increase
enrollment in the B.S. Mathematics program, as well as give students from other
disciplines
an option

to

minor or double major
in

statistics.


The following curriculum changes were made during this review period
:



MTH 121, MTH 125, and MTH 229/229H have been certified as critical thinking (CT)
classes.



Online courses have been created for MTH 122, MTH 127, MTH 132, MTH 140, and
MTH 225 (in addition to existing MTH 121 and MTH 130).



MTH 340
-

Discrete Structures w
as discontinued and MTH 220


Discrete Structures
and MTH 440


Graph Theory and Combinatorics were created. The change was
made to meet the need of Computer Science major and the department’s own
mathematics major.



MTH 345


Applied Probability and Stati
stics was created to meet the need of few
majors in science and engineering.



The department had by spring 2011 approved
a
proposal to create a major in
statistics
in addition to the

existing pure and applied mathematics majors.
Adding
this major will

addre
ss
a dire

need for statisticians in the 21
st

century. It is anticipated
that the new degree program
will

be instituted

in fall 2012.


2.

Faculty:
The Department has a dedicated and hard
-
working faculty that is committed to
both education and scholarship, which are viewed
in the department
as inextricably
linked. The Department of Mathematics can boast of having four Marshall and Shirley
Reynolds Out
standing Teacher Award winners, two Distinguished Artists and Scholars
Award winners, one Hedrick Outstanding faculty winner, one West Virginia Professor of
the Year winner, and one winner of the “Chair” Award from the West Virginia Council of
Teachers.


The Department has 32 full
-
time faculty members:












s





Fifty percent (50%) of the full
-
time faculty is tenured. Nearly 38% of the full
-
time faculty
is temporary with either one year or 3
-
year
-
term positions. This is mainly due to the


9

addition of new remedial mathematics courses MTH 098 and MTH 099. Half of our

temporary faculty teaches remedial
classes. Many of our freshman level courses are
taught by temporary faculty, part
-
time faculty or graduate teaching assistants. For
example, during the fall and spring semesters of 2010


2011 AY, permanent faculty
taugh
t only 39% of the freshman courses (MTH 120 to MTH 231). See the table below.



Semester

Number of
freshman
classes
offered

Number of
freshman
classes taught
by permanent
faculty

Number of
freshman
classes taught
by temporary
faculty and TA’s

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published
45

articles in peer reviewed journals. On average, this represents
approximately 5.63 research articles per research faculty member, a significant
increase f
rom the previous review period (t
hese numbers do not include abstracts, as
they are not c
ounted in mathematics
)
.



made
71

presentations at international, national, and regional conferences. This
represents 112% of the data reported in the last program review.

About 136
conferences (
international, national, and regional
) were attended by faculty during the
period of review.




b
een

involved in large competitive national grants, and have been princi
pal
investigators or co
-
principal
investigators in many of these grants. These include
grants from NSF, U.S. Department of Ed
ucation (Mathematics and Science


10

Partnership grants through West Virginia Department of Education), NASA (WV
Space Consortium), West Virginia Department of Education, West Virginia Higher
Education Policy Commission, and other various funding agencies.





3.

Students:



a.

Entrance Standards:

Mathematics is an open program; the major need not be declared
before application for graduation. Most graduates are transfer students, either internally or
externally. There is no admissions process other than to be ad
mitted to the University and
to the College
, which requires a Math ACT score of 21 or higher
.


b.

Entrance Abilities:

Data provided by Institutional Research indicates 30 students
(including freshmen and transfer students) enrolling in our majors during the
review period.
Among those entering the program, the mean Mathematics ACT score was 25.2 (N=24),
the mean Mathematics SAT score was 635 (n=11), and the mean high school grade point
average was 3.62 (n=28). The above data show a slight decrease over the pre
vious review
period. See Appendix III for more details.


c.

Exit Abilities:

The program does not require a national examination for graduation, other
than exit grade point average. Graduate
s

of the program had a mean grade point average
of 3.08. This is somewhat below the grade point average for the previous review period.
This
may be taken as

evidence that the rigor of our degree program has increased,
or it
may be consistent with

the patter
n
mentioned in

Entrance Abilities.





4.

Resources:



a.

Financial:



The majors represent a relatively small part of the instructional mission of the Department.
However,
o
urs is a growing undergraduate pro
gram, with

growth
expected to continue
in
subsequent years, particularly when the
Statistics

major
become
s

operational. Beside faculty
salaries, there appears to be a steady number of faculty positions (excluding temporary
positions) despite growth in the Department’s service and degree program
s.
Financial
allocations to the department during the review period are shown in the table below.


Allocations to the department’s operating funds increased during the first three years of the
review period, but in the final year dropped to the lowest le
vel during the entire period. The
decreased operating funds dramatically limit the department’s ability to fund faculty
professional development. Personnel funds appear to increase notably in FY 2008, but that
change actually reflects the transfer of fun
ds from lab fees to support graduate assistant
stipends. The personnel budget dropped again in FY 2011, this change being due to the


11

removal of faculty summer school stipends from this fund to be administered from a central
university fund. The increases
in lab fee allocations in the final two years of the review period
reflect major enrollment increases in developmental math classes.

The department has made
use of lab fees to offset the decrease in operating funds
.

A percentage of what is realized
from
the lab fees annually allows the Department some flexibility with its finances. Expenses
for supplies, student travel, and graduate assistant stipends are largely from the lab fees.




Department of Mathematics

Allocations to Fund Numbers:

Fiscal
Year

Operating
(
119001
)

Personnel
(
119004
)
1

Lab Fees
(
119005
)
2

FY 2007

$16,540.00

$57,911.66

$8
9
,800.00

FY 2008

$15,598.00

$99,066.60
3

$70,541.00

FY 2009

$26,708.00

$137,322.09
3

$66,744.00

FY 2010

$24,515.00

$104,415.09
3

$97,919.00

FY 2011

$13,0
00
.00

$61,956.56
4

$123,125.00

1

includes personnel funds for
extra help, work study,
part
-
time faculty, faculty summer school salaries

(except where noted)
, annual employment increments, and fringe benefits

2

includes initial lab fee allocation plus supplemental allocations during the budget year

3

includes funds for graduate assistants (transfer from lab fees) in addition to categories noted in 1, above

4

does not include faculty summer school salaries, budge
ted separately hereafter



b.

Facilities:



The Department has priority use of six classrooms on the fifth floor of Smith Hall as far back as
1967 when the building was built and one additional classroom in Corbly Hall. Half of the
classrooms have
the
Technology Enhanced Classroom Initiative (TECI)

status with modern
teaching computer equipment. Three of the classrooms need urgent upgrade with state
-
of
-
the
-
art technology. It should be mentioned that six classrooms are not adequate for the
department as
the size of Marshall has grown two to three
-
fold since 1967. As a result, the
department teaches a percentage of its classes elsewhere.

Most of our faculty members have their offices on the seventh floor of Smith Hall. But we have
several other faculty me
mbers having their offices scattered on different floors of Smith Hall
and Morrow Library First Floor. For example, five (5) faculty offices are in Morrow Library, five
(5) on the third floor, one (1) on the fifth floor (shared with the tutoring room), one

(1) on the
first floor, and the remaining twenty (20) on the seventh floor of Smith Hall. It is the desire of
the department to have all of its faculty offices in one floor of one building. There have been
talks and hopes that the department would be move
d to the proposed new Engineering
Complex when it is ready. If this plan changes, the department would like to have to all of its


12

faculty offices on the seventh floor of Smith Hall after the Department of Art moves to its new
building. Because of the scatt
ered

nature

of faculty members, there is virtually no sense of
communal interaction, and there is equally no convenient space that faculty could meet
together for discussions on social matters or ones that could possibly lead to collaborative
work.


The
department maintains a mathematics tutoring lab for its undergraduates. The lab is mainly
intended for students taking MTH 098 to MTH 231 classes. In the fall semester of 2010, there
were more than 3000 students enrolled in those courses while in the sprin
g of 2011 the figure
was close to 2000. This means, there are at least 2000 students who are eligible to receive
tutoring from our tutoring lab as these students pay the lab fees. The lab, located on the fifth
floor of Smith Hall, is manned mainly by gradu
ate teaching assistants and few undergraduate
tutors. The lab is not big enough to accommodate a large number of students requiring tutoring
out of the 2000 or so students who are eligible to come to the tutoring lab. Therefore, the
department is in dire n
eed for a larger room for its tutoring lab.


It is sad to note that the department does not have a computer laboratory for the computational
needs required in the applied mathematics courses. There was a plan to have two additional
classrooms added to the
department. Perhaps, if this happens, one of the current six
classrooms may be converted to a computer lab cum research lab.



Until last year, the department lacked sufficient space for its graduate students. However, that
problem had been addressed with

the acquisition of Smith Music 115 for its graduate students.
So the space problem for our graduate students has been solved.


5.


Assessment Information
:


a.

Summary

The B.S. in Mathematics was extensively revised in the 1995
-
96 academic year, with the new
requirements going into effect in summer 1996. Academic year 2006
-
2007 was the 11th year
of implementation of the Mathematics Department’s more focused, more applica
tion
-
oriented,
and more technology
-
intensive B.S. program. Calculators, especially graphing calculators, and
computer software, such as
Mathematica
,
Excel
, and
SAS
, have been integrated into the
coursework. The addition of a new major in applied mathematic
s was the cornerstone of the
curriculum revision of the B.S. in Mathematics program that became effective in the fall 2006
semester. The size of each major

mathematics and applied mathematics

was made
dependent upon the interdisciplinary nature of the prog
ram of study of the individual student.
The majors are far more flexible than the major before the revision. The student learning
outcomes for the B.S. Mathematics/Applied Mathemat
ics are based on the following
six
standard program goals outlined in the Pr
ogram Assessment Plan:




13

1.

Mathematical Reasoning


Students should be able to perform intellectually demanding
mathematical tasks and reason rigorously in mathematical arguments.

2.

Personal Potential


Students should be able to undertake independent work and
possess an advanced level of critical thinking and analytical skills.

3.

Nature of Mathematics


Students should develop knowledge of the breadth of the
mathematical sciences and of the fundamental dichotomy of mathematics as an object of
study and a tool for

application.

4.

Mathematical Modeling


Students should be able to apply mathematics to a broad
spectrum of complex problems and issues.

5.

Communication and Resourcefulness


Students should be able to read, write, listen
and speak mathematically and contribut
e effectively to group efforts.

6.

Content Specific Goals


Students should be able to apply the theory and basic
techniques of calculus, modern algebra, discrete mathematics, and probability

and statistics.


b.


Other
Learning and Service Activities:

The
program goals given above and in the Program Assessment Plan include the following
associated student learning and service activities and outcomes:


1.

a. ability to demonstrate proofs using three methods of deductive reasoning:


direct, contrapositive, an
d contradiction


b. ability to demonstrate proofs by mathematical induction


c. ability to verify the need for hypotheses by finding counterexamples for the


alternative statements


2.

a. ability to use the library to find books and journal

articles on a specified


mathematical topic

b.

ability to recognize when a certain theorem may be applied in a given


problem situation

c.


ability to assimilate and critique a mathematical paper independently


3. a. study two additional areas of
the mathematical sciences


outside the required core


b. deepen understanding and appreciation of the real number system


c. develop an appreciation of mathematics as a unique discipline with aspects


of both art and science


4. a. abi
lity to use probability distributions to model situations exhibiting


random behavior in the real world


b. ability to read, interpret, organize, analyze, and solve complex


multi
-
step mathematical problems


c. ability to use computer
software and graphing calculator for simulation and



14


visualization of complex mathematical ideas and processes



5. a. ability to conduct research and make written and oral presentations on


various topics


b. ability to work effectively in a team to organize effective approaches to


solving mathematical problems


c. ability to create and document algorithms and to write computer programs


in a high
-
level language to solve mathematical
problems


6. a. ability to use combinatorial formulas to determine the number of outcomes


in an event and to compute its probability


b. ability to use numerical measures and graphic displays to describe sets


of data


c. ability to u
se the differential and integral calculus to solve problems dealing


with rates of change and geometric areas and volumes d. ability to use


techniques of linear algebra and abstract algebra to solve equations and


systems of equa
tions


Percentages of students achieving usable grades (
pass with grade C or better
) in courses
that are either required or elective for majors in mathematics were collected and are
reported in the table below. Percentages are reported including withdrawal
s.

Many of these courses are required for students in other programs (Physics, Chemistry,
Biology, Geology, Computer Science, Pre
-
Engineering, Mathematics Education 5
-
9 or 5
-
8,
Mathematics Education 5
-
12 or 5
-
Adult). In fact, every course on this list exce
pt MTH 300,
427, 428, 430, 431, 460, 461, and 491 is required by at least one other major on campus.
We suspect that the usable grade percentages in most courses would be higher if we
counted grades for mathematics majors only.




Percentage of Usable Cou
rse Grades (A, B, C, CR) Fall & Spring only:

Course

2006/07

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Mean

MTH 229

82

76

65

78

74

75

MTH 230

68

74

86

87

77

78

MTH 231

88

91

92

87

83

88

MTH 300

86

92

85

81

95

88

MTH 331

92

93

100

100

72

91

MTH 335

88

80

85

85

72

82

MTH 405

100

100

100


95

99

MTH 415


71


100


86

MTH 416





83

83

MTH 427

87

78

100

100

80

89

MTH 428

100

71

100

100

100

94

MTH 430


100


100


100



15

Percentage of Usable Course Grades (A, B, C, CR) Fall & Spring only (Contd.):


Course

2006/07

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Mean

MTH 431


100


100


100

MT
H

440


100


100

100

100

MTH 442

83


100



92

MTH 443

100

100

100

100

100

100

MT
H

445

100

90

76

63

100

86

MTH 446

100

75

70

57

100

80

MTH 448

83

100

100

100

100

97

MTH 449

92

83

100

100

100

95

MTH 450

100

90

89

100

100

96

MTH 452

100

100

100

100

100

100

MTH 460

100


100


67

89

MTH 461

100


100


100

100

MTH 491

83

85

100

100

100

94


Every student in
Senior Seminar,
MTH 491, is required to give written and oral presentations
and do
research in the mathematical literature. This, in addition to the course grade, is an
indicator of the student’s growth in the areas of personal potential, communication, and
resourcefulness. Students in this course improve their abilities to work both ind
ependently and
in teams, and to make written and oral Reports.


HEPC Initiative 3 requires that our graduates be evaluated with a national exam. We have
been using the
ETS Major Field Test in Mathematics
for several years now
.
The planned
benchmark was set

at the 45th percentile of the national mean in the last program review.
Although there was a decline in the set percentile in 2008
-
2009, we have improved
dramatically, and expect to perform well above the set mark in subsequent years.





2006
-
2007

2007
-
2008

2008
-
2009

2009
-
2010

Examinee

5

11

9

6

High Score

199

175

181

166

Median Score

155

155

149

158

Mean Score

153.2

154.2

150.2

157.7

Low Score

120

134

120

149

National Median

156.3

156.3

156.3

156.3

National Mean

155

155

155

155

MU Percentile

46

44

37

57







16

c.

Plans for Program Improvement:


One major and significant area for improvement is assessment. The department did not
submit
the Yearly A
ssessment
reports for
2008
, 2009 and 2010

academic years
. To address this, an
Assessment Monitoring Group was recently constituted that will not only monitor assessment
of the program in the department, but will also work with other affiliated programs on the
campus on our inputs in meeting their programs’ asse
ssments.


Prior to the last program review, assessment of the program resulted in a significant overhaul
of the degree program to conform to the curricula at our peer institutions and the curriculum
recommendations of the Mathematical Association of Ameri
ca (MAA), particularly from the
Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM). One major outcome of
that program review was the introduction of the Applied Mathematics major. As pointed out in
the last program review, although the degree ove
rhaul was significant, it was not as radical as
it should be, because we did not have the faculty to do so at the time. Following this, proposals
to create statistics programs are being submitted. The programs are expected to commence in
fall 2012. Mathema
tics remains a small degree program
. Hence the low undergraduate majors
in mathematics and applied mathematics.
One plan the Department has in addressing this
problem is the approval of the proposed statistics majors. It is hoped that this program when it
becomes operational would increase enrollment. Also, efforts shall be made in our recruitment
drive to increase enrollment.





d.

Graduate and Employer Satisfaction:


A summary of the results of the Graduating Senior Survey conducted for the College of
Science in 2008 is given below. The data for 2010
-
2011 is adequate for comparison with
college, as only three (3) students participates with one student skipping very many of the
questions in the survey
.


The issue of advising had been addressed in the de
partment by centralizing departmental
advising. The Assistant Chair for Undergraduate Studies oversees this affair in addition to
College of Science Student Advisory Unit. Although availability of courses is limited by the size
of the department, our perfo
rmance is still better than that of the college.












17


N

College of
Science

Mathematics

CRITERIA


Impor
-
tance

Satis
-

faction

Impor
-

tance

Satis
-

faction

availability of academic advising and quality of advising

542

3.76

3.25

3.93

3.27

availability
of courses

549

3.88

2.74

3.93

2.63

responsiveness to students with special needs

207

3.48

3.28

2.86

3.20

professionalism/scholarship of faculty

536

3.75

3.48

3.73

3.47

development of critical thinking skills

547

3.77

3.46

3.87

3.50


College of Science

Graduating Senior Survey


This may be due to increasing number of faculty holding graduate status who often agreed to
offer special topics. Responsiveness to special needs is not specific. While we may do well in
responsive to student need in some areas,
we would need to improve in others. On
professionalism/scholarship of faculty, the perception of our faculty by students and in general
as compared with the science faculty may be easily explained by the abstractness of
mathematics (or, perhaps equivalent
ly, by the visibility of experimentation in the sciences). The
data show that we do well in critical thinking as is expected.



We do not have a record of graduate employer satisfaction. The newly constituted Assessment
Monitoring Group will incorporate th
is as part of their responsibilities in future. However, we
have knowledge of the where
-
about of some of our graduates. Graduates have continued their
studies at a variety of prestigious institutions, including, Marshall University, University of
South Flo
rida, University of Missouri, Central Michigan University, Clemson University, Illinois
Tech, and Ohio State University, among many others.


Annual Assessment Report: See the evaluation of annual assessment report provided by the
Office of Assessment for t
he academic year 2006
-
2007 at the end of the report. Unfortunately,
yearly assessments for 2007
-
2008, 2008
-
2009, and 2009
-
2010 were not conducted and
submitted by the department to the Office of Assessment. Letters indicating this are provided
at the end o
f this report.


6.

Previous Reviews:


The recommendation on the last program review in 2006 was “continuation of program at the
current level of activity”.



The 2006 program review states the weakness as follows:

The glaring weaknesses of the
program involve its size and its woefully under
-
funded status.
There has been no faculty growth to match the growth of the program. This is dangerous; the
success of any program depends on the continuance of an influx of new energy. Instead the
Department
has faced a string of temporary hires who give no value to the program and have
no affinity for the University, the state, or the region.




18

The phrase “woefully under
-
funded” and “temporary hires who give no value to the program
and have no affinity…” appear to be inappropriate.
However
, there has been improvement on
faculty growth even though the program needs at least two additional tenure
-
t
rack positions to
the present status in order to function effectively.




7.

Strengths/Weaknesses:



The B.S. Mathematics, with majors in mathematics and applied mathematics is vibrant and
rigorous. With the tenure
-
track faculty hires expected to have gradu
ate status and conducting
research, there is an increase in undergraduate and graduate research activities leading to
professional talks at international, national and regional meetings. The program has highly
skilled, academically enthusiastic and publish
ed faculty. Graduates of the program either
pursue higher degrees in mathematics, statistics or related disciplines in strong and highly
reputable universities, or secure jobs.


One area of weakness in the program is its size. Then number of students grad
uating from
the program is still low, although a very small number of students enter college with the aim of
pursuing mathematics as a career. However, with the increasing number of graduate faculty,
many more students are likely to be attracted into the p
rogram through participation in
research activities and proper outreach programs. Another way of addressing this problem
would be through the statistics program that the department had developed. Mathematics as
a major is insular, and a major in statistics

i
n

a department of mathematics
,

as we have at
Marshall
,

is always a way to open more windows of opportunities for students. Another area
of weakness is in program assessment. For example, there had not been the yearly
assessment for the program since 2008
. To address this problem, an assessment monitoring
group was recently formed in the department to provide a dynamic and effective assessment
tool for the department.



B.


VIABILITY

.


1.

Articulation Agreements:



There is no articulation agreement with
any other institutions.


2.

Off
-
Campus Classes:


None of our major courses are taught off
-
campus. Only entry
-
level, remedial
courses and pre
-
major courses are involved. See Appendix VI.

The data in
Appendix Vi indicates that there is high demand for our entry
-
level courses taught
off
-
campus.




19

3.

Online Courses:

During the current program review period, the department taught a total of 70 online
classes. See Appendix VI for details.


4.

Servi
ce Courses:


The largest instructional mission of the Department is service courses. These are for
general education in
the Marshall Core Curriculum
as well as for other majors from
every undergraduate
program
in the University. All courses listed in Table

VI prior to
MTH 229 are service courses.


5.

Program Course Enrollment:

The
data in Appendi
x VI

presents enrollment data for
all undergraduate courses offered by the department for the period under review.
Mathematics and Applied Mathematics majors all take a common set of
core
courses totaling
21 credit hours. These are MTH 229
Calculus with Analyt
ic
Geometry

I, MTH 230
Calculus with Analytic Geometry

II, MTH 231
Calculus with
Analytic Geometry

III, MTH 300
Introduction to Higher Mathematics
, and MTH 331
Linear Algebra
. Also, majors take a 2
-
credit hour capstone course MTH 491 Senior
Seminar, and
an

additional required sequence of 12 credit hours chosen under their
respective majors. Students are required to take
electives ranging
0
-
12 credit hours
depending on whether they are taking a single major in mathematics or either a
minor or a major

outsid
e the department
. A double major in mathematics and
applied mathematics would require a total of
59

credit hours. The courses that form
the core of our program are offered regularly, with multiple sections every semester
in those courses required by other
majors.
Enrollments in these courses are
expected to grow, particularly when the statistics majors being proposed by the
department come

into effect, and also with the growth in the Engineering program

and other programs that require a great deal of mathem
atics courses
.



6.

Program Enrollment:


Enrollments in the core courses are expected to grow, particularly when the
statistics majors being proposed by the department come into effect, and also with
the growth in the Engineering program

and other programs that require a great deal
of mathematics courses.

.


7.

Enrollment Projections:

The enrollment figures in Appendix VII do not include
mathematics education
majors. There are nearly as many secondary education majors with an emphasis in
mathematics as there are mathematics majors. It is impressive to see the number of
students enrolled in the program as high reported in Appendix VI. Although there is
a d
ip
in 2007


2008 academic year, the program has witnessed a high enrollment


20

figures w
ith a sharp increase in 2010


2011. This increase is likely due to more
research faculty joining the department. This upward trend is expected to continue,
and more significantly when the statistics major being proposed comes into effect.

In summary, the

increasing number of enrollment is an indicator that the program is
an excellent one and graduates are making remarkable progress after graduation.
Also, there have been more effective advertisement approaches of our majors and
minor, with the latter poss
ibly considering majors. The rigor and flavor of the minor
has been altered to make it more attractive, but more indicative of the nature of the
majors.


We also see that the Applied Mathematics major is attracting more students from the
period the major was created. This is due to the fact that students in other
disciplines are seeing the relevance of the application of mathematics in their
various fields.





C.

NECESSITY:

No accreditation required for mathematics


1.

Advisory Committee:
None.



2.

Graduates
:


There is no evidence of any survey of the department’s Graduate Questionnaire
(see a copy at the end of this report) during this period of program revi
ew. However,
majority of our graduates pursue further degrees in the field mathematical sciences,
while others enter into work places to become, for example, teachers, naval officers,
corporate business analyst, actuaries, physicians, data analysts, and in
vestment
analysts. Salaries of graduates ranged from $32,000 to over $200,000. See
Appendix VIII for more information.



3.

Job Placement:


Mathematics graduates enjoy a wide variety of career and educational choices.
Many pursue graduate or professional
school opportunities not only in mathematics,
but also in statistics, computer science, education, operations research, and
engineering, as well as medicine and law. Many pursue careers in education from
middle schools through the university level. And man
y pursue careers in technology
and business. A degree in mathematics is indeed an open door to many
possibilities. Graduates from the program do not have any difficulties in seeking job
placements.




21

IV
.

RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT (If applicable)

Not Applicable.


22

Appendix I

Required/Elective Course Work in the Program

Degree Program:

B.S. Mathematics/Applied Mathematics
Person responsible for the report:

Dr. Ari
yadasa

Aluthge



Courses Required in Major

Total

Req.

Hours

Electives Required by the Major
1

Elective
Hours

Related Field Courses
Required

Total
R
elated
Hrs.

Core I Courses

MTH 229 Calculus with Analytic


Geometry I

MTH 230 Calculus with Analytic


Geometry II

MTH 231 Calculus with Analytic


Geometry III

MTH 300 Introduction to Higher


Mathematics

MTH 331 Linear Algebra

MTH 491 Senior Seminar
2

Core

II (Sequence) Courses

MTH 335 Differential Equations

MTH 415 Partial Differential


Equations
3

MTH 427 Advanced Calculus I

MTH 428 Advanced Calculus II

MTH 430 Topology I

MTH 431 Topology II

MTH 442 Numerical Linear Algebra
4

MTH 443 Numerica
l Analysis

MTH 445 Probability and Statistics I

MTH 446 Probability and Statistics II

MTH 450 Modern Algebra I

MTH 452 Modern Algebra II

MTH 460 Complex Variables I

MTH 461 Complex Variables II


5


4


4


4


4

2



4


3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

MTH 405
History of Mathematics

MTH 411 Mathematical Modeling

MTH 416 Advanced Differential


Equations

MTH 440 Graph Theory and


Combinatorics

MTH 448 Modern Geometries

MTH 449 Projective Geometry

MTH 455 Number Theory

Any sequence co
urse(s)

3

3


3


3


3

3

3






1

Students must complete four elective MTH courses. An outside major removes this requirement. Alternatively, an outside minor
reduces the requirements to two electives. A Mathematics and Applied Mathematics double major must complete two sequences
from eac
h major plus four elective MTH courses.

2

MTH 491 is the program capstone course.

3

Student may choose to take MTH 416


Advanced Differential Equations instead.

4

Student may choose to take MTH 411


Mathematical Modeling instead.



23

Appendix II

Faculty Data Sheet

(Information for the period of this review)


Name: ___
Laura Adkins
_____________________________ Rank: _____
Professor
_____________


Status (Check one): Full
-
time__
X
__
Part
-
time_____ Adjunct _____


Current MU Faculty: Yes _
X
_
No ___


Highest Degree Earned: ___
Ph.D.
__________________ Date Degree Received: ___
June 1996
____


Conferred by: _____
The Ohio State University
__________________________________________


Area

of Specialization: ___
Statistics
____________________________________________________


Professional Registration/Licensure_____
None
______ Agency: ___
N/A
_________________________


Years non
-
teaching experience





____
0
____

Years of employme
nt other than Marshall



____
0
____

Years of employment at Marshall




___
25
____

Years of employment in higher education



___
25
____

Years in service at Marshall during this period of review


____
5
___


List courses you taught during the final two years of t
his review. If you participated in a team
-
taught
course, indicate each of them and what percentage of the course you taught. For each course include
the year and semester taught (summer through spring), course number, course title and enrollment.
(Expan
d the table as necessary)


Year/Semester

Alpha Des. & No.

Title

Enrollment

2011 / Spring

GLY 641

Biological Aspects of Geology (Special Topics)

1

2011 / Spring

MTH 225

Introductory Statistics

31

2011 / Spring

MTH 345

Applied

Probability and

Statistics

30

2011 / Spring

BSC 417/517

Biostatistics

67 / 11

2011 / Spring

MTH 518

Biostatistics

10

2010 / Fall

ENGR 610

Applied Statistics

15

2010 / Fall

MTH 225

Introductory Statistics

91

2010 / Fall

MTH 345

Applied

Probability and

Statistics

32

2010 /
Spring

IST 131

Analytical Methods II: Differential Calculus

17

2010 / Spring

MTH 225

Introductory Statistics

22

2010 / Spring

BSC 417/517

Biostatistics

53 / 14

2010 / Spring

MTH 518

Biostatistics

6

2009 / Fall

ENGR 610

Applied Statistics

13

2009 /
Fall

MTH 121

Concepts and Applications of Mathematics

63

2009 / Fall

MTH 225

Introductory Statistics

67






24

NOTE: Part
-
time adjunct faculty do not need to fill in the remainder of this document.


1)

If your degree is not in your area of current
assignment, please explain.

N/A


(For each of the following sections, list only events during the period of this review and begin with
the most recent activities.)

2)

Activities that have enhanced your
teaching and or research.

June 18, 2010


Present:
Dissertation Committee Member for Linda Hunt


Ed.D.

Dec. 1, 2009


May 11, 2010: Graduate Committee Member for Yvonne Asafo


M.S. in
Environmental Science.
Recycling Awareness on Marshall University’s Huntington Campus
.

July 17, 2009


August 1, 2010
:

Graduate Committee Member for Yoseph Gebrelibanos


M.S. in
Environmental Science.

Feb. 8, 2010


June 11, 2010: Graduate Committee Member for Iyad Kaddora


M.S. in Biology.
Antibiotic
sensitivity patterns of hospital acquired and community acquired me
thicillin
-
resistant Staphylococcus aureus
.


3)

Discipline
-
related books/papers published (provide a full citation).

None


4)

Papers presented at state, regional, national, or international conferences.

Fahrmann, E. ,Adkins, L. , Driscoll H.,

Diabetes Type
1, Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality: New Insights.

Presented at the 23
rd

Marshall University School of Medicine Research Day March 21, 2011


5)

Professional development activities, including professional organizations to which you belong and state,
regional, national, and international

conferences attended. List any panels on which you chaired or
participated. List any offices you hold in professional organizations.

Member of Mathematical Association of America

Member of American Statistical
Association (Sections on Statistical Education, Teaching
Statistics in the Health Sciences)

Member of
Appalachian Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators

Regional Conference of the
Appalachian Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators
,
February 26
-
27, 2010


6)

Externally funded research grants and contracts you received.

None


7)

Awards/honors (including invitations to speak in your area of expertise) or special recognition.

Fahrmann, E. ,Adkins, L. , Driscoll H.,

Awarded the Roland H. Burns
Memorial Clinical Science Oral
Winner

at the 23
rd

Marshall University School of Medicine Research Day March 21, 2011


8)

Community service as defined in the
Greenbook
.

Judge for the West Virginia State Science and Engineering Fair: 2007


2008

Voluntee
r for the Marshall University Mathematics Competition: 2007


2008

Volunteer for the Marshall University SCORES Competition: 2007


2010

Expand Your Horizons Workshop for Middle School Girls
: April 10, 2010







25

Appendix II

Faculty Data Sheet

(Information for the period of this review)


Name: ___
______
_
Alfred Akinsete
__________________
__ Rank: ____
Full Professor
___________
_

Status (Check one): Full
-
time_
X
__
Part
-
time____ Adjunct _
Current MU Faculty: Yes _
X
__ No _
__
_

Highest Degree Earn
ed: ________
Ph.D
.
_____________ Date Degree Received: ___
1996
________
__

Conferred by: __________
University of Ibadan
_____________________
________________________

Area of Specialization: ________
Mathematical

Statistics
____
_____________
____________________

Professional Registration/Licensure____
N/A
_____ Agency: _____________________________
___
__

Years non
-
teaching experience





___
01
___

Years of employment other than Marshall




___
21
___

Years of employment at Marshall





___
08
___

Years of employment in higher education




___
29
___

Years in service at Marshall during this period of review


___
05
___

List courses you taught during the final two years of this review. If you participated in

a team
-
taught course, indicate each of them
and what percentage of the course you taught. For each course include the year and semester taught (summer through spring),
course number, course title and enrollment.
(Expand the table as necessary)

Year/Semester

Alpha Des. & No.

Title

Enrollment

Summer III 2009

MTH 231

Calculus with Analytic Geometry I
II

05

Fall 2009

MTH 445/545

MTH 589

MTH 661

Probability & Statistics I

TA Seminar

Advanced Mathematical Statistics

18

15

07

Spring 2010

MTH 446/546

MTH 589

MTH 662

Probability & Statistics I

TA Seminar

Multivariate Mathematical Statistics

16

13

06

Summer 2010

MTH 230

Calculus with Analytic Geometry I
I

20

Fall 2010

MTH 660

MTH 690

Stochastic Processes

Advanced Distribution Theory


Independent Study

05

05

Spring 2011

MTH 482

MTH 681

MTH 691 (SpTp)

Applied Time Series Forecasting

Thesis

Computational Statistics with R

02

01

05

NOTE: Part
-
time adjunct faculty do not need to fill in the remainder of this document.

1)

If your degree is not in your area
of current assignment, please explain.

(For each of the following sections, list only events during the period of this review and begin with the most recent activit
ies.)

2)

Activities that have enhanced your teaching and or research.

Teaching:



West
Virginia 14th Annual Great Teacher Seminar
. Cairo, West Virginia. June 26


29, 2006.



Mathematical Association of America (MAA)
Short Course on the Teaching of Statistics with Baseball Data.

Summer Short Course. Mount Union College, Alliance, Ohio. June 6


9, 2006.

I supervised four Graduate long essays in my Stochastic class in Fall 2006

Research: I was engaged in the following research activities:



Computational science training: summer NSF REU grant, 4 students’ projects, summers 2010 and 2011



Summer Res
earch Activities in the Summer of 2006 (Summer Research Grant)



Collaborated with a researcher on
T
he beta
-
Pareto distribution



Carried out research work on
The Generalized Exponentiated Beta Distribution




I supervised an undergraduate student in Summer 2006

under the SURE Program

3)

Discipline
-
related books/papers published (provide a full citation).



Akinsete, A. A. and Lowe, C. (2008). The beta
-
Rayleigh distribution in reliability measure. Proc. of the American Statistical Assoc.



Akinsete, A. A., Famoye, F.

F., & Carl, L. (2008). The beta
-
Pareto Distribution.
Statistics; A Journal of Theoretical and Applied Statistics.
42(6), 547
-
563



Akinsete, A. A. (2008). Generalized exponentiated beta distribution. Journal of Probability and Statistical Science. 6(1), 1
-
1
2



Akinsete, A. A. & Lowe, C. (2007). Stochastic modeling of sports data. Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, S
ection on
Statistics in Sports. 2581


2588.



More results on beta
-
Rayleigh distribution in reliability measure.
Journal of Probab
ility and Statistical Science

(Submitted)

4)

Papers presented at state, regional, national, or international conferences.



Lowe, C, and Akinsete, A. (2009). Beta
-
Maxwell Distribution. Presented at Mathematical Association of America


Ohio Section. Kenyon
College. Gambier, Ohio. October 30


31, 2009.



Akinsete, A. A
., Famoye, F. F. and Lee, C. (2008). “The beta
-
Pareto”.
Prese
nted

at the Royal Statistical Society Conference.
Nottingham, England. September 1


5, 2008.



Akinsete, A. A.

and Lowe, C. (2008). “The beta
-
Rayleigh distribution in reliability measure”.
Presented

at the Joint Statistical Meeting of
the American Statistic
al Association held in Denver, Colorado. August 3


7, 2008.



Akinsete, A. A. (2008). “The beta
-
Rayleigh distribution”.
Presented

at the 7
th

World Congress in Probability and Statistics. Singapore July
14


19, 2008.



“Generalized exponentiated beta distribu
tion”.
Presented

at the Joint Statistical Meeting of the American Statistical Association held in
Salt Lake City, Utah, in July 29
-

August 2, 2007.



26



“Stochastic modeling of sports data”.
Presented

at the Joint Statistical Meeting of the American Statistic
al Association held in Salt Lake
City, Utah, in July 29
-

August 2, 2007.



“Online statistics teaching resources”. Presented at the 3
rd

Association of Appalachia Mathematics Teacher Education, held at Marshall
University, Huntington, West Virginia. November

2


3, 2007.



“The beta
-
Rayleigh distribution in reliability measure”. Presented with Charles Lowe at the Mathematical Association of America, 2007
Ohio Section, held at Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio. October 26


27, 2007.



Akinsete, A. A. (2006
). “Beta


Geometric Distribution in Survival Modeling”. Presented at the Joint Statistical


Meeting of the American Statistical Association held in Seattle, Washington, in August 6
-
10, 2006.

5)

Professional development activities, including professional
organizations to which you belong and state, regional, national, and
international conferences attended. List any panels on which you chaired or participated. List any offices you hold in
professional organizations
.

Professional Organization



American Stati
stical Association

-

National



Royal Statistical Society
-

International



Appalachian Collaborative Center for Learning Assessment & Instruction in Mathematics (ACCLAIM)

-

Regional



Faculty member of the Department of Mathematics, Marshall University arm of P
i Mu Epsilon
-

National



Nigerian Statistical Association


International



Nigerian Mathematical Society


International

Conferences Attended



Fall Meeting of Mathematical Association of America


Ohio Section. Kenyon College. Gambier, Ohio. October 30


31,
2009



Bicentennial Beginnings Conference. Department of Statistics. Miami University. Oxford, OH. November 12


13, 2009.



Banner Basic Navigation Workshop. Marshall University. May 6, 2009.



Joint Statistical Meeting of the American Statistical Association
held in Denver, Colorado. August 3
-

7, 2008.



7
th

World Congress in Probability and Statistics. National University of Singapore. July 14


19, 2008.



Royal Statistical Society Conference. Nottingham, England. August 01


05, 2008.



The 36
th

Annual Confere
nce on Recreation Mathematics. Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. September 26


27, 2008.



Chautauqua Course DAY
-
3 Workshop on Increasing the Retention of Under
-
Represented Groups
--
And the Learning of All Groups
--
In
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathem
atics Courses. University of Dayton, Ohio. April 28
-
30, 2008.



Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning in the Classroom (POGIL). Marshall University. March 15, 2008.



Association of Appalachia Mathematics Teacher Education, held at Marshall University, Hu
ntington, West Virginia. November 2


3, 2007.



MAA, 2007 Ohio Section, held at Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio. October 26


27, 2007.



Joint Statistical Meeting of the American Statistical Association held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in July 29
-

Aug
ust 2, 2007.



Organized by the Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education (CAUSE). The Ohio State University, May

16 &
17, 2007.



United States Conference on the Teaching of Statistics (USCOTS). (17


19 May, 2007). The Ohio State U
niversity, Columbus, Ohio.




“Statistics Online Computational Resources (SOCR) & Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education
(CAUSE)”. Los Angeles, CA. August 6


8, 2007




“An Introduction to the Fundamentals and Functionality R Lan
guage”. Organized by the American Statistical Association, at Alexandria,
VA in October 18 & 19, 2007.




“How to Use Effective Learning Environments to Motivate and Engage Students”. Sponsored by the Center for the Advancement of
Teaching and Learning. Mars
hall University, Huntington, WV. August 15, 2007.




“Best Practices in Teaching Mathematics”. Organized by Teachers Development Group. June 11


15, 2007. Mingo County, WV.




“West Virginia Higher Education Mathematics Symposium”. Sponsored by West Virginia
Higher Education Policy Commission. Fairmont
State University, Fairmont, WV. February 23


24, 2007.



Joint Statistical Meeting (JSM) of the American Statistical Association (ASA): Seattle, Washington. (August 6
-
10, 2006).

Annual Conference of the
Appalachian Association of Math Teacher Educators, held at Morehead, Kentucky. Oct., 27
-
28, 2006



West Virginia 14
th

Annual Great Teacher Seminar, Cairo, West Virginia. June 26


29, 2006


6)

Externally funded research grants and contracts you received.
The
Region II Partnership of Mingo County Public Schools, Marshall
University’s June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, Marshall University, and RESA II.$189,000.00



Involved in the grant proposal on Science Training for Undergraduat
e
s in the Mathematical Sciences
. Submitted to NSF on REU



Quinlan Award of $500.00, and other local travel grants to attend the Joint Statistical Meeting of the American Statistical A
ssociation.
Denver, Colorado. August 3


7, 2008; Summer Research Grant Pr
oposal, 2008 ($2000.00)



INCO grant to attend the “CAUSE Undergraduate Statistics Program Workshop”. The Ohio State University, May 16 & 17, 2007.



Quinlan Award of $500.00, and other local travel grants to attend the Joint Statistical Meeting of the America
n Statistical Association. Salt
Lake City, Utah. July 29


August 2, 2007.



T
ravel
grant
to attend the Continuing Statistics Educational Training in “Statistics Online Computational Resources (SOCR) & Consortium
for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statisti
cs Education (CAUSE)”. Los Angeles, CA. August 6


8, 2007



Travel support to attend workshop for both teaching and research, titled, “An Introduction to the Fundamentals and Functional
ity R
Language”. Organized by the American Statistical Association, at A
lexandria, VA in October 18 & 19, 2007.



2006 Travel Grant to attend the Joint Statistical Meeting of the American Statistical Association. [Seattle, Washington]



2006 INCO Grant to attend MAA Short Course on the Teaching of Statistics with Baseball data. [
Mount

Union College, Alliance, Ohio.

7)

Awards/honors (including invitations to speak in your area of expertise) or special recognition.

8)

Community service as defined in the
Greenbook
.



Member, Academic Planning Committee,
Member;

Commission on Multicult
uralism
;
Series of Statistical Consulting



Faculty Advisor to Organization of Africa Students; Peer
-
review of research papers and textbook; Series of letters of recommendation



Assisted with SCORES proctoring;
Attendance and participation in church
activities



Attendance at department and college meetings; Coordinated Department’s Lecture and Colloquia Activities
; Promotion Committee


27

Appendix II

Faculty Data Sheet

(
Information
for the period of this review)


Name
:
Ariyadasa Aluthge







Rank
:

Professor


Status (Check one
): Full
-
time

_
X
_

Part
-
time_


Adjunct

_
Current MU Faculty:

Yes

_
X
_
_ No

___


Highest Degree Earned
:
Ph D








Date Degree Received
:
1990



Conferred by
:
Vanderbilt University


Area of Specialization
:
Mathematics


Professional Registration/Licensure
:
Not applicable



Agency
:
Not applicable



Y
ears non
-
teaching experience





____
0
____

Years of employment other than Marshall



____
2
____

Years of employment at Marshall




___
21
____

Years
of employment in higher education



____
23
___

Years in service at Marshall during this period of review


____
5
____


List courses you taught during the final two years of this review. If you participated in a team
-
taught
course, indicate each of them and
what percentage of the course you taught. For each course include
the year and semester taught

(summer through spring)
, course number, course title and enrollment.
(Expand the table as necessary)


Year/Semester

Alpha Des. & No.

Title

Enrollment

2009
summer

MTH 127 (online)

College Algebra Expanded

2
9

(39)

2009 Fall

MTH 122 (two sections)

MTH 122 (online)

MTH 127 (online)

MTH 140 (two sections
)

Plane Trigonometry

Plane
Trigonometry

College Algebra Expanded

Applied Calculus

22 (28)
, 15(20)

20 (28)

50

(61)

21 (25), 17 (21)

2010 Spring

MTH 120

(team
-
t 33%
)

MTH 122 (online)

MTH 127 (online)

MTH 140 (two sections)

MTH 690

Algebra

Plane Trigonometry

College Algebra Expanded

Applied Calculus

SpTp: functional Analysis

6

21 (26)

45 (51)

4 (5), 10 (12)

1

2010 Summer

MTH 122 (online)

MTH 127

(online)

Plane Trigonometry

College Algebra Expanded

31 (36)

29 (33)

2010 Fall

MTH 120

MTH 122 (online)

MTH 127 (online)

MTH 140 (online)

MTH 140

Algebra

Plane Trigonometry

College Algebra Expanded

Applied Calculus

Applied Calculus

7

27 (30)

42 (45)

8 (12)

19 (25)

2011 Spring

MTH 120

MTH 122 (online)

MTH 127 (online)

MTH 140 (online

MTH 519

Algebra

Plane Trigonometry

College Algebra Expanded

Applied Calculus

Forensic
S
tatistics

9

30 (33)

55 (60)

17 (22)

16


NOTE
: Part
-
time adjunct faculty
do

not need to fill in the remainder of this document.


1)

If your degree is not in your area of current assignment, please explain.


Response
: My degree is in the area of current assignment.




28

(For each of the following
sections, list only events during the period of this review and begin with
the most recent activities.
)

2)
Activities that have enhanced your teaching and or research.


See (3) through (7) below

for
details


3
)

Discipline
-
related books/papers published
(provide a full citation).


Publications:

On the spectrum of the invertible semi
-
hyponormal operators, Journal of Integral Equations
and Operator Theory, 59(2007), pp. 299


307.


4
)

Papers presented at state, regional, national, or international
conferences.


Presentations:

a)
Title:
On some results related to w
-
hyponormal operators and several other classes of
operators.

Conference:
International conference of Operator Theory and Operator Algebra,
Suzhou, China, June 20


22, 2009

b)
Title:
On t
he operator transform

and its applications.