Introduction to thermofluid mechanics

sisterpurpleMechanics

Oct 24, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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1

Introduction to thermofluid
mechanics


Introduction and contents
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Introduction to thermofluid mechanics

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What is this course about?

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Course materials
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T236 Course materials

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Acknowledgements

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Introduction and contents

The materials listed below are presented on the following pages of this unit in pdf
format.



T236: Course guide.



Block 1: Modelling flui
d flows.

o

Unit 1: Modelling fluids;

o

Unit 2: Dimensional analysis and similarity.



Block 2: Bernoulli's equation and internal flows.

o

Unit 3: Principles;

o

Unit 4: Applications.



Block 3: Fluid momentum.

o

Units 5 and 6: Fluid momentum.



Block 4: The first law of th
ermodynamics.

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Units 7 and 8: Energy and temperature.



Block 5: The second law of thermodynamics.

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Units 9 and 10: Entropy and cycles.



Block 6: Thermodynamic flow processes.

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Units 11, 12 and 13: Thermodynamic flow processes.

Introduction to thermofluid mechan
ics

What is this course about?

This course introduces the subject areas of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics
from an engineering perspective. The course is concerned with the application of
these topics to analysis and design in an engineering context.

Th
e aims of the course are therefore twofold. Firstly, it aims to teach the basic
analytical methods, that is, the fundamental concepts and techniques of
thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. Secondly, it aims, in a limited way, to show
the implementation of t
hese methods in engineering design. The limited time
available to study the course has meant that the Course Team have had to lay the
emphasis on the analytical methods. They believe that if the learner acquires a solid
foundation in analysis from this cou
rse, then its implementation in design will
become apparent both in future courses and in the mechanical engineering that
surrounds us every day.

Suggested study hours

120

Format

pdf for 9 books

Where is this from?

These materials comprise the core teachin
g text of T236, which is an introductory
course to mechanical/aeronautical/materials engineering.
Introduction to
Thermofluid Mechanics

was last presented in 2001.



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What is included?

On the basis that ‘it is better to do a few things well’ the Course Team a
dopted a
policy of simplification of course components. Their watchword was ‘if in doubt,
leave it out’. The course as a whole, thus, comprised:



Six blocks covering thirteen unit texts, some bound in pairs;



Supplementary notes with assignments;



Eight video

programmes;



Audio
-
cassettes.

The course also used a set book,
Thermodynamics and Transport Properties of
Fluids (SI Units)
, arranged by Rogers, G. F. C. and Mayhew, Y. R., 5th or later
editions, published by Basil Blackwell Ltd.

Each Unit contains its own

set of aims and learning outcomes.

OpenLearn is making the following materials available:

Block 1 Modelling fluid flows



Unit 1 introduces the basic properties of fluids, especially viscosity,
laminar and turbulent flow and flow visualisation;



Unit 2 is de
voted to ‘similarity’ and dimensional analysis as applied
to fluid mechanics.

Block 2 Bernoulli’s equation and internal flows



Unit 3 considers in more detail the evaluation of fluid density and
viscosity, and introduces the first basic analytical tool of f
luid dynamics


Bernoulli’s equation;



Unit 4 goes into detail on the practical application of Bernoulli’s
equation.

Block 3 Fluid momentum



Unit 5 covers the second important analytical tool of fluid dynamics,
introducing momentum analysis of fluid flow.



Un
it 6 looks at the application of momentum analysis, including the
internal design of hydraulic turbines, showing how the shapes of components
are dictated by fluid behaviour.

Block 4 The first law of thermodynamics



Units 7/8 are an introduction to energy a
nd thermodynamics,
considering mathematical modelling procedures, energy transformations,
working, heating and an introduction to the first law of thermodynamics.
They also consider thermodynamic equilibrium and the concepts of a
property, a state and a pr
ocess and look at specific heat capacity, the perfect
gas model and non
-
flow processes.



4

Block 5 The second law of thermodynamics



Units 9 and 10 develop the ideas of reversible and irreversible
processes, efficiency of heat engines and practical limitations
, pressure
-
volume diagrams, refrigeration and heat pumps and introduce entropy.
Analysis of thermodynamic cycles is introduced.

Block 6 Thermodynamic flow processes



Units 11, 12 and 13 considers the analysis of continuous
thermodynamic flow processes, with

emphasis on methods of control
-
volume
analysis, and looks at various important devices, such as turbines and
compressors.

What are the suggested study hours?

The Course Team used the standard 12
-
hour Technology unit estimate during
course development. Thi
s means each Unit main text was created to be read in
about 3 hours, whilst allocating 6 hours for practising problem
-
solving, that is,
working on the relevant Self
-
Assessment Questions (SAQs). This translates into 9
hours of study for each unit and approx
imately 120 hours for the complete set.

Course materials

T236 Course materials

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Acknowledgements

This material is taken from The Open University's OpenLearn website. OpenLearn
provides free open educational resources for learners and educators around the
world
under a Creative Commons licence. Third party materials have been removed
but for ease of use the original acknowledgements copy has been included. For the
online version of this unit and for other free educational resources across a range of
topics, pleas
e go to http://www.open.ac.uk/openlearn/home.php.