DRAFT Revised 10/25/13

siberiaskeinData Management

Nov 20, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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LSC
8
74

Digital Humanities

(
Spring 2014
)


1









Department

of Library and Information Science

LSC 8
74
:
Special Topics:
Digital
Humanities

Spring, 2014


DRAFT

Revised 10
/
2
5
/13





3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
One of:
551
,

553,
55
5
,

557,
648, 652, 677 or
permission of the instructor. The course is
designed for graduate students.

Classroom:
Leahy 51


Kevin Gunn, M.A., M.L.I.S.

Coordinator of Religious Studies and Humanities Services

314 Mullen Library

1
-
202
-
319
-
5088

mailto:gunn@cua.edu

Office Hours:
Monday
-
Friday, 9:00 a.m.


3:00 p.m. (by appointment is preferred).



Course Description


Digital Humanities can be defined as “a diverse and still emerging field that encompasses the pra
ctice of
humanities research in and through information technology and the exploration of how the

humanities
may evolve through their engagement with technology, media, and computational methods.”

Digital
Humanities combines the methodologies from the
traditional humanities disciplines such as religion,
philosophy, art, architecture, literature, linguistics, film and theater, music, history, and archaeology with
tools from computer science such as d
ata visualiz
ation, data mining,
textual

analysis, infor
mation
retrieval, and digital publishing.

Librarians
are playing
collaborative role
s

in such areas as data curation

and preservation
, digitization of critical editions,
data analysis,
project design, and project
management
.

Topics include

the evolution of

humanities to
digital humanities;
the
tools and techniques used by digital

humanists;
the scholarly communication issues impacted by

the digital humanities
; and the

issues
pertaining to funding,
managing, and evaluating digital humanities

projects.


This

course
will provide a foundati
on for understanding the issues
and problems surrounding the digital
humanities. It is a ‘jumping off’ point for the study of digital humanities rather than a ‘capstone’ course.


Instructional Methods


Le
ctures in classroo
m, labs, Blackboard
, guest lecturers

LSC
8
74

Digital Humanities

(
Spring 2014
)


2




Required Text
s


Anne Burdick, Johanna Drucker, Peter Lunenfeld, Todd Presner, and Jeffrey Schnapp.
Digital

Humanities

(MIT Press, 2012). Open source:
http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/digitalhumanities
-
0


Matthew Gold,
Debates in the Digital Humanities

(University of Minnesota Press, 2012)
.

Open source
edition:
http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/


Recommended Texts



none

http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companionDLS/

Recommended Resource
s


CUA Digital Humanities Research Guide:
http://guides.lib.cua.edu/digitalhumanities


Digital Humanities and the Library: a Bibliography:
http://miriamposner.com/blog/?page_id=1033


Adams, J.L. and
Gunn, K.B. (2012). "
Digital Humanities: Where to start
."
College & Research Library
News 73

(9), pp. 536
-
569.


Course Goals

The course is designed to provide students with a foundation
of understa
nding the issues in the digital
humanities.
Specifically,
explore various theoretical and applied perspectives on the digital humanities,
work with a wide variety of digital humanities projects, methods, and tools; and develop project
management
skills
in
examining and evaluating digital humanities projects.


Goals for Student Learning

At the conclusion of the course, the student will be able to
critically discuss digital humanities with
regards to theories, methods, and practices within the various discipl
ines, be familiar with the tenets of
digital humanities research and scholarly communication, and
be comfortable
with project management
issues when
working on a digital humanities project.


Professional Standards Addressed


American Library Association (
ALA)

http://www.ala.org/ala/educationcareers/careers/corecomp/corecompetences/finalcorecompstat09.pdf



Best
P
ractices for TEI in Libraries


http://www.tei
-
c.org/SIG/Libraries/teiinlibraries/



Evaluation of DH: Guidelines for Librarians


http://acrl.ala.org/dh/2012/12/03/evaluating
-
dh
-
work
-
guidelines
-
for
-
librarians/



Guidelines for Evaluating Work in Digital Humanities and Digital Media

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Digital Humanities

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3



http://www.mla.org/guidelines_eval
uation_digital




Map and Geography Round Table (MAGERT)


Map, GIS and Cataloging / Metadata Librarian Core Competencies




Required
Technologies


Capabilities Required for Course Delivery and Student Participation:

Blackboard; standard CUA
software; CUA library and information system accounts; ability to use ALADIN digital library resources.
Every student should have daily access to a
computer and high speed internet access, and the ability to use
Microsoft Word, Powerpoint, and Excel or equivalent tools.

Students should fulfill the Baseline
Technology Requirements (
http://slis.cua.
edu/tech/base
-
tech.cfm
).



Tools and Technologies Taught:

This course includes the discussion and use of information technology
in
:



text
analysis for humanities computing and textual scholarship using Juxta
(
ht
tp://www.juxtasoftware.org/
)



critical edition creation using
XML
in the
Oxygen
XML
Editor

(or other open source software
)

following TEI Guidelines

(
http://www.oxygenxml.com/
)



spatial analysis with
Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
using
ArcGIS

(
http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis
)


All software will be either free, open source software or trial based. No software will need to be
purchased by the student.
In

addition to the above packages
that will be assig
ned
, t
he course will contain
bi
weekly exercises and demonstrations of
a

varie
ty of software packages deal
ing

with some aspect of
hum
anities
data manipulation.

Students should not be intimidated by the
nature or variety of
software.
We will get our feet wet by exploring
the possibilities

that abound in digital humanities
!




Expec
tations and policies


Academic honesty:

Academic honesty is expected of all CUA students. Faculty are required to
initiate the imposition of sanctions when they find violations of academic honesty, such as
plagiarism, improper use of a student’s own work,
cheating, and fabrication.



The following sanctions are presented in the University procedures related to Student Academic
Dishonesty (from
http://policies.cua.edu/academicu
ndergrad/integrityprocedures.cfm
): “The
presumed sanction for undergraduate students for academic dishonesty will be failure for the
course. There may be circumstances, however, where, perhaps because of an undergraduate
student’s past record, a more serio
us sanction, such as suspension or expulsion, would be
appropriate. In the context of graduate studies, the expectations for academic honesty are greater,
and therefore the presumed sanction for dishonesty is likely to be more severe, e.g., expulsion.
...I
n the more unusual case, mitigating circumstances may exist that would warrant a lesser
sanction than the presumed sanction.”

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Digital Humanities

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Please review the complete texts of the University policy and procedures regarding Student
Academic Dishonesty, including require
ments for appeals, at
http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrity.cfm

and
http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrity.cfm
.


Attendance
. Show up and be on time! It is CUA Policy that attendance is mandatory. Attendance
is important as there will be many topics, examples, etc. that will discussed in class but not found
in

the reading material. Absences will affect your final grade. Let me know before class if you
will be absent.

Accommodations for students with disabilities:

Any student who feels s/he may need an
accommodation based on the impact of a disability should

contact the instructor privately to
discuss specific needs. Please contact Disability Support Services (at 202 319
-
5211, room 207
Pryzbyla Center) to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented
disabilities. To read about the service
s and policies, please visit the website:
http://disabilitysupport.cua.edu.


Course Requirements and Assessment




Assignment 1:
Text analysis with Junta

(
2
0%)


Assignment 2:
XML/
TEI coding project (20%)


Assignment 3: GIS project (20%)


Other Assignmen
ts
:

working with tools
from
Bamboo DiRT






(
http://dirt.projectbamboo.org/
)

(20%)


Project Management of a DH proposal (
2
0%)





Final grades will be assigned
as follows:



Letter

Numeric range

A

94
-
100

A
-

90
-
93.99

B+

86
-
89.99

B

82
-
85.99

B
-

78
-
81.99

C

70
-
77.99

F

Below 70




University grades:

The University grading system is available at

http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad//gradesfull.cfm#II

for undergraduates and
http://policies.
cua.edu/academicgrad//gradesfull.cfm#iii

for graduate students.

Reports of grades in courses are available at the end of each term on
http://cardinalstation.cua.edu
.



LSC
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Digital Humanities

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Spring 2014
)


5


Libraries

The CUA Libraries' wide rang
e of resources and services, including databases, online journals, and FAQs
are on the
main web site

(http://libraries.cua.edu).


For assistance on papers and assignments, consult the
research guides

(http://guides.lib.cua.edu/) or schedule an appointment with a
subject librarian

(http://libraries.cua.edu/about/subjLibs.cfm).


NOTE: Friday,
January 24th

is the la
st day to register or add courses for credit; last day to drop a
course without record.



Course Schedule


January 14

In
troduction to the course.
What are the Humanities?
What is Digital

Humanities?




Required Readings:



Anne Burdick, Johanna Drucker
, Peter Lunenfeld, Todd Presner, and Jeffrey
Schnapp.
Digital Humanities

(MIT Press, 2012)
, 1
-
26.




Svensson,
Patrik, “The Landscape of Digital Humanities,” Digital Humanities
Quarterly 4,
no. 1 (Summer 2010).


Drucker, Johanna
,


The Virtual Codex from Page Space to E
-
space
,”

A Companion to Digital Literary Studies
. Susan Schreibman and Ray Siemens. Oxford:
Blackwell, 2008.


Hopkins, Curt. “Future U: Rise of the Digital Humanities.” Ars Tech
nica, June 17,
2012.
http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/06/future
-
u
-
rise
-
of
-
the
-
digital
-
humanities/
.


Spiro, Lisa. “‘This Is Why We Fight’: Defining the Valu
es of the Digital
Humanities.” I
N

Matthew K. Gold, ed.,
Debates in the Digital Humanities
. Minneapolis:
University of Minnesota Press, 2012, 16
-
35.




January 21


History of Digital Humanities




Required Readings:




Susan Schreibman, John Unsworth, Ray

Siemens
.
A Companion to Digital
Humanities
. "The Digital Humanities and Humanities Computing: An Introduction"



Susan Hockey, "A History of Humanities Computing"


Andrea Laue, "How the Computer
Works"


Willard McCarty, "Modeling: A Study of Words and Meanings"



Dalbello,

Marija,

“A

Genealogy

of Digital Humanities
,


Journal of

Documentation

67(3)

(2011)
: 480
-
506
.


Burdick, Anne, et al. (2012). “Humanities to Digital Humanities” in

Digital_Humanities
, 3

26.


Lab: Instructing Junta for assignment

#1


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Digital Humanities

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6


January 28



L
ibrary & Information Science

and
the Disciplines



Required Readings:




Adams, J.L. and Gunn, K.B. (2012). "
Digit
al Humanities: Where to start
."
College

& Research Library News 73

(9)

(Oct. 2012)
,

536
-
569.

Kamada,
Hitoshi,
Digital Humanities: Roles for
Libraries?

College and Research
Libraries News 71

(9)

(Oct. 2010)
,

484
-
485.

Bryson, Tim; Posner, Mariam, et al. Digital Humanities SPEC Kit 326.
Washington, DC: Association of Research Libraries, 2011.

Mu
ñoz
, Trevor.
Digital Humanities in the Library isn't a Service
. August 19, 2012.

Nowviskie, Bethanie.
A Skunk in the
Library: the Path to Production for Scholarly
R&D
.

June 28, 2011.

Posner, Miriam.
What are Some of the Challenges in Doing DH in the Library?

August 10, 2012.

Shower, Ben.
Does the Library have a role to play in the Digital Humanities?

JISC,
February 23, 2012.

Sula, Chris Alen, “Digital Humanities and Libraries: A Conceptual Model.”

Journal
of Library Administration 53, issue 1 (2013): 10
-
26.




Sula,
Chris.


Philosophy through the Macroscope: Technologies, Representations,


and the History the Profession
,”

The Journal of In
teractive Technology & Pedagogy,
vol.1


issue 1, 2012).



Kirschenbaum, Mathew, “What is Digital Huma
nities and What is it doing in
English Departments?”
Debates in the Digital Humanities
, Ma
t
thew

K.

Gold, editor.
University of Minnesota Press, 2012, 3
-
11.



Underwood, Ted. “For most literary scholars, text
mining is going to be an
exploratory tool
,

The Stone and the Shell
, August 15, 2011.
http://tedunderwood.
wordpress.com/2011/08/15/how
-
to
-
make
-
text
-
mining
-
serve
-
literary
-
history
-
and
-
not
-
the
-
other
-
way
-
around/
.




February 4
Tools and Methodologies: TEI




Required Readings:




Terras, Melissa, Ron Van den Branden, and Edward Vanhoutte. “Teaching TEI:

The Need

for TEI by Example.” Literary and Linguistic Computing 24, no. 3 (2009)
,

297
-

306.



Zillig, Brian L. Pytlik. 2009.

TEI Analytics: converting documents into TEI

format

for cross
-
collection text analysis
,”

Literary and Linguistic Computing. 24, no. 3
,


187
-
192.

Sukovic, Suzana. “Convergent Flows: Humanities Scholars and their Interactions
with Electronic Texts,”
Library Quarterly

78 (3) (2008), 263

284.

Clement, Tanya. “
Knowledge Representation and Digital Schol
arly Editions in
Theory and Practice.
” Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative 1.1 (2011).


Lab: Instructing
XML

for assignment

#2


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February 11

Tools and Methodologies:
Topic Modeling


Required Readings:




Weingar
t
, Scott
.
Topic Modeling for Humanists: a Guided Tour
.

July 25, 2012.



Riddell, Allen Beye.
A Simple Topic Model (Mixture of Anagrams)
, Jul
y 22, 2012.



Ramsay, Stephen.
The Hermeneutics of Screwing Around; or What You Do with a

Million Books
. April, 2010.



February 18

Tools and Methodologies:

Sp
atial Humanities




Required Readings:




David J. Bodenhamer, John Corrigan, and Trevor M. Harris, eds.,
The Spatial
Humanities: GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship
. Bloomington: Indiana
University Press, 2010.


Drucker, Johanna.
Humanities Approaches to Graphical Display
. DHQ: Digital
Humanities Quarterly vol. 5 no. 1 (2011).



JB Harley, "
Deconstructing the Map
"


Gregor Kalas, Diane Favro, and Chris Jo
hanson, "Visualizing Statues in the Late
Antique Forum":
http://inscriptions.etc.ucla.edu



Harris, Trevor M., Susan Bergeron and L. Jesse Rouse (2011). “Humanities GIS:
Place, Spatial Storytelling, and Imme
rsive Visualization in the Humanities”
GeoHumanities: Art, History, and Text at the Edge of Place
, Michael Dear, Jim

Ketchum, Sarah Luria, Doug Richardson, editors. New York: Routledge, 226
-
240.


Lab: Instructing
ArcGIS

for assignment

#3



February 25

ADMINISTRATION MONDAY

No Class




March 4



Tools and Methodologies:
Data Mining



Required Readings:


Manovich, L. (2012).

How to compare one million images.


In Berry, D. (Ed.),
Understanding Digital Humanities

(249
-
278). New York: Palgrave MacMi
llan.

Simeone, Michael, Guiliano, Jennifer, Kooper, Rob, AND Bajcsy, Peter. “
Digging
into data using new collaborative infrastructures supporting humanities
-
ba
sed computer
science research
.”
First Monday

16 (5) (16 April 2011).

Hagood, Jonathan. “
A Brief Introduction to Data Mining Projects in the
Humanities
.” ASIS&T Bulletin.

April/May 2012.

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Tenopir, Carol, Ben Birch and Suzie Allard.
Academic Libraries and Research




Data Services
.
Washingt
on, DC: ACRL, 2012.




Williford, Christa and Charles Henry.
One Culture: Computationally Intensive




Research in the Humanities and Social Sci
ences
. Washington, DC: CLIR, 2012.






March 11

SPRING BREAK

NO CLASS




March 18

Tools and Methodologies:
Data Curation



Required Readings:





Higgins, Sarah. “Digital Curation: The Emergence of a New Discipline.” IJDC 2
.
6


(2011): 78
-
88
.




Jahnke, Lori, Andrew Asher and Spencer D.C. Keralis.
The Problem of Data
.



Washington, DC: CLIR, 2012.





Latham, Bethany and Jodi Welch Poe.

The Library as Partner in University Data



Curation
: A Case Study in Collaboration.


Journal of Web Librarianship 6. 4 (Oct 2012),



288
-
304
.







Smith, Susan S.

Introduction: Special Issue on Data Curation.


Journal of Web



Librarianship 6. 4 (Oct 2012): 225
-
227.




Weber, Nicholas M., Carole L.
Palmer & Tiffany C. Chao.

Current Trends and



Future

Directions in Data Curation Research and Education.


Journal of Web




Librarianship

6. 4 (Oct 2012), 305
-
320.






March
25


New Models for Scholarly Publishing

and Research




Required Readings:







Burdick, Anne, et al. “Emerging Methods and Genres
,
” Digital_Humanities,
2012,

29
-
60.





Christine Borgman,
Scholarship in the Digital Age: Information, Infrastructure,

and the

Internet
.
MIT Press, 2007
.



Christine Borgman,
The Digital Future is Now: A Call to Action for the
Humanities
.

Digital Humanities Quarterly

vol. 3 issue 4 (2009).



Maron, Nancy L. and K. Kirby Smith.
Current Models

of Digital Scholarly
Communication
. Association of Research Libraries, 2008.


Research Information Network
.

Reinventing Resear
ch? Information Practices in
the Humanities
. April, 2011.

Zorich, Diane. A Survey of Digital Humanities Centers in the United States.
Washington, D.C.: Council on Library and Information Resources, 2008.

Rieger, Oya.
Framing Digital Humanities: the role of new media in humanities
scholarship
.
First Monday

15 (10)(11 October 2010).

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Vinopal, Jennifer and Monica McCormick, “Supporting Digital Scholarship in
Research L
ibraries: Scalability and Sustainability,” Journal of Library Administration 53,
issue 1 (2013): 27
-
42.

Fitzpatrick, Kathleen, “Beyond Metrics: Community Authorization and Open Peer
Review,”
Debates in the Digital Humanities
, 2012.



April 1

Criticism in

the

Digital Humanities




Required Readings:



Liu, Alan. “Where Is Cultural Criticism in the Digital Humanities?”
Debates in

the Digital Humanities
, Matthew K. Gold, editor. University of Minnesota Press, 2012,

490
-
509.


Edwards, Charlie. “Digital
Humanities and Its Users.”
Debates in the Digital

Humanities
, Matthew K. Gold, editor. University of Minnesota Press, 2012, 213
-
232.


Gibbs, Fred. “
Critical Discourse in Digital Humanities
.”
Journal of Digital

Humanities

(March 9, 2012).


Greetham, David. “The Resistance to Digital Humaniti
es.”
Debates in the Digital

Humanities
, Matthew K. Gold, editor. University of Minnesota Press, 2012, 438
-
451.


Hall, Gary. “There are no Digital Humanities.”
Debates in the Digital Humanities
,

Matthew K. Gold, editor. University of Minnesota Press, 2012
, 133
-
8.






April
8


Issues
i
n Collaboration




Required Readings:




Marilyn Deegan and Willard McCarty,
Collaborative Research in the Digital Humanities
.
Farnham, UK: Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2011.


Kretzschmar, William and Willaim Gray Potter. "Libra
ry Collaboration with large Digital
Humanities
Projects."
Literary and Linguistic Computing 25.4 (Dec 2010), 439
-
445.




April
15


Planning
,
Funding

and Preserving
DH Projects


Required Readings:



CenterNet.
Resources for Starting and Sustaining DH Centers

DevDH.org
: Development for the Digital Humanities

Hockey, Susan. The rendering of humanities information in a digital context:
Current trends and future developments. Aslib Proceedings, 58(1/2) (2006), 89
-
101.

Lui, Alan. “
The State of the Digital Humanities: A Report and a Critique
.” Arts and
Humanities
in Higher Education, 11.1 (2012): 1
-
34.


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About Project Manag
e
ment

Brian Croxall,
12 Basic Principals of Project Management


Sharon Leon, Project Managemen
t for Humanists: Preparing Future Primary
Investigators

Bethany Nowviskie,
Ten Rules for Humanities Scholars New to Project
Management

Bre Pettis,
Cult of Done Manifesto



April
22


Evaluation & Usability

of DH Projects and Tools





Required Readings:





Burdick, Anne, et al. “How to Evaluate Digital

Scholarship
,




Digital_Humanities
,

2012,

128
-
1
29
.




Gibbs, Fred and Trevor Owens,

Building Better Digital Humanities Tools:




Toward Broader Audie
nces and User
-
Centered Designs
,
” Digital Humanities Quarterly



6(2)

(2012)
.



April 2
9


The Future of Digital Humanities




Required Readings:


Besser, Howard.

The Past, Present, and Future of Digital Libraries
’.
Susan
Schreibman, Ray Siemens, Joh
n Unsworth, editors
. A Companion to Digital Humanities
.
Oxford: Blackwell, 2004.



Davidson, Cathy. “Humanities 2.0: Promise, Perils and Predictions.”
Matthew

Gold
, editor
,
Debates in the Digital Humanities

(U
niversity of Minnesota Press, 2012).




Lui, Alan. “Where is Culture Criticism in the Digital Humanities?”
Matthew Gold
,

editor
,

Debates in the Digital Humanities

(University of Minnesota Press, 2012).



Mano
vich, Lev.

Trending: The Promises and the Challenges of Big Social Data
.”

Matthew Gold
, editor
,

Debates in the Digital Humanities

(University of Minnesota Press,

2012).




Presentations of Digital H
umanities Project proposals