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Private Bag X1000, Pretoria, 0001, Tel.

+27 12 300 5490 Fax: +27 12 300 5734





A
R
eport on the
N
ational

C
onsultative

C
onference in

P
reparation
for
S
outh
A
frica’s

P
articipation in the
52
ND

S
ession of the United
Nations Commission on the Status of Women

(UNCSW)









31
ST

J
anuary to
01
ST

F
e
bruary

2008


PRETORIA









C
onvened by
:

T
he
O
ffice on the
S
tatus of
W
omen

T
he

P
residency


1

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


The Office of the Status of Women (OSW)
wishes to acknowledge those individuals and
organizations who participated at the National Consultative Co
nference in
p
reparation
for South Africa’s
p
articipation in the 52
ND

Session of the United Nations Commission on
the Status of Women (UN

CSW) and provided the information on which this report is
based and without whom this conference would not have been po
s
sible:


We would like to thank in particular the
c
onference
p
resenters, namely, Professor Zuby
Saloojee

(Independent Researcher)
, Ms. Nomcebo Manzini

(Director: UNIFEM)
,
Ms.
Imelda Diouf

(Independent Consultant)
, Mr. Dean Peacock

(Sonke Gender Justice),

R
ev. Bafana Khumalo

(Sonke Gender Justice)
,
Ms. Lillian Mtembu

(Gauteng Premier’s
Office)
, Ms. Nomboniso Gasa

(Acting Chairperson, CGE)
, Ms. Girlie Njoni

(SAWID),

Ms
Ruby Marks
(Chief Director, Department of Foreign Affairs)
, Ms.Palesa Olifant

(Director,
SAP
S)
, Ms. Themba Kgasi

(Gender Focal Point, Department of Home Affairs)
, Ms.
Khamarunga Banda

(Energia)
, Ms. Nchedi Maphokga

(Gender Focal Point, Department
of Minerals and Energy)
, Mr. Victor Loate

(Department of Environmental Affairs and
Tourism)

and Ms.
Peggy Khumalo

(Department of Water Affairs and Forestry)

who
sacrificed their time and prepared presentations on the various
c
onference themes.


Our thanks to the
Staff of the OSW, Ms. Julia Masekele

(Chief Direcorate: Programems)
,
Ms. Nyameka Ndara

(ORC)
, Ms. Joanna Dorasamy
(OSDP)
and
Staff

from the
Presidency
for their input on various aspects
of
the conference.


Last but not least, we would like to

especially
thank Ms Safoora Sadek and Ms Kedibone
Seutloadi of Diabalwa Professional Services cc who
fac
ilitat
ed the workshop and
assisted in compiling

this report.










2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acronyms










03

1.

Introduction









04

2.

Part 1: Background and Context of the 52
nd

Session of the UN CSW



0
7


1.1

The CSW, its Method of Work, and Multi
-
Yea
r Programme of Work



07


1.2

Global Commitments on Financing for Gender Equality and the



Empowerment of Women







09


1.3

Rationale for the Theme on “Financing for Gender Equality”




12


1.4

Gender Mainstreaming and Finance






13


3.

Part 2:

Summ
ary Report of the National Consultative Workshop




15


2.1

Priority Theme 1: Financing for Gender Equality and Women’s



Empowerment








15



2.1.1

Presentations







15



2.1.2

Key Points







16



2.1.3

Challenges and Recommendations





20



2.1
.4

Way Forward







22


2.2

Priority Theme 2: Women and Armed Conflict





23



2.2.1

Presentations







23



2.2.2

Key Points







24



2.2.3

Challenges and Recommendations





25



2.2.4

Way Forward







26


2.3

Emerging Issue: Gender Perspective on

Climate Change




27



2.3.1

Prese
ntations







27



2.3.2

Key Points







27



2.3.3

Challenges and Recommendations





27



2.3.4

Way Forward







28


4.

Part 3:

South African Position Paper on Financing for Gender Equality and the



Empowerment
of Women;
Women and Armed Conflict; and Gender



Perspectives on Climate Change






29



3.1

Preamble








29



3.2

Country Position on Financing for Gender equality and the




Empowerment of Women






30



3.3

Country Position on Women and Armed Con
flict




32



3.4

Country Position on a Gender Perspective on Climate Change


34


5.

Part 4: Annexure



4.1

Annexure 1: Programm
e






36



4.2

Annexure 2:
Amendments on Conclusions and Recommendations of

Secretary General on Financing for Gender Equali
ty



38

4.3

Annexure 3:
Agreed Conclusions of the CSW on Women’s
Equal Participation


in Conflict Prevention, Management and resolution and in

Post
-
Conflict

Peace
-
Building
(2004/12)





40



4.4

Annexure 4:
List of Participants





44



3

ACRONYMS


AIDS



Acqui
red Immune
-
Deficiency Syndrome

CEDAW

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination
against
Women

CGE



Commission on Gender Equality

CSW



Commission on the Status of Women

DAW



Division for the Advancement of Women

ECOSOC


Economic and Soc
ial Council

GRB



Gender Responsive Budgeting

HIV



Human Infective Virus

IDPs



Internally Displaced Persons

M&E



Monitoring and Evaluation

MDGs



Millennium Developmental Goals

NGM



National Gender Machinery

NGO



Non
-
Governmental Organization

OSW



Of
fice on the Status of Women

SAPS



South African Police Service

SAWID



South African Women
-
in
-
Dialogue

UN



United Nations

















4

1. INTRODUCTION



The National Office on the Status of Women (OSW) in The Presidency convened a two
-
day national cons
ultation
conference

in preparation for South Africa’s participation
1

in the
upcoming 52
nd

Session of the U
nited
N
ations (UN)

C
ommission on the
S
tatus of
W
omen
(CSW)
.
The National Gender Machinery (NGM) met over 31
st

January and 1
st

February
2008 to deliber
ate the thematic areas
that will be
under consideration during the 52
nd

Session of the Commission and to develop a country specific position on these issues.

The purpose
of the conference was

to facilitate the n
ational delegation
’s deliberations at

the 52
n
d

Session through an informed, national consensus perspective involving all
stakeholders.


This report provides a summary of

the discussions
and recommendations that emerged
from the
afore
-
mentioned
national consultative process. The conference was attend
ed
by
7
5

representatives drawn from all

sectors of society which constitute

the NGM,
including the Commission on Gender Equality (CGE), the Joint Monitoring Committee on
the Improvement to the Quality of Life and Status of Women (JMC IQL SW), Provincial
OS
Ws, Provincial Legislatures, National Gender Focal Persons, N
on Governmental
Organizations (N
GOs
)

and
other
participants from
civil society. A list of

participants
to
the
conference

is attached
to this report as an annexure (Annexure 4
).


The National Cons
ultative Conference
focused on
the
two themes and
one

emerging
issue that will be deliberated
at

during the 52
nd

Session
. These are

as follows:




Priority Theme 1:
Financing for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of
Women,

which will take the form of a hig
h
-
level roundtable and panel discussion




1

45 member states of the UN serve as members of the CSW at any one time. The Commission
consists of one representative from each of the 45 member states elected by the Council on the
basis of e
quitable geographical distribution: 13 members from Africa, 11 from Asia, 9 from Latin
America and Caribbean, 8 from Western Europe and other states and 4 from Eastern Europe.
Members are elected for a period of four years.
South Africa as a member
state
of the
UN
participates annually in the
CSW
. In 2008, SA enjoys observer
status in the
Commission, having
completed its 4 year membership of the Commission in 2006.



5

during the Commission
, the outcome of which will be negotiated in the form of
agreed conclusions.



The second priority theme
“Women’s participation in armed conflict”

was
negotiated on in the form of agreed conclusio
ns
at

the 48
th

Session of the CSW,
in 2004, and is being reviewed in the upcoming Session, the outcome of which
will be the Chair’s Summary.




Emerging issue
“Gender Perspectives on climate change”.


The approach taken in the national consultative
conferenc
e
was premised on
:




Presentations on each thematic area to stimulate discussions and debate, which
is highlighted in the
conference
programme
that is
attached as
an
annex
ure

to
this report

(Annexure 1)
;



Plenary and group discussions to reach consensus on
d
raft conclusions and
recommendations presented by the UN Secretary General’s Report on “Progress
in mainstreaming a gender perspective in the development, implementation and
evaluation of national policies and programmes, with a particular focus on
financi
ng for gender equality and the empowerment of women” which
will

be
tabled for discussion at the 52
nd

Session (attached as
Annexure 2 to this report).



Plenary and group discussions, to review where necessary, the existing Agreed
Conclusions (UN CSW 2004/12)

on women’s equal participation in conflict
prevention, management and resolution and in post
-
conflict peace
-
building

(attached as Annex
ure

3
to
this report)



Plenary discussions on the emerging issue



Development of new and additional conclusions and recomm
endations


Th
is

report
that follows
is
ordered into four sub
-
sections as follows
:




Part
1
:
Background and Context of the 52
nd

Session of the UN CSW
:
This
section
highlights the
Commission’s
method of work a
s well as
identified themes
;

major

globa
l commitm
ents on financing for gender equality

and provides
a brief
outline of gender mainstreaming as it relates to the issue

of financing for gender
equality
.


6



Part
2
:
Summary of the National Consultative Process
:
This section

includes
the key points made in each

of the presentations
;

a focus on the challenges and
recommendations identified by various presenters
;

as well as the final, in
-
principle and in some instances comprehensive, views on current and proposed
c
onclusions and recommendations.



Part
3
:

The
South

African Position Papers

on each of the themes
that will be
under discussion

at the 52
nd

Session.



Part
4
:
Annex
ure

to the report
. That is the

list of participants,
the conference
programme,
base documents that informed discussions,
and other relevant
docum
entation


























7

PART
1


BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT OF THE 52
ND

SESSION OF THE UN CSW


1.1


The

CSW
, its Method of Work,

and
its Multi
-
Year Programme of Work


The UN CSW
,
established on 21 June 1946
, is a functional commission of the UN
Economi
c and Social Council (ECOSOC)
and is
dedicated exclusively to
addressing
gender equality and the advancement of women. As the principal global policy
-
making
body, it serves
to develop international strategies and programmes that would promote
and ensure ge
nder equality and empowerment of women
across the world
. It is also
tasked
with
integrating, coordinating where necessary, monitoring
,

and evaluating
progress made by individual
M
ember
S
tates

on gender equality in relation to all
international commitments,

protocols, conventions, etc that either directly or indirectly
impact on gender equality.


Some of the international commitments addressed by the UN CSW are the Beijing
Platform for Action, the Paris Declaration, the Monterrey Declaration, the Millennium

Development Goals (MDGs), the UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Peace
Keeping and Peace Building
,

and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of
Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)
.


The CSW prepares recommendations and reports to ECOSOC on p
romoting women’s
rights in political, economic, civil, social and educational fields. It also makes
recommendations to ECOSOC on urgent problems requiring immediate attention in the
field of women’s rights.


E
ach
year, t
he UN CSW convenes
a
session

over tw
o
-
weeks
,

(
late
February
/early

March)
,

that include
s

the full and active participation of all Member States.
Representatives of Member States evaluate progress made on gender equality, identify
challenges, set global standards and formula
te

concrete policie
s to promote gender
equality
and the advancement of women worldwide.
Each annual session focuses on a
selected number of existing themes and emerging issues, with the final outcome of a

8

session being a set of agreed conclusions endorsed / adopted by all Me
mber States as
members of the Commission with a voting status
.


Further to this, participating Member States

and

UN Regions
,

entities and organizations
identify and table for discussion and agreement a range of topical and emerging issues
that impact
on
g
ender equality and the empowerment of women.


Prior to each session of the Commission,
an Expert Group Meeting(s) on
the i
dentified
theme
(
s
)

are convened by the UN Division for the Advancement of Women (UN DAW).
The intention is to contribute to a further

understanding of the issue and to assist the
Commission in its deliberations. The findings and recommendations of the Expert Group
Meeting provide inputs for the report of the UN S
ecretary General

on the priority theme
of CSW. The Secretary General’s repo
rt
, including a set of draft conclusions and
recommendations
,

is released for tabling during the Commission’s session. This forms
the core of deliberations during the Commission’s session
, where

Member States
informally negotiate until consensus and agreem
ent is reached. The final draft agreed
conclusions is then tabled for adoption on the final day of the Commission’s Session.


The CSW uses the approach of adopting themes for each of its sessions as a way of
foregrounding and prioritizing particular gende
r issues of concern and allowing for in
-
depth discussion and debate on these issues. This is in accordance with its multi
-
year
programme of work 2007
-
2009, adopted by the 50
th

Session of the UN CSW in 2006.
Therefore, while p
revious annual
s
essions of the
Commission focused on negotiations
around two thematic areas
;

i
n 2007, the 51
st

Session was organized as follows:




Priority theme 1

which is
based on one critical area of the Beijing Platform for
Action
;



Priority theme 2

which is

a review theme based on p
rogress made in
implementation of agreed conclusions on a priority theme from a previous
session
;

and



Emerging issue
s, trends and new approaches to issues affecting the situation of
women or equality between women and men. This usually takes the form of
an

interactive panel

discussion
.



9

Table 1 below provides an outline of the thematic areas spanning the 51
st

Session
(2007) to the 53
rd

Session (2009).


T
T
a
a
b
b
l
l
e
e


1
1
:
:


T
T
h
h
e
e
m
m
a
a
t
t
i
i
c
c


A
A
r
r
e
e
a
a
s
s


o
o
f
f


t
t
h
h
e
e


U
U
N
N


C
C
S
S
W
W


f
f
o
o
r
r


2
2
0
0
0
0
7
7


t
t
o
o


2
2
0
0
0
0
9
9




5
5
1
1
s
s
t
t


S
S
e
e
s
s
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n




2
2
0
0
0
0
7
7



5
5
2
2
n
n
d
d


S
S
e
e
s
s
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n


2
2
0
0
0
0
8
8



5
5
3
3
r
r
d
d


S
S
e
e
s
s
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n


2
2
0
0
0
0
9
9


P
P
r
r
i
i
o
o
r
r
i
i
t
t
y
y


t
t
h
h
e
e
m
m
e
e


1
1


E
E
l
l
i
i
m
m
i
i
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n


o
o
f
f


a
a
l
l
l
l


f
f
o
o
r
r
m
m
s
s


o
o
f
f


v
v
i
i
o
o
l
l
e
e
n
n
c
c
e
e


a
a
g
g
a
a
i
i
n
n
s
s
t
t


t
t
h
h
e
e


g
g
i
i
r
r
l
l


c
c
h
h
i
i
l
l
d
d




F
F
i
i
n
n
a
a
n
n
c
c
i
i
n
n
g
g


f
f
o
o
r
r


G
G
e
e
n
n
d
d
e
e
r
r


E
E
q
q
u
u
a
a
l
l
i
i
t
t
y
y


a
a
n
n
d
d


t
t
h
h
e
e


E
E
m
m
p
p
o
o
w
w
e
e
r
r
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t


o
o
f
f


W
W
o
o
m
m
e
e
n
n


T
T
h
h
e
e


E
E
q
q
u
u
a
a
l
l


S
S
h
h
a
a
r
r
i
i
n
n
g
g


o
o
f
f


R
R
e
e
s
s
p
p
o
o
n
n
s
s
i
i
b
b
i
i
l
l
i
i
t
t
i
i
e
e
s
s


b
b
e
e
t
t
w
w
e
e
e
e
n
n


M
M
e
e
n
n


a
a
n
n
d
d


W
W
o
o
m
m
e
e
n
n
,
,


i
i
n
n
c
c
l
l
u
u
d
d
i
i
n
n
g
g


C
C
a
a
r
r
e
e
-
-
g
g
i
i
v
v
i
i
n
n
g
g


i
i
n
n


t
t
h
h
e
e


C
C
o
o
n
n
t
t
e
e
x
x
t
t


o
o
f
f


H
H
I
I
V
V


a
a
n
n
d
d


A
A
I
I
D
D
S
S


P
P
r
r
i
i
o
o
r
r
i
i
t
t
y
y


t
t
h
h
e
e
m
m
e
e


2
2


T
T
h
h
e
e


R
R
o
o
l
l
e
e


o
o
f
f


M
M
e
e
n
n


a
a
n
n
d
d


B
B
o
o
y
y
s
s


i
i
n
n


A
A
c
c
h
h
i
i
e
e
v
v
i
i
n
n
g
g


G
G
e
e
n
n
d
d
e
e
r
r


E
E
q
q
u
u
a
a
l
l
i
i
t
t
y
y


(
(
A
A
g
g
r
r
e
e
e
e
d
d


C
C
o
o
n
n
c
c
l
l
u
u
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s


o
o
f
f


4
4
8
8
t
t
h
h


S
S
e
e
s
s
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n
,
,


i
i
n
n


2
2
0
0
0
0
4
4
)
)


W
W
o
o
m
m
e
e
n
n


a
a
n
n
d
d


A
A
r
r
m
m
e
e
d
d


C
C
o
o
n
n
f
f
l
l
i
i
c
c
t
t


(
(
A
A
g
g
r
r
e
e
e
e
d
d


C
C
o
o
n
n
c
c
l
l
u
u
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s


o
o
f
f


4
4
8
8
t
t
h
h


S
S
e
e
s
s
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n
,
,


i
i
n
n


2
2
0
0
0
0
4
4
)
)


T
T
o
o


b
b
e
e


d
d
e
e
t
t
e
e
r
r
m
m
i
i
n
n
e
e
d
d


i
i
n
n


t
t
h
h
e
e


5
5
2
2
n
n
d
d


S
S
e
e
s
s
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n


o
o
f
f


t
t
h
h
e
e


U
U
N
N


C
C
S
S
W
W


E
E
m
m
e
e
r
r
g
g
i
i
n
n
g
g


T
T
h
h
e
e
m
m
e
e


E
E
l
l
i
i
m
m
i
i
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n


o
o
f
f


a
a
l
l
l
l


f
f
o
o
r
r
m
m
s
s


o
o
f
f


v
v
i
i
o
o
l
l
e
e
n
n
c
c
e
e


a
a
g
g
a
a
i
i
n
n
s
s
t
t


w
w
o
o
m
m
e
e
n
n
:
:


F
F
o
o
l
l
l
l
o
o
w
w
-
-
u
u
p
p


t
t
o
o


t
t
h
h
e
e


U
U
N
N


S
S
e
e
c
c
r
r
e
e
t
t
a
a
r
r
y
y




d
d
e
e
n
n
e
e
r
r
a
a
l
l


s
s


I
I
n
n
-
-
D
D
e
e
p
p
t
t
h
h


S
S
t
t
u
u
d
d
y
y


a
a
t
t


n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l


a
a
n
n
d
d


i
i
n
n
t
t
e
e
r
r
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l


l
l
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
s
s




d
d
e
e
n
n
d
d
e
e
r
r


m
m
e
e
r
r
s
s
p
p
e
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c
c
t
t
i
i
v
v
e
e
s
s


o
o
n
n


C
C
l
l
i
i
m
m
a
a
t
t
e
e


C
C
h
h
a
a
n
n
g
g
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q
q
o
o


b
b
e
e


d
d
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r
m
m
i
i
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d
d


b
b
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t
t
h
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C
C
h
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a
a
i
i
r
r


o
o
f
f


t
t
h
h
e
e


r
r
k
k


C
C
p
p
t
t


i
i
n
n


O
O
M
M
M
M
U
U





1.2

Global Commi
tments on Financing for Gender Equality and the
Empowerment of Women
2


Commitments on financing for gender equality and the empowerment of women have
been made by Governments at an international level. These include those made at the
Fourth World Conferenc
e on Women (Beijing, 1995), the twenty
-
third Special Session of
the General Assembly (UN, New York, 2000) and the Millennium Summit (UN, New
York, 2000)
,
and are as follows:








2

United
Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Division for the Advancement
of
Women: 2007,
AIDE MEMOIRE
: Expert Group Meeting on “Financing for Gender Equality and
the Empowerment of Women: (EGM/FFGE/2007/INF.1), 16 July 2007, New York


10

1.2.
1
.


The Beijing Platform for Action




Emphasizes that funding has to be ide
ntified and mobilized from all sources and
across all sectors for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of
women;



Calls for sufficient resources to be allocated to national machineries for the
advancement of women
,

as well as to all institut
ions, as appropriate, that can
contribute to the implementation and monitoring of the Platform for Action;



Calls upon Governments to create a supportive environment for the mobilization
of resources by NGOs, particularly women’s organizations and networks,

feminist
groups, the private sector and other actors of civil society, to enable them to
contribute towards this end;


1.2.2

The twenty
-
third Special Session of the General Assembly




Calls upon Governments to incorporate a gender perspective into the design,
de
velopment, adoption and execution of all budgetary processes, as appropriate,
in order to promote eq
u
itable, effective and appropriate resource allocation
;



Calls upon Governments to

establish adequate budgetary allocations to support
gender equality and de
velopment programmes that enhance women’s
empowerment
;



Calls upon Governments to

develop the necessary, analytical and
methodological tools and mechanisms for monitoring and evaluation
;



Calls upon Governments to provide national machineries with the neces
sary
human and financial resources, including through exploring innovative funding
schemes, so that gender mainstreaming is integrated into all policies,
programmes and projects.


1.2.3

The Beijing +10 Conference (50
th

Session of UN CSW, 2006)




Encourag
ed the international community, the UN system, relevant regional and
international organizations, the private sector and civil society to provide the
necessary financial resources to assist national Governments to meet

11

development targets and benchmarks ag
reed upon at major UN summits and
conferences and their follow
-
up processes;



Also called for the mobilization of adequate funding for gender
-
sensitive
development policies and programmes;



For gender
-
responsive budgeting processes in all sectors; and



For th
e allocation of adequate funding for women
-
specific measures.


1.2.4

The Monterrey Consensus
, adopted at the International Conference on

Financing for Development, March 2002




Highlights the importance of a holistic approach to financing for development,
includ
ing gender
-
sensitive development;



Encourages the mainstreaming of a gender perspective into development
policies at all levels and in all sectors;



Stresses the critical need for reinforcing national efforts in building capacity for
gender budget policies.


1.2.5

The Paris Declaration

on Aid Effectiveness




Acknowledges that harmonization efforts are needed on cross
-
cutting issues,
such as gender equality


1.2.6

Workshop on Development Effectiveness in Practice, April 2007




Emphasizes that gender equality, human rights
and environmental sustainability
are fundamental cornerstones for the achievement of good development results
and must be harnessed to advance the implementation of the Paris Declaration


1.2.7

CEDAW




In several of its general recommendations, including genera
l recommendation
No. 6 on “Effective national machinery and publicity”, the CEDAW Committee
recommended that State parties provide adequate resources, commitment and

12

authority to national machineries and mechanisms for the advancement of
women
;




In its con
cluding comments
,

the CEDAW Committee calls on State parties to
monito
r

the effects of macroeconomic policies, in
cluding

trade a
g
reements, on
women so as to ensure that all national development policies, plans and
programmes explicitly promote women’s empo
werment
;



Calls on States parties

to seek innovative sources of funding and assistance for
the promotion of gender equality, including
in

partnership with the private sector.


1.3


Rationale for the Theme on “Financing for Gender Equality”
3


There has been
limited assessment of progress made in channeling and allocating
resources to translate international commitments into action. Serious gaps and
challenges exist, particularly the financing gap for resources needed to achieve MDG3 in
low
-
income countries. M
echanisms for financing gender equality and the empowerment
of women need closer scrutiny
in respect of their
continu
ing to

perpetuat
e

gender
disparities and inequalities
. These mechanisms include
:


1.3.1

P
ublic finance, including gender
-
responsive budgeting



r
esources remain
insufficient to adequately support policies and programmes that promote gender
equality and the advancement of women. While a number of Governments have
integrated gender perspectives into national budgets to reflect the differentiated
need
s and priorities of women and men, attention has mainly been on the
expenditure side of the budget with limited focus on the revenue side. Challenges
in implementing gender responsive budgets include limited dialogue between the
Ministries of Finance and N
ational Gender Machineries, and the lack of expertise
and tools for monitoring and evaluating budgets from a gender perspective
;


1.3.2

M
acro
-
economic policies, particularly in relation to follow
-
up to the Monterrey
Consensus on financing for development



Macr
oeconomic policies have
implications for financing for gender equality. What is needed is for the



3

United
Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Division for the Advancement of
W
omen: 2007,
AIDE MEMOIRE

: Expert Group Meeting on “Financing for Gender Equality and
the Empowerment of Women: (EGM/FFGE/2007/INF.1), 16 July 2007, New York



13

international community to advance concrete action
-
oriented, gender
-
sensitive
policy recommendations and coherence between macroeconomic policies and
internat
ionally agreed development goals, including on gender equality
;


1.3.3

Mobilization of international resources, including bilateral and multilateral
assistance and new aid modalities



In recent years there has been a shift in the
way that development assistanc
e has been delivered, with increased focus
placed on sector
-
wide approaches of large programm
e
s.
There is l
imited focus
on
activities that have
gender

equality as a principal or significant objective

by
bilateral aid allocated to specific sectors. Two thir
ds of this funding is actually
directed to the social sectors, mainly health and education, and limited funds
allocated to promoting gender equality in the agriculture, infrastructure or finance
sectors
; and


1.3.4

New and innovative sources of funding



In add
ition to public finance and
international resources, including donor funding, funds and foundations have
been established to mobilize resources for activities promoting gender equality
and the empowerment of women. Women’s development funds, and funds run
by women, have been set up in many instances to fund local, national and
regional organizations working towards gender equality and the empowerment of
women. Remittances flows in many countries and has emerged as potential
sources of financing for gender e
quality and the empowerment of women
.


As Governments hold the primary responsibility for ensuring gender equality and the
advancement of women, they should make efforts to systematically review how women
benefit from public sector expenditures

and macroec
onomic policies
.


1.4

Gender Mainstreaming and Finance


Efforts to promote gender equality and women’s empowerment require adequate
financial resources. There is a growing body of evidence that indicates that gender
equality makes good economic sense, the
refore there needs to be more concerted
efforts for gender mainstreaming in economic and public finance processes. A clear
political will
, together with an adequate

allocation of human and financial resources
,

are

14

critical to ensure gender mainstreaming
, p
articularly in translation of the concept into
practice. (ECOSOC: Agreed Conclusions of 1997/2). It is vitally important that a gender
perspective is incorporated into the design, development, adoption and execution of all
budgetary processes to promote
equitable and effective resource allocations to support
gender equality and development programmes that enhance women’s empowerment.
In
this regard, g
ender mainstreaming
remains
an effective tool for achieving gender
equality and women’s empowerment.





























15

PART
2


SUMMARY
REPORT
OF THE NATIONAL CONSULTATIVE WORKSHOP


One of the specific tasks undertaken by the National OSW is that of coordinating South
Africa’s official representation to the UN CSW. It is in this light that the OSW conv
ened
this two
-
day
conference

of all representatives of the NGM. The intention
was

towards
ensuring a consensus national position on the thematic areas. In addition
, this process
aim
s to ensure
that the deliberations of the official delegation during the Co
mmission
reflects the views of the majority of institutions and organizations dealing with issues
pertaining to gender equality and the empowerment of women.


This sub
-
section therefore seeks to provide a summary report of the consultation
conference

held

over 31
st

January and 1
st

February 2008 in Pretoria. It highlights key
discussion points made by the presenters on the various topics
and

capture
s

the gist of
discussions that took place. In addition, it outlines some of
the
challenges that exist a
s
well
as
the recommendations proposed by participants during the
conference
.


2.1

Priority theme 1: Financing for Gender Equality and Women’s
Empowerment


2.1.
1.
Presentations

made on this theme included the following:




“Applying a Gender Lens to Official Donor
Assistance (ODA) and the Paris
Declaration”
-

by Professor Zuby Saloojee
, Independent Consultant





Africa, gender and aid effectiveness



by Ms. Nomcebo Manzini, Director


UNIFEM





Some observations from a G
ender
E
quality and
W
omen’s
E
mpowerment

practiti
oner in South Africa: A government approach to budget analysis from a
gender perspective”
-

by Ms. Imelda Diouf, Development Planner & Gender
Specialist




Strategies for achieving men’s equal involvement in the care economy



by Mr.
Dean Peacock
and Rev.

Bafana Khumalo
,
Sonke Gender Justice Network


16



“Gender Responsive Budgeting: Experience of Gauteng Province”


by Ms.
Lillian Mtembu, Provincial Gender Coordinator




A
Gender
Perspective and Critique of GRB and Financing
:
Policy and

Conceptual
C
o
nsideration



by Ms. Nomboniso Gasa, Acting Chairperson, CGE



“Financing for Gender Equality


A Civil Society Perspective”


By Ms. Girlie
Njoni
, South African Women
-
in
-
Dialogue (SAWID)


Copies of the presentations made at this workshop can be obtained from the Nati
onal
OSW.
Discussions on the presentations addressed the mechanisms for financing gender
equality and the empowerment of women, such as:



Development aid;



Public finance management systems;



Gender responsive budgeting (GRB);



Mobilisation of internal financi
al resources; and



Ensuring that macro
-

and micro
-
economic policies are gender sensitive


2.1.
2.
Key points

that emerged from the presentations and discussions that followed
are outlined below.




On Development A
id

-

The Paris Declaration and its processes ar
e key in defining aid
disbursement and management, and is very much about process. It barely
mentions gender, i.e. the current 12 indicators of the Paris Declaration are
gender insensitive

-

In spite of the existence of the Paris Declaration, the MDG
s

and th
e
Monterrey Consensus, gender equality is still not adequately financed

-

Gender must be central to all discussions and decisions on financing for
development, and in particular on the various funding modalities proposed
by the Paris Declaration

-

Some funds a
re available for delivery of “quick wins” but very little funding
is available for behaviour change on values and norms that perpetuate
gender inequalities and inequities.

-

Gender equality needs to function as a sector and as a cross cutting issue


17

-

There is
an emerging international recognition of the significance of gender
responsiveness for human development.

-

There are differences among donors in support for gender equality.




On Fiscal Processes

-

Three key gains made by the women’s movement thus far include
the
development of women’s studies as a field of study; the development of
analytical frameworks to measure and assess gender in development, and
the development of gender responsive budget systems.

-

GRB has grown out of engaged thinking on how best to util
ize some of the
gender development indices and measures, especially Gender
Empowerment Measure (GEM) and the Gender Development Index (GDI)

-

GRB must be located within the
symbiotic relationship between the formal
and informal economy

-

GRB strengthens govern
ment’s processes

-

Women should participate in decision
-
making in respect of economic
policies

-

It is important to make visible and emphasize the cost of gender inequality
in society

-

It is important to link budgetary and fiscal policies with mechanisms used i
n
the

implementation of CEDAW and other international agreements

/

instruments

-

Important to locate gender in international development targets

-

Ensure that the face of poverty


which is female


features in
macroeconomic policies of governments

-

It is impor
tant to integrate women’s experiences and roles, such as time
-
use, care
-
giving, etc into macroeconomic policies




On GRB in Gauteng

-

GRB seeks to link government policies on gender equity to budget
allocations, output performance and to long term outcomes

-

Ge
nder budget advocates that public resources should be allocated in a
manner that recognizes the different roles that women and men play in the
economy as well as the different needs and constraints that they have


18

-

Departments submit formal gender budget sta
tements, against format
provided

-

In Gauteng, gender budget submitted after departmental budget and thus
not part of the main budget

-

Gender Focal Persons not involved in the gender budgeting process

-

Monitoring mechanisms regarding GRB are the budget bilater
als with
Treasury, the analysis of departmental strategic plans and one
-
on
-
one
meetin
gs with the Premier

-

Trained all middle and senior managers across all departments on gender
budgeting

-

Assessing impact of GRB should be part of overall M&E system

-

Gender b
udgeting should be integral part of strategic planning and
development of operation plans




On the Paris Declaration

-

The Paris Declaration is to improve coordination and effectiveness of donor
aid for sustainable development

-

It is a systems approach and mec
hanism that provides a framework with
progress measures, indicators a
n
d targets to promote partnership and
mutual accountability

-

Five principles of Paris Declaration: Donor to help strengthen capacity of
country partner in:

-

Ownership: national development
goals into cluster priorities and
programmes

-

Harmonization: common and simplified procedures

-

Alignment: country modalities used

-

Results: achieve desired outcomes against country strategy

-

Mutual Accountability: link between national development strategies
a
nd budget and joint assessment of results and reporting

-

South African Government as a signatory to the Paris Declaration has the
IDC, National Treasury to oversee its implementation, and South African
ownership and aid effectiveness

-

The Paris Declaration o
nly mentions gender, but is generally gender blind


19

-

Gender is addressed through commitment to meeting MDGs: Promoting
gender equality and the empowerment of women and improving maternal
health

-

Implementation of the Declaration

is critical to promote a wider

sustainable
development approach with gender equality as an essential

-

It is important
to

strengthen the capacity of Governments and civil society
organizations to effectively engage with donors and the UN system around
the Paris Declaration

-

Ministries of
Finance should take leadership in ensuring the promotion of
gender equality in new aid modalities for enhanced aid effectiveness
through dialogue, negotiations and coordination

-

Gender equality should be included as a core and integral part of the Accra
Hig
h
-
level Forum Agenda for enhancing the development of a gender
sensitive monitoring framework for the Paris Declaration




A Government Approach to budget analysis from a gender perspective

-

The current socio
-
economic and political situation is to be consider
ed.
Some of the points to be noted include:

-

Existence of the 1
st

and 2
nd

economies


a vibrant economy and
growing gap between wealthy and poor

-

Modern and traditional context


co
-
existing sometimes uneasily

-

Cultural and social integration and diversity

-

14

years into democracy


politics robust and fragile




Men and the Care Economy

-

According to the 2002 South African General Household Survey only 48%
of fathers are present in the homes of children under the age of 18
compared with 80% of mothers

-

Time
-
use s
tudies show that men spend only “a tenth of the time, compared
to women, in performing childcare tasks for children under seven years of
age” (Budlender et al in Richter, 2005)

-

Women and girls bear disproportionate impact of care and support for those
livi
ng with HIV and AIDS

-

Barriers to men’s involvement are:


20

-

Patriarchal practices and notions of what constitutes men’s and
women’s roles

-

Lack of skills and fear of appearing incompetent

-

Migrant labour system

-

Self fulfilling prophecies and lack of nuance and c
omplexity in our
understanding of varied lives lived by men across the country

-

Strategies for decreasing women’s burden of care:

-

Address structural forces


macroeconomic policy and privatization of
critical resources

-

Recognize and make visible care work s
ome men are doing

-

Programme interventions

-

Policy approaches e.g. to increase men’s involvement in care
activities to shift social norms


nursery and primary schools, nursing,
etc.

-

Nordic countries


substantial parenting leave for men (4 months for
mother
,
followed by
4 months for
the
father and
then
4 months as
negotiated between the two)
. This is the 4
-
4
-
4 policy.

-

Brazil is looking at a Bill to make 30 days of paternity leave available
for all fathers

-

Educate male policy makers about gender and their ro
les and
obligations.


2.1.
3.
Challenges
and recommendations

emerging from discussions on this theme
are

summarized as follows:




Despite the fact that the Paris Declaration, PRA’s and SWA are all “gender blind”
and does not provide for resources to be alloc
ated towards gender equality,
opportunities are still available for us to influence that a gender perspective be
incorporated into these processes. In addition, we can still avail those
opportunities to influence implementation and become involved in the m
onitoring
and evaluation processes. Furthermore, women must ensure that the indicators
for the Paris Declaration are made gender responsive



Gender must be in National Development plans for ODA to contribute to this

process
.


21



Gender issues included in Nation
al Development Plans but not funded


need to
ensure that they are funded.



Gender not addressed as a cross
-
cutting issue in reports on MDGs and only
considered and reported as MDG that is specific on gender.



Funding for behavioral change not addressed. Bal
ance funding quick wins and
longer
-
term sustainable transformation.



Ensure gender recognised as fundamental to socio
-
economic development


broaden from education and health.



For GRB to be effective, must ensure expenditure tracking (need indicators /
guid
elines); resource allocation, administrative accountability, inclusion of gender
in performance contracts of senior managers, tabling of budget statements on
Gender and inclusion of gender analysis into budget cycles.



Women must be involved in decision
-
mak
ing of economic policies



Make visible and emphasis cost of gender inequality



Link budget and fiscal policies to CEDAW and other international commitments



Sharpen location in International Development Targets



Make gender budget part of main budget



Involve
gender staff in development of gender budgets



Ensure that gender budgeting is an integral part of strategic and operational
plans



Provide Gender budgeting training



Include gender equity tracking in overall M & E system



Include women’s work at Household
level in macro
-
economic framework and
GDP calculation


factor in unpaid work, care work, informal work and work done
to produce goods for household own consumption



There is confusion” of roles between the three tiers of government and within
government de
partments


with regard to strategic decision making, planning
and budgeting.



There is political and institutional support but with limited systems support e.g.
gender planning and budgeting, gender analysis, gender monitoring



Gender Responsive Planning an
d Budgeting opportunities include:

-

Lobbying in terms of the Public Finance Management Act (1999)

-

National Treasury creating an enabling environment

-

Gender responsive Integrated Development Plans


22

-

Gender policy framework for local government

-

DP
SA launched a Strategic Framework for Gender Equality within


the public service

-

SAMDI pilot and roll out the mainstreaming of gender in dept

-

SAQA qualifications



Linkage to PRS

link gender budgeting to poverty eradication/reduction goals



Instituti
onal Commitment

commitment from senior managers to include
gender planning and budgeting in operational plans



Expertise


use of economic and gender expertise to ensure a gender
responsive IDP



Expenditure Tracking

the use of expenditure t
racking systems to

determine
the
level of expenditure relating to gender



Resource Allocation

available budget for processes that reduce gender
inequalities



Administrative Accountability

scrutinise administrative procedures for gender
sensitivity


2.1.
4.
Participants etched
the

way forward
in respect to financing for gender equality

and women’s empowerment which informed

the crafting of the country position paper on

this theme (Refer

to

Part
3

of this report)
. The base document which served as the
source of discussion in this

session was the draft conclusions and recommendations
contained in the UN Secretary
-
General’s Report, entitled “Progress in mainstreaming a
gender perspective in the development, implementation and evaluation of national
policies and programmes, with a pa
rticular emphasis on financing for gender equality
and the empowerment of women”.


Participants agreed with the principles and intent of all the conclusions and
recommendations contained in the Secretary
-
General’s Report. They were also
requested to look
at language used in the text of the document. Suggestions,
amendments and proposals in this regard focused on issues of clarity, emphasis and
ensuring accountability, in particular, political accountability. These proposals are
attached as Annex
2
in Part
4

of this report.



23

Participants further concurred that the South African Position
Paper must

highlight
that
those critical areas omitted in the draft resolutions of the Secretary
-
General be included
by the National Delegation during the 52
nd

Session. These

include:



The care economy and unpaid work undertaken by women



Child
-
headed households, especially as they relate to the girl child



Women do not constitute a homogenous group and that the diversity of needs of
women


rural/urban; race; class; disability;
displaced; refugees


must be
considered as having differential needs with regard to financing.



Role of boys and men in the care economy and its impact on decreasing the
burdens on women


The Conference mandated the National OSW to craft these suggestions
into a final
country position which will inform the manner of deliberations by the National Delegation
in the UN
. The OSW was also mandated to work with a task team wherever necessary
for technical guidance on some issues. Furthermore the conference endors
ed the view
that the country position should as far as possible be aligned to the regional / Africa
group position on these issues.


2.2


Priority Theme 2: Women in Armed Conflict


2.2.
1.
Presentations

made on this theme included the following:




Gender Ma
instreaming in
Interdepartmental Framework on Peace Miss
ions

-


by Ms Ruby Marks, Department of Foreign Affairs




Practical experience of S
outh African Police Service in
Peace Keeping in
Sudan”
-


by

Ms.
Palesa Olifant
, South African Police Service (SAPS)




Women Refugee Dialogue

-


by

Ms.
Themba Kgasi
,

Department of Home
Affairs


Copies of the presentations made at this workshop can be obtained from National OSW.
Presentations on this theme focused on current policies and initiatives undertaken by the
Sou
th African Government and the extent to which this experience can influence
international approaches to the involvement of women in peace
-
making processes.



24

2.2.
2.
Key points

that emerged from the presentations and discussions that followed
are outlined b
elow.

These are as follows:




Gender Mainstreaming in UN Security Council Resolution 1325

-

The Department of Foreign Affairs is leading the country process on
ensuring that UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) is being
implemented within the country.
In this regard, the department is
overseeing that gender is mainstreamed into all its processes. To
execute this task, the department has put in place an
interdepartmental framework on peace missions as well as
undertaking a review of the White Paper on De
fence.





Participation of Women in Peace
-
Keeping and Peace
-
Building Processes

-

There is a pressing need to focus on women as peace
-
builders and
how they are involved in peace
-
making

-

There is
,

in general,
an increase in the number of women in peace
negotiat
ions, peace
-
keeping and post
-
conflict peace
-
building and
peace
-
reconstruction
. However to date, the involvement of women in
peace processes has not had a tremendous impact on the lives of
women in the affected country

-

It was noted that using the indicator

of quantity (numbers of women in
peace missions) is in itself inadequate and insufficient to measure
success and impact of women’s involvement in peace missions




Women and Children Refugees and Asylum Seekers in South Africa

-

South Africa as a country need
s to look at financing for refugees but
this must be looked at within the general national policy environment
on the issue of refugees.

-

Xenophobia must be addressed, particularly through awareness
raising processes.

-

Need to develop strategies for assisting

with internal conflict e.g. in
the Western Cape province, there are purported reports of killings of
people from Somalia



25



SAPS Best Practice on Women in Peace Mission

to Darfur, Sudan

-

The role of SAPS in peace missions includes
organizational

developm
ent; training; ensuring effective and impartial maintenance of
law and order; ensuring that human rights and fundamental freedoms
are fully protected and maintained; providing assistance to women
and children in the Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camps

-


Female members participate in the development and implementation
of women’s desks in the IDP camps to share information and
exchange experiences on sexual harassment; abuse; and rape

-


Some of the criteria for recruitment and training of female SAPS
m
embers include 4 years of police service experience; possession of
a valid driver’s license and passing essential medical and fitness level
tests

-

Recruitment for SAPS women into these peace missions is purely
voluntary.

-

Female and male members recei
ve the same training in preparation
for a peace mission.


2.2.
3.
Challenges and recommendations

emerging from discussions on this theme are
summarized as follows:




Increase involvement of women in peace
-
making e.g. negotiations



Ensure that women’s involve
ment in peace missions contribute to long term and
sustainable positive impact on the lives of women in the affected country



Increase qualitative indicators on to assess impact of women’s involvement in
peace processes e.g. on empowerment, need, etc



Develo
p more strategies and allocate resources to make it possible for women to
participate “comfortably” e.g. availability of sanitary pads, protection from gender
based violence



Need to clarify specific roles and responsibilities of women in peace missions



Int
roduce appropriate customised and generic training for women, based on UN
tools



Strengthen relationships between Gender Focal Point people in relevant line
departments and the Department of Foreign Affairs


26



Processes and training to prepare women for cultu
ral differences and language
barriers



Voluntary recruitment limits numbers, organisational interest over
-
rides personal
interest



Inadequate involvement of women at senior operational levels



Need to address needs of Child Refugees



Need to address needs of r
efugees such as adjusting to cultural and socio
-
economic conditions, clearly defining their legal status; extending social services
to refugees, integrating them into communities instead of setting up refugee
camps



Most
asylum

seekers are women and childre
n but system does not respond
adequately to their needs



Need to educate service providers on rights of refugees e.g. access to health
care and financial services



Tie in refugee issues with financing for gender


2.2.
4
.
Participants

etched the

way forward
in

respect to women and armed conflict,
which
informed the crafting of the country position paper on

this theme (Refer Part
3

of this report). The base document which served as the source of discussion in this
session was the
Agreed C
onclusions
of the CSW on

Women’s Equal Participation in
Conflict Prevention, Management and Resolution and in Post
-
Conflict Peace
-
Building, 2004/12.

This document is attached as Annex
ure

3
in Part
4

of this report.


Participants agreed with
the
principles and intent of all the Ag
reed Conclusions
2004/12
. The Conference

mandated the national delegation to include any additional
comments and /or recommendations identified at the workshop
, and

which is not
reflected in the 2004/12 Agreed Conclusions,
during

the
informal negotiation
p
rocesses
of

the Commission
. However, the Conference cautioned that in doing so,
the National Delegation must ensure that these additions are, as far as is possible,
aligned to regional positions on the issue.


Participants also agreed that all comments and

recommendations on women in
peace processes and on the issue of women refugees / asylum seekers must be
aligned to all current South African positions and commitments on these two issues.


27

2.3


Emerging Issue: Gender Perspective on Climate Change


2.3.
1.

Presentations

made on this theme included the following:




“Gender and Sustainable Development”


by Ms. Khamarunga Banda, Energia
(a Global Network for Gender and Energy)
and Ms. Nchedi Maphokga,
Department of Minerals and Energy




“Gender Perspectives on

Climate Change: An Environmental Perspective”


by
Mr. Victor Loate, Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism



“Gender Perspectives on Climate Change: A Water and Forestry Perspective”


by Ms. Peggy Khumalo, Department of Water Affairs and Forestry


Copies of the presentations made at this workshop can be obtained from the National
OSW. Presentations on this emerging issue focused on current policies and initiatives
undertaken by the South African Government, particularly in
responding to

the issues

of
sustainable development. Women’s involvement in these processes was generally
highlighted, with one presentation providing an insightful analysis of the impact of the
energy issue on and in women’s lives.


2.3.
2.
Key points

that emerged from the pres
entations and discussions that followed
are outlined below. These are as follows:




Climate change involves the build up of man made gases in the atmosphere that
trap the sun’s heat causing changes in weather patterns



A strong gender component is needed, es
pecially in developing
countries
, which,
if ignored, could lead to increased poverty especially
amongst

the rural
population
of South Africa,
where two third of all women are located
. These
women depend chiefly on natural resources (water, fire wood, coal,

etc) for their
livelihood.



2.3.
3.
Challenges and recommendations

emerging from discussions on this issue are
summarized as follows:



28



Women to be involved in decision
-
making on climate change/ environmental
issues



Need to build technical capacity of wome
n to engage on these issues



Need to recognize impact of climate change on lives of women e.g. those
working in the Forestry Sector, those working with land issues, etc



Women need to play a pivotal role in the developing and implementing the
adaptation resp
onse to climate change



Women and Climate Change issues in other UN and international commitments
to be supported



SA has supported women and energy agenda. Table SA contributions on this
issue to UN CSW



Need to develop gender
-
responsive climate change strat
egies


2.3.
4
.
Participants

etched the

way forward
in respect
o
f

the emerging issue of
Gender
Perspectives
on Climate Change, which
informed the crafting of the country position
paper on

this theme (Refer
to
Part
3

of this report).



Participants at the Co
nference noted the concerns raised by the Africa Group
regarding the manner in which this emerging theme was decided upon by the
Commission Chairperson for discussion at the 52
nd

Session. However, participants
strongly recommended that discussions on this
topic is critical and therefore should
continue, based on their understanding of the generally negative impact of climate
change on the lives of women, especially rural based women in South Africa.



Participants further agreed that the country position
on

this issue should include the
comments and recommendations identified at the conference and that this must be
done in alignment with current South African positions and commitments on the
issue of climate change.








29

P
ART
3


SOUTH AFRICAN POSITION PAPE
R ON FINANCING FOR GENDER EQUALITY AND
T
HE
EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN;

WOMEN AND ARMED CONFLICT;
AND

GENDER
P
ERSPEC
TIVES ON CLIMATE CHANGE


Approximately 75 representatives from all sectors of society,
departments,
organizations
and institutions

of civil society

that comprise the
Na
tional Gender Machinery, deliberated
on the two

p
riority
t
hemes and one
e
merging
t
heme to be discussed at the forthcoming
52
nd

session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women (UN CSW).


In preparation for South Africa’s participa
tion in the afore
-
mentioned UN CSW session,
the Office on the Status of Women (OSW) in The Presidency, convened and hosted a
two
-
day
conference

which was held over 31
st

January and 1
st

February 2008. The
r
ecommendations listed here
-
under, theme by theme, r
epresents the final consolidated
views of all participants at this National Gender Machinery
conference
; and essentially
serves as the South African Position Paper on each theme.


3.1
PREAMBLE


The S
outh
A
frican

National Gender Machinery
:


3.1.1

Acknowled
ges

and applauds

the significant advances made to date

in respect
of gender issues at a local, sub
-
regional, regional, national, continental and
global level
;



3.1.2

Further

acknowledges

that
:




increased co
-
operation, collaboration and co
-
ordination be
tween sectors of
society and between nation states, under the leadership and guidance of
the women’s movement and related organizations that support gender
equality and the empowerment of women, has been a critical factor in
consolidating the gender equali
ty gains thus far; and



30



advances in respect of gender equality and empowerment of women are
impeded,
in some instances
, by factors such as persistent gaps between
policy and implementation; insufficient financial resources for
implementation of programmes
that address gender issues; absence of
national gender machineries; inadequate baseline and sex disaggregated
data and peripheral political accountability for gender issues.


3.1.3

R
ecognizes
the diversity of women’s experiences and needs in respect of ru
ral

/

urban, class, race, religion, sexual orientation, disability, etc and that any
proposed recommendation to promote and support gender equality and
empowerment of women must take into account these differences.


3.1.4

Further
recognizes

that
:




women continue

to be the sector of society that is most negatively affected
by poverty and underdevelopment; and that gender equality and the
empowerment of women is critical to long term, sustainable socio
-
economic
development that meets the needs of all in any society
;



there is a need for increased public awareness and visibility on the
successes, challenges, costs


financially and in terms of human and socio
-
economic development

of persistent gender inequality in society
,


3.1.5

Therefore
, w
ithin this context, rem
ain committed to facilitating increased
commitment and action at local,
national,
sub
-
regional, regional, and global levels, to
achieve wide
-
spread gender equality and empowerment of women
.


3.2
COUNTRY POSITION ON
F
INANCING FOR GENDER EQUALITY AND

EMPOWE
RMENT OF WOMEN


NOTING

THAT
:




The Paris Declaration is gender insensitive;



That gender is in general, acknowledged only at a marginal level in all other
international financing, economic and trade agreements;


31



That development aid is a key mechanism for pro
viding much needed financial
resources for gender quality and women empowerment programmes;



The M
DG
s, National Development Plans of some countries, Structural
Adjustment Programmes and other such poverty reduction and socio
-
economic
development initiatives

and interventions do not address gender as a cross
-
cutting issue



GRB serves to link government policies on gender equity to budget allocations,
output performance and to long
-
term outcomes



That gender equality must be addressed as a sector and as a cross
-
cutting issue



There is an emerging international recognition of the significance of gender
responsiveness for human development.



There are continuing differences among donors in support for gender equality



That experiences and roles of the majority of wom
en, e.g. care
-
giving is still not
acknowledged and reflected in economic policies (macro and micro)


THEREFORE RECOMMEND
S
:




In general an acceptance
of

the principles and intent of the Conclusions and
Recommendations contained in the Secretary General’s Re
port, but further that
the following additional issues be included in the final set of Conclusions and
Recommendations:

-

Financial resources for implementation of all the MDG’s and other
international and national level poverty reduction plans and strategie
s is
increased

-

Country Reports on the MDG’s must include reporting on gender equality
and the empowerment of women as a sector and as a cross cutting issue
in terms of all the MDG’s

-

Gender equality must be crafted into the five principles and into the
ind
icators of the Paris Declaration; and that decision
-
making in respect of
development aid and the monitoring and evaluation of the impact thereof
should include women at the highest levels.

-

Development aid must balance funding for “quick wins” and long
-
term

behavioral change which will lead to sustainable transformation.


32

-

Gender equality and the empowerment of women must be recognised as
fundamental to socio
-
economic development and a core pillar of all macro
and micro economic policies of all nation states;
and that women must be
involved in decision
-
making of economic policies

-

Expenditure tracking, resource allocation, administrative accountability,
inclusion of gender in performance contracts of senior managers, tabling
of budget statements on
g
ender as par
t of a main budget, linking of
budget and fiscal policies to CEDAW, other international commitments as
well as national socio
-
economic development plans, and the inclusion of
gender analysis into budget cycles must be included as fundamental
components of
the GRB mechanism in respect of its systems and
processes.

-

Gender budgeting is effected as an integral part of strategic and
operational planning processes, systems and outcomes.

-

There is an increase in financial support for gender budgeting training,
and
that gender budget training be compulsory for all middle and senior
officials in the public service of all nation states

-

That women’s work at household level, their unpaid work, their care work,
informal work and work done to produce goods for household ow
n
consumption is included in macro and micro economic framework of all
governments and forms an integral part of all countries GDP calculations

-

That the existing, albeit minor involvement of men in the care economy


alongside women, is acknowledged, encou
raged and supported by the
women’s movement and related organizations that work on issues of
gender equality and the empowerment of women



3.3
COUNTRY POSITION ON WOMEN IN ARMED CONFLICT


NOTING THAT:




There is an increased number of women playing a role
in managing and building
sustainable and lasting peace.



To date, the involvement of women in peace processes has not had an impact on
the lives of the women in the affected country


33



The special needs and cultural background of women when participating in
p
eace missions is still not adequately addressed



Most asylum seekers are women and children but the system does not respond
adequately to their needs



To achieve sustainable peace there needs to be full participation of women and
girls and the integration of

a gender perspective in building peace.



There is a need to create a conducive environment that encourages women to
participate in peace processes.



There is a need to provide institutional support, develop and implement
innovative strategies to encourage
women to participate at decision
-
making
levels.



The special needs of women when participating in peace mission is still not
adequately addressed



To achieve sustainable peace there needs to be a full participation of women and
girls and the integration of
a gender perspective in building peace



There is a need for a paradigm shift in integrating refugees in communities.



Women’s presence in peacekeeping missions improves access and support for
local
women;

it makes male peacekeepers more reflective and respon
sible.


THEREFORE RECOMMEND
S
:




Government’s promote and support increased involvement of women, at senior
levels, in peace
-
making processes e.g. negotiations



The role of women in peace missions must be designed to ensure that their
participation contribute
s to long term and sustainable positive impact on the lives
of women in the affected country, and that qualitative

indicators

that would
assess such impact be developed and implemented



Government’s develop more detailed strategies and allocate adequate res
ources
to make it possible for women to participate “comfortably” in all multidimensional
peacekeeping operations e.g. availability of sanitary pads, protection from gender
based violence and providing appropriate customised and generic training for
women,

based on UN tools



That the needs of refugees such as adjusting to cultural and socio
-
economic
conditions, clearly defining their legal status; extending social services to

34

refugees, integrating them into communities where this is a feasible option, are
ad
equately addressed and resourced by governments



That women are supported to fully participate in implementing development
activities and formal peace processes including conflict prevention and
resolution, post
-
conflict reconstruction, peacemaking, peaceke
eping and peace
-
building



That all peace agreements must fully and explicitly integrate gender perspectives
and be framed in gender neutral language



That capacity building especially for civil society in order to increase community
commitment to conflict pr
evention be supported



That gender advisory capacity and mandatory context
-
specific gender training
programmes be provided for all staff pre
-
deployment and in missions relating to
armed conflicts



That each mission should have an active strategy to prevent
and respond to the
problems of sexual abuse and exploitation.


3.4
COUNTRY POSITION
O
N

A GENDER PERSPECTIVE ON CLIMATE CHANGE


NOTING THAT:




addressing the challenges of tackling climate change and improving energy
security that face governments, industr
y and society as a whole requires a
coordinated response



there are gender differences in the impact of climate change, rooted in the
feminization of poverty, other gender inequalities, as well as men’s and women’s
gendered roles in society and in the divis
ion of labour



climate change fundamentally impacts on lives of women that work in the
Forestry Sector, those working with land issues, etc.



poorest people in the poorest countries are most negatively affected by climate
change



since rural women form a disp
roportionate share of the poor in developing
countries and communities that are highly dependent on local natural resources,
these women are disproportionately vulnerable to the effects of climate change


35



the effects of climate change affect men and women d
ifferently because of
gender differences in property rights, access to information and in cultural, social
and economic practices and roles



the effects of climate change on gender inequality can lead to changes in gender
relations.



spending more time on t
raditional reproductive tasks re
-
enforces traditional work
roles and works against a change in which women might begin to play other
roles.


THEREFORE RECOMMEND
S
:




That women are included at senior levels in decision
-
making on all climate
change and envir
onmental issues



That all governments commit to, and make available the necessary resources,
for building the technical capacity of women to engage on climate change and
environmental issues



That women are supported to play a pivotal role in the developing
and
implementing mitigation and adaptation responses and strategies to climate
change



That empirical, global and national studies on the gender
-
differentiated impacts
of
c
limate
c
hange with a focus on gender differences in capabilities to cope with
c
limate

c
hange adaptation and mitigation be undertaken




36

PART 4
:
ANNEXURE

Annexure
1:

Programme


NATIONAL CONSULTATIVE WORKSHOP

In preparation for


THE 52
ND

SESSION OF THE UNITED NATIONS COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN (UN CSW)


31 JANUARY
-

01
FEBRUARY 2008

PREMIER HOTEL















DAY 1: 31 JANUARY 2008

“FINANCING FOR GENDER EQUALITY AND THE EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN.”

08.00
-
08.30

Registration


08.30
-
08.45

Welcoming Remark
s and
Back Ground to the 52
nd

session of the UN
CSW


Ms
Ranji Reddy
;
D
irector
,
OSW



08.45
-
09.00

Applying a Gender Lens to ODA and the Paris Declaration
.


Prof. Zuby Saloojee

09.00
-
09.30

Africa perspective on financing for Gender Equality

Ms Nomcebo Manzini, UNIFEM.


09.30


10.00

Gender Responsive budgeting

from aGEWE P
erspective

Ms Imelda Diouf ,Capacity Development Network


10.00


10.15

PLENARY: Comments, Questions and Discussion


10.15
-
10.30

TEA BREAK



10.30
-
11.10

Panel: South African perspective on Gender Responsive Budgeting



Gauteng Dept
-

Ms Lillian Mthembu, Ga
uteng Premier’s Office



CGE
-

Ms. Nomboniso Gasa:
Chairperson



SAWID
-

Ms Girlie Njoni

11.10
-
11.30

PLENARY: Comments, Questions and Discussions

11.30
-
12.00

Men and the Care Economy

Mr. Dean Peacock,

Sonke Gender justice







O
O
F
F
F
F
I
I
C
C
E
E


O
O
N
N


T
T
H
H
E
E


S
S
T
T
A
A
T
T
U
U
S
S


O
O
F
F


W
W
O
O
M
M
E
E
N
N




THE PRESIDENCY

Private Bag X1000, Pretoria, 0001,Tel 012 300 5490


37

12.00


13.00

GROUP DISCUSSIO
NS

13.00


14.00

LUNCH BREAK

14.00
-
15.00

Reports from groups

15.00
-
16.00

Plenary: Consolidating agreements for position paper.

16.00
-
16.30

Closing remarks
-

summary of agreements



DAY 2: 01 FEBRUARY 2008

SESSION 1


“WOMEN AND ARMED CONFLICT”

08.30
-
09.00

Gender Mainstreaming in peace keeping missions

Ms Ruby Marks, Department of Foreign Affairs.


09.00
-
09.15

Practical experience of SA Peace Keeping in Darfur

Ms. Palesa Oliphant : SAPS



09.15
-
09.30

Women Refugee Dialogue

MS. Themba Kgasi:

Department of Home Affairs


09.30
-

10.00

Group Work :
Review of the 48
th

session agreed conclusion on Women
and Armed Conflict


10.00
-
10.30

FEEDBACK FROM GROUPS

10.30
-
11.00

TEA BREAK

SESSION 2

“GENDER PERSPECTIVE ON CLIMATE CHANGE”


11.00
-
11.15

G
ender and Sustainable Development

Ms. Khamarunga Banda (Energia) and

Ms. Nchedi Maphokga:
Department
of Minerals and Energy

11.15
-
11.45

Gender perspective on climate change

Ms. Peggy Khumalo:
Department of Water Affairs and Forestry

Mr. Vicyor Loate:
Environmental Affairs and Tourism

11.45
-
12.30

Plenary: Consolidating agreements for position paper.

12.30


13.00

Closing Remarks

LUNCH







38

Annexure 2:

S
outh African proposals to the UN Secretary
-
General’s Conclusions and

Recommendations on Financi
ng for Gender Equality and Empowerment of
Women




PLEASE NOTE: The proposed amendments are in
CAPITAL LETTERS

BOLD AND UNDERLINED
.




83.

The global commitments on gender equality and the empowerment of women at
national level have yet to be fully
UNDERSTOOD
, COMMUNICATED

& implemented.
Unless financial resource are mobilized across all sectors, through both domestic and
international channels, progress towards gender equality and the empowerment of
women will remain slow.


84.

Sound and equitable public finance
management can ensure increased
PRO
-
POOR

resource allocation to meet gender equality commitments. Recent shifts towards result
-
based budgeting provide opportunities for mainstreaming gender perspective in public
finance,
IN PARTICULAR (to replace the
word
including)

through gender
-
responsive
budgeting.


85.

Gender
-
responsive budget initiatives have been implemented by
SOME (to replace the
words a large number) of Member States. Many initiatives have not, however, been
adequately linked to overall public finan
ce management or moved beyond analysis of
expenditures. Greater efforts are needed to identify gender perspective in relation to
revenue.


86.

Gender equality
SHOULD BE (to replace the words is not yet seen as)

a central goal
in all national
-
level economic po
licies, plans and programmes, which
WILL

result in
INCREASED (to replace the word limited)

coherence between policy commitments on
gender equality and resources allocations.


87.

The failure to assess the costs of, and secure resources for, implementation of g
ender
equality policies, strategies and plans,
IN PARTICULAR (to replace the word
including)

the gender mainstreaming strategy, constrains the achievement of gender
equality and empowerment of women.


88.

National mechanisms for the advancement of women need s
ignificantly increased
resources to advocate for, support and monitor the incorporation of gender perspectives
in all policy areas and the implementation of gender equality plans and programmes.
The critical role of women’s organizations in promoting accou
ntability for and monitoring
implementation of commitments on gender equality at national level must also be
supported through increased
RESOURCES AND

funding.


89.

Sex
-
disaggregated data and gender
-
sensitive indicators
SHALL (to replace the words
are needed

to)

ensure the effective monitoring and evaluation of all national plans,
policies and programmes from a gender perspective



90.

The Commission on the Status of Women may wish to call on Governments, the United
Nations system, the Bretton Woods institutions,

international and regional organisations,
non
-
governmental organisations, civil society, private sector and other relevant actors
to:


39


(a)

Develop methodologies and tools to systematically incorporate a gender
perspective into results
-
based public financ
e management systems, including
through
GENDER
-
BASED

analysis
AND TRACKING

of both revenues and
expenditures, and ensure that tools developed to monitor and evaluate public
finance management systems incorporate a gender perspective


(b)


Allocate
SUFFICI
ENT
resources to build capacity for gender mainstreaming
within finance and other line ministries, national machineries, parliaments
AND
THE PRIVATE SECTOR
, and among other stakeholders, to ensure that
domestic resource mobilisation and allocation are carr
ied out in a gender
-
sensitive manner


(c)

Ensure that gender equality is prioritised as a central goal in the design,
implementation, monitoring and evaluation of all national economic policies,
strategies and plans, across all
OTHER

policy areas,
IN PAR
TICULAR

(to
replace the word including) in national development strategies and poverty
reduction strategies, and
ENSURE (to replace the word encourage)

the active
participation of national mechanisms for the advancement of women, women’s
organisations
AND
ALL GROUPS MARGINALI
ZED ON THE BASIS OF
SEXUALITY
, in the design and development of such policies, strategies and
plans

(d)

ALL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE NEEDS TO BE GENDER RESPONSIVE
AND (to replace the word increase)

the share of development assistance
sp
ecifically targeting gender equality and women’s empowerment
SHOULD BE
50%
, building on existing mechanisms, strengthen ways and means to effectively
assess the resources allocated to incorporating gender perspective in all areas of
development assistance.

DEVELOPMENT ASSISATNCE MUST NOT BE
CONTRARY TO NATIONAL PRIORITIES


(e)

Cost and fully resource national gender equality policies, strategies and plans,
including gender mainstreaming strategy, and ensure that they are incorporated
into overall national
development strategies and reflected in relevant sector plans
and budgets


(f)

Strengthen the mandates
AND AUTHORITIES
of national machineries for the
advancement of women, and ensure that they are adequately resourced
AND
HAVE THE NECESSARY POWERS

to car
ry out their critical mandates in
advocating for, supporting and monitoring the incorporation of gender
perspectives in all policy areas and the implementation of gender equality plans
and programmes


(g)

Identify and address the challenges that women’s
A
ND GENDER EQUALITY
organisations face in securing adequate and sustained funding for their activities
at national level


91.

The Commission
MUST (to replace the words may wish to)

encourage the Committee
on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women to:


(a)

Invite State parties to include information in their reports on resources allocate to
gender equality and women’s empowerment


(b)

Ensure that the Committee’s lists of issues and questions prepared as an input into
the consideration of reports of States parti
es include the explicit request for
information on resources allocated to gender equality and women’s empowerment
at all levels


40


Annexure 3:

Agreed Conclusions of the CSW on Women’s Equal Participation in
Conflict Prevention, Management and Resolution and

in Post
-
Conflict
Peace
-
Building (2004/12)


The Economic and social Council,


Endorses the following agreed conclusions adopted by the Commission on the Status of Women
at its forty
-

eight session with respect to women’s equal participation in conflict p
revention,
management, and resolution and post


conflict peace


building:


1. The Commission on the Status of Women recalls and re


iterate the strategic objectives and
actions of the Beijing Declaration and Platform of Action , the outcome document of
the twenty


third special session of the General assembly , entitled “Gender Equality”, development and
peace for the twenty


first century , and its agreed conclusions on women and armed conflict
adopted at its forty


second session in 1998. It also ca
lls recalls the Convention on the
Elimination of all forms Discriminations against Women, Security Council resolutions of the
General Assembly, including resolution 2325(2000) on women, peace and security and all
relevant resolutions of the General Assembl
y, including resolution 58/142 of 22 December 2003
on women and political participation


2. The Commission calls for the full respect o the International human rights law and international
humanitarian law, including the four Geneva Conventions of 1949, i
n particular the fourth Geneva
Convention relative to the Protection of Civilians Persons in Time of War


3. The Commission calls for the promotion and protection of the full enjoyment of human rights
and fundamental freedoms by women and girls at all time
s, including during conflict prevention,
conflict management and conflict resolution and in post


conflict peace


building. It further calls
for protection and security for women and girls under threat of violence and their freedom of
movement and partic
ipation in social, political and economic activities


4. The Commission recognizes that the root causes of armed conflict are multi
-

dimensional in
nature and thus require a comprehensive and integrated approach to the prevention of armed
conflict.


5. Int
ernational cooperation based on the principles of Charter of the United Nations enhances
women’s full participation in conflict prevention, conflict management and conflict resolution and
in post


conflict peace building an contributes to the promotion of

sustainable and durable peace


6. To achieve sustainable and durable peace, the full and equal participation of women and girls
and the integration of gender perspectives in all aspects of conflict prevention, management and
resolution and in post


conf
lict peace


building is essential. Yet women continue to be
underrepresented in the process, institutions and mechanisms dealing with these areas. Further
effort, is therefore needed to promote gender equality and ensure women’s groups to participate
at a
ll levels of decision


making in all relevant institutions. Further effort, including consideration
of adequate resourcing, is also needed to build and consolidate the capacity of women and
women’s groups to participate fully in these processes, as well a
s to promote understanding of
essential role of women. In this regard, the international community should use lessons learned
from the actual experience to identify and overcome barriers to women’s participation.


7 The Commission recognizes that while bot
h men and women suffer from consequences of
armed conflict, there is a differential impact on women and girls, who are often subject to, and
affected by, particular forms of violence and deprivation. The Commission calls for measures to
prevent gender


ba
sed violence, including sexual violence against women and girls, as well as
trafficking in human beings, especially trafficking in women and girls, arising from armed conflict
and post conflict situations and to prosecute perpetrators of such crimes.


41


8. t
he Commission encourages the collection and dissemination of sex


disaggregated data and
information for planning , evaluation and analysis in order to promote the mainstreaming of
gender perspective into conflict prevention, management and resolution a
nd in post


conflict
peace


building


9. Peace agreements provide a vehicle for the promotion of gender equality and participation of
women in post


conflict situations. Significant opportunities for women participation arise in
preparatory phase leadi
ng up to a peace agreement. The content of peace agreement likewise
offers significant scope for ensuring that the rights, concerns and priorities of women and girls are
fully addressed. Finally, once more a peace agreement has been concluded, its implemen
tation
should be pursued with explicit attention to women’s full and equal participation and the goal of
gender equality.


10. Women’s full and participation and integration of gender perspective are crucial to t
democratic electoral processes in post


co
nflict situations. A Gender constitutional and legal
framework, especially electoral laws and regulations, is necessary to ensure that women can fully
participate in such processes. Political parties can play a crucial role in promoting women’s equal
parti
cipation. Steps are also necessary to ensure that women participate fully in, and that a
gender perspective is incorporated throughout, the design and implementation of voter and civic
education programmes and in election and administration and observation
.


11. Governments in particular , as well as the United Nation Systems, especially those united
nations entities having a mandate with regard to peace and security ,and other relevant
international, regional and national actors ,including civil society, h
ave the responsibility of
advancing gender equality and ensuring women’s full and equal participation in all aspects of
peace processes and in post

conflict peace building ,reconstruction, rehabilitation and
reconciliation, where they are participants in
these processes .


12. In regard to conflict prevention, the commission on the Status of Women calls on
governments, as well as other relevant participants in these processes:


a)

To improve the collection, analysis and inclusion of information on women and g
ender
issues as part of conflict prevention and early warning efforts;


b)

To ensure better collaboration and coordination between efforts to promote gender
equality and efforts aimed at conflict prevention;


c)

To support capacity building, especially for civil

society, in particular for women’s
organization, in order to increase community commitment to conflict prevention;


d)

To continue to make resources a available nationally and internationally for the
prevention of conflict and ensure women’s participation in

the elaboration and
implementation of strategies for preventing conflict.


1.3 In regard to peace processes, the Commission on the Status of Women calls on
Governments, as well as all other relevant participants in these processes


a)

To promote women’s full
, equal and effective participation as actors in all peace
processes, in particular negotiation, mediation and facilitation;


b)

To ensure that peace agreements address, from a gender perspective the full range
of security aspects, including legal, political,

social, economic and physical, and also
address the specific needs and priorities of women and girls;



42

c)

To ensure, in the implementation phase of peace agreement, that all provisions
concerning gender equality and the participation of women are fully com
piled with
and all provisions of the peace agreement, including those concerning demobilization
disarmament, reintegration and rehabilitation, are implemented in a manner that
promotes gender equality and ensures women’s full and equal participation;


d)

To p
romote women’s full and equal access to public information release to peace
processes;


e)

To review, on a regular basis, their contributions to the promotion of gender equality
and the full and equal participation of women, and to fulfill their monitoring,
a
ccountability and reporting obligations in the implementation of peace agreements;


f)

With regard to gender mainstreaming, to ensure and support the full participation of
women at all levels of decision

making and implementation in development activities
an
d peace processes, including conflict prevention and resolution, post
-
conflict
reconstruction, peace
-
making, peacekeeping and peace
-
building and, in this regard,
support the involvement of women’s organizations, community
-
based organizations
and non
-
govern
mental organizations;


g)

To develop and strengthen the provision of gender advisory capacity and gender
sensitive training programmes for all staff in missions relating to armed and conflicts.


In this regard, the Commission takes note of the report of the S
ecretary General.
83


14. In regard to post
-
conflict peace
-
building, the Commission the Status of Women calls on
Governments, as well as all other relevant participants in these processes,


Concerning elections:


a)

To ensure equal access of women in all stag
es of the electoral process and to
consider the adoption of measures for increasing women’s participation I
elections through, inter alia, individual voter registration, temporary gender
-
specific positive actions and access to information, representation o

bodies
administering elections and as election monitors and observers, as well as
encouraging political parties to involve women fully and equally in all aspects of
their operations;


b)

To ensure equal access for women to voter and civic education, to provi
de
women candidates with full support, training and financial resources and to
eliminate discriminatory practices hampering women’s participation either as
voters or candidates.



Concerning reconstruction and rehabilitation:


a)

To ensure the full participat
ion of women on an equal basis in the reconstruction
and rehabilitation process;


b)

To ensure the equal access of women to social services, in particular in the
areas of health and education, and, in this regard, to promote the provision of
adequate health c
are and health services, assistance for women and girls in
conflict and post
-
conflict situations and counseling for post
-
conflict trauma;




43

c)

To facilitate equal employment opportunities for women to achieve economic
empowerment.



15. The realization and th
e achievement of the goals of gender equality, development and peace
needs to be supported by the allocation of these necessary human, financial and material
resources for specific and targeted activities to ensure gender equality at the local, national,
r
egional and international levels, as well as by enhanced and increased international cooperation.


16. The Commission on the Status of Women requests the Secretary General to disseminate the
present agreed conclusions widely, including to the high
-
level pa
nel on global security threats and
reform of the international system.





































44

Annexure 4
:

List of Participants

at

the National consultative workshop

-

31
st

January



1
st

February 2008



1.

The Presidency


1.1 Ms.
Ranji

Reddy


:

O
SW

1.2 Ms. Linda Hlaisi


:

OSW

1.3 Ms. Pheladi Bopape


:

OSW

1.4 Mr. Godfr
ey Nematemba

:

OSW

1.5
Ms. Busisiwe Ndungane

:

OSW

1.6 Ms. Julia Masekela


:

Chief Directorate: GDC

1.7 Ms. Joanna Dorasamy

:

OSDP


2.

Commission on Gender Equality


2.1
Ms. Nomboniso G
asa

:

Acting Chairperson

2.2 Mr. Lefa Mallane


:

Commissioner

2.3 Dr. Maretha de Waal

:

Head of Research Unit


3.

National Departments



3.1 Ms. Noluthando Mtoto

:

Dept. of Agriculture

3.2 Ms. Sindiwa Nzama


:

Ministry of Land Affairs and Agriculture

3.3 Ms.

Zodwa Mashonga

:

Ministry of Land Affairs and Agriculture

3.4 Ms. Petronella Linders

:

Dept. of Communications

3.5 Ms. Dorothy Makhuza

:

Dept. of Correctional Services

3.6 Maj. Gen. N. Motumi

:

Dept. of Defence

3.7 Brig. Laura L V Vuuren

:

Dept. of Defen
ce

3.8 Mr. Victor Loate


:

Dept. of Environmental Affairs & Tourism

3.9 Ms. Sellinah Kungwane

:

Dept. of Environmental Affairs & Tourism

3.10 Mr. Eli Bitzer


:

Dept. of Foreign Affairs


3.11
Ms. Louise Graham


:

Dept. of Foreign Affairs


3.12 Ms. Rub Marks


:

Dept. of Foreign Affairs


3.13 Mr. Mandixole Matroos

:

Dept. of Foreign Affairs


3.14 Ms. Gloria Ncwana


:

Dept. of Foreign Affairs


3.15 Mr. Mzoliswa Bona


:

Dept. of Foreign Affairs


3.16 Ms. Themba Kgasi


:

Dept. of Home Affairs


3.17 Mr. Richard Si
kakane

:

Dept of Home Affairs


45


3.18 Ms. Maureen Smit


:

Independent Complaints Directorate


3.19 Ms. Joyce Maluleke

:

Dept. of Justice & Constitutional Development


3.20 Ms. Tshepiso Moeti

:

Dept of Labour


3.21 Ms. Sarah Manthata

:

Dept. of Land Affairs


3.22 Ms. Nchedi Maphokga

:

Dept of Minerals and Energy


3.23 Ms. Rosalia Mohlabi

:

National Intelligence Agency


3.2
4

Ms. Zandarine Theron

:

Dept. of Public Enterprises


3.25

Ms. Rhulani Makhubela

:

Dept. of Public Service & Administration


3.26

Ms. Colett
e Clark


:

Dept. of Public Service & Administration


3.27

Dr. Bunny Subedar


:

SAMDI


3.28

Ms.
Palesa
Oliphant

:

SAPS


3.29

Ms. Liezel Fouche


:

SAPS


3.30

Capt. Borman


:

SAPS (Headquarters)


3.31

Ms. Sizakele Shongwe

:

Dept. of Social Development


3.32

Ms. Kanyane Mohlala

:

Dept. of Sports and Recreation


3.33

Ms. Thabi Mtshali


:

Dept. of Trade & Industry


3.34

Ms. Ntsiki Magazi


:

Dept. of Water Affairs & Forestry


3.35

Ms. Peggy Khumalo

:

Dept. of Water Affairs & Forestry


4.

Provincial OSWs


4.1 Ms. Zuk
elwa Mlakalaka

:

Eastern Cape

4.2 Ms. Debbie Lesshope

:

Free State

4.3 Ms. Lillian Mthembu


:

Gauteng Premier’s Office

4.4 Dr. Queeneth M.Castiano

:

Kwa
-
Zulu Natal

4.5 Ms. Jane Manugu


:

Limpopo

4.6 Ms. Lindi Ntuli
-
Tloubatla

:

Mpumalanga

4.7 Ms. Regina Mol
eko


:

Northern Cape

4.8 Ms. Monica Makaula

:

Western Cape


5.

Provincial Legislatures


5.1
Ms. Hope Malgas


:

Eastern Cape

5.2 Ms. Bonisile Nesi


:

Eastern Cape

5.3 Ms. Bongiswa Skeyi


:

Eastern Cape

5.4 Ms. Gloria Swaartbooi

:

Kwa
-
Zulu Natal



46

6.

Institutions,
Civil Society and NGOs


6.1 Ms. Brenda Madumise

:

Black Women Lawyer’s Association

6.2 Ms. Tamara Braam


:

Canadian High Commission

6.3 Ms. Imelda Diouf


:

Capacity Network Development

6.4 Prof. Zuby Saloojee


:

Independent Researcher

6.5 Ms. Safoora Sadek


:

Diabalwa Professional Services

6.6 Ms. Kedibone Seutloadi

:

Diabalwa Professional Services

6.7 Ms. Khamarunga Banda

:

Energia/NAFU

6.8 Ms. Marilyn Setlalentoa

:

Energia/NAFU

6.9 Ms. Zethu Cakata


:

Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC)

6.10 Mr. Mbuyes
elo Botha

:

Men’s Forum

6.11
Ms. Carrie Shelver


:

POWA

6.12 Ms. Delphine Serumaga

:

POWA

6.13 Ms. Girlie Njoni


:

SAWID

6.14 Ms. Mandisa Tsotsi

:

SAWID

6.15 Mr. Dean Peacock


:

Sonke Gender Justice

6.16 Rev. Bafana Khumalo

:

Sonke Gender Justice

6.17 Ms.
Nomcebo Manzini

:

UNIFEM

6.18 Ms. Nomtuse Mbere

:

Independent Consultant



7.

Apologies

Received


7.1 Ms. Storey Morutoa


:

Chairperson


Joint Monitoring Committee on

Improvement to the Quality of Life and Status of
Women, National Parliament


7.2 Ms. Mbang
i Dzi
vhani

:

Chief Director
-
Programmes, The Presidency