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1


EDEL 2300
-
002

SCHOOLS, SOCIETY, AND DIVERSITY

SPRING 2008



Instructor: Jan Lupton Office hours:


TT: 8;30
-
9:30



12:30
-
1:30


MWF: 8
-
9


11
-
12

E
-
mail:
Ja
nice.lupton@ttu.edu









IFLYRF@aol.com











Phone: 742:1997 x 228

Office: 204

Home phone: 87
3:3328



COURSE DESCRIPTION: Historical, philosophical, sociological, and
ideologic foundations of education: Purposes and roles of schools in a
pluralistic society. Contemporary issues and reform trends in American
public schools.


COURSE CREDIT, FREQU
ENCY, AND DESIGNATION

This course is taught during the fall, spring, and summer semesters. It is
a three
-
semester hour course in general education that can satisfy the
university’s requirement for three hours in individual or group behavior
study.

Thi
s cl
ass is scheduled to meet

for 1 hour and 2
0 minute
s

TT


COURSE PURPOSE:

EDEL

2300 provides teacher candidates with multiple opportunities to
examine personal dispositions, acquire a knowledge base of the diversity
factors influencing the teaching
-
learning p
rocess, and develop pedagogical
culturally inclusive decisions in classrooms.



A GOOD EXERCISE FOR THE HEART IS TO BEND DOWN AND HELP
ANOTHER UP.

**********************
*******************************


2



RELATIONSHIP TO THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK:


The essenc
e of the conceptual framework is captured by the theme
-
Professional Educators Opening Doors to the Future.

This is considered in
two ways. First, the TTU faculty, as professional educators model
dispositions, share knowledge, and develop skills with teach
er candidates
enabling them to open doors to their future. In turn, teacher candida
tes,
as professional ed
ucators, model dispositions, share knowledge, and develop
skills as they respond and interact with their students allowing them to
open doors to thei
r futures.
The dispositions, knowledge base,

and

skills
teacher candid
a
tes acquire and develop in
EDEL
/EDSE

2300 are
demonstrated through their learning outcomes measured by university
classroom course experiences, activities, assignments, and assessments.

These are also consistent with State of Texas and national standards.


Second, course work in
EDEL
/EDSE

2300, guided by the concept of
“opening doors”, metaphorically, prepares culturally competent teachers who
(a)

successfully teach in a culturally dive
rse, pluralistic, democratic, and
global society and (b) participate in creating an equitable future where
everyone is given access to schooling opportunities in an environment where
their culture, knowledge, and skills are respected and valued.

In

EDEL

23
00, acquiring a knowledge base of culturally comfortable classroom
context, and learning multiple strategies to teach and assess culturally,
economically, ethnically, racially diverse students is central. Diversity
factors such as race, ethnicity, culture
, socio
-
economic status, gender,
ability, sexual orientation, and religious differences as they relate to
schooling concerns are addressed throughout the course. The development
of technological skills and understanding how to use technological resources
in

a

diverse setting are also critical to the course cont
ent in
EDEL
/EDSE

2300.










3

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES AND ASSESSMENTS OF


OUTCOMES

STUDENT LEARNING


OUTCOMES


ASSESSMENTS


By the completion of this course,
st
udents will:

Students will be assessed by one or
more of the following documents or
activities. Students will:

Acquire and respond to information
from various sources regarding issues
of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic
status, gender, exceptionality, and
equality in education.

Students w
ill participate in
a
presentation

regarding diversity in
education. Class discussion, defining
these words and reflecting up
on

their
prejudices.

Reflect and analyze the problems
concerning the role of public schools
and t
heir obligation to meet the
needs of all cultures and
socioeconomic groups.

Through the use of technology and
the class text, prepare material for
class debate regarding issues in the
public schools. Construct solutions.

Take part in discussions concerni
ng
other contemporary issues and the
impact on the role of teachers and
the education field

Write reflection papers analyzing
current material regarding
contemporary issues in education.
Present to class as a group discussion
tying with class text.

Resea
rch/investigate current
material regarding issues of diversity
in education; issues such as
homelessness, poverty, abuse,
foster families, bullying.

Students will consider and discuss
issues covered in our class as well as
issues of concern to them so th
at
they might be able
to not only open
the doors to

their future, but their
students as well.

Develop awareness of school law,
liabilities, morals, and ethics of
schools and personnel.

Students will take part in class
discussion concerning school law,
lia
bilities, morals, and ethics of
schools. They will become aware of
information as presented by a
speaker of school law

if available.









4

REQUIRED TEXT:

Sadker, M.P., & Sadker, D.M.
Teachers, Schools, and Society.

(8
th

Edition) NY: McGraw Hill.

Sugges
ted: Pocket folder to keep class papers, grades, attendance,
handouts
, class outline for reference


RECOMMENDED and ordered for this class:

Payne, Ruby K. (1996)
A Framework for Understanding Poverty
.

Aha! Process Inc. Highlands, Texas


Pelzer, Dave (1995
),
A Child Called It.

Health Communications,
Inc. Deerfield Beach, Florida


Pelzer, Dave (1997)
The Lost
Boy
. Health Communications,

Inc. Deerfield Beach, Florida


*********************************************

STRIVE FOR HONOR, EVERMORE; INTEGRITY


CODE O
F ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:

Integrity is expected of every student in all academic work. The guiding
principle of academic integrity is that a student’s submitted work must

be

the student’s own. Conduct prohibited by the code consists of all forms of
academic d
ishonesty
.


CIVILITY IN OUR CLASSROOM:

Students are expected to assist in maintaining a classroom environment
which is conducive to learning. In order to assure that all students have
the opportunity to gain from time
spent in class,
students are prohibit
ed
from engaging in any form of distractions. Inappropriate behavior in the
classroom shall result, minimally,

in a request to leave class
:




**

This includes turning off and putting away cell phones

or other devices

as well as newspapers or other class

assignments

**







5

OBJECTIVES OF COURSE:

*Analyze the sociocultural and ideological perspectives that shape the
democratic ideology of American Education
.

* Explore issues of diversity related to race, ethnicity, socioeconomic
status, gender, exceptional
ity, and equality in education.

*Understand the implications of an increasingly pluralistic society on the
role of public schools and their obligation to meet the needs of all cultures
and socioeconomic groups.

*Understand the dimensions of multicultural
education and explore
multicultural influences on school curricula, school climate, student learning,
and teaching practices.

*Explore other contemporary issues that impact the role of teachers and
the educational field.

*Engage in informed discussions and

investigate current research literature
in issues of diversity in elementary education.


STUDENT EXPECTATIONS
:

We are learning to be professionals.
I will begin class on time and

I expect
you to be on time to class each day. I also expect you to have rea
d the
assignment and be able to participate in the class discussion and activities
because you have read
and
are familiar with the information.

Being late and
uninformed is disrespectful of your fellow students as well as your
professor.


Professionals, wh
ich you are learning to be, should always be prepared and
organized for class. Class participation will be graded on the basis of text
material and research as well as your opinions and your experiences. The
class outline is tentative
.
In order to know wha
t will be done and what is
expected it is important that you be in class.




Those who educate children well are more to be honored than parents; for
these only gave life, those the art of living well.

~Aristotle (384 BC
-
322 BC)

***************************
**********************





6


Students are held responsible for correct grammar and spelling of all
assignments turned in for evaluation. Professional
s

use correct grammar
and spell correctly.
Learn to spell or look up words you do not know how to
spell, suc
h as “separate, principal, curriculum, their, there, they’re etc.

Spell check will not correct these mistakes

Do not turn in any papers with
typographical errors, misspelled words, or crossed out words. Be neat.
Edit your work. They must be typed in a n
eat format unless it is class
work, and then it must be in ink. Points will be taken from grade for
misspelled words

or incorrect grammar.

Y
o
ur work represents who you are.

Edit all visuals, handouts, etc. which will be used for presentation.

Misspelled
words will not be tolerated.



If you have continued problems with writing, grammar, etc., please find
help at the Writing Center in the English Philosophy building.



All assignments are due on time. Late work will be penalized one point for
each day late

including weekends and will not be accepted one week after
due date.
*
Work due o
n a Tuesday, for example, will
not

be taken on the
next Tuesday which would be a week later.

Missed exams or presentations
can only be made up if you have documentation (i.e.,

physician’s note,
Athletic Dept. letter, etc.) Missed exams may not be made up after a
week has passed. Contact

me immediately upon missing an

assignment or
exam.


****Sharing books with o
thers is not recommended. S
ome students read and
study differently
and your sharing with them may cause another student a
problem without your knowing it. Please bring your own book to class.
Bringing your book to class is considered an important part of class
participation. *******


Follow all guidelines/directions for
completing assignments and activities.
Listen carefully for instructions. If you do not understand, as
k

questions.







7

Any student who, because of a disability, may require some special
arrangements in order to meet course requirements should contact me

At 742
-
1997x228 or by e
-
mail:
Janice.lupton@ttu.edu

as soon as possible
to request necessary accommodations. Students should prese
nt appropriate
verification from

Student Disability Service (Access TECH). No
requirement exists that accommodations be made prior to completion of this
approved university process.


ASSESSMENT:

1.

Three

exams will be administered. Each exam will be graded on a
scale
:
100
-
90
-
A; 89
-
80
-
B; 79
-
70
-
C; 69
-
60
-
D; 60
-
below
-
F


EXAMS COUNT AS TWO

GRADES




PROJECT; Grade counts twice as an exam



**
THE FINAL IS EXAM 3
**


2.

Class participation. Some classes will involve a class participation

activity. These activities will be based on the reading for the day.
They will be small and

large group discussions. Researched
information will be presented and discussed with the class. You will
be expected to know the material and participate in the activity
fully.


Class participation grades:

Check++


exceeded expectations
-
100

Check+



expected participation
-

95

Check

minimum work

-
7
5

Check


-


no interest shown


-

0


This will be a class participation grade which counts once. This
grade cannot be made up if you are absent, therefore, it will be a
0. All partici
pation or lack of participation will be considered at the
time of your final grade.




3.

Reflections of readings :

Reflection one= 50 points; reflection two= 50 points=100 points


8






METHODS:


Instructional methods will include lectures
, small and large group
discussion, examinations, student presentations, small and large group work
and individual student contribution into the class discussion
.



DO NOT ASK FOR YOU
R

AVERAGE DURING THE SEMESTER. KEEP UP
WITH YOUR GRADES AND ATTENDANCE I
N YOUR CLASS FOLDER.
STUDY FOR EACH EXAM AND BE PREPARED FOR CLASS

SO THAT YOU
WILL RECEIVE THE GRADE YOU WANT FROM THIS CLASS.




ATTENDANCE POLICY
:

Attendance and participation are critical in your profession. It is assumed
that your course
-
related perf
ormances would be an accurate indicator of
interest in your profession. It is therefore imperative that you be
present, on time, with your textbook and any necessary materials, and
involved in every aspect of this class. Attendance will be taken at every

class. It is your responsibility to make sure your name is on the list. If
your name isn’t on the list, you aren’t here. A grade for attendance will be
recorded and thus will be a part of your final grade for the course. Late
attendance will also be c
onsidered
in your grade.

If you must be absent,
be aware of the class out
l
ine for assignments due upon your return. Since
the class outline is tentative, it is a good idea to call a clas
s member to
make sure the assig
nment is correct.

Please don’t plan t
o pick someone up
at the airport etc. and expect an early release from class. It is very
distracting when students leave class early.


Our class is made up of families which will form our classroom community.
Please exchange correct e
-
mail and telephone
numbers with your family.
Your family will have any handouts you may have missed. Contact your
family for any information you missed because of your absence.



The greatest thing in life is to trust and be trusted

****************************************
********************




9


Mandatory attendance days: 1 absence=2 absences

Mandatory days are those when we have a speaker or a group is presenting
a project.


0
-
2 absences 100

3
-
4 absences 80

5
-
6 absences 60

7 or more 0


If you must be absent

please e
-
mail me.

I keep the lists you sign for attendance, if there is a question I will look
for your name. If it isn’t there, you were not in class.



OVERALL AS
S
ESSMENT FOR THE CLASS

Tests count twice
-
you will not need scantrons nor blue books

Class
participation projects within class counts once

Daily grades count once

Attendance counts once

Reflections count once




FINAL WORD: THE INSTRUCTOR RESERVES THE RIGHT TO AMEND
THIS COURSE OUTLINE ANY TIME DURING THE SEMESTER. IN
ORDER TO AVOID STUDENT DIS
APPOINTMENT, IT IS THE
RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT TO CLARIFY ANY ISSUES WITH
THE INSTRUCTOR PRIOR TO GRADING.







If you are going to talk the talk, you have to walk the walk





10


TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

I very much intend for this class to be learner
-
centered, teacher
-
directed. This schedule may change due to your needs.




January 10

Orientation/Expectations/class outline. Who are you?





Who am I? What is my philosophy of this class? What do I






want for you? Ch.

1
: “ Becoming a Teacher”

What is a





professional? Why bother? Why become a teacher?






15


“ Stand and Deliver” Questions on board to guide viewing.






*Assigned readin
g: Who is Jaime Escalante? Pg 26






Was he an effective teacher? How did he deal with





d
iversity?



Please take notes for discussion and exam.



17

Continue video and class discussion





*Assigned reading:
Ch.

8
:
“Philosop
hy of Education” take the








survey

pp. 317
-
31
9. What is yo
ur philosophy of


education?





Will your philosophy change as we proceed through






the semester?

Why is this your philosophy?



22



Cha
pter 11, “Teacher Effectiveness” pp. 428
-
462






What makes a teacher effective? Who was your most







e
ffective teacher and why?

Most ineffective? Why?






*Assigned reading: Ch.

11 pp.428
-
462







*

Class activity
*




24



Continue Chapter 11






*

Class activity

*


29

Ch. 11 continued



Cultural plunge activity assignment for next class. Take notes to


hand in and share with class.




11


* Visit a store, a laundromat, barber sh
op
,
or beauty shop etc. in a
neighborhood unfamiliar to you and observe your reactions to various

diversities. Record your thoughts, actions, body language, regarding these
people. Is it ok? Are they looking at you and thinking you are the weird
one? W
here do our prejudices come from? Are you prejudiced? Is that
fair? Write a paragraph describing this experience and turn in.



31

Ch

3

“Culturally Responsive Teaching” Pg. 67
-
86





Pg. 87
-
104


Discuss and turn in cultura
l plunge assignment


February 5

Ch

3 continued


Pg. 87
-
104



7

C
h

2 “Different Ways of Learning

Pg. 33
-
49



12

Ch.2 continued


Pg. 49
-
62


Review Exam I



14

Happy Va
lentine’s Day



Exam I




19 Ch. 4 “Schools: Choices and Challenges


Pg. 126
-
141



21

Ch. 4 continued: Choices


Pg. 141
-
155


What do you know about these choices
? What can you

find out on the internet to help us better understand the
choices so we can make wise decisions.


26
Ch. 4 What makes a school effective?

Pg. 157
-
165

Homework: Pro or Con

Uniforms: Pro or Con

*
Bring articles in so you can give educa
ted information.


12

We will use
the articles in class to make your arguments.

* Projects assigned


28

LRC Orientation and group planning

Education building; 2
nd

floor 253



March 4

Ch. 5 “Student Life in School and at Home


Pg. 169
-
184



6

Ch. 5 “

The Adolescent Society and Meeting Affective


Needs
” Pg. 184
-
190,201
-
204


Class disc
ussion of chosen article

tied into Sadker, Ch.
5






How does your chosen reading reflect the text? Be


a
ble t
o discuss the text material tied into the reading.


*Assigned reading text and reflection one article
-
turned



in after class discussion







First reflecti
on due:




Relate important points of article to Sadker. Cite





Sadker making a tie
-
into any textbook material covered


to date.




M
inimum 2
full
pages, double
-
spaced,

EDITED





Format:


Read arti
cle. Discuss the article and

A.

Discuss
at le
ast three
important points you read which
make a
teacher or a school effective.




B.
What were many

points Sadker discussed in



Chapter Five

which agreed with this article?



C. What
was
your impr
ession of this article
?


D. Are there some
ideas you could use as you teach or


lead people?





11

Exam II

and opportunity to meet with your family for

for project planning














13



Study Day


25




Ch. 6, “Curriculum, Standards, and Testing”


13


Pg. 210
-
225, 228
-
244, 248
-
251


What are the definitions of the various curri
culums


i
ncluding The
Saber tooth

Curriculum


What is your
educated

opinion regarding standardized


Testing and No Child Left Behind? Utilize technology


t
o balance the materi
al in the text. You will be graded


o
n the material you bring to class. You must discuss


i
ntelligently based on information you find. What are


t
he most recent developments concerning TAKS?





***Class debate activity:


Pro/Con: No Child Left Behind


Pro/Con: Standardized Testing


Which side will you be able to argue? Be able to argue



both.




27


Ch. 6 “The Reign of the Textbook”


Pg. 225
-
227 “Censorship” Pg. 244
-
246


Textbook adoption activit
y


April 1 Ch 10: “School Law and Ethics”


Pg. 381
-
407


Read throu
gh all situations. Would you choose


the correct solutions? What are the teacher’s


rights / student’s rights? What are the responsibilities?



3



C
h.

10
:

Teaching and Ethics

, pp. 407
-
414




Child abuse: What is your moral and ethical




responsibility?




*What is the problem?



*What does it look like?




*What is the solution?




Bring
A CHILD CALLED IT
and share the what


m
ade an impression on you. You may also share from


THE LOST BOY.







8

Group Planning Day: M
eet in the classroom. Take roll
.








14

FAMILY PROJECT: You are to research through Sadker, the internet,

teacher
interv
iews, journals, or any other method you can find to give us
the answers:

What is the problem? What does it look like in the classroom or workplace,
and how can we be the solutions?

What resources
will we have to help us
be the solution?

Prepare a handout
to give to the class which answers these questions.
Handout must have a title, your names listed, major points you think we
should know in order to answer the above questions, and resources listed
such as websites. Make an impact. Dress prof
essionally,
no caps, flip
-
flops

etc.

Absences will be counted twice. This is important information.
Present it with pride and passion. As a class member, take notes, ask
questions and realize this is information you will not get anywhere else.
Treat the presenters

with respect.

You will have 20 minutes. There will be time to discuss the information.












10




Ch 5: “Student Life in School and at Home
” pp.






191
-
204






There are real problems. What

are the solutions?


*
Family Project
:

Divorce;

Homelessness



15


Ch 5

Projects




Substance abuse; Dropouts




17

Ch. 5 Projects:

Youth Suicide; Bullying




22

Exam III




24


Video: “Without a Trace”


Youth Suicide and Bullying



29

Reflection II:

“Lessons From Skateboarders”

Read article and reflect upon the main points. What
is CPUPO? How were these needs met outside of the
classroom? How must we

try to meet them within the

15

classroom to present dropouts? Why bother? Who
cares?

Have you ever dropped out of something because one
of these needs wasn’t being met?



Philosophy of Education: Do you still believe in your
philosophy from the beginning
of the year or did it
change? Why? How?








****************************************************************


“How far you go in life depends on y
our being tender with the
young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving
,

and tolerant of the weak

because some day you will have been all of
these.”

~George Washington Carver




PERSONAL NOTES: