Flexure Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams Three Stages in the ...

shootperchUrban and Civil

Nov 26, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

79 views

CE 331, Fall 2010 
Flexure Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams 
1 / 5 

Three Stages in the Life of a Reinforced Concrete Beam
 
Reinforced concrete, considered “low‐tech” by some, is actually complex.  It consists of two materials, 
steel and concrete; the concrete can be cracked or uncracked; and the load‐deformation behavior of 
both the steel and the concrete are non‐linear at failure.  The figure below shows characteristics of the 
response of a simply‐supported reinforced concrete beam under increasing loads.   

1. Uncracked 
 
 
Short‐span beams supporting only their weight may not crack.  These beams are typically analyzed 
using the gross section properties of the beam (much like a wood or a steel beam) and the steel 
reinforcement is ignored. 
 
2. Service Loads 
 
 
Concrete has little tensile strength.  For example, concrete with a compressive strength of 4000 psi 
has a tensile strength of only 500 psi.  Depending on the span and configuration, many beams will 
crack under their own weight when the forms are removed.  Typically the strength of all of the 
concrete in the tension zone is neglected.  The concrete in the compression zone and the steel in the 
tensile zone form a couple to resist bending of the beam.  The stresses in both the concrete and the 
steel are far below their failure strength and are analyzed as linear‐elastic materials.  Beam 
deflections are evaluated at this stage. 
 
3. Ultimate Strength 
 
 
As the loads on the beam approach the failure load, the steel reinforcement yields and the concrete 
fails in compression (crushes).  The non‐linear concrete compressive stresses are analyzed using an 
equivalent uniform stress distribution and the reinforcement is assumed to yield.  Beam flexure 
strength is evaluated at this stage. 
steel
y
ields
concrete crushes
compression zone
concrete in tension zone
cracked (neglected)
Reinforcement yielded
flexure crac
k

compression zone
concrete in tension zone
cracked (neglected)
reinforcement
compression zone
tension zone
reinforcement
ne
g
lecte
d
CE 331, Fall 2010 
Flexure Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams 
2 / 5 

Example Analysis of Ultimate Flexure Strength.
  The flexure strength of the simply‐supported beam 
shown below is evaluated to demonstrate the procedure.   
 
f’
c
 = 5000psi    clear cover = 2.0 inches   
A
s
 = 4 #7 bars = 2.40 in

f
y
 = 60ksi      assume stirrups are #4 bars 
 
 
 
Explanation of terminology:
 
• The compressive strength of the concrete (f’c) in this beam is 5000 psi.  Compressive strengths 
typically range from 3000 psi for footings to 6000 psi. 
• The yield stress (f
y
) of the steel reinforcement is 60 ksi.  This is typical for modern construction. 
• All reinforcement in the beam must be protected from the environment by a layer of concrete at 
least 2 inches thick.  Clear cover depends on the environment of the structure (outdoor exposure 
requires more cover), the type of member (columns and beams require more cover than slabs and 
joists), and the size of the rebar (larger bars require more cover). 
• The stirrups are formed from #4 bars.  Typically, stirrups are #3 or #4 bars.  Stirrups provide added 
shear strength to the beam.  Shear strength is not discussed in this course. 

The flexure reinforcement consists of 4 #7 bars.  Rebar sizes typically range from #3 (3/8” 
diameter) to #11 (1.410” diameter).  Information on rebar sizes is provided in a table on Page 144 
of the FE reference manual.  From this table, the cross‐section area of a #7 bar is 0.60 in
2
.
Therefore, the area of the steel reinforcement (A
s
) = 4 x 0.60 in
2
 = 2.40 in
2
.
 
• The beam span is 30 feet and the uniform load due to factored load (w
u
) is 1.50 klf. 
• The beam width (b) is 12 inches and the beam depth (h) is 20 inches.  The effective depth of the 
beam (d) is measured from the centroid of the reinforcement to the extreme compression fiber 
(the top of the beam in this example).  The effective depth will be calculated below. 
 
Overview of Flexure Strength Equations.
  The factored loads on a beam create a bending moment (M
u

which is resisted by an internal couple in the reinforced concrete beam (see figure on next page).  The 
couple is formed by a pair of equal and opposite forces:  the compressive force in the concrete (C
c
) and 
the tensile force in the steel reinforcement (T) separated by a moment arm (shown as “x” in the figure).  
The maximum value of the internal couple occurs when the concrete reaches its compressive strength 
(f’
c
) and the steel reaches the yield stress (f
y
), and is termed the available flexure strength (φ M
n
).   
 
 
w
u
 
 = 1.50
klf 
30ft 
Elevation View of Beam
Section A‐A
 
A
A
h=20in
b=12in 
d
stirrup
CE 331, Fall 2010 
Flexure Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams 
3 / 5 

 
 
Calculation of a beam’s flexure strength entails calculating the values of the internal forces (C
c

and T) 
and the distance between them (d – a/2).  The strength reduction factor, φ, must also be calculated.  
These values are calculated based on the strain and stress distributions on the beam’s cross‐section 
(shown above).   
• As for all structural analysis, the strain distribution is linear.  The concrete is assumed to fail in 
compression at a strain of 0.003.  The depth of the compression zone is labeled “c” above.  The 
strain in the steel reinforcement (ε
s
) will be calculated in the last step of the analysis. 
• The concrete stress distribution is non‐linear at failure.  An equivalent uniform stress 
distribution (called the Whitney Stress Block) with the same area and centroid as the actual 
stress distribution is used to simplify calculations.  The magnitude of this stress distribution is 
0.85 f’
c
 and the depth of the stress block is labeled “a”.  “a” is related to the actual depth of the 
compression zone (“c”) by β
1
, which depends on the concrete strength (see Page 144 of the FE 
Reference Manual). 
• The stress resultants (or internal forces) are calculated from the stress magnitudes and the areas 
under stress. 
   
15f
t
15f
t
Section
A-A
Neutral
Axis
Strain
Distribution
Actual Stress
Distribution
Stress
Resultants
.003

c

ε
s
f'c

f
s
C
c
T

a/2

d

Equivalent Stress
Distribution
0.85f'c

f
s
a=
β
1
c
=
w
u
 = 1.50
kl
f
 

22
.5
k

M
u
1.50
klf
compression 
cracked 
Whitney Stress Block 
(same area and centroid as 
actual stress distribution)  
ftk
ft
ftklfftk
u
M

=−= 169)
2
15
)(15)(50.1()15)(5.22(
C
c
 
T

φ M
n
 =
φ
 T 
.
 x 
x
Loads:
 
resisted by
 
Internal 
Forces: 
(at failure) 
concrete stress 
distribution  
CE 331, Fall 2010 
Flexure Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams 
4 / 5 

Example of flexure strength calculations:
 
 
1. Calculate depth of stress block (a)
 
)60)(40.2()12()5(85.0
85.0
,0
2
'
ksiinksi
ysc
cH
ina
fAbaf
TCFfrom
=
=
==

yielded) has entreinforcem steel the that (Assume  
   
a = 2.82
in
 
2. Calculate effective depth (d)
 
 
 
2
8/7
8
4
"2"20
2
coverclear hdeptheffective
stirrup
in
in
bar
-d −−−=−−==
φ
φ
    d = 17.06
in
 
 
 
3.  Calculate the strain in the steel (
ε
s
).  The strain in the steel can be calculated using similar triangles 
and the strain distribution shown on pg 3.  The FE Reference Manual has an equation on Page 144 for b
1
,
but the table on the right below is easier to use. 
 
d
a
ca
and
dc
s
s
ε
β
β
ε
+
=

=
+
=
003.0
003.0
003.0
003.0
1
1
 
 
 
For this example,  
 
in
s
in
06.17
003.0
80.0
82.2
003.0
ε
+
=
 
ε
s
 = 0.0115
 
 
   
φ
bar

/ 2

φ
獴楲牵p
=
捬敡爠捯癥c
栠㴲ど
n
=


stirrup 
f'c, psi
β
1
<= 4,000 0.85
5,000 0.80
6,000 0.75
7,000 0.70
>=8,000 0.65
CE 331, Fall 2010 
Flexure Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams 
5 / 5 

4. Calculate 
φ
 
(strength reduction factor) 
φ
 is a function of the strain in the steel.  If the strain in the steel (
ε
s
) is at least 2.5 times the yield strain 
(
ε

~= 0.002 = 60
ksi
 / 29,000
ksi
 = f
y
 / E
s
), then the max. value of 
φ
 = 0.90 can be used.  If the strain in the 
steel is less than 0.005, then the equation shown in the figure below must be used.  For beams, ACI 
requires that 
ε

be >= 0.004. 
 
 
Therefore, 
(a)  steel has yielded (
ε
s
 > 0.002 = 
ε
y
) as assumed at top of pg 4. 
(b)
ε
s
 > 0.004 = ACI minimum for beams, OK 
(c)
φ = 0.90
 
 
5.  Calculate 
φ
 M
n
 
(nominal moment capacity) 
yss
sn
fAT
a
dTM
=
−= )
2
(φφ
 
)
12
1
)(
2
82.2
06.17)(60)(40.2()90.0()
2
(
2
in
ftin
inksi
ysn
in
a
dfAM −=−=

φφ
 
φ
 M
n
 = 169
k‐ft
 
 
6. Check flexure strength against moment due to factored loads
 
 
We want:  
un
MM ≥
φ
 
 
 
φ
M
n
 = 169
k‐ft  
>=  169
k‐ft
, OK

0.002
0.005
0.65
0.90
ε
s
φ
=
〮㐸‫=㠳=
ε
s
mi渠景爠扥慭猠㴠〮004
Moment due to factored loads
reduced nominal moment