READING REVIEW: LESSON 13 This Reading Review is based on the Lesson 13 There are 10 questions. The Review is not graded.

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Nov 29, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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READING REVIEW: LESSON 13

This Reading
Review is based on the Lesson 13

reading from Robert McKee’s Story.

There are 10 questions. The Review is not graded.


1. Which of these sums up what McKee says about Unity?


a.

A causal link between the Inciting Inci
dent and Climax sabotages surprise

b.

Stories can never express chaos. They must be unified

c.

A story’s climax should never be inevitable

d.

The Inciting Incident should determine the inevitability of the climax


Hint: “Because the shark killed the swimmer, the
sheriff had to kill the shark.” (Page
288, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


Correct: “
A story, even when expressing chaos, must be unified. This sentence, drawn
from any plot, should be logical: ‘Because of the inciting incident, the Climax

had to
happen.”

(Page 288, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


2. What does McKee say about bringing variation into a story?


a.

Many writers mistake a multitude of story types for variation

b.

Variation is another word for unfocused, and unfocused stories are unwatchable.

c.

Stories s
hould have as much variety as possible

d.

Stories should find a single note and strike it in a confident rhythm.


Hint: “
We seek the tragic in the comic, the political in the personal, the personal driving
the political…”
(Page 289, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 199
7)


Correct: “Unity is critical, but not sufficient. Within this unity, we must induce as much
variety as possible. CASABLANCA, for example, is not only one of the most loved
films of all time, it’s also one of the most various.” (Pages 288
-
289, Robert

McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


3. What does McKee say about pacing in a good screenplay?


a.

Life gains and loses tension, but a screenplay must never release its tension

b.

Once established, screenplay rhythm should be aggressively maintained

c.

Tension, danger and fear
should come and go in a screenplay

d.

Sharp peaks of tension are preferable to easing pressure gently up and down.


Hint: “But too much of this day after day and again we end up in the rubber room.”
(Page 289, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


Correct: “We use

our act structure to start at a base of tension, then rise scene by
sequence to the Climax of Act One. As we enter Act Two, we compose scenes that
reduce this tension, switching to comedy, romance, a counterpointing mood that lowers
the Act One intensity
so that the audience can catch its breath and reach for more energy.
…After retarding pace, we build the progressions of the following act until we top the
precious Climax in intensity and meaning.” (Pages 290
-
291, Robert McKee’s
Story
,
1997)


4. McKee
describes Rhythm as the
length

of scenes and Tempo as the
level of activity

within a scene. How does one use these to build to the Climax?


a.

The scenes before the frenetic Climax should be long and low key

b.

Telescope Rhythm and spiral Tempo to allow the Cli
max to be stretched out

c.

Telescoping Rhythm and Tempo before the Climax is a cliché to be avoided

d.

The more often we pause, the stronger the effect becomes


Hint: “We want to use cinema’s sensory power to hurl the audience toward act climaxes
because scenes

of major reversal are, in fact, generally long, slow and tense.” (Page 293,
Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


Correct: “Instead, we must “earn the pause” by telescoping
rhythm

while spiraling
tempo
,
so that when the Climax arrives, we can put the brakes on, s
tretch the playing time and
the tension holds.” (Page 2938, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


5. McKee says that Progression in a story means that more and more is being asked of
the protagonist in varied ways. How does McKee describe Social Progression?


a.

Th
e story starts as a metaphor for Capitalism but ends as one for Socialism

b.

The story starts as a metaphor for Feudalism but ends as one for Democracy

c.

The story moves from involving only a few characters to society at large

d.

Both A and B


Hint: “But as the t
elling moves forward, allow their actions to ramify outward into the
world around them…” (Page 294, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


Correct: “Let your story begin intimately, involving only a few principal characters. But
as the telling moves forward, allow

their actions to ramify outward into the world around
them, touching and changing the lives of more and more people. Not all at once. Rather,
spread the effect gradually through the progressions.” (Page 294, Robert McKee’s
Story
,
1997)


6. How does McK
ee describe Personal Progression?


a.

A progression model popularized in 1950s movies using Freudian symbolism

b.

A story that moves from involving many people to concentrating on only one

c.

A story with simple inner conflict that deepens into unspeakable truths.

d.

A story that starts with unspeakable truths and moves to solvable inner conflicts.


Hint: “Start with a personal or inner conflict that demands balancing, yet seems
relatively solvable.” (Page 295, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


Correct: “If the logic of
your setting doesn’t allow you to go wide, then you must go
deep. Start with a personal or inner conflict that demands balancing, yet seems relatively
solvable. Then, as the work progresses, hammer the story downward

emotionally,
psychologically, physica
lly, morally

to the dark secrets, the unspoken truths that hide
behind the public mask.” (Page 295, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


7. How does McKee describe Symbolic Ascension?


a.

As building the symbolic charge from the particular to the universal

b.

As build
ing the symbolic charge from the vague to the specific

c.

As building the symbolic charge from the

abstract to the concrete

d.

As building the symbolic charge from the profane to the divine.


Hint:
“…but as the story progresses, choose images that gather great
er and greater
meaning.”

(Page 296, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


Correct: “
Build the symbolic charge of the story’s imagery from t
he particular to the
universal.


“Symbolic progression works this way: start with actions, locations, and roles that
represen
t only themselves. But as the story progresses, choose images that gather greater
and greater meaning, until by the end of the telling characters, setting and events stand
for universal ideas.” (Page 296, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997) (For example, THE
DE
ER HUNTER and THE TERMINATOR)


8. How does McKee describe Ironic Ascension?


a.

A story that moves from bitterness to renewed innocence

b.

A story
of

duality
, aware of the
chasm between what seems and what is

c.

A story that, after the climax, leaves the protag
onist in bitter resignation

d.

A story that, after the climax, leaves the protagonist in smirking satisfaction


Hint: “…it plays with our paradoxical existence…” (Page 298, Robert McKee’s
Story
,
1997)


Correct: “Irony is the subtlest manifestation of story

pleasure, that delicious sense of
‘Ah, life is just like that.’ It sees life in duality; it plays with our paradoxical existence,
aware of the bottomless chasm between what seems and what is. …in story, irony plays
between actions and results

the primar
y source of story energy, between appearance
and reality

the primary source of truth and emotion.” (Pages 298, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)



9. Which of the following is an example of a story utilizing Ironic Ascension?


a.

The protagonist tries to throw aw
ay the only thing that will make him happy

b.

The protagonist does exactly that which will take him further from his goal

c.

The protagonist gets what he wants, but it’s too late to have it

d.

All of the above


Hint: McKee cites OTHELLO, TOOTSIE, RAIN and the 1952

version of MOULIN
ROUGE as examples of Ironic Ascension.


Correct: “He gets at last what he’s always wanted… but too late to have it.


“…He throws away what he later finds is indispensible to his happiness.


“…To reach his goal he unwittingly takes the pr
ecise steps necessary to lead him away.”
(Page 298
-
301, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


10. McKee describes the Principle of Transition as a link from the tail of Scene A with
the head of Scene B, either
in common

or
in opposition
. Which is NOT an example?


a.

A characterization trait (from a bratty child to a childish adult)

b.

An object (from the Congo to Antarctica)

c.

An idea (from a child’s birth to a musical overture)

d.

They are all correct examples


Hint: “Something held in common by two scenes or counterpoin
ted between them.”
(Page 301, Robert McKee’s
Story
, 1997)


Correct: McKee lists as examples of ways to create scene transitions:
a characterization
trait, an action, an object, a word, a quality of light, a sound
or
an idea
. “After a century
of filmmak
ing, transition clichés abound. Yet we can’t put down the task. An
imaginative study of almost any two scenes will find a link.” (Pages 301
-
302, Robert
McKee’s
Story
, 1997)