Grant Profiles Cultures of Giving: Innovation and Impact Across Communities

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Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ


Grant Profiles

Cultures of Giving: Innovation and Impact
Across Communities
Pages 2 - 29


Organization Profiles

Build Tools for Nonprofit Sustainability and
Innovative Giving
Pages 31 - 50
Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ



Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ

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Table of Contents

Cultures of Giving: Innovation and Impact Across Communities Grant Profiles...........................2 - 29
American Indian Family Empowerment Program.........................................................................................2
Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS)......................................................3
Asian Americans-Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy (AAPIP).........................................................................4
Association of Black Foundation Executives, Inc. (ABFE)............................................................................5
A Territory Resource.....................................................................................................................................6
Boston Women’s Fund..................................................................................................................................7
Cardinal Stritch University.............................................................................................................................8
Center for Community Action, Inc. (CCA).....................................................................................................9
Changemakers............................................................................................................................................10
Community Foundation for Greater New Haven.........................................................................................11
Diversity Pipeline Alliance...........................................................................................................................12
Faith Partnerships, Inc................................................................................................................................13
Grassroots Leadership, Inc.........................................................................................................................14
Hands On Network......................................................................................................................................15
Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP)..................................................................................................................16
The Hopi Foundation...................................................................................................................................17
National Center for Black Philanthropy, Inc................................................................................................18
National Community Development Institute (NCDI)...................................................................................19
Native Americans in Philanthropy...............................................................................................................20
North Carolina People’s Coalition for Giving...............................................................................................21
Potlatch Fund..............................................................................................................................................22
Public Allies.................................................................................................................................................23
Resource Generation..................................................................................................................................24
Social Venture Network...............................................................................................................................25
Southern Partners Fund..............................................................................................................................26
Sponsors for Educational Opportunity, Inc.................................................................................................27
Support Center for Nonprofit Management.................................................................................................28
Women’s Funding Network.........................................................................................................................29

Build Tools for Nonprofit Sustainability and Innovative Giving Organization Profiles................31 - 50
Acumen Fund..............................................................................................................................................31
Arizona State University – Center for Nonprofit Leadership and Management..........................................32
Association of Small Foundations...............................................................................................................33
Capital Markets Access Program / Wall Street Without Walls Initiative.....................................................34
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Community Foundations of America...........................................................................................................35
The CompuMentor Project..........................................................................................................................36
GlobalGiving................................................................................................................................................37
Grand Valley State University - Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership..38
GuideStar....................................................................................................................................................39
Hands on Network.......................................................................................................................................40
LaPiana Associates, Inc..............................................................................................................................41
Michigan Nonprofit Association ..................................................................................................................42
National Center on Nonprofit Enterprise.....................................................................................................43
Network For Good (Powered by Groundspring).........................................................................................44
NPower National.........................................................................................................................................45
NPower Michigan........................................................................................................................................46
Philanthropy Incubator – Silicon Valley.......................................................................................................47
Plugged In – Learning Through Technology...............................................................................................48
VolunteerMatch...........................................................................................................................................49
Women's Funding Network ........................................................................................................................50






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CenterPoint Institute
11000 Front Street
Mokena, IL 60448
Voice (708) 478-6494
Fax (708) 478-6495
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Cultures of Giving: Innovation and
Impact Across Communities
A W. K. Kellogg Foundation Philanthropy and Volunteerism Cluster






Grant Profiles
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Grant Profile
American Indian Family Empowerment Program
Grant Purpose
To advance American Indian leadership and participation within the
Minnesota philanthropic/nonprofit sector by supporting the American
Indian Family Empowerment Program’s leadership development project.
Collaborating
Organization(s)
Marbrook Foundation
Westcliff Foundation
Minneapolis Foundation
Grotto Foundation

Grant Description
While philanthropy is a new term to Native communities, the philanthropic
concept has been a practiced tradition among tribal communities since time
immemorial and remains a cherished cultural practice today. In order for
contemporary philanthropy to benefit from the American Indian tradition of
giving, the American Indian Family Empowerment Program’s Leadership
Development Project documents a number of areas in which it can serve as a
philanthropic resource.

The American Indian Family Empowerment Program (the Program) seeks to
advance American Indian leadership within the local philanthropic arena and to
develop/promote this work as a model for philanthropic decision making and
giving to Native communities.

The Program’s vision is that American Indian culture and values are respected,
preserved, and passed on. Since its inception in 1996, the Program’s mission is to
support and encourage American Indian families and individuals to be of service
to their community, connected to their culture, and to have their potential realized.
It is one of the few philanthropic endeavors that includes the wisdom and
expertise of the American Indian community in its grantmaking structure and
decision making.

American Indian leadership, community service and volunteerism, and civic
engagement are at the heart of its grantmaking principles which are based on
American Indian culture and values. This mission is based on the premise that
community building and development occur through the contributions of those
that live, work, study, and play in the community. These contributions are not
monetary in nature but take the form of individual and collective energy, time, and
creativity. Grantees have been recognized annually by the local philanthropic and
nonprofit community for their contributions.

The goals of this next phase of project growth are to achieve a sustainable
model of American Indian grantmaking which will allow the partnership to
accomplish the following objectives.
 Expanding the role of the Advisory Committee.
 Preparing and nurturing emerging American Indian philanthropic leaders.
 Building relevant partnerships and networks among and across
philanthropic, tribal, corporate and nonprofit communities and sectors in
order to learn from those who have implemented American Indian
controlled/focused funds and/or foundations, while promoting the
Program as a best practice model of American Indian community
engagement.
 Strengthen the Program’s internal infrastructure.

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Grant Profile
Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS)
Grant Purpose
To encourage sustained, strategic philanthropy in the Arab American community.
Collaborating
Organization(s)
National Network for Arab American Communities

Grant Description
The Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS)
engages the efforts of the Collaborative for Arab American Philanthropy in
response to three main concerns: 1) strengthening the role of Arab Americans in
American civil society by introducing strategic philanthropy to promote
community empowerment and increase the impact and visibility of Arab
American civic participation; 2) providing information and resources to connect
donors with worthy organizations among the affluent and less affluent sectors of
the Arab American community; and 3) addressing the pressing need to focus Arab
American resources on community building in the Arab American community
itself.

For many years, Arab American leaders from other cities have called upon
ACCESS for advice and support in creating their own community centers that
could provide services, advocacy, or cultural programming in their communities.
In the aftermath of September 11th, 2001, ACCESS recognized that a more
concerted strategy was necessary to support these needs.

This philanthropic initiative will create systematic, long-term approaches to
resource development for a broad spectrum of Arab American organizations.
Indeed, creating permanent structures for promoting philanthropy is one of
ACCESS’s key goals for mobilizing Arab American resources for the
empowerment of the whole community.

The initiative has three core strategies:
1) Promote the development of Arab American philanthropy through research,
targeted outreach, and support to donors.
2) Promote Arab American philanthropy by strengthening the capacity of their
community organizations to integrate systematic philanthropic techniques into
resource development plans.
3) Promote Arab American philanthropy by creating a permanent institutional
forum that will provide resources, tools, and training to strengthen Arab American
giving.

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Grant Profile
Asian Americans-Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy (AAPIP)
Grant Purpose
To facilitate and stimulate giving by individual Asian Pacific American
communities for the field of organized philanthropy.
Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description
AAPIP fundamentally recognizes the Asian American population as bi-modal,
occupying extreme ends of the social and economic spectrum from wealth to
marginal daily survival, advanced education to illiteracy. To this end, AAPIP
seeks to stimulate donors within the community not merely to grow Asian
American philanthropy for its own sake, but also to address the issues and
community conditions of disadvantaged Asian Americans. There is enormous
potential for engaging Asian American donors. A recent poll by New California
Media found that Asians in California donated $200 million of a total $1 billion
given by U.S. residents to address the Asian tsunami disaster – meaning that one
out of every five American dollars was given by an Asian in California. AAPIP
recognizes the incredible philanthropic potential within the Asian Pacific
American (APA) community and in the next few years will put in place many
different kinds of vehicles to stimulate APA giving and instill a sense of social
responsibility among the more well-off in APA communities.

In 2004, AAPIP finalized a new community philanthropy mission: working to
improve traditional philanthropy by making it more inclusive, just, equitable, and
accountable. AAPIP is committed to building its work with its new community
philanthropy mission, while continuing to strengthen operations, expand and
improve services to members, and incubate new models for the field. Since 2002,
AAPIP’s promotion of new research on Asian American women, post 9/11 issues,
and the soon-to-be released report on APAs and the criminal justice system
represents a new approach to research as a vehicle not just to inform the
philanthropic field but as a call to action for donors and APA community-based
organizations to join forces and address some of the most pressing issues facing
our communities today.

The goals of this initiative are:

Increase, stimulate, and facilitate giving by APAs;

Incubate new models of community philanthropy of mutual benefit to
both donors and Asian Pacific American community-based organizations
(APA CBOs);

Educate the field of organized philanthropy about less visible but
significant forms of philanthropy within the Asian and Pacific Islander
diasporic communities in the United States; and,

Build AAPIP’s infrastructure and sustainability.

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Grant Profile
Association of Black Foundation Executives, Inc. (ABFE)
Grant Purpose
To strengthen professional development opportunities for leaders in the
philanthropic and nonprofit sectors while serving as a social change vehicle to
increase philanthropy for and in Black and Latino communities.
Collaborating
Organization(s)
Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP)

Grant Description
The HIP and ABFE collaborative will work at the intersection of their parallel
programs in nonprofit capacity building, professional and leadership development,
and community-based research. The collaborative will enhance the activities of
their existing programs to engage in dialogue across their individual communities
and membership bases. This collaborative project consists of the following
activities.

Joint-Dialogue and Strategic Planning: HIP and ABFE plan to engage in joint
dialogue and strategic planning process to identify ways and opportunities to work
together to ensure that communities of color have access to organized
philanthropy. The joint dialogue will create an environment to learn about the
work of each organization and provide the opportunity to share some of the
lessons learned that may have application across each of their targeted groups.

Co-sponsored Roundtable Discussions and Workshops: Through this collaborative
effort, HIP and ABFE plan to increase their internal capacities to improve
communications across their membership bases so that members of each
organization have access to the programs of each organization. As a first step in
the collaboration, it is expected that this sharing of knowledge and peer
networking will provide a foundation for joint initiatives as the partnership
matures and the strategic plan is developed. The partnership will work to
incorporate at least four additional discussions each year and three key regional
site workshops that specifically focus on the theme of providing access to
organized philanthropy for communities of color and capacity building.

Community-based Research and Dissemination: ABFE and HIP have both made
commitments to produce high quality research on critical issues in their
communities that are relevant to the philanthropic field and nonprofit sector. As
part of this collaboration, they plan to commission, produce, and disseminate at
least one research project between 2006 and 2007 that identifies an issue in both
of the communities where philanthropy can play a major role; provide
recommendations for the philanthropic community on how to best address this
issue; and establish a national agenda for raising awareness of the issue and the
impact that it is having in their communities.

The ABFE and HIP collaborative anticipate their work will yield the following
results:
 Increased integration of ABFE’s and HIP’s work to strengthen
communities of color across the philanthropic field;
 Increased leveraging and joint-dialogue of key infrastructures to engage
and develop leaders and donors of color;
 Enhanced knowledge creation and dissemination focusing on leaders and
donors of color; and
 Enhanced capacity of leaders and donors of color.


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Grant Profile
A Territory Resource
Grant Purpose
To strengthen social change philanthropy in the northwest region by expanding A
Territory Resource’s unique membership model to engage new donors of color
and create leadership opportunities for people of color in organized philanthropy.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description
A Territory Resource (ATR) Foundation plays a leading role in promoting
progressive philanthropy in the Northwest, collaborating with philanthropic
partners to provide donor education on a wide range of social justice issues.

The ATR staff and membership delved into the difficult issue of institutional
racism and explored whether the requirements for membership were keeping out
the very people they were serving. Based on some serious introspection, the Board
made a decision in 2002 to change its financially prohibitive membership
requirement to encourage members of working and middle class communities and
communities of color to join the organization. Anyone who embraces ATR’s
mission and who gives $20 a month can join.

Over one quarter of the membership is now made up of people of color, many of
whom are leaders within their own communities, leaders of activist organizations,
or program officers of foundations in the Northwest. As a result, ATR members
now include long-time activists, middle-class professionals, and grassroots social
change activists who had never before seen themselves as philanthropists sitting at
the table with wealthy donors as equal partners.

Over the next two years, ATR will build a diverse and democratic membership
community funding social change in the Northwest and Northern Rockies. ATR’s
work involves five key goals:
 Increase the number of people of color participating in organized
philanthropy as donors and volunteers.
 Increase the number of people of color participating at leadership level at
ATR and in the field of philanthropy.
 Influence ATR members’ giving to leverage more dollars for social
change.
 Document efforts and evaluate the changes that occur.
 Create a template with guidance that can be adapted in other regions to
help others “Unleash Resources.”

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Grant Profile
Boston Women’s Fund
Grant Purpose
To support local social change philanthropy in communities of color project, "Our
Public Spirit."

Collaborating
Organization(s)
Haymarket People’s Fund
The Women of Color Fundraising Institute
The Women’s Theological Center

Grant Description
The Boston Women’s Fund as lead agency along the Haymarket People’s Fund,
the Women of Color Fundraising Institute, and the Women’s Theological Center
are partnering in the philanthropy project, “Our Public Spirit.” All project partners
share reflective values that align with W. K. Kellogg’s core values. Since each
organization’s inception, they have actively involved the voices and practices of
their constituents, particularly those who are most marginalized — women of
color, women with disabilities, gay and lesbians, and youth of color. These
organizations continuously learn from each other to work toward social change
and they utilize an asset-based thinking approach for resource allocation and to
build allies.

“Our Public Spirit” will leverage the opportunity to learn about how the social
change concept is interpreted, how it has evolved from diverse perspectives, and
how the process of giving translates into community empowerment, ownership,
and unity. Their work seeks to expand current donor services, including education
and training, to document and learn from historical giving patterns in communities
of color. This knowledge will then be translated into tools to sustain social change
organizations and institutionalize a cultural system of giving both at the Boston
Women’s Fund and the Haymarket People’s Fund.

This partnership has learned from allies in the field about innovative cultural
models of giving. These alliances have strengthened their knowledge base of
philanthropy in communities of color. The partnership now seeks the opportunity
to further test their strategy of connecting individuals, communities, and
organizations to achieve positive social change. The proposed project unleashes
resources of time, money, and know-how from a targeted constituency of people
of color, wealth creators, youth, and women to address issues such as social,
economic, and environmental injustices. Their strategy is based on the assumption
that donors can give in meaningful ways that bring donors and receivers together
as equal partners in the work for social justice.

The strategies of “Our Public Spirit” include three key approaches:
 Support Emerging Leaders and Donors.
 Create and Share Knowledge.
 Build Tools for Nonprofit Sustainability and Innovative Giving.

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Grant Profile
Cardinal Stritch University
Grant Purpose
To increase strategic philanthropy and leadership in Metro Milwaukee
communities of color.
Collaborating
Organization(s)
Greater Milwaukee Foundation
The Women’s Fund of Greater Milwaukee
The Wisconsin Donors Forum

Grant Description
Cardinal Stritch University Leadership Center, Greater Milwaukee Foundation,
the Wisconsin Women’s Fund, and the Wisconsin Donors Forum have come
together to create the Philanthropy Incubator Project. This project was created to
foster strategic philanthropy and leadership in Metropolitan Milwaukee emerging
donors of color that is grounded in personal values and passion and informed by
best practices.

The Philanthropy Incubator Project – Legacy Building in Communities of Color
will target business owners, entrepreneurs, and professionals of color to increase
strategic philanthropy and leadership in Metropolitan Milwaukee. The project will
identify, inform, connect, and support diverse, emerging donors. It will foster
strategic philanthropy from the context of a lifetime legacy connected to passion
and values. The proposed initiative includes strong evaluative, learning, and
dissemination components. Project objectives include:
 Increased awareness of national initiatives and best practices in
philanthropy.
 Increased knowledge about philanthropy and giving options.
 Creation of personal giving plans by learning circle participants.
 Increased number of funds established and/or gifts given.

The activities of the Philanthropy Incubator fall into four categories:

Identify: The Philanthropy Incubator Project will begin by identifying current and
potential local donors, learning more about local giving patterns and motivation,
and exploring national research and best practices.

Inform: The research and scanning process will be followed by a speakers’ series
that showcases best practices and trends occurring in other cities related to
philanthropy in communities of color.

Connect: Four learning circles with six to eight members would gather monthly
for nine months to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for
strategic philanthropy.

Support: A legacy coach will assist each learning circle member establish a
personal giving plan. The legacy coaches will interact with their members on a
monthly basis for nine months. One legacy coach will be matched with each
learning circle. A master coach will support the four legacy coaches through group
training and one-on-one dialogue.

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Grant Profile
Center for Community Action, Inc. (CCA)
Grant Purpose
To establish the Giving Exchange, a tool for giving time, talent, and money in
communities of color in Robeson County, North Carolina in order to increase their
engagement in philanthropy.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description
The purpose of the Giving Exchange is to build and expand the community of
givers of time, talent, and money in rural Robeson County and its diverse, ethnic
communities. It will build on the informal networks of voluntary giving that
already exist in communities of color. It will develop an extensive system of
giving of time and talent that is rewarded and converted into purchasing power for
securing both public and private goods and services from other individuals, private
organizations, public agencies, and businesses. Robeson County provides a unique
setting for this project. Its population is 38 percent Native American, 32 percent
European American, 25 percent African American, 4 percent Latin American (and
rapidly increasing), and 1 percent Asian American, making it the most ethnically
diverse rural county in the United States. It is also one of the poorest counties in
North Carolina and the United States, measured by personal income. It is home to
the Lumbee, the largest Native American tribe east of the Mississippi and the sixth
largest tribe in the nation.

The causal loop for this project is as follows: the situation is that there are
traditions of giving among the ethnic communities in this rural county, but they
are isolated and not mutually reinforcing, and a culture of deficits (rather than
assets) is dominant; the Giving Exchange will provide a framework for building
on assets not only of individuals but also cross-sectoral organizations; expected
outcomes include increased giving and increased social capital with enhanced
cross-race and cross-sectoral relationships.

The Giving Exchange will adapt the models of Time Dollar USA and Ithaca
Dollars. Similar to Time Dollar, every hour of giving of time and talent in the
Giving Exchange will earn one Exchange Dollar. Everyone’s giving is worth the
same and is not dependent on age, skill level, or area of expertise. Once exchange
dollars are earned, they can be swapped with other members of the Giving
Exchange for a diversity of public and private services and goods. The Giving
Exchange will grow organically as persons request to join, both out of an interest
in giving and receiving. This program turns helping others into “a two-way
street:” Every act of helping leads to another act of helping, creating a web of
support and caring that rebuilds trust and enhances community. The goal is to
create a currency of caring, making it possible for people who receive help to give
back to others.

Research on Time Dollar demonstrates that membership increases year-by-year,
unlike most other voluntary programs that reach a peak after a few years and then
wane. Research also indicates that the amount and quality of giving increases as
well, including the giving of money by both individuals and businesses engaged in
Time Dollar Programs.

Grant Profile
Changemakers
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Grant Purpose
To strategically engage communities of color in social change philanthropy by
developing and disseminating a series of workshops.
Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description
Changemakers is tackling the issue of the under-engagement of donors of color in
social change making by developing and disseminating a series of workshops
intended to strategically engage communities of color in social change
philanthropy. This will result in an increase in tools and knowledge to foster
engagement of donors of color in social change philanthropy, with an emphasis on
moving donor giving from charity to change-making.

Changemakers proposes to partner with representatives from communities of color
to pilot culturally-appropriate versions of workshops intended to strategically
engage communities of color in social change philanthropy (strategic giving,
fundraising, and leadership). Specifically, they will create, test, and disseminate a
series of “workshops-in-a-box” on social change philanthropy specifically created
for – and in partnership with – each of the major ethnic groups in the United
States.

Each “workshop-in-a-box” will include suggestions and outlines for exercises and
activities as well as ideas for structures to adopt, sample contracts, background
readings, and other resources on the workshop’s specific topic. The workshops
will draw upon the best resources currently available from peers in the field, new
materials developed by the project advisory groups during the first year of this
project, and thoroughly-tested materials from Changemakers’ five-year history of
philanthropic education.

A format will be created which maximizes accessibility to these tools and to
empower communities to modify the curriculum to best suit their needs.
Changemakers is committed to ensuring that members of advisory groups, having
taken part in the creation and evaluation of the materials and will feel empowered
to lead trainings with the finished workshops in their organizations, networks, and
communities. Changemakers’ leadership team will also conduct in-person
trainings and train representatives from the social change funds so that they can in
turn utilize the workshops to train others.

The three goals of workshop in a box are:
 Increase understanding of the intent and motivations of donors of color.
 Increase the donor education and engagement capacity of philanthropy
groups working in, with, and for communities of color, especially those
working for social, economic, and environmental justice.
 Increase the number of donors of color involved in social change
philanthropy on the giving side and on the fundraising side.

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Grant Profile
Community Foundation for Greater New Haven
Grant Purpose
To mobilize philanthropy in the Asian American, Latino, and African American
communities to strengthen community systems, connect giving to community
impact, and expand available resources.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
African American Legacy Council (AALC)
Alliance of African American Nonprofit Executives (AANE)
Latino donor advised fund

Grant Description
Over the last several years, the Community Foundation of Greater New Haven
(the Community Foundation) has been in a process of fundamental transformation.
They adopted a new strategic direction, established new priorities, and put in place
a new organizational structure in order to play a stronger leadership role in their
community. One of the ways in which the Community Foundation is now
providing philanthropic leadership is by empowering and supporting individuals
and institutions of color. These individuals and institutions , in partnership with
the Community Foundation, articulate their own agenda of positive change for
their communities by providing leadership to build support for that agenda and
working together to mobilize resources to achieve it.

The Communities of Color Initiative is such a partnership and is one of the
Community Foundation’s primary community leadership activities. The
Communities of Color Initiative addresses the issue of how to strengthen service
to the region with its rich racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity by engaging
communities of color in ways that transcend the historic role of both the
Community Foundation and the communities they serve.

Since launching the Communities of Color Initiative in 2003, the organization has
succeeded in establishing productive partnerships with philanthropic leaders
throughout the region’s communities of color. Their work together has involved
extensive outreach to potential new donors as well as mobilizing new
philanthropic resources through the establishment of new funds under the
Communities of Color Initiative work. The work of the Communities of Color
Initiative employs strategies to increase the number of donors of color, increase
understanding and knowledge of what motivates and interests donors of color, and
demonstrate improvements in connecting leadership of color with the broader
community to leverage resources to enhance community impact.

The Communities of Color Initiative will employ to achieve these goals include
the following strategies:

 Expand the philanthropic opportunities for donors of color in Greater
New Haven;
 Develop a cadre of philanthropic and nonprofit leaders who are focused
on issues affecting communities of color;
 Engage other philanthropic institutions, individuals, and the community
at large as partners in addressing and redressing social and economic
disparities affecting communities of color;
 Increase the Community Foundation’s capacity to meet the charitable
giving needs of African donors in communities of color;
 Develop a mechanism to collect and disseminate the knowledge and
information gained.

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Grant Profile
Diversity Pipeline Alliance
Grant Purpose
To develop the next generation of philanthropists in communities of color through
a network of national organizations dedicated to helping underrepresented
minorities pursue business careers.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
Leadership Education For Asian Pacifics, Inc. (LEAP)
National Black United Fund (NBUF)
National Society of Hispanic MBAs (NSHMBA)
National Black MBA Association (NBMBAA)
Sponsors For Educational Opportunity (SEO)

Grant Description
The Diversity Pipeline Alliance (the Alliance) is a network of national
organizations which share the common goal of preparing people of color for
leadership and management in the 21
st
Century, especially in the for-profit sector.
There are over 15,000 members in these organizations who are MBA graduates
and mid-level career professionals. There is unrealized potential for leveraging
their giving back to their communities to effect positive social change. The
Alliance will do utilize this potential by creating a curriculum and an educational
process within each of the organizations. The outcome will be increased giving of
time and money and increased participation in leadership positions, especially
board service in the nonprofit sector.

This project, “Business and Philanthropy: Giving Back to Communities of Color,”
will harness the resources of these diverse organizations to create a best practice
model that can be implemented independently within each organization’s
framework. However, Diversity Pipeline Alliance intends to go beyond
strengthening each organization by connecting across the divide that often
separates communities of color. This latter issue is a uniting principle of the
Diversity Pipeline Alliance. This project will unify minority civic education, board
involvement, and philanthropy at the community level. For example, links will be
developed among all collaborative partner Web sites; relevant curricula and
knowledge will be integrated and trainings will be multi-ethnic at the community
level. By blending knowledge and learning from various communities – while
remaining distinct and separate organizations – the curricula and seminar tools,
research, and content exchange will improve the practice of encouraging multi-
ethnic civic and philanthropic involvement within each collaborator’s endeavors.
Finally, knowledge and sustainability tools will be developed that improve
practice beyond W.K. Kellogg Foundation funding. Each organization has key
assets that will help ensure the success of the project.

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Grant Profile
Faith Partnerships, Inc.
Grant Purpose
To promote research and education to encourage collaborative efforts among faith
partners, grantmakers, and government for the purpose of addressing issues of
poverty in our communities and elsewhere.
Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description
The purpose of Faith Partnerships, Inc. is to increase the engagement and visibility
in giving by women of faith in the African American community. Women in
African American churches have always been leaders in giving time, talent, and
personal treasure for the well-being of the community. The purpose of this project
is to assure that this giving is recognized and that it uses all the tools available to
leverage and maximize the impact.

The results of this project will include “sisters of faith stirring up the gifts”—more
engagement and visibility, more use of tools, more giving, and perhaps most
importantly, greater collaborative efforts addressing issues of poverty in
underserved communities.

More specifically, the Sisters of Faith project will help women:
 Gain a greater awareness of the challenges and benefits of using tools
such as 501(c)3 status, donor advised funds, and giving circles (for
example) to leverage impact;
 Gain a better understanding of policy issues that create challenges for
faith-based organizations achieving donor status as they work to
underwrite the costs of programs that assist “the least of these;”
 Increase their knowledge of the steps for acquiring donor status and
thereby offer potential solutions for leveraging resources to assist the
economic empowerment of “the least of these;” and
 Gain a greater ability to identify, provide, and/or secure resources to
support creative initiatives.

The participating Sisters of Faith will receive training via workshops and
site visits in areas such as:
 Grants management;
 Asset management;
 Assessing community needs;
 Legal issues that accompany donor status;
 Understanding differences between charity/mission-giving and focused-
giving;
 Building permanent assets that will create wealth-building opportunities
in low-income communities; and
 Donor Advised Funds 101 and Giving Circles 101.

The project will validate and support women of faith in the African American
community, including women clergy who are often relegated to minor
programming roles.

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Grant Profile
Grassroots Leadership, Inc.
Grant Purpose
To increase the philanthropic and fund-raising skills of individual African
American leaders in the southeastern United States, with an emphasis on North
Carolina, by providing knowledge and understanding in the field of philanthropy
within the context of social movements.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
Hindsight Consulting
Next Generation of African American Philanthropists
National Network of Grantmakers
Resource Generation
Young Donor Organizing Alliance

Grant Description
Logic of the work of Zidi Ujamaa, a project of Grassroots Leadership, flows as
follows: 1) African American communities in general (and social change
nonprofits in particular) require resources of time, talent, and money; 2) there are
relatively few fundraisers of color and, in fact, it may be especially powerful and
effective to help people see themselves as givers as a precursor to becoming
fundraisers; and 3) growing the capacity of African American philanthropists will
lead to more resources to address progressive social change issues in communities.

The purpose of this project is to provide knowledge and understanding in the field
of philanthropy within the context of social movements and increase the
philanthropic and fundraising skills of individual African American leaders in the
southeastern United States with an emphasis on North Carolina. Participants will
become involved in philanthropic leadership efforts, fund development
instruction, and leadership trainings based on the Ujamaa philanthropy model.

The model is derived from the Kwanza principle of cooperative economics which
emphasizes the positive potential of African American communities in building
wealth, maintaining resources, and creating economic justice together. Zidi is a
Swahili word for continue or sustain. Thus, this Zidi Ujamaa project seeks to build
upon and expand the pilot work started with a Kellogg Foundation grant in 2003.
It also builds upon an earlier Kellogg grant in 1990 called Barriers and Bridges
which helped organizations achieve more powerful diversity and more effectively
address issues of power and privilege.

The original Ujamaa project asked, “How can African American-led communities
and organizations raise funds?” During the course of the project they learned to
ask, “How do African American-led communities and organizations utilize
philanthropic leadership to become more effective and powerful change agents
and contribute to the transformation of philanthropy across class and cultures?”

The Ujamaa model uses a core set of activities which can be replicated and
expanded as participants ‘take them home.’ These activities include trainings,
retreats, house parties, cultural and community sharing, giving back/practicing
philanthropy and fundraising, donor circles, mentoring and peer exchange, and
materials development and distribution.

Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting January 23 - 26, 2006 Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ

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Grant Profile
Hands On Network
Grant Purpose
To promote sustainable community development within economically
marginalized communities of color by engaging resident leader assets.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
Hands on Atlanta
American Institute for Managing Diversity (AIMD)
Interaction Institute for Social Change (IISC)

Grant Description
Hands On Network and Hands On Atlanta support sustainable community
development and neighborhood revitalization within economically marginalized
communities of color by: 1) offering 250 resident leaders the tools and skills
necessary to affect change; and 2) equipping staff members of five community
development corporations and/or community-based organizations (hereafter
referred to as “partner agencies”) to effectively engage and access the resident
leader assets in their community.

These efforts will be piloted in five Atlanta communities with a goal of
developing a national “Be The Change In Your Neighborhood” curriculum and
sector-wide sharing of lessons learned. This program will be tailored to fit two
distinct audiences: resident leaders and the agencies or groups that need to access
those leaders. Goals of the two-year pilot program are to: 1) increase the number
and leadership capabilities of community members working to transform these
five communities; 2) strengthen the foundation and infrastructure for community
involvement, neighborhood empowerment, and resident leadership; and 3) share
the key learning and potential for national program replication.

The Hands On Network approach seeks to intentionally develop both the human
capital within marginalized communities of color and the local organizational
infrastructure within which these volunteer leaders will serve. While community
involvement and leadership are powerful agents for positive social change, there is
often minimal access to the resources necessary to develop community members
into effective change agents and social entrepreneurs. Skills such as recruiting
volunteers, building consensus, leading people to action, leveraging local
resources to achieve the most effective results, and being effective with their own
philanthropy are not innate attributes for many community volunteers. The
resident “Be The Change In Your Neighborhood” curriculum will focus on
building these skills within resident leaders, combining the volunteer leadership
and project management expertise of Hands On Network/Hands On Atlanta
experience with the diversity and community development expertise of AIMD and
IISC, respectively. Through this training, Hands On Network and its partners not
only anticipate having a lasting impact on the five targeted Atlanta communities
but also have a program that is transferable to other communities as a powerful
platform for strengthening marginalized communities of color.

This proposed pilot project presents an innovative approach to generating and
meeting the demands for sustainable resident leadership and organizational
development that is targeted to result in the development of long-term
philanthropic resources (financial, in kind, and human capital) within underserved
communities.

Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting January 23 - 26, 2006 Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ

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Grant Profile
Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP)
Grant Purpose
To expand the presence and voice of Latino leaders within mainstream
philanthropy through a pilot program of initiatives to increase the amount and
impact of giving by Latinos through local Latino funds.
Collaborating
Organization(s)
The Rose Community Foundation
The Latino Community Foundation
Grant Description
The strategy to build the number and capacity of Latino funds at local community
foundations is to support a program of integrated activities that will grow the
amount and impact of giving by Latinos through local Latino funds. The program
will include a pilot strategy to strengthen the individual donor base of two funds, a
needs assessment, peer education, networking, and capacity-building support for
those Latino funds in the pilot.

The types of community impact that this project is seeking to achieve include: (1)
increased giving to social change issues prevalent in the Latino community
identified by Latino leadership, (2) a broader engagement of Latino nonprofits and
(3) engagement of new and emerging leaders and donors from the Latino
community.

More specifically, the activities of this pilot strategy include:
1. Strengthening the donor outreach and development activities of two
Latino Funds. HIP has identified two sites, The Rose Community
Foundation and the Latino Community Foundation, that have strong
relationships with Latino donors and will be the focus for a pilot
collaborative project to promote vehicles for giving.

2. Knowledge creation and dissemination:
HIP will engage a consultant to conduct a review of the current status and
needs of Latino funds, together with a comparative review of other
“Identity Fund” networks, their activities, strengths, and challenges. This
consultant will conduct a targeted needs assessment that will build on the
recent work of the Hispanic Federation, the recent study released by
Hispanic Silicon Valley, as well as research by New Ventures in
Philanthropy and Social Ventures Network. They will develop research
pertinent only to the two funds where the work will take place – the San
Francisco Bay area and Denver, Colorado. This research will be a strong
component of the project. These changes notwithstanding, HIP
anticipates that the research will shed new learning and will be pertinent
to the field.

The anticipated results of this project include:
 Increased number of Latinos giving to local issues and organizations.
 Increased knowledge of Latino communities and their interests.
 Increased connection of Latino leadership in the broader community
to leverage resources that enhance community impact.

Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting January 23 - 26, 2006 Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ

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Grant Profile
The Hopi Foundation
Grant Purpose
To provide leadership development for Hopi people working with local nonprofit
institutions via the Hopi Foundation Leadership and Professional Mentoring
Program.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A
Grant Description
The Hopi Foundation has over 17 years experience working with outside
philanthropists and partners to develop self-sufficiency among the Hopi people.
As a part of this work, they have launched a number of nonprofit and for-profit
organizations. Although these institutions have experienced notable successes,
their stability and growth has been hampered in part by a lack of leadership and
professional skills among local people.

Changes to the Hopi community over the past three generations have diminished
traditional values as well as the traditional mechanisms that supported the training
and development of new Hopi leaders. Traditional roles and values are not
necessarily being transferred or developed in younger generations, especially in
modern settings. At the same time, outside professional training and schooling
fails to accommodate the unique considerations of being Hopi. While many Hopi
have had some professional training, it is extremely difficult for them to bridge
both cultures and effectively apply their knowledge in their own communities.

Many effective organizations and nonprofits on Hopi land are challenged by the
issue of sustainability when the founding leaders move on. If organizations of the
Hopi nation are to be strong and vibrant, their leaders must find ways to boost the
leadership capacity of the community. Since its establishment in 1985, the Hopi
Foundation has become a focal point for the dissemination of information for the
Hopi Indian community. The Hopi Foundation recognizes that leadership and
governance concerns are high on the list of importance for local reservation
organizations where great disparities exist between themselves and mainstream
nonprofit institutions.

In an effort to address this problem, the Hopi Foundation developed the Hopi
Leadership and Professional Mentoring Program. The Hopi Foundation plans to
proactively grow and develop the requisite philanthropic knowledge of their
community leaders, as well as tactical and strategic leadership and management
skills needed to successfully govern and grow philanthropic organizations.

The overall purpose of the program is two-fold:
1. Build the management and leadership skills of Hopi’s philanthropic
organizations to help them grow, expand, and survive transitions in
leadership and build sustainable operations to more effectively provide
resources and services to the Hopi community. By developing a more
robust professional community, the program would help lay a stronger
foundation for a culture of financial giving in a place where most giving
is neither monetary nor reciprocal.

2. Educate and acculturate Hopi people to the different philanthropic tools
and strategies (planned annuities, automatic payroll deductions for tribal
employees, etc.) that would enable Hopi nonprofit organizations to be
more effective resource providers, as well as recipients in order to
achieve long-term financial stability.

Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting January 23 - 26, 2006 Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ

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Grant Profile
National Center for Black Philanthropy, Inc.
Grant Purpose
To research and expand strategic giving in African American-owned businesses,
one of the fastest growing segments in U.S. economy.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
Twenty-First Century Foundation
The National Black Chamber of Commerce
The Center on Philanthropy at the City University of New York (CUNY)
Howard University

Grant Description
The specific objectives of the Black Business & Philanthropy Initiative are to:
1) conduct research into the current levels of giving (in terms of dollars
contributed) as well as donations of goods, services and volunteer time in black
businesses; 2) assess their current level of knowledge about contemporary
philanthropy and opportunities for intra-business and philanthropy cooperation
and support; 3) develop new educational materials and conduct sessions whose
goals are to increase the giving of time, talent and dollars of Black business people
within specific targeted communities (New York, Washington, DC, Chicago, and
Los Angeles are the proposed pilot cities), and 4) increase understanding and
participation in structured, contemporary philanthropy; and 5) set up a joint black
business/philanthropy advisory group to help set future goals and objectives of the
Black Business & Philanthropy Initiative.

The partners of the Black Business & Philanthropy Initiative have recognized the
tremendous opportunity to increase Black business investment in and support to
communities where they live and work.

The Black Business and Philanthropy Initiative has five strategic components:
increase knowledge of black business philanthropy, increase access to and use of
donor-educational materials, direct marketing of philanthropy to black businesses,
promote and market philanthropy by recognizing, honoring and promoting
outstanding examples of such philanthropy, and establish a national black business
and philanthropy leadership council consisting of black business people.

The anticipated results of this initiative include:
 Increased access, visibility and engagement of people of color in giving.
 More innovative ways of giving among Black owned businesses.
 Improved access and useful knowledge about giving.
 Improved access to and use of tools.

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Grant Profile
National Community Development Institute (NCDI)
Grant Purpose
Through efforts like Transforming Philanthropy in Communities of Color, we
envision a future where communities of color will be able to collectively address
common challenges, nurture strong leadership, sustain stable infrastructures and
forge cooperative partnerships that create a “community giving spirit.”
Collaborating
Organization(s)
Center for Community Action
Community Development Institute
Migrant Benevolent Association, Inc.
Sandhills Heritage Family Association
One East Palo Alto
South of Market Community Action Network

Grant Description
The goal of Transforming Philanthropy in Communities of Color is to create
transformation among grassroots and community-based organizations to cultivate
philanthropic support from communities of color. Transformation represents a
change within the form, structure, condition or nature of the practice of giving
within our communities.

Traditional notions of philanthropy are often associated with some form of
requesting and giving of money. Through this initiative we hope to expand this
notion. By taking a broader view of philanthropy that includes resources, time,
knowledge and connections, communities of color have an increased opportunity
to access a larger and more varied network of support.

By identifying and drawing upon traditional and emerging cultural giving
practices within our communities, our organization will gain:
• The ability to more effectively harness a variety of resources to
address social issues
• The consciousness to address cultural issues of race, class and power
that often challenge communities of color who want to cultivate
diverse ways to support their work or unite their social change
efforts.

Transforming Philanthropy in Communities of Color will begin in North Carolina
and California, and later expand to other states. We are currently creating
communities of giving in the Southeast Region of North Carolina, and within the
East Palo Alto and South of Market, San Francisco regions of California. Our
goals for this project are:
• Build individual capacity by providing philanthropists with
culturally-based training to enhance their knowledge and skills.
• Build organizational capacity by providing participating
organizations with on-site technical support and consultation
services.
• Build community capacity by facilitating networking and peer
exchange.
• Support the field by sharing tools and what we learn at conferences
and other gatherings.
Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting January 23 - 26, 2006 Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ

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Grant Profile
Native Americans in Philanthropy
Grant Purpose
To enhance Native philanthropy and build capacity of Native Americans in the
field of philanthropy.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description
The purposes of the project Building Membership and Capacity are to increase
the scope and effectiveness of Native philanthropy; acknowledge, engage, and
promote Grantmakers; and increase investment in Native communities for self-
determined efforts for social change.

Tremendous opportunities currently exist for Native communities to engage with
mainstream philanthropy and Native giving programs to develop relationships
leading to Native-led change. Important possibilities currently exist to: support
and strengthen the capacity and the connections of Native philanthropic
organizations and tribal giving programs; influence the core values of organized
philanthropy to acknowledge and successfully build on Native cultural values of
generosity and reciprocity; support Native leadership in mainstream and Native
philanthropy; acknowledge and promote grantmaker engagement and investment
with Native communities in self-determined efforts for social change.

Building Membership and Capacity will build Native American’s In
Philanthropy’s membership and capacity to increase the scope and effectiveness
of Native philanthropy, acknowledge, engage, and promote grantmakers and
increase investment with Native communities in self-determined efforts for
social change. Goals include:
1. Broaden and deepen our membership and the network of organized,
mainstream philanthropy that is engaged in learning and investment in
self-determined Native-led causes and concerns.
2. Enhance communications and technical assistance to the diverse
and influential players in Native philanthropy.
3. Bolster Native leadership, mentoring, and investment in Native
philanthropy.
4. Continue to strengthen the Native Americans in Philanthropy
organization.

Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting January 23 - 26, 2006 Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ

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Grant Profile
North Carolina Peoples' Coalition for Giving
Grant Purpose
The North Carolina People’s Coalition for Giving is a statewide effort whose
purpose is to develop strategies that:
 Honor, celebrate, and share our diverse traditions of giving, both past and
present;
 Increase the giving of time, money, and know-how from and to
communities of color in North Carolina; and
 Build bridges with each other and contemporary philanthropy.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
Our fiscal sponsor is the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro.
Additionally, we have a 10-person Advisory Council. By definition and design,
the Coalition is a collaborative effort. Any person of color who is engaged with
philanthropy
– as a volunteer, donor, grantmaker, advisor, consultant, or
community-based leader – is welcome to be a member of the Coalition.

Grant Description
Intentionally multi-cultural and multi-racial, the NC Peoples' Coalition for
Giving seeks impact at three levels: 1) within communities of color, 2) between
communities of color, and 3) with and within contemporary philanthropy (i.e.,
mainstream grantmaking institutions.) We have three strategies/objectives for our
work:

Documenting current and historical giving by people and communities of
color. The Coalition would convene other NC Discovery Alliance and Kellogg
groups and engage an ethnographer to develop and test culturally appropriate
methods for uncovering the full range of giving in communities of color. We
expect that these innovative tools, particularly those for measuring the giving of
time and talent, could have broad appeal and utility. Through this strategy, we also
seek to highlight and celebrate different forms of giving by people and
communities of color. We would create a website and other tools for
dissemination.

Educating ourselves, each other, and contemporary philanthropy. In the first
18 months, we would seek a presence at statewide and regional meetings to share
our efforts..In particular, we aim to communicate the value of “two-ness” of
people of color who work in and interact with the philanthropic field. With their
dual lenses, networks, and senses of responsibility, these professionals bring a
unique ability to blend traditional and contemporary models and to facilitate
change at both the community and institutional levels. During this first 18 months,
we would set the stage to convene conferences to allow people of color and
contemporary philanthropy to connect, share their respective expertise, and learn
from and with each other. Here, we would pay particular attention to balancing
power so that both groups are teaching as well as learning. Finally, we would
support opportunities for ongoing leadership development, particularly for people
of color working in institutional philanthropy and the next generation of leaders in
our diverse communities.

Networking with those who have similar – and different – traditions. While
respecting and maintaining cultural integrity, the Coalition seeks to build bridges
between diverse communities of color. The Coalition would help uncover
common interests and provide opportunities for cross-cultural learning and
collaboration. In addition, we intend to engage openly with the tensions inherent
in a truly multicultural group – for example, the inter-group prejudices and
internalized oppression that often separate us. In this way, the Coalition’s work
would advance broader social change to enhance the quality of life for all North
Carolinians
Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting January 23 - 26, 2006 Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ

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Grant Profile
Potlatch Fund
Grant Purpose
To improve Northwest Native American communities by expanding the leadership
capacity of Native American philanthropists and nonprofit organizations.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description
The Potlatch Fund has been created by Northwest Indian people who believe that
they have a responsibility to expand opportunities for their communities. A series
of “talking circles” put a spotlight on a number of important findings that helped
motivate and guide the Potlatch Fund’s development, as shown below:
 Native American communities only receive 1/20
th
of one percent of
private grants.
 Many tribal communities are not familiar with the formal process of
philanthropy and no organization exists to provide culturally appropriate
technical assistance to tribes and tribal organizations.
 Foundations that work with tribes report they seldom fund Native
American groups because of a lack of proposals from Native
organizations, incomplete or inappropriate proposals, misconceptions
about gaming on reservations, and limited knowledge and awareness of
tribal structures, culture, and sovereignty.
 Some tribes are now in a position to be grantmaking organizations. The
laws and tax requirements related to charitable giving are new to most
tribes. Technical assistance and skills are needed to expand philanthropic
giving from tribes that are interested in using some of their economic
resources for outside charitable giving.

The tradition of gift-giving or “potlatch” was introduced in this region thousands
of years ago. The term “potlatch” is a Chinook jargon word used by Indians of the
northwestern coast of North America that means “to give” or “a gift.” Potlatches
are occasions when tribal members share their wealth by distributing gifts to
members of their tribe and to neighboring tribes.

After two years of operation, the Potlatch Fund has built a solid track record and
reputation for providing strategic and innovative services. The Potlatch Fund now
wish to build their program with the Expanding Northwest Native Philanthropy
Initiative. This initiative aims to improve Northwest Native communities by
unleashing new resources in and into Indian Country and expand the leadership
capacity of Native philanthropists and nonprofit organizations.

The Expanding Northwest Native Philanthropy Initiative has two objectives:
1. Unleash New Resources – The Potlatch Fund will attract new funding
into Native communities in the region by engaging mainstream
individual donors and foundations in collaborative activities with Native
donors and foundations that result in more money for Northwest Native
communities.

2.
Boost Leadership Capacity – The Potlatch Fund will provide and
facilitate the distribution of resources, advice, and technical assistance to
leaders of Native organizations, including grassroots nonprofit groups, to
an emerging group of Native “philanthropic” leaders who are awarding
grants using profits from gaming money or other sources.


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Grant Profile
Public Allies
Grant Purpose
To stimulate dialogue and giving between and by philanthropic institutions,
women, people of color, and young people.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description
Public Allies’ GIVING CHANGE initiative will a) stimulate dialogue and break
down barriers between philanthropic institutions, women, people of color, and
young people, and b) encourage people who may not see themselves as “donors”
to explore how different cultural approaches to philanthropy can be important
strategies for their individual and collective leadership working for community
and social change.

The primary target audiences for this initiative are allies and alumni – diverse
young people between the ages of 18-30. Through this initiative allies and alumni
will develop skills and increased understanding of their identity as donors, as well
as a greater understanding of formal and informal philanthropic practices. The
secondary audience is philanthropic organizations who will benefit from increased
understanding of and outreach to communities of diverse young people, as well as
access to a wider pool of qualified, diverse applicants and board members. The
tertiary audience for this initiative is the broader community of those
underrepresented in philanthropy. Through this initiative they will experience
increased representation and understanding of their own identity as donors and
greater access to resources.

Through GIVING CHANGE, Public Allies will build philanthropy into the core
experience for both allies and alumni, as well as engage peer organizations in a
broadened definition of leadership development for social change. Despite years
of leadership series trainings that include skills workshops and critical reflections
and dialogues on the issues and practices of the nonprofit sector and public life,
Public Allies’ conversations about philanthropy have focused mainly on how to
build relationships with institutional donors rather than the role of philanthropy in
their own leadership.

GIVING CHANGE seeks to achieve its goals through two strategies: 1) bringing
philanthropy into the ally experience; and 2) mobilizing the 1,800 alumni as
givers. It also builds on Public Allies North Carolina and Public Allies Chicago’s
diverse networks of over 450 young people (alumni), including several who have
already become philanthropic innovators in North Carolina and Chicago. By
mobilizing these networks to connect grassroots leaders to traditional
philanthropic practices and institutions, Public Allies will develop more effective
citizen leaders. If the pilot project in North Carolina and Chicago proves
successful, Public Allies will replicate this work to all sites and build philanthropy
as a core component of its ally program and alumni strategy.

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Grant Profile
Resource Generation
Grant Purpose
To engage young wealthy people of color as participants and leaders in
philanthropic networks.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description
Resource Generation’s purpose is to promote innovative ways for young people
of wealth to align their personal values and political vision with their financial
resources to deepen their social and civic engagement. Resource Generation
supports the ability of these young people to better understand themselves as
philanthropists, their place in the socio-economic system, and their capacities to
contribute to social change. Resource Generation also builds cross-class alliances
with people and organizations working for social, racial, and economic justice.

A major effort that Resource Generation has been working on for the past three
years is to educate approximately their 800 young donors about practices and
approaches to building cross class and cross race alliances so that giving can be
more informed by the experience of those in need. This proposed effort will
build upon prior work and pursue the following goals:
 Conduct outreach, provide support for, and engage young wealthy people
of color as participants and leaders in philanthropic networks.
 Partner and collaborate with people of color-led philanthropic
organizations with a specific focus on supporting groups to effectively
involve young people.
 Continue to build a national network of wealthy young people who are
developing tools and strategies to bring a conscious analysis of race to
the field philanthropy with a commitment to building more democratic
and inclusive institutions.

Resource Generation will use the following strategies to accomplish its goals:
 Expand programming to better meet the needs of young people of color.
 Connect more young people of color with wealth to socially just
networks.
 Increase Resource Generation’s organizational capacity to support and
partner with people of color-led philanthropic organizations such as
Public Allies in North Carolina, Grassroots Leadership/Ujaama, and the
Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy.
 Develop and deliver trainings on inclusive grantmaking practices that
focus on the intersection of race and privilege.

Cultures of Giving / Tools Connecting Meeting January 23 - 26, 2006 Tempe Mission Palms, Tempe, AZ

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Grant Profile
Social Venture Network
Grant Purpose
To increase the relevance of socially responsible business practices in
communities of color by building partnerships between business leaders and social
entrepreneurs of color.
Collaborating
Organization(s)
Business Collaborative
DreamMakers
The Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility
Women’s Technology Cluster/Social Fusion
The Alliance of Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs

Grant Description
There is a growing need in the nonprofit sector for a more focused, sustainable
effort to share information and leverage collective resources. This need led to the
creation of the Social Impact Leadership Coalition (SILC), a network of
organizations that have worked together over the past two years to align their
efforts in supporting socially responsible entrepreneurs and economic justice
initiatives. Social Venture Network has taken a leadership role in SILC and will
continue to 1) manage SILC collaborations; 2) direct the Diversity and Inclusion
Initiative; and 3) host urban Social Venture Institutes.

This Diversity and Inclusion Initiative will address the near absence of diversity of
the socially responsible business movement. This absence has resulted in its lack
of relevance in communities of color and has limited the support and resources
available to entrepreneurs of color. SILC now seeks to enhance and grow its
"network of networks,” connect and support leaders in communities of color, and
take a leadership role in broadening the impact of the socially responsible business
movement.

SILC’s Diversity and Inclusion Initiative will focus on:
 Building mutually beneficial partnerships between founding SILC
organizations and other business networks, especially those that represent
and support entrepreneurs of color.
 Promoting innovative models of leadership and partnership in the
socially responsible business sector.
 Increasing the relevance and use of socially responsible business
practices in communities of color.
 Working to identify and eliminate barriers to success for entrepreneurs of
color.
 Enabling successful business leaders, investors, and donors to share their
expertise in “giving back” to local communities and stakeholders.

Building partnerships with diverse leaders will increase SILC’s reach and
relevance. Expanding access to social and professional networks will offer
entrepreneurs and nonprofit leaders valuable connections to potential clients,
partners, and donors. The result will be a stronger, more comprehensive socially
responsible business movement, with greater potential to foster environmental,
social, and economic justice.

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Grant Profile
Southern Partners Fund
Grant Purpose
To enhance skills for community change by and for leaders in communities of
color by developing a philanthropy and leadership network.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description
This project seeks to transform the perception, too often held within communities
of color and within the majority community, that philanthropy is by the majority
for the minority. It will build upon the traditions of giving within communities of
color through a planning process with 20 communities across the southern U.S.
Participants will make giving in communities of color more visible and develop
access to tools of giving and community change.

The immediate objective of this project is to develop an implementation plan for
a Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership Network. The pilot network will
provide learning and training opportunities in 20 communities over a three-year
period to address four broad areas: 1) improve education and understanding of
philanthropy in rural communities; 2) develop and nurture grassroots
community-based leaders and organizers; 3) develop philanthropic leadership
that promotes equitable peer relationships and support real transformation
toward a just society; and 4) build nonprofit organizational capacity.

SPF is taking an axiom out of popular education and expanding it to
philanthropy: organizations experiencing the problems of insufficient resources
and management skills have the answers within their organizations. The
proposed process acknowledges that too often the work with communities of
color by a foundation, although well intended, is short-term with little or no
lasting impact. SPF seeks to avoid this pitfall by committing the time necessary
for a viable implementation plan to emerge, a plan to understand and build
philanthropic and non profit organizational capacity owned by leaders in 20
communities across the South.

Specific objectives are to: 1) recruit collaborating community learning teams; 2)
develop tools for marketing social change philanthropy in and among
communities of color; 3) seek options for greater philanthropic support to SPF
grantee partners; 4) encourage innovation in approaches to community
philanthropy; 5) raise awareness about social change philanthropy trends for SPF
constituency; 6) increase education about philanthropy and volunteerism at the
community level; 7) promote opportunities for exchange between mainstream
philanthropy and social change philanthropy; 8) enhance nonprofit management
skills in social change organizing groups, and 9) carry out these strategies in ways
that will intentionally build the capacity of SPF.

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Grant Profile
Sponsors for Educational Opportunity, Inc. (SEO)
Grant Purpose
To provide philanthropic leadership development training to young professionals
who will channel their knowledge and resources back into communities of color.
Collaborating
Organization(s)
N/A

Grant Description SIRV (Saving, Investing and Returning Value in Communities of Color) is a
national initiative, teaching financial literacy to students and families and
promoting asset management, wealth creation, strategic philanthropy, and
volunteerism to alumni. SIRV is founded on a two-tiered approach to wealth
growth and philanthropy. The goal is to create a culture of asset accumulation and
traditional philanthropic giving among communities in which these skills and
values have been underrepresented. With past support from the W.K. Kellogg
Foundation, the SIRV Program has successfully engaged both alumni and a
growing web of professionals of color in the practice of philanthropy and
volunteerism.

SEO will enhance and expand their network of young professionals of color
throughout New York City who are engaged in philanthropy. Through the creation
of the Speakers’ Series for early career professionals and a Philanthropy
Roundtable Series for alumni in mid- and advanced-career stages, participants will
be introduced to a solid, hands-on process to learn about giving back to their
communities. The goal of this programming is to create and nurture a new set of
philanthropic leaders who will channel their knowledge and resources back into
communities of color, building a new tradition of philanthropy that will sustain
over generations.

The following programs will be supported:
 Speakers’ Series
- Young professional alumni and their colleagues will
learn that wealth building and strategic philanthropy are important,
interconnected personal practices. The Speakers’ Series will mesh
presentations on both wealth creation and philanthropy with an
opportunity for professional networking. Philanthropy speakers —
including foundation program officers, individual donors, and
philanthropy advisors — will explore each of four core philanthropy
areas identified by our Alumni Advisory Committee.
 Capstone Seminar
- SIRV will hold a final Capstone Seminar for all
program participants at the end of each programming year featuring a
keynote presentation by a noted philanthropist. Those who played deeper
roles in the work – Philanthropy Roundtable participants and
grantmakers from collaborative fund projects – will also have an
opportunity to share some of the lessons they learned in the previous year
with all participants, as well as representatives from locally-based
nonprofit organizations and foundations.

This new phase of SIRV will actively involve participants – alumni and through
them a growing web of professionals of color – in building their philanthropic
knowledge into giving action and building their philanthropic capacity in tandem
with their wealth. They will start giving far earlier in their lives than previous
generations have, and they will have the tools they need to sustain that giving
including individual donor funds, access to financial and philanthropic advisors,
and collaborative opportunities. As a result, a network of young donors will be
created, more deeply involved in their communities with more opportunities to
pass this knowledge and commitment on to subsequent generations.

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Grant Profile
Support Center for Nonprofit Management
Grant Purpose
To promote increased and strategic philanthropy in communities of color.

Collaborating
Organization(s)
Asian American Federation of New York
The Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society at the Graduate Center of the City
University of New York
The Hispanic Federation
The New York Regional Association of Grantmakers
The Twenty-First Century Foundation

Grant Description
The Coalition for New Philanthropy (the Coalition), a project of the Support
Center for Nonprofit Management, Inc., is dedicated to increasing the
participation of African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos as donors and
volunteers in support of community nonprofits in the New York metropolitan