Visualization

separatesnottySoftware and s/w Development

Nov 25, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

81 views

Visualization

Purpose:


Forum to discuss Social Studies applications of
visualizations (of data or anything else).


Begin discussions around working together to
make stuff to use in the classroom.

https://mail.bedford.k12.ma.us/~richard_donnelly/

Agenda


Who
are we?


What
isn’t this?
What

is this
(visualization)?


When / where?
Here. Now.


Why
do this?


How
to do visualization better?



Break down examples, issues, and tools
for different kinds of visualizations

Who are we?


Social Studies Teachers at Bedford High

What isn’t this session?


Not some
metaphysical
“visualization” hippy thing

Not a
technical

presentation
on
how to use

particular
hardware / software / aps,
although we will show you a
few specific examples

What is visualization for Social Studies?



Pictures, Cartoons and Videos

Maps

Graphs

Mind
-
mapping and Diagramming

Unemployment

Economic
Contraction

↓ Household
Income

↓Prices



Consumption

↓Profits

Businesses cut
back or fail

↓Production

Cause
-
Effect Diagram

2D Outline

Why do this?


Thinking a little more about
how

we do it.


The brain:

Half of the
cerebral cortex is made up
of vision
-
processing
regions.



Perception, attention,
memory

are by their nature
very limited, so we have to
use the best tools.

Perception, Attention and Memory

Perception



Vision is
actually very limited in
scope. We need to know
where

to look.

Attention



Even when we
are

looking our attention
has a very limited
capacity:

Dan Simon

http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=FWSxSQsspiQ&
list=UUoUA
-
CpKaFCCV2Uz__qNJZw
&index=9&feature=plcp



Memory



Better visualizations are more memorable than verbal
recitations or a bunch of words.


Why do this?


We already are…



Largely kids as
consumers

of visualizations



Kids are also
producers
of
visualizations

(projects, etc.)



Technology
allows them
to do both more effectively



We need to think more about it and consciously
teach our students to think about it

How to do this well?

Four Criteria for
Visualization


Interestingness


Form


Function


Integrity



How to do this well


Pictures,
Cartoons and
Video


Maps


Graphs


Mind
-
Mapping
and
Diagramming


We’ll Present
Example(s) for
Discussion


You’ll share
resources,
activities, ideas

Pictures, Cartoons and Video


Importance of context for still images
to create
function

and
integrity


Documentary video project, National
History Day

Picture and Video Resources


Photoshop


Youtube, pbs, and a variety of tv
channel aps


Movie
-
Maker


imovie


Adobe Premiere


Countless others

Maps


2004 election results

Maps


Interactive Data Mapping

http://www.measureofamerica.org/maps/

Map Resources


Google Maps


Google Maps Mania


http://googlemapsmania.blogspot.com/


Radical Cartography


http://www.radicalcartography.net/?projectionref


Worldmapper
http://www.sasi.group.shef.ac.uk/worldmapper/index.html


Graphs


Graphical Data Presentation

Graphs use data to visually tell a “story”.


The important part of being able to
recognize the “story” that the data tells.

The style of the graph and format
provides the reference points for the
data.

Badly constructed graphs can confuse
the “story” and mislead the viewer.

Good Story


Bad Graph

What “story” does this
graph tell?


Is the U.S. and Europe
really going down?


Is Asian growth build on
Western Decline?


Is there a better graph to
tell this “story”?

Same Type of Story


Better Graph

What Is the Story Here? Good Graph?

Federal Reserve’s Asset Balance Sheet

Source of Chart:
Cleveland Fed

Same Data


Two Stories (1)

Same Data


Two Stories (2)

Story


Cause & Effect?

Bar Graph


Points of Comparison

Nonsensical Student
-
Created Graphs

0
1
2
3
4
5
Degrees of Separation
Test Group
This is a very clever experiment. Students were attempting to find
out how many “degrees of separation” were required (through
having someone’s cell number) to get from a senior to another
individual in the school. But what does this graph mean?


A Pretty Good Student
-
Created Graph

Survey


On a scale of 1
-
10 how much social hierarchy at
Bedford High? (x axis) v. self
-
identified social group (color)

A Very Cool Student Visualization

The 12 Tribes of American Politics

Very Complex
Graphing



Hans
Rosling TED talk

http://www.ted.com/talks/hans_rosling_shows_the_best_stats_you_ve
_ever_seen.html

Gap Minder
-

http://www.gapminder.org/


Technology and Complex Interactive
Graphs / Resources


http://www.nytimes.com//interact
ive/2009/07/31/business/2008080
1
-
metrics
-
graphic.html



http://www.babynamewizard.com
/voyager#


Spreadsheet software


Numbers,
Excel, Google docs


Within presentation software
(powerpoint, keynote, etc.)




Many Eyes


Interactive Graphs

http://www
-
958.ibm.com/software/data/cognos/manyeyes/

Mind
-
Mapping and Diagramming


Ways for students to visualize their (or
others’) thinking.


Our most significant experience is with
diagramming arguments.

Diagramming


Cause
-
Effect

RELATIONSHIPS

Point of argument is to explain the
relationship

between a cause & an effect.


--
Diagram starts with big cause in box on left and
ultimate effect in box on right.

Ex. Unemployment is a major contributor to economic contraction.
Unemployment decreases household income. This, in turn, reduces
consumption. Decreased consumption creates downward pressure on prices
which cuts business profits. With profits reduced, businesses cut production or
fail. This, inevitably, means less production thus a contraction. Also, business
failure creates a vicious cycle as workers are laid off.

Unemployment

Economic
Contraction

↓ Household
Income

↓Prices



Consumption

↓Profits

Businesses cut
back or fail

↓Production

Depression Causes
World War I
ends
D
European Economy
Collapses
Bank
Panics
Unequal wealth
distribution
Overinvestment
Decreased
Production
US Industrial
Overproduction
Businesses
cut back &
fail
Tax loopholes: rich
pay little income
tax
Hawley
-
Smoot
Tariff
Retaliatory Tariffs
(other countries)
Decreased exports
Decreased
Profits
US Agricultural
Overproduction
Low Food
Prices
Loan
Defaults
Decreased
Consumption
Decreased Money
Supply
Unemployment
Bank
Failures
Decreased
household wealth
hoarding
Stock Crash
of 1929
Pessimism
Speculative
bubble
Easy Credit
1920s
Margin
Trading
Debt Burden
Fed Increases reserve
requirement 1931
More European
Production
Diagramming Comparisons

“Tables with Issues”

COMPARISON STATEMENT
:

ISSUE

THING 1

THING 2

Issue A

Descriptor 1A

Descriptor 2A

Issue B

Descriptor 1B

Descriptor 2B

Issue C

Descriptor 1C

Descriptor 2C

Diagramming Comparisons

“Tables with Issues”


Juniors are better students than sophomores

ISSUES

JUNIORS

SOPHOMORES

Academic
Seriousness

Can see collage & life after
HS so serious

Can see only immediate so don’t
see longer
-
term importance of
learning

Intellectual
Development

Older so prefrontal lobe
more developed therefore
capable of more
sophisticated work

Younger so prefrontal lobe less
developed therefore can’t do as
complex work

Emotional
Maturity

Older so more emotionally
mature & better able to set
aside emotions

Younger so less emotionally
mature and thus more
emotionally distracted

Diagramming Resources


Within Powerpoint / Keynote


Google docs


Prezi


Inspiration


Aps?