Sonya Van Horn, M.S., ATP

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Oct 24, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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Sonya Van Horn, M.S., ATP

AT Consultant

North Carolina Assistive Technology Program

North Carolina

Assistive Technology Program


State & federally funded


No charge to persons with disabilities and families


Programs that are required by law to provide assistive
technology services must reimburse us for our services


Vocational Rehabilitation


Independent Living


Veteran’s Administration


Public School Systems


CAP
-
MR/DD


Eligibility

NCATP
provides AT
services to
individuals of
all ages,
all disabilities,
their families
and service
providers.

Services

Advocacy

Consultation

Equipment
Demonstration

Education and
Training

Equipment Loan

Information and
Referral

Technical Assistance

Technical Services

Program
Development

Sylva

ATRC

Sylva

ATRC

Sylva

ATRC

Sylva

ATRC

Sylva

ATRC

What Is Assistive
Technology?

Any piece of
equipment that
is used to
increase the
independence
of an individual
with a disability.

Technology=Tools=Power

Assistive technology
is connecting the
world quickly and
easily in previously
unimaginable ways,
especially through
the Internet and e
-
mail. Many of these
advances have been
lifesavers for people
with disabilities.


Technology choice depends on

type and severity of aphasia


Receptive


Difficulty understanding spoken language


Difficulty understanding text


Expressive


Difficulty speaking


Most Common Types of Assistive Technology
Used by Persons with Aphasia



Computer
-
based Treatment Systems



Augmentative Communication



Computer Access



Reading Aids

Computer
-
based Treatment Systems


Computer
-
based treatment systems
consist of a regular desktop or laptop
computer equipped with specialized
software programs. The software
programs may be used by the person
with aphasia independently or may be
used as an adjunct to weekly therapy
sessions with a speech
-
language
pathologist or other rehabilitation
professional.



.




Knowing whether or not a computer will be
helpful in home therapy is a complex
decision. It requires detailed knowledge of
the user's language capabilities plus a
familiarity with the software and hardware
options. How do you pick software that
targets the skills that need to be
strengthened? How do you know that the
difficulty level is not too high and not too
low? A speech language pathologist and/or
an assistive technology consultant can help
you find answers.

Computer
-
based Treatment Systems

Computer
-
based Treatment Systems


Research demonstrates that specific
problems may be improved with
computerized treatment approaches.
For example:



Computerized reading treatment has

been shown to improve the

language performance of people

with aphasia on reading tasks that

were not computer based.

Computer
-
based Treatment Systems


People report benefits that come from
“exercising” their brain and practicing
skills on a daily basis with the
nonjudgmental, immediate feedback a
computer can provide.

Computer
-
based Treatment Systems


To find out whether you might benefit from a
computer
-
based treatment system, you need
first to determine your particular goals. A
speechlanguage pathologist can help you
define goals and identify appropriate software
tools. There are programs designed to help
with:



auditory comprehension



reading comprehension



writing



word
-
finding



cognitive skills, such as attention,



memory and problem solving

Software for At
-
home Language Practice


MossTalk Words


Parrot Software


Lingraphica

Computer
-
based Treatment Systems


A symbol
-
based communication system,
in combination with a daily training
program, has been shown to improve
natural language production in people
with severe aphasia

Augmentative Communication Systems


These systems help people with speech or
language disorders function better in daily
life. They may look like portable “talking
boxes” or may consist of software that is
used on a desktop or laptop computer.


Augmentative and alternative communication
systems can enhance the speech and writing
of people with significant speech and
language difficulties.



Augmentative Communication Systems


A wide variety of alternative communication
options exist:


voice
-
output devices that come in many shapes
and sizes


word
-
prediction software that “guesses” what you
are trying to type


programs that read the text on the screen out
loud


Alternative communication systems may also
be called “speech
-
generating devices” and
are covered by Medicare and many other
insurance



Augmentative Communication Systems


Can be a low tech device (such as an
alphabet board) or a very high tech
device (such as a computer driven by
the eye gaze of its user). The critical
thing is to match the communication
needs and abilities of the user to the
right device.



Augmentative Communication Systems


The American Speech/Language and Hearing
Association (ASHA) has produced a booklet to outline
the process for deciding when an augmentative
communication device would be helpful in enhancing
communication. For a free copy of



"Augmentative Communication for Consumers",

contact the



American Speech
-
Language
-
Hearing Association:



ASHA



Consumer Information



10801 Rockville Pike



Rockville, MD 20852



Phone: 800
-
638
-
8255 or 301
-
987
-
5700



http://www.asha.org/

Augmentative Communication Systems

Low Tech Symbol
Systems

Augmentative Communication Systems

Recorded Voice
Systems

Augmentative Communication Systems

Text
-
based
Systems

Augmentative Communication Systems

Dedicated Digitized
Voice Systems

Augmentative Communication Systems

Computer
-
based
Systems

Computer Access


Alternative keyboards


Alternative mice


trackballs


eye gaze systems


head mouse


foot mouse


Word predicting
programs



Reading Pens


Are shaped like a pocket
-
sized pen with a
display screen and buttons. Users scan
printed text with the small optical scanner in
the tip of the pen, and the device translates,
defines, reads aloud, or stores the text quickly
and accurately


anytime and anywhere.


Reading pens can:


Define and translate scanned everyday words,
phrases, and professional terms into any of 25
languages


Read scanned words aloud


Store scanned text and transfer it to a PC or
handheld device (online or later)


Use special display and audio features to help
people with special needs (such as dyslexia,
aphasia, and literacy issues)



Funding Resources


Public schools, private schools, Head Start


CSHS/Medicaid


CAP MR/DD


Birth to Three AT Funds


Vocational Rehabilitation


Independent Living


Private health insurance (DME)


Disability organizations (Easter Seals, UCPA)


Service organizations (Lions, Masons, Elks)


Private organizations


Self
-
pay/low interest loans

Determine the need.

Determine the device or assistive
technology needed.

Determine available funding resources.

Gather all essential information.

Get funding authorization approval.

Seek co
-
payment sources.

Seek appeals as appropriate.


Funding Process

NCATP

Funding Specialist


Annette Lauber

919
-
850
-
2787

Staff

Sonya Van Horn, M.S.,
ATP

AT Consultant


Mary Kay Dulin, B.S.

AT Specialist

Computer

Access


Provide access
to internet
information
resources


Increase
employment
options


Increase
educational
opportunities


Increase
communication
with the world

Job
Accommodation


Increase
employment
options


Provide
compensation
for sensory
deficits


Activities of
Daily Living


Increase
independence


Improve
safety


Decrease risk
of injury to
care providers


Vehicle
Modifications


Provide
community
access


Recreation


Increase
access to
recreational
opportunitie
s



"Computers Made Easy
: A guide to computer solutions for


individuals with disabilities and their caregivers." Ruth Bluestone


©2000. This practical guide will answer important questions related


to the use of computers by individuals with disabilities, specifically


those with communication and/or cognitive problems. Its goal is to


help individuals with disabilities, the professionals who treat them,


and family members find hardware and software solutions to meet


the individual needs and to enhance the quality of lives of


individuals with disabilities. Cost 22.50USD (includes shipping and


handling). To order, call Ruth Bluestone at 508
-
238
-
6015 or email


r.bluestone@comcast.net
for more information.