Unit 7 - APSB Public

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4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

152


Ascension Parish Comprehensive Curriculum

Concept Correlation

Unit

7: Autobiographies and Biographies

Time Frame:

Approximately
2

weeks



Big Picture:
(Taken from Unit Description and Student Understanding)




Biographical and autobiographical texts
impart information about personalities, customs, and events of a particular time
period.



An author’s style, accuracy of informational sources, visuals, other documents, and organization of the text structure makes

扩潧牡灨pca氠灩ece敥琠t桥⁣物瑥物a⁦潲

g潯搠汩瑥ta瑵牥.






















Reading

Biographies/Autobiographies

In My Family

Lou Gehrig

Other Biographies/Autobiogra
p
hies

Grammar
:
including present
perfect, past perfect, and
future perfect

verbs;
irregular verbs

Writing
/ Language

Biography

Author’s Purpose, Viewpoint
and Style

In My Family

Lou Gehrig


Interviews

Decoding

Skill


Encoding


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

153


Guiding Questions

Activities

GLEs

1. Can students identify what


makes a biography or an


autobiography worth reading?

2
. Can students identify criteria for


making a biography or an


autobiography interesting?

3
. Can students demonstrate how a


biographer’s or an


autobiographer’s writing style is


used to “hook” the reader?

4
.

Can students identify the author’s



viewpoint?

5
.


Can students
research
, write, and publish




b
iographies

and/or autobiographies
?

6
.

Can students write using standard English



usage?





Activity 1
14
: Daily Independent Reading

9, 10

Activity
115
: Vocabulary Activities

2,

3

Activity
116
: Daily Writing Activities

20e, 21, 22, 23b, 24,
26b

Activity
11
7
: Daily Language


31a, 31b,
31c
, 31d

Activity
118
: People About People

GQ 1,

2, 3

14g, 18
,
19d, 21, 22,
23a, 23b, 23g, 39,
41a, 42

Activity
119
: About You

GQ
1,
2, 3

19d, 20a, 20b, 20c,
20d, 20e, 43e

Activity
1
20
: Focus Lesson

GQ
2,
3

14e, 18, 45

Activity 1
21
: Map It Out

GQ 1,
2

08, 19d, 23a, 23b

Activity 1
22
: Know
Your Subject

GQ
5

08,
14g
, 23b, 42, 43a,
43b, 43c,
43e
, 45, 46,
49

Activity 1
23
:
Final Publication

GQ
5, 6

20a, 20b, 20c, 20d,
20e, 23c, 23d, 23e,
23f, 26b,
27
, 28, 29,
30b, 31a, 31b,
31c
,
31d
,
32
, 47

Activity 1
24
: Showtime!

GQ
5

34, 36a, 36c, 37,
38

Activity 1
25
:

Critical Thinking Written Response:

Lou
Gehrig: The Luckiest Man

GQ 6


(Critical Thinking Written Response Activities could also
be used to apply grammar skills, such as GLEs 28, 29, 30b,
31c, 31d)

14c


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

154


Activity 1
26
:

Critical
Thinking Written Response:

In My
Family


GQ 6


(Critical Thinking Written Response Activities could also
be used to apply grammar skills, such as GLEs 28, 29, 30b,
31c, 31d)

17, 18

Activity
127
: Word Recognition Activity


1,2

Activity
128
: Fluency
Activity 5

10

Activity
129
: Vocabulary Activity 4

2

Activity
130
: Composition Activity 5

GQ
5,
6

21, 27

Activity
131
: Parts of Speech
Activity

GQ
6

31c,
31d


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

155


DOCUMENTATION

GLEs

GLE Description


1

Use understanding of base words, roots, prefixes, and suffixes to decode more complex words (ELA
-
1
-
E1)

(Application)

2

Determine the meaning of unfamiliar words using knowledge of word origins and inflections (ELA
-
1
-
E1)

(Analysis)

13

Identify and explain the defining characteristics of various types of literature, including the myth and the legend

(ELA
-
6
-
E3) (Comprehension)
(Focus: Biography and Autobiography
)

14g

Demonstrate understanding of information in grade
-
appropriate texts
using a variety of strategies, such as:
making simple inferences (ELA
-
7
-
E1) (
Analysis)

17

Explain in oral or written responses how an author’s life and times are reflected in a text (ELA
-
7
-
E3) (Analysis)

18

Explain how an author’s purpose influences organization of a text, word choice, and sentence structure

(ELA
-
7
-
E3) (Analysis)

21

Organize individual paragraphs with topic sentences, relevant elaboration, and concluding sentences

(ELA
-
2
-
E1) (
Analysis
)

27


Write legibly in standard cursive or printed form, indenting paragraphs

appropriately,
using standard margins,
and demonstrating fluency (ELA
-
3
-
E1) (Application)

31c

Apply knowledge of parts of speech in writing, including
:
identifying and using verb tenses correctly, including

present perfect, past perfect, and future perfect (ELA
-
3
-
E4)

(Application)
(F
ocus: past, present, future tense

verbs)

31d

Apply knowledge of parts of speech in writing, including
:
using grade
-
appropriate
irregular verb tenses

correctly (ELA
-
3
-
E4)

(Application)

32

Use knowledge of root words, affixes, and syllable constructions to spell words (ELA
-
3
-
E5) (Application)

43e

Evaluate the usefulness of information selected from multiple sources, including: interviews

(ELA
-
5
-
E2)

(Evaluation)



4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

156





4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

157


Grade 4

English Language Arts

Unit 7
:
Autobiographies and Biographies


Unit 7 Grade
-
Level Expectations

(GLEs)


Highlighted

area is focus of GLE within this concept.


GLE #

GLE and Text and Benchmarks

Reading and Responding

01.

Use understanding of base words, roots, prefixes, and suffixes to decode more
co
mplex words (ELA
-
1
-
E1) (Application
)

02.

Determine the meaning of unfamiliar words using knowledge of word origins and
inflections (ELA
-
1
-
E1) (Analysis)

04.

Adjust speed of reading to accomplish purpose base on text complexity (ELA
-
1
-
E3)

(Comprehension)

05a.

Identify a variety of story
elements, including
:
the impact of setting on character
(ELA
-
1
-
E4)

(Analysis)

08.

Connect information in grade
-
appropriate texts to prior knowledge and real
-
life
situations in oral and written responses (ELA
-
1
-
E6)

(Analysis)

09.

Increase oral and silent
reading fluency and accuracy with grade
-
appropriate texts
(ELA
-
1
-
E7)

(Application)

10.

Demonstrate oral reading fluency of at least 140 words per minute in fourth
-
grade text
with appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression (ELA
-
1
-
E7)

(Application)
Focus:
118+

words a minute with 95% accuracy

13

Identify and explain the defining characteristics of various types of literature, including

the myth and the legend (ELA
-
6
-
E3) (Comprehension)
(Focus: Biography and

Autobiography
)

14e.

Demonstrate
understanding of information in grade
-
appropriate texts using a variety of
strategies, such as
:
comparing and contrasting story elements or information within
and across texts (ELA
-
7
-
E1)

(Comprehension)

14g.

Demonstrate understanding of information in gra
de
-
appropriate texts

using a
variety of strategies, such as:
making simple inferences (ELA
-
7
-
E1)

(A
nalysis)

17.

Explain in oral or written responses how an author’s life and times are reflected
in a text (ELA
-
7
-
E3) (Analysis)

18.

Explain how an author’
s purpose influences organization of a text, word choice,
and sentence structure (ELA
-
7
-
E3)

(Analysis)

19d.

Demonstrate understanding of information in grade
-
appropriate texts using a variety of
strategies, including
:
generating questions to guide
examination of topics

in texts

and
real
-
life situations (ELA
-
7
-
4)

(Synthesis)

19e.

Demonstrate understanding of information in grade
-
appropriate texts using a variety of
strategies, including
:
explaining connection between information from texts and real
-
life experiences (ELA
-
7
-
4)

(Comprehension)

Writing

20a.

Write compositions of at least three paragraphs organized with
the following:
a clearly
stated central idea (ELA
-
2
-
E1
)
(Synthesis)

20b.

Write compositions of at least three paragraphs organized
with the following:
an
introduction and a conclusion (ELA
-
2
-
E1)

(Synthesis)


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

158


GLE #

GLE and Text and Benchmarks

20c.

Write compositions of at least three paragraphs organized with
the following:
a middle
developed with supporting details (ELA
-
2
-
E1)

(Synthesis)

20d.

Write compositions of at

least three paragraphs organized with

the following:
a
logical, sequential order (ELA
-
2
-
E1)

(Synthesis)

20e.

Write compositions of at least three paragraphs organized with

the following:
transitional words and phrases that unify points and ideas (ELA
-
2
-
E
1)

(Synthesis)

21.

Organize individual paragraphs with topic sentences, relevant elaboration, and
concluding sentences (ELA
-
2
-
E1)

(Analysis
)

22.

Identify an audience for a specific writing assignment and select appropriate
vocabulary, details, and
information to create a tone or set the mood and to affect or
manipulate the intended audience (ELA
-
2
-
E2)

(Synthesis)

23a.

Develop grade
-
appropriate compositions by identifying and applying writing
processes, including

the following:
selecting topic and
form (ELA
-
2
-
E3)

(Synthesis)

23b.

Develop grade
-
appropriate compositions by identifying and applying writing
processes, including
the following:
prewriting (e.g., brainstorming, researching, raising
questions, generating graphic organizers) (ELA
-
2
-
E3)
(Syn
thesis)

23c.

Develop grade
-
appropriate compositions by identifying and applying writing
processes, including
the following:
drafting (ELA
-
2
-
E3)

(Synthesis)

23d.

Develop grade
-
appropriate compositions by identifying and applying writing
processes, includi
ng conferencing with peers and teachers (ELA
-
2
-
E3)
(Synthesis)

23e.

Develop grade
-
appropriate compositions by identifying and applying writing
processes, including
the following:
revising based on feedback and use of various tools
(e.g., LEAP21 Writer’s
Checklist and rubrics) (ELA
-
2
-
E3)

(Synthesis)

23f.

Develop grade
-
appropriate compositions by identifying and applying writing
processes, including
the following:
proofreading/editing (ELA
-
2
-
E3)

(Synthesis)

23g.

Develop grade
-
appropriate compositions by i
dentifying and applying writing
processes, including

the following:
publishing using available technology

(ELA
-
2
-
E3)

(Synthesis)

26b.

Write for various purposes, including
:

informational reports that include facts and
examples and that present
important details in a logical order (ELA
-
2
-
E6)

(Application)

Writing/Proofreading

27.

Write legibly in standard cursive or printed form, indenting paragraphs
appropriately, using standard margins, and demonstrating fluency (ELA
-
3
-
E1)

(Application)

28.

Use standard English punctuation, including apostrophes in contractions and in
the
possessive case of singular and plural nouns (ELA
-
3
-
E2)

(Application)

29.

Capitalize greetings, titles of respect, and titles of books, articles, chapters, movies,
and song
s (ELA
-
3
-
E2)

(Application)

30b.

Write using standard English structure and usage, including
:
avoiding writing with
sentence fragments and run
-
on sentences (ELA
-
3
-
E3)

(Application)

31b.

Apply knowledge of parts of speech in writing, including
:
identifying

and using
transitive and intransitive verbs correctly (ELA
-
3
-
E4)

(Application)

31c.

Apply knowledge of parts of speech in writing, including
:
identifying and using
verb tenses correctly, including present perfect, past perfect, and future perfect
(ELA
-
3
-
E4)

(Application)


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

159


GLE #

GLE and Text and Benchmarks

31d.

Apply knowledge of parts of speech in writing, including
: using grade
-
appropriate
irregular verb tenses correctly

(ELA
-
3
-
E4)

(Application)

32.

Use knowledge of root words, affixes, and syllable constructions to spell words
(ELA
-
3
-
E5)

(Application)

Speaking and Listening

34.

Adjust pacing to suit purpose, audience, and setting when speaking (ELA
-
4
-
E1)

(Application)

36a.

Deliver presentations that include
the following:
information drawn from several
sources and
identification of the sources (ELA
-
4
-
E4)

(Application)

36c.

Deliver presentations that include
the following:
details, examples, anecdotes, or
statistics that explain or clarify

information

(ELA
-
4
-
E4)

(Application)

37.

Demonstrate active listening
strategies, including asking questions, responding to cues,
and making eye contact (ELA
-
4
-
E5)

(Application)

38.

Adjust speaking content according to the needs of the audience (ELA
-
4
-
E5)

(Evaluation)

39.

Listen to and critique messages such as advertising

that are communicated in a variety
of mediums, including television and print (ELA
-
4
-
E6)

(Analysis)

Information Resources

41a.

Locate information using organizational features of a variety of resource, including
:

electronic information such as keyword searches, passwords, and entry menu features
(ELA
-
5
-
E1)

(Comprehension)

42.

Locate information using a broad variety of reference sources, including almanacs,
atlases, newspapers, magazines, and brochures (ELA
-
5
-
E1)

(Application)

43a.

Evaluate the usefulness of information selected from multiple sources, including
:

library and online databases (ELA
-
5
-
E2)

(Evaluation)

43b.

Evaluate the usefulness of information selected f
rom multiple sources, including:
electronic
reference works (ELA
-
5
-
E2)

(Evaluation)


43c.

Evaluate the usefulness of information selected from multiple sources, including
Internet

I
nformation (ELA
-
5
-
E2)

(Evaluation)

43e.

Evaluate the usefulness of information selected from multiple sources, includ
ing
:

interviews (ELA
-
5
-
E2)

(Evaluation)

45.

Paraphrase or summarize information from a variety of sources (ELA
-
5
-
E3)
(Synthesis)

46.

Construct simple outlines with main topics and subtopics that reflect the information
gathered (ELA
-
5
-
E3)

(Synthesis)

47.

Use electronic and print resources (e.g., spelling, grammar and thesaurus checks) to
revise and publish book reviews and research reports (ELA
-
5
-
E4)

(Application)

48.

Create a list of sources (e.g., books, encyclopedias, online resources) following a
specified format (ELA
-
5
-
E5)

(Synthesis)

49.

Define plagiarism (ELA
-
5
-
E5)

(Knowledge)


Note:

For additional resources, see Harcourt Teacher’s Manual for

the following skill
:



Author’s Purpose:

o

Introduce: pg. 522I

(T199)

o

Reteach
: S138
-
S139, S150
-
S151, S188
-
S189,
and
T141

o

Review: 542, 568I

(T218)
, 714I

(T274)


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

160




Louisiana Comprehensive Curriculum Activities



Activity 1
1
4
: Daily Independent Reading
(Ongoing)
(GLEs
:

09
,
10
)


Materials List:

a

wide variety of trade books, non
-
fiction, classroom sets, and chapter books at
various reading levels, student library books


Teachers should reserve a specific amount of time every day for daily independent reading
.

This reading time should supplement

the standard reading program by encouraging students to
read independently. This time also provides an opportunity for students to read according to a
variety of student interests and abilities. This daily reading time
should

not

take the place of
regula
r guided reading instruction.

The teacher could introduce the Harcourt Leveled Readers to
students at this time. Students could read the leveled readers for enjoyment and for the purpose of
indentifying the focus skill.


Activity
11
5
: Vocabulary Activiti
es (GLEs: 02,
03
)


Materials List: 3 x 5 or 5 x 7

index cards,
pictures or video clips, index cards, colored
pencils/markers/crayons, Vocabulary Self
-
Awareness Chart BLM


Students are involved with vocabulary activities to allow opportunities for
students to apply
context clues to demonstrate understanding of text
s

and to determine base word

meanings. A
variety of vocabulary
-
building activities will be used throughout the year. These strategies will
be used to gain meaning from unfamiliar texts t
hrough application of context clues and
determination of base word meanings. These strategies will be repeated, built upon, and ongoing.
Strategies may also be used to teach alphabetizing up to the third
letter and dictionary skills.


Teachers can assess

students


understanding of vocabulary e
ither formally (written tests)
or
informally (writing stories, poems, or sentences using the vocabulary words, etc.)



Teachers can choose from these activities to reinforce weekly vocabulary comprehension.
Teachers

do not have to use every activity.


Vocabulary Cards Activity
:



Students create
vocabulary cards

(
view literacy strategy descriptions
)

related to words in the
stories they are reading. Each student receives an index card and a word from the story. Students
write the word (or a sentence using the word) on the front and the definition on the back
(Teachers can have these ready before clas
s to save time). Each student should have one
vocabulary card. The teacher will say, “Stand up, hands up, and pair up.” Students will walk
around the room and find a partner. Students will hold up their cards, and the person they are
paired with will s
tate the definition. If they do not know it, the student may give hints or use the
word in a sentence. After two chances the student should show the definition. Then the other
student turns to hold up his/her vocabulary card and asks for the definition.

When the two
students are finished, they trade cards. The teacher will say,” Stand up, hands up, and pair up”
again, and students will find a new partner.


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

161





Illustrate the Word Activity
:


The teacher shows pictures or video clips that demonstrate the meaning
of a word. Students
receive a list of the vocabulary they will use to draw and label a picture

illustrating the meaning
of the words from the story. This activity is not limited to co
ncrete nouns


for example, a
grim

expression. The labels explain how the word and drawing fit. Drawing skills are not important;
stick figures with accurate labels can succinctly express an idea as much as a well
-
drawn picture.
The student should not r
eplace an abstract idea with a concrete example of it. The teacher can
also use the vocabulary cards above to illustrate the definition of the words.



Vocabulary Self
-
Awareness Activity:



Before reading a story, students receive a list of vocabulary words and complete a
vocabulary
self
-
awareness chart

(
view literacy strategy descriptions
)

to determine their knowledge of t
he
words. Students do not receive definitions or examples at this stage. They rate their
understanding of each word with either a “+” (understand well), a “√” (limited understanding or
unsure), or a “

“(don’t know). After reading the story and being exp
osed to other information,
students return to the chart and add new information to it. The goal is to replace all check marks
and minus signs with a plus sign. Students will be given many opportunities to revisit their
vocabulary charts to revise their e
ntries.


Vocabulary Self
-
Awareness Chart
:

Word

+





䕸a浰me

䑥晩湩瑩潮

a畴潢u潧ra灨y

+



f 牥a搠a渠n畴潢uog牡灨y
a扯畴⁄b⸠.略獳s


biography

+



I wrote an autobiography.




Activity
116
: Daily Writing Activities
(Ongoing) (GLEs:

20e, 21, 22
, 23b,
24, 26
b
)


Materials List:
j
ournal, pencil


Students will keep a daily journal or writer’s notebook. Daily writing activities can include, but
are not limited to
,

the following list:



Daily journal prompts


Story summary


Daily news (
W
rite about things
that happened at school that day
.
)


Picture prompts (
U
se pictures to create a story
.
)


Word wall or spelling activities


Story starters


Comic strips (Fill in what the characters are saying.)


Pen pals (Write to another class.)


Story responses

(Respond to reading story or trade book.)


Poetry


Round Robin Writing (Students create and add to stories as they are passed around
.
)


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

162



Want ads


Advertisements


Directions


Greeting cards


Biographies



Websites for writing prompts:




http://www.busyteacherscafe.com/wspages/writing.htm




http://www.canteach.ca/elementary/prompts.html


Activity
117
: Daily Language

(Ongoing
)
(
GLEs:
31a, 31b, 31c, 31d
)


Materials List:
d
aily sentences

or short passages (including letter format) that are to be edited;
printed copy for each student and/or

transparency copy for use as a class
; overhead projector.


Focus skills could
include:
including present perfect, past perfect, and future perfect verbs;
irregular verbs


Daily editing activities

can be used in many ways. Here is
one

possible procedure that you might
use:



Copy the day's daily edit activity onto a transparency. As students
enter class
, hand them a
copy of the day's passage. Immediately,
they settle into finding the

errors of capitalization,
punctuation, or grammar included in that passage.



Give students 5 m
inutes or so

to find and mark

errors in the day's passage.



Divide the class into two teams or more. The teams you establish in this way will be
"permanent teams" (for at least a month).



Start with one team and ask a student on that team to identify an er
ror in the passage. If the
student cor
rectly identifies one of the

errors in that day's passage, a point is awarded to the
team. Then it is the other team's chance to identify an error.
Go back and forth until all
errors have been found in that day's passa
ge. (Students might even find additional errors in
a daily passage. Give credit if they offer an idea that would improve the passage.)



Keep score over the course of a month and award a special treat (an ice pop, a homework
-
free
-
night coupon, or something
else that students will value) to members of the team that
has the highest score at the end of the month. You might change the makeup of teams for
the following month.

Activity 1
18
: People About People (GLEs:
14g, 18,
19d, 21, 22, 23a, 23b, 23g, 39, 41a,
42)


Materials List: variety of biographies and autobiographies,
Lou Gehrig, In My Family,
computer,
publishing software
,
GISTing

BLM
,

overhead projector, transparency


The teacher brings in a variety of biographies and autobiographies from the library
or Harcourt
selections
Lou Gehrig

and
In My Family

for students to peruse. Teacher and students

discuss
what makes a biography/an autobiography recommended reading, how accurate and interesting
the biography/ autobiography is, and what writing style the bi
ographer/autobiographer uses to
“hook” the reader.
Teacher should explicitly teach inferences with this text.
Students read aloud
models of autobiographies and biographies from a variety of sources, including their own from
previous grades, the media, tel
evision network biography, and magazines such as
Kids National
Geographic, Sports Illustrated for Kids, Children’s Digest,

and
Teen
magazines. The teacher

asks

4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

163


what makes these magazines attract large audiences. Students critique information presented for
accuracy and discuss author’s intent

and viewpoint
, noting that sometimes accounts are
sensationalized in order to attract more readers. Students discuss the impact of biographical
reporting for a public with a high level of curiosity about the rich and fa
mous.


After this quick exploration, students are asked to identify one person in the field of sports,
entertainment, or government about whom they are interested. Students will make a list of five
questions they would like to ask them. Generating a list o
f key words, they complete a mini
-
research exercise, finding information online and using tools for periodical searches.
Students
will use the literacy strategy
GISTing

(
view literacy st
rategy descriptions
)
(teachers can make
copies of
GISTing

BLM)
to

write a one
-
paragraph essay about the person of interest to them.

This
activity helps students to focus on the main ideas in a text or informational piece of reading.
Students summarize
information and answer key questions about the reading. This activity helps
students decide what is important and what is not important in an article or book. It can also help
them to use concise and precise sentences as well as help

develop their vocabula
ry
. I
t
also
helps
students to learn the content and main ideas in the readings
, an important benefit
. After the essays

are complete, students use PC publishing software to compile their summaries into a classroom
version of a

magazine or newspaper.


For
example:

Using the
GISTing
BLM, the

teacher selects 4
-
5 paragraphs from an article or text. Place the
selection or article on an overhead. Read the textbook selection or article aloud to the students.
After the article is read
,

explain how to get the gist

of the article. Next,
h
ave the students draw 20
blanks on their paper. Cover the article so only the first paragraph is visible. Read the paragraph
aloud. Point out the focus of the article or textbook selection. Students and teachers are to
summarize the

first paragraph in
exactly
20 words. The students are to decide what is
or is not
important to keep
.

Practice asking key questions to start examining the information. Always begin
the first

sentence of the gist with who
and
/or

what in the article or textb
ook selection. Note
information that is repeated. Identify a main idea. After the paragraph is “gisted
,
” or summarized
,

the teacher reads the second paragraph, while students follow along. The students draw 20 more
blanks on their paper and summarize the f
irst and second paragraphs. The same process is
continued with the third and fourth paragraphs.


Activity 1
19
:
About You

(19d, 20a, 20b, 20c, 20d, 20e, 43e)



Materials List: LEAP 21 Writer’s Checklist BLM,

LEAP 21 Writing Rubrics BLM


Students follow a similar procedure to learn more about each other. The class
brainstorms

(
view
literacy strategy descriptions
)

a list of questions that would provoke thought about a stu
dent’s
personality, life experience, and personal ambitions. Examples may include:



What is my best childhood memory?



Who are the people I most admire?



What was my most embarrassing experience?



What is my best/most unique attribute?



What makes me the happie
st?



Where in the world would I most like to travel?



What are my future dreams?



4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

164


Students use the list of guiding questions to
interview a classmate and write notes on graphic
organizers. If you choose you could have students
write a “bio”
of three or more

paragraph
s

that
shares information classmates may not know about them.
Give each student a copy of the LEAP
21 Writer’s Checklist BLM. Discuss with them what will be expected from their composition.
The composition should be organized to include a clever

introductory paragraph, paragraphs with
main ideas and supporting details generated by the guiding questions, and a concluding
paragraph. The
auto
biographical sketch should flow in a logical, sequential order, using
transitional words and phrases that uni
fy points and ideas. Students share their work with the
class. The teacher facilitates a discussion about the kinds of information that can be included to
make a biography more interesting.

Remind students that their compositions will be scored using
LEAP

21 Writing Rubrics BLM.


Activity
1
20
: Focus Les
son (GLEs: 14e, 18,

45)


Materials List: two biography and/or autobiography selections, chart paper


The teacher chooses two selections about a person, each representing a different approach, for
example, an autobiography by Mark Twain and a biography about him by his daughter Susy
Clemens. Each represents different approaches to biography and gives the
s
tudents two different
views of biographical writing. Using the literacy strategy
Student Questions for Purposeful
Learning (SQPL)

(
view literacy strategy descriptions
)

the teacher will g
enerate a statement based
upon the two books. The statement does not have to be factually true as long as it provokes
interest and curiosity. Next, the teacher asks the students to think of one good question they have
about the books based on the statemen
t. As students respond, write their questions on the chart
paper or on the board. Tell students to listen carefully for the answers to their questions as you
read the books aloud. Stop after the section or page that supplies the answer and ask students
if
they heard an answer to their question. Mark questions that are answered. Continue this process
until the books are completed. Remind students they should ask questions before they learn
something new, then listen and look for answers to their questi
ons.


After reading the books, students discuss the information

and identify how the reader is hooked,
how the selection is organized, what is important to remember about this person, and how this
person made a difference for others. They complete a graphi
c

organizer comparing and
contrasting approaches to text.


Activity
1
21
: Map It Out! (GLEs: 08, 19d, 23a, 23b)


Materials Lis
t:

Biography Research Checklist

BLM, Graphic Organizer BLM

Discuss with the students what kinds of information are needed to have a complete biography.

A. Name or names

B. Place and date of birth

C. Family

D. Places lived

E. Hobbies

F. Occupations

G. Significant incidents in his/her life

H. What made him/her
famous


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

165



Students have developed prior knowledge for choosing, researching, and using

effective writing
strategies to write their own biographies. Students

choose a person they want to research and
write about
. Using Biography Research Checklist BLM and

the strategies discussed in Activities
5 and 6

to formulate a plan for their work
,
students

will have a
pre
-
conference with the teacher to
share preliminary ideas about the subject, possible resources, essential
questions, and thoughts on
how to “hook” th
e reader. To complete these prewriting steps, students use a
g
raphic o
rganizer

(
view literacy strategy descriptions
)

to plan a potential framework for the
biography

(see Graphic
Organize
r BLM)


Activity
1
22
: Know Yo
ur Subject (GLEs: 08, 14g,

23b, 42,

43a, 43b, 43c, 43e, 45, 46,

49)


Materials List:

GISTing

BLM, Bibliography BLM



Students

use available resources to learn important information about the subject. Teachers
continue to model how to learn more about a subject using a variety of resources, such as
interviews, the Internet, books, etc. They also review information
about
GIST
ing

(
view literacy
strategy descriptions
)

(see GISTing BLM) and note taking, plagiarism, and citing references, as
students independently research using multiple sources. After an in
-
depth inv
estigation of their
subject, students make inferences about what is important to know and remember about this
person and how this person made a difference for others. Students make an outline and other
organizers of the information to be included in their
biography draft, listing main headings and
supporting details. They complete a bibliography

(see Bibliography BLM) according to the
specified format.



Activity 1
23
:
Final Publication

(GLEs: 20a, 20b, 20c, 20d, 20e, 23c, 23d, 23e, 23f, 26b, 27,
28, 29, 30
b, 31a, 31b, 31c, 31d, 32, 47)


Materials List:
LEAP 21 Writer’s Checklist BLM
,

LEAP 21 Writing Rubrics BLM



Students begin the actual draft of the biography of another person of interest. Students

write a
number of paragraphs encompassing many facets of this person’s life, such as what is important
to know about this person, what relationships this person has in his or her life, who has influenced
him or her and how, what experiences have shaped his

or her values and beliefs, etc.


Using the LEAP 21 Writer’s Checklist BLM, students

continue through the writing process


draft, revise, focusing on introductions and conclusions, supporting details, sequential order,
legibility, interjections, hyphenat
ion and syllabication/spelling, and verb usage

(
present perfect,
past perfect, and future perfect verbs; irregular verbs
)
. Students will read their drafts aloud to a
peer who listens for transitional words and phrases that unify the writing and for interes
ting word
choice. Peers will also proofread for run
-
on or fragmented sentences, standard usage errors,
capitalization, and punctuation errors. The writer will make revisions and edit the work with
attention to conventions. Students will use spelling, gramm
ar checks, and the t
hesaurus to
improve vocabulary
before printing a final draft of their multi
-
paragraph essays. Students’ essays
will be graded using a rubric such as the LEAP 21 Writing Rubrics BLM.


Activity Specific Assessment:

Activity
1
23
: Students will use the
LEAP 21 Writer’s Checklist

for self

and peer editing. Teachers
will use this list as a standard for grading the final draft.


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

166



Activit
y
1
24
: Showtime! (GLEs:

34, 36a, 36c, 37, 38)



Materials List: Presentation Rubric BLM


Students

present their compositions and share everyday objects as artifacts that reflect their
subject. For example, if they wrote about Ben Franklin, they could have a key or a calligraphy
pen as a departure point to understand about his life and about how he mad
e a difference in our
lives. Students share their pieces while audience expectations are clearly established using scoring
rubrics (see
Presentation Rubric

BLM) that address speaking, listening, and presentation skills.



Activity Specific Assessment:

Activity 1
24
: Teachers and students will construct a presentation rubric (see Presentation Rubric
BLM) that includes standards for speaking (content, pacing, volume, posture), listening (eye
contact, listening etiquette, questioning), and presentation (pr
ops, visuals, timing). Teachers use
the rubrics to score the student’s final presentation and provide written commentary about
strengths and weaknesses.



Activit
y
1
25
: Critical Thinking Written Response:
Lou Gehrig: The Luckiest Man

(Teacher
-
Made) (GLE

14c
)


In his speech Lou Gehrig said he considered himself the “luckiest man on the face of the earth.”
Using story evidence, explain what he meant
by this? Do you agree? Why or why not?



Activity
1
26
: Critical Thinking Written Response:
In My Family

(
Teacher
-
Made)

(GLE

17, 18
)


What experience from the author’s childhood do you most relate to? Write a paragraph about
why it is easy to relate to that experience. Give specific reasons and details to support your
response.


Activity
127
: Word
Recognition Activity

(GLEs: 1, 32)

Goal: Decodes and spells unknown words through structural analysis


Note:
See Reading and Language Arts Essentials Resource Document


Activity
128
: Fluency Activity 5

(GLE: 4)

Goal: Read an end
-
of
-
fourth
-
grade text with

accuracy and prosody, at
135
-
140 words per
minute on the first reading



Sample Activities


1.

Whole
-
Group.

The teacher selects a high
-
fourth
-
grade passage. Each child must be able to
see the text, either

in his/her

own copy or via a projection. The teacher reads aloud the first
text segment and the students echo it back. Each segment the teacher reads aloud must be long
enough that the students need to attend to the print yet short enough that the teacher’s reading
can serve to prompt pronunciations.



4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

167


2.

Small
-
Group.

Students are grouped according to a match between their fluency level and the
demands of the text. The teacher may follow the sequence of activities (
echo reading, choral
reading, partner reading, and
whisper reading). In doing so, the benefits of repeated readings
are naturally provided.


3.
Independent.

It is important to provide opportunities for children to repeatedly read a variety


of texts. These texts should be near the child’s instruct
ional reading level and should not be



controlled for phonics elements (that is, they should not be decodable texts). Children can


practice reading the texts using whisper phones or can read aloud to adults at home.


Activity
129
: Vocabulary
Activity 4

(GLE 2)

Goal: Incorporate new words encountered in text into meaning vocabulary


Sample Activities


1.

Whole
-
Group.

The teacher displays his/her own word bank, showing how it has grown over
time, why the words were selected, how the definitions
were sometimes converted into
everyday language, and how the teacher often reviews the words informally.



2.

Small
-
Group.


A group of students share their word banks. They take turns holding up a card
they have made for a recently added word. They tell th
e definition and explain why they
found it interesting.


3.

Independent.


Each child reviews the word bank individually, perhaps selecting a few words
for which to write sentence contexts.


Activity
1
30
: Comp
osition

Activity
5

(GLE: 21, 27)

Goal: Use a
research process and a writing process (e.g.
, planning, drafting, revising,
editing, publishing) to construct coherent 5
-
paragraph essays on unfamiliar topics


Sample Activities


1.

Whole
-
Group.

The teacher presents an overview of the entire process, using fourth
-
grade
examples at various points of development. It is important to use examples and topics that are
largely familiar to the students so that they can concentrate on the process. Each ex
ample
should be accompanied by an outline, showing the organization that links the five paragraphs.
It is also important to stress the overall organization of the essay and the need
to
provide clear
transitions from one paragraph to the next.


2
.
Independe
nt.

Each student will select a
famous person

from a list prepared by the teacher. The



steps of the process will then begin, and although the teacher will expect students to move



through them independently, support may be required in some cas
es. The planning step will


involve th
e creation of a topical diagram

in which the student indicates the overall organization



of the essay. It is important for the teacher to review this outline with the student before




d
rafting
b
egins.


Activ
ity
13
1
: Parts of Speech

(31c, 31d)



4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

168




Teacher introduces the present perfect verb tense. Student
s identify the present perfect
tense in sentences provided by the teacher. They create their own sentences using the
perfect tense.



Teacher introduces past
perfect tense and future perfect verb tense. Students
recognize the past perfect and future perfect tenses in sentences provided by the
teacher. Students use the past perfect and future perfect tenses in sentences they
create.



Teacher reviews the past ir
regular form of verbs. Students correct

incorrect usage in
sentences provided by the teacher.



Sample Assessments

General Guidelines


Use a variety of performance assessments to determine student understanding of content.
Select assessments that are
consistent with the type of product that results from the student
activities; and develop a scoring rubric collaboratively with other teachers or students. The
following are samples of assessments that could be used for this unit:

General Assessments



Teach
ers will observe student performance in locating and using references and will use
anecdotal records to determine which students need individual assistance in this process.



Teachers will provide students with a checklist of required steps and timeframes fo
r the
biography project. As each step is completed, students bring their checklists to the teacher
to be initialed/discussed.



Biography and Autobiography Booklist


Alcott, Louisa May


Her Childhood Diary

Anderson, William

Laura’s Album: A Rem
embrance Scrapbook of Laura

Anderson, William



Pioneer Girl: Story of Laura Ingalls Wilder

Bail, Raymond



Where Lincoln Walked

Burchard, Peter

Charlotte Forten: A Black Teacher in the Civil War

Burleigh, Robert



Home R
un: The Story of Babe Ruth

Coles, Robert




Story of Ruby Bridges

Cooney, Barbara



Eleanor

Cooney, Barbara

Emily

Dahl, Roald




Boy

DePaola, Tomie



26 Fairmount Avenue

Fisher, Leonard E.



Gandhi

Greene, Carol




Katherine Dunham

Fleischman, Sid

Abracadabra

Freedman Russell



Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery

Johnson, Jane

My Dear Noel: The Story of a Letter from Beatrix Potter

Kent, D.
Thurgood



Marshall and the Supreme Court

Kwan, Michelle

Michelle Kwan, Heart of a Champion: An Autobiography


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

169


Lowry, Lois




Looking Back

Lyons, Mary




Catching the Fire: Philip Simmons, Blacksmith

Martin, Jacqueline




Snowflake Bentley

Matthews, Tom



Light Shining Through the Mist: a Photobiography of

Nickens, Bessie



Walking the Log: Memories of a Southern Childhood

Parks, Rosa




Rosa Parks: My Story

Pickney, Andrea



Duke Ellington

Roop, Pe
ter




Keep the Lights Burning, Abby

Say, Allen




Grandfather‚s Journey

Sis, Peter




Starry Messenger: Galileo Galilei

Stanley, Diane



Joan of Arc

Szabo, Corrine

Sky Pioneer: A Photobiography of Amelia Earhart

T
owle, Wendy



The Real McCoy

Townton, Evelyn

Frederick Douglas and the War Against Slavery

Wells, Rosemary



Mary on Horseback: Three Mountain Stories

Winter, Jeanette



My Name is Georgia: A Portrait



Book: Lead the Way

Theme 1: You Can Do It!

Story
: Lou Gehrig: The Luckiest Man


Additional Harcourt Practice Activities


These can be found on the Harcourt Website at
www.harcourtschool.com

1. Grade 4: Authors and Illustrators, Y
ou Can Do It!,
Lou Gehrig: The Luckiest Man

2. Grade 4: Building Background, You Can Do It!,
Lou Gehrig: The Luckiest Man

3. Grade 4: Test Tutor, You Can Do It!,
Lou Gehrig
-

Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots


Technology Related Activities


PLATO:
Refer to the PLATO Alignment Chart located at the end of this document for other
possible lessons.



Book: Lead the Way

Theme 5: Community Ties

Story: In My Family


Add
itional Harcourt Practice Activities


These can be found on the Harcourt Website at
www.harcourtschool.com

1.

Grade 4:
Author and Illustrator, In My Family

2.

Grade 4:
Building Background, In My Family

3.

Grade 4:
Reading Skills Rocket, In My Family


Text Structure: Sequence

4.

Grade 4:
Test Tutor, In My Family


Sequence

5.

Grade 4:
Test Tutor, In My Family


Reference Sources


4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

170



Technology Related Activities


PLATO: For additional lessons please see PLATO alignment chart at the end of t
his document.







Name
/School
_________________________________

Unit No.:______________


Grade
_
_______________________________

Unit Name:________________


Feedback Form

This form should be filled out as the unit is being taught and turned in t
o your teacher coach upon completion.



Concern and/or Activity
Number


Changes needed*


Justification for changes


























































4
th

Grade ELA
-
Autobiographies and Biographies
-
Unit 7

171














* If you suggest an activity substitution, please
attach a copy of the activity narrative formatted
like the activities in the APCC (i.e. GLEs, guiding questions, etc.).