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GENERATIONAL POVERTY

Twilight Forum

9
th

March 2010.

A Framework for Understanding



Poverty

Ruby K Payne, Ph.D.


www.ahaprocess.com

Tonight is a snapshot.





Full training


Up to 4 days

15 Modules including


theory and
practise.

Available through “Social Solutions”


I am an accredited trainer.



The World As 100 People


( Page 1)

POVERTY????

Keys Points to Remember.

Poverty is relative.

Poverty occurs in all races and in all countries.

Economic class is a continuous line, not a clear
-
cut distinction

Generational poverty and Situational Poverty are different.

This work is based on patterns. All patterns have exceptions.

An individual brings with him/her the hidden rules of the class in which
he/she was raised.

Schools and businesses operate from middle
-
class norms and use the
hidden rules of middle class.

For our students to be successful, we must understand their hidden
rules and teach them the rules that will make successful at school and
work.

We can neither excuse students or scold them for not knowing; as
educators we must teach them and provide support, insistence, and
expectations.

To move from poverty to middle class or middle class to wealth, an
individual must give up relationships for achievement ( at least for some
period of time.)

Two things that help one move out of poverty are education and
relationships.

Four reasons one leaves poverty are: It’s too painful to stay, a vision or
goal, a key relationship, or a special talent or skill.


TODAY’S SNAPSHOT

HIDDEN RULES

RESOURCES

USE OF LANGUAGE

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS.

HIDDEN RULES

“The unspoken cues and habits of a
group.”


Whether we like it or not there is
definition economic classes in our
society.


Could you live in …………………….
Quiz


Quick summary of hidden rules
among classes


WHAT DOES THIS INFORMATION MEAN IN THE SCHOOL
OR WORK SETTING?

Assumptions made about individuals’ intelligence and
approaches to the school and/or work setting may relate
more to their understanding of hidden rules.


Students need to be taught the hidden rules of middle class


not in denigration of their own but rather as another set of
rules that can be used if they so choose.


Many of the attitudes that students and parents bring with
them are an integral part of their culture and belief systems.
Middle class solutions should not necessarily be imposed
when other, more workable solutions might be found.


An understanding of the culture and values of poverty will
lessen the anger and frustrations that educators may
periodically feel when dealing with these students and
parents.

How do these characteristics surface
with adults and students from poverty?


Complete pages 76
-
80.

RESOURCES

Poverty is not about money but
resources.

FINANCIAL

EMOTIONAL

MENTAL

SPIRITUAL

PHYSICAL

SUPPORT SYSTEMS

RELATIONSHIPS/ROLE MODELS

KNOWLEDGE OF HIDDEN RULES

Scenarios

Three scenarios.


Can you analyse their resources?


( In groups of three read and analyse
each scenario. Share findings.)



REAL SCENARIO

PART ONE:

Think about a child in your class/school.
When this child is absent you don’t really
mind because you know much of your time
will be spent with him/ her due to academic
progress, behavioural issues, social issues
etc.


Analyse this child’s resources using the grid
supplied.

Discuss with partner.


PART TWO.

Think about a child in your class who you
look forward to seeing every day and you
are disappointed when they are absent.
This is the child you right a report




“…… is a pleasure to teach”


Analyse this child’s resources using the grid
supplied.

Discuss with partner

WHAT DOES THIS INFORMATION MEAN IN THE SCHOOL OR
WORK SETTING?

Resources of students and adults should be analysed before
dispensing advice or seeking solutions to the situation. What
may seem to be very workable suggestions from a middle
-
class point of view may be virtually impossible given the
resources available to those in poverty.



Educators have tremendous opportunities to influence some
of the non
-
financial resources that make such a difference in
students’ lives. For example, it costs nothing to be an
appropriate role model.

INTERVENTIONS
-

Reflection

Identify two interventions you could
make to assist Child No.1


How will you make them and what is
the timeline for doing so?


Share.

USE OF LANGUAGE

Registers of Language


Every language in the world has five registers (Joos 1967) as follows:


FROZEN

FORMAL

CONSULTATIVE

CASUAL

INITIMATE



RULE: Joos found that a person can go one register down in the same
conversation, and that is socially acceptable. However, to drop two
registers or more in the same conversation is to be socially offensive.


Majority of students from poverty backgrounds DO NOT have access to
the formal register at home. The problem is that our schooling (tests
etc ) are all in formal register.





WE MUST TEACH FORMAL REGISTER.



DISCOURSE PATTERNS

The manner in which the information is
organised.


Formal


SPEAKER OR WRITER GETS STRAIGHT TO THE POINT.


Casual


SPEAKER OR WRITER GOES AROUND THE ISSUE
BEFORE FINALLY COMING TO THE POINT.


Example: Cinderella.

Many students come to school with
limited access to language and
therefore finds difficulty. Often these
children have been seen to have a
Language Disorder or Language
Delay.


What would it be like?

WHAT DOES THIS INFORMATION MEAN IN THE SCHOOL
OR WORK SETTING?

Formal register needs to be directly taught.


Casual register needs to be recognized as the primary
discourse for many students.


Discourse patterns needs to be directly taught.


Discipline that occurs when a student uses the inappropriate
register should be a time for instruction in the appropriate
register.


Student need to be told how much the formal register affects
their ability to get a well
-
paying job.

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS

LANGUAGE NEGOTITAION


THE CHILD VOICE


THE PARENT VOICE


THE ADULT VOICE











NO SIGNIFICANT LEARNING
OCCURS WITHOUT A
SIGNIFIACNT RELATIONSHIP.


Dr James Comer.





Stephen Covey’s work (1989)

The emotional bank account

-
Deposits and withdrawals.



-
Adapted for individuals in poverty.







What can a teacher do to build
relationships

1.
Calls on everyone in the room equitably.

2.
Provides individual help.

3.
Gives ‘wait’ time ( allows students enough time to answer.

4.
Asks questions to give the student clues about the answer.

5.
Asks questions that require more thought.

6.
Tells students whether their answers are right or wrong.

7.
Gives specific praise.

8.
Gives reasons for praise.

9.
Listens.

10.
Accepts feelings of the student.

11.
Gets within and arm’s reach of each student each day.

12.
Is courteous to students.

13.
Shows personal interest and gives compliments.

14.
Touches students ( appropriately)

15.
Desists ( he or she does not call attention to every negative
behaviour)


ACTIVITY



Of the 15 TESA identified behaviours,
analyse which ones you do
consistently and comfortably. Which
is your greatest strength? Which do
you need to improve? How will you do
it?

If comfortable, share with a partner.


Want to know more?

www.ahaprocess.com


A Framework for Understanding
Poverty




Ruby.K.Payne.


Watch for PD through “Social
Solutions”