Android Golf Scorecard App

safetroubledMobile - Wireless

Nov 24, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

141 views

COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


1

|
P a g e







Android Golf Scorecard App

COMP 6620

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter, James McCracken

Version: 1

Last Updated: 12
/
08
/11



Phase

I
I
I
Evaluation

I.

Introduction

02

II.

Heuristic Evaluation

02

III.

Cognitive Walkthrough

0
4

III.I.

Subt
ask


Create Round

04

III.II.

Subt
ask


Edit

Round

07

III.III.

Subt
ask


Delete Round

11

IV.

Usability Experiment

12

V.

Comparison Experiment

14

VI.

Appendix

16



COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


2

|
P a g e


I.
Introduction

This document details our group’s efforts
evaluate
the design of our Golf Scorecard app. This
document is organized as follows. In section
II

(
Heuristic Evaluation
),

we
develop
several heuristics for
evaluating our design
.

In section III (
Cognitive Walkthrough
),
we conduct a cognitive walkthrough of
each of our core tasks by answering the three questions for each step and explaining the problem. In
Section IV (
Usability
Experim
ent
), we design and conduct a usability experiment. In section V
(
Comparison Experiment
), we design a comparison experiment.
Section

VI (
Summary
) summarizes this
information in a tabular form and presents some brief discussion of the complexity of our de
sign.

II.
Heuristic Evaluation

Title

Explanation

Question(s)

Development

Match bet
w
een system
and the real world


(General)

The system should
allow users to perform
actions in ways similar
to those in which they
would perform the
same actions without
using the system

-

Is the language used at
the interface simple?

-

Is appropriate
feedback provided
within reasonable time
about a user's action?

-

Does the system work
similarly to a paper
scorecard

system
?

This is taken from Jakob
Nielsen’s list of 10

n敲慬
-
pu牰o獥s
楮瑥牦慣r⁨敵 楳瑩捳⁡湤
慤慰瑥T⁦ r⁵獥 楮 ou爠
獹獴sm.

䅥獴桥瑩A⁡湤
m楮業慬as琠T敳楧n

⡇敮敲慬(

周攠獹獴sm⁳ ou汤⁨慶攠
慮⁡ 瑲慣瑩WeⰠ
un捬c瑴敲敤⁤e獩sn
睨楣w⁰牯mo瑥s
敦晩捩敮cy⁷i瑨Wu琠
獡捲楦楣楮g⁣污l楴y

-

䥳⁡Iy⁵ n散敳獡ey⁡湤
楲i敬e
v慮琠楮景rma瑩Wn
p牯v楤敤?

-

Are highly visible
system functions
meaningful to golfers?

This is taken from Jakob
Nielsen’s list of 10
g敮敲慬
-
pu牰o獥s
楮瑥牦慣r⁨敵 楳瑩捳⁡湤
慤慰瑥T⁦ r⁵獥 楮 ou爠
獹獴sm.

䕡獥No映楮pu琬Ws捲敥n
牥慤慢楬楴i⁡湤
g污l捡c楬楴
y

⡓(散楦楣e


Mob楬攩

周攠獹獴sm⁳ ou汤⁢攠
u獡s汥⁩渠愠v慲a整y o映
汩gh瑩Wg⁡湤
敮e楲潮m敮瑡氠
獩瑵s瑩Wn猬⁧ v敮⁴h攠
mob楬攠n慴畲ef⁴h攠
p污瑦lrm.

-

Do敳e瑨攠畳敲⁨慶攠Wo
u獥sbo瑨⁨慮T猿

-

䥳⁴桥Is捲c敮⁥慳y⁴o
牥慤⁤敳灩瑥楧h瑩Wg
捯nT楴楯ns?

-

䍡C
捲c捩慬
楮景牭a瑩Wn⁢攠
ob瑡楮敤⁢y⁧ 慮捩cg?

-

Will users be able to
use the app indoors and
outdoors despite
weather
/lighting

conditions?

This is taken from a
paper available through
the ACM Portal, and
adapted for use in our
project:

E. Bertini, S. Gabri
elli
, S.
Kimani. Appropriating
and
assessing heuristics
for mobile computing.
In proceedings of the
working conference on
advanced visual
interfaces, May 2006.




COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


3

|
P a g e


Title

Explanation

Questions

Development

Flexibility, efficiency of
use and personalization
(Specific


Mob楬攩

周攠獹獴sm⁳ ou汤⁢攠
晬數楢汥⁩渠me整楮g⁴he
T敭慮T猠o映愠v慲a敤e
捯汬散瑩Wn o映畳敲猬e睨w
獨潵汤⁢攠e硰散x敤⁴o
u獥s瑨攠獹s瑥m⁩渠愠
v慲a整y o映摩晦敲敮琠
u獡s攠獣sn慲ao献

-

䍡C⁵獥牳⁰敲獯n慬aze
晲敱u敮琠慣瑩Wns?

-

䍡C⁵獥牳⁤yn慭i捡汬y
捯n晩fu牥r瑨攠sy獴sm?

-

Is the system flexible
enough to
accommodate a wide
range of golfers’ needs?

This is taken from a
paper available through
the ACM Portal, and
adapted for use in our
project:

E. Bertini, S. Gabrielli, S.

Kimani. Appropriating
and
ass
essing heuristics
for mobile computing.
In proceedings of the
working conference on
advanced visual
interfaces, May 2006.

Appropriate
affordances

(Design Principle)

The system should
make appropriate use
clear to users through
the use of familiar and
consistent interface
mechanisms

-

Do appropriate actions
suggest themselves?

-

Do interface elements
respond to natural
interactions?

-

Will golfers feel like
the way in which the
interface behaves is
familiar to them and
consistent with what
they expect?

This is taken from a
design principle
discussed by Norman
and mentioned in the
course text:
affordances.

Appropriate constraints

(Design Principle)

The system should
make inappropriate use
difficult or impossible
by offering only correct
and meaningful
in
terface mechanisms
in every system state

-

Are inappropriate
actions hidden?

-

Are appropriate
actions made no more
complicated as a result?

-

Will golfers be
protected from invalid
actions without being
excessively
hindered in
performing valid ones?

This
is taken from a
design principle
discussed by Norman
and mentioned in the
course text, adapted for
use in our project:
constraints.

Easy to learn

(Usability)

The system should be
such that new users can
learn most important
functions in little time
with a
t most modest
effort

-

Can the user figure out
how to perform
appropriate actions?

-

Can the user
determine what the
capabilities of the
system are?

-

Will golfers be willing
to make the required
effort to learn the
system for the benefit
the system provid
es?

This is taken from one
of our usability goals,
which is one outlined by
Norman and mentioned
in the course text,
adapted for use in our
project: learnability.

COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


4

|
P a g e


Title

Explanation

Questions

Development

Efficient use possible

(Usability)

The system
should
make it possible for
users to achieve good
levels of efficiency in
performing known tasks

-

Do appropriate actions
take a reasonable
amount of time /
number of steps?

-

Do experienced users
benefit from acquired
knowledge?

-

Will golfers be able to
use the system
efficiently, once the
system has been
learned?

This is taken from one
of our usability goals,
which is one outlined by
Norman and mentioned
in the course text,
adapted for use in our
project: efficiency.

Satisfying

(User Experience)

The sys
tem should
leave users feeling
satisfied upon
successfully completing
tasks

-

Is the app easy to use?
-

Does the app add to
the user’s satisfaction
o爠摥r牡捴r晲om⁴h攠
user’s doing the task?

-

Will the app add to
rather than detract
from golfers’ enjoyment

of the game?

This is taken from one
of our user experience
goals, which is one
outlined by Norman
and mentioned in the
course text, adapted for
use in our project:
satisfaction.

Helpful

(User Experience)

The system should give
users the impression
that t
he system has
been helpful enough to
justify users’ using it

-

䅲攠common⁡ 瑩Wns
m慤攠敡獩敲⁵獩 g⁴h攠
獹獴sm?

-

䅲攠獰散s慬⁦an捴con猠
獯m整h楮g⁵獥 猠s慲攠
慢ou琿

-

Will golfers feel like
the app adds value over
paper scorecards?

This is taken from one
of

our user experience
goals, which is one
outlined by Norman
and mentioned in the
course text, adapted for
use in our project:
helpfulness.


III.
Cognitive Walkthrough

The following table is a cognitive walkthrough of each of the three core tasks for the d
esign.

IV.I.
Subtask


Managing Courses

1. Click the ‘Courses’ button on the main screen

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if
the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


5

|
P a g e


2. Press the Menu hardware button

Will the user know what to do?

Possibly

Place an add button on the
interface so that the menu
button doesn’t need to be
p牥獳rT

坩汬⁴h攠us敲e歮ow⁨ 眠Wo To⁩琠on⁴h攠i
n瑥牦r捥?

奥Y


坩汬⁴h攠us敲ebe⁡扬攠Wo⁩湴敲灲整 瑨攠Wy獴敭
晥fTb慣欠瑯⁤整敲e楮攠楦⁴i攠慣瑩on⁰ oTu捥搠che
T敳楲敤⁥晦散e o爠ro?

奥Y


3. Click the ‘Add’ menu option

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the
interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


4. Click the entry field next to the Name label and type in a name using the soft keyboard

Will the user know what
to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


5. Click on each entry field for the values in the table and
type in a number using the soft keyboard

Will the user know what to do?

No

The value labels in the table look
exactly like all the other labels.
They do not have the normal
button imagery that virtually
affords pressing. We could
change their background t
o
indicate that they can be
pressed.

Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


6
. Click
the ‘Save’ button

Will the
user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


6

|
P a g e


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


6
.
Select a course from the list

Will the user
know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


7
.
Click on any of the entry fields and use the soft k
eyboard the enter a new value

Will the user know what to do?

No

The value labels in the table look
exactly like all the other labels.
They do not have the normal
button imagery that virtually
affords pressing. We could
change their background to
indicate
that they can be
pressed.

Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


8
. Click
the ‘Save’ button

Will the user know wha
t to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


9
.
Long click a course from the list

Will the user know what
to do?

Possibly

Add delete button next to each
item in the list so the long click
does not have to be done

Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Possibly

Android users might not know
the long click can be done so we
will add delete buttons so
it is
not necessary

Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


7

|
P a g e


10. Click the ‘Delete’ menu option

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the
interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


1
1
.
Press

the Back hardware button to go back to the main screen

Will the user know what to do?

Possibly

We could
add a back button to
the interface so the hardware
button is not necessary

Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes



IV.I
I.
Subtask


Managing

Round
s

1. Click

the


Rounds’ button

on main screen

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action
produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


2. Press the Menu hardware button

Will the user know what to do?

Possibly

Place an add button on the
interface so that the menu
button doesn’t need to be
pressed

Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Y
es


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


3. Click the ‘Add’ menu option

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
Yes


COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


8

|
P a g e


desired effect or no?

4. Select a course from the list

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will
the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


5. Click the entry field next to the date label

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


6. Enter the date using the date picker dialog

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the
interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


7. Click the entry field next to the time label

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do
it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


8. Enter the time using the time picker dialog

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know
how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


9. Click the ‘Add Player’ button

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to

do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
Yes


COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


9

|
P a g e


feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

10. Enter a player name using the soft keyboard

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user
know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Y
es


11. Click ‘Save’

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on
the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


12. Select a round from the list

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the
interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


13. Click on one of the score labels in the table

Will the user know what to do?

No

The score labels in the table
look
exactly like all the other labels.
They do not have the normal
button imagery that virtually
affords pressing. We could
change their background to
indicate that they can be
pressed.

Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the use
r be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


14. Click the ‘+’ button to increment the score by 1

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
Yes


COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


10

|
P a g e


feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

1
5
.
Press the Back hardware button to go back to the scorecard

Will the user know what to do?

Possibly

Place a back button on the
interface so that the menu
button doesn’t need to be
p牥獳rT

坩汬⁴h攠us敲e歮ow⁨ 眠Wo To⁩琠on⁴h攠楮瑥牦r捥?

奥Y


坩汬⁴h攠us敲ebe⁡扬攠Wo⁩湴敲灲整 瑨攠Wy獴敭
晥fTb慣欠瑯⁤整敲e楮攠楦⁴i攠慣瑩on⁰ oTu捥搠che
T敳楲敤⁥晦散e o爠ro?

奥Y


1
6
.
Press the B
ack hardware button to go back to the rounds list

Will the user know what to do?

Possibly

Place a back button on the
interface so that the menu
button doesn’t need to be
p牥獳rT

坩汬⁴h攠us敲e歮ow⁨ 眠Wo To⁩琠on⁴h攠楮瑥牦r捥?

奥Y


坩汬⁴h攠us敲ebe
慢汥⁴o⁩湴敲灲整 瑨攠Wy獴敭
晥fTb慣欠瑯⁤整敲e楮攠楦⁴i攠慣瑩on⁰ oTu捥搠che
T敳楲敤⁥晦散e o爠ro?

奥Y


17. Long click on a round in the list

Will the user know what to do?

Possibly

Add delete button next to each
item in the list so the long click
does
not have to be done

Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Possibly

Android users might not know
the long click can be done so we
will add delete buttons so it is
not necessary

Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to
determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


18. Click the ‘Delete’ menu option

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to
determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


1
9
.
Press the Back hardware button to go back to the main screen

COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


11

|
P a g e


Will the user know what to do?

Possibly

Place a back button on the
interface so that the menu
button doesn’t need to be
p牥獳


坩汬⁴h攠us敲e歮ow⁨ 眠Wo To⁩琠on⁴h攠楮瑥牦r捥?

奥Y


坩汬⁴h攠us敲ebe⁡扬攠Wo⁩湴敲灲整 瑨攠Wy獴敭
晥fTb慣欠瑯⁤整敲e楮攠楦⁴i攠慣瑩on⁰ oTu捥搠che
T敳楲敤⁥晦散e o爠ro?

奥Y



IV.III.
Subtask


Viewing Statistics


1. Click ‘Statistics’ on main
screen

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


2. Select a golfer from the list

Will the user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


3. Click ‘Select Course’

Will the
user know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


4. Select a course from the list

Will the user
know what to do?

Yes


Will the user know how to do it on the interface?

Yes


Will the user be able to interpret the system
feedback to determine if the action produced the
desired effect or no?

Yes


5
.
Press the Back hardware button to go back to the go
lfer screen

COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


12

|
P a g e


Will the user know what to do?

Possibly

Place a back button on the
interface so that the menu
button doesn’t need to be
p牥獳rT

坩汬⁴h攠us敲e歮ow⁨ 眠Wo To⁩琠on⁴h攠楮瑥牦r捥?

奥Y


坩汬⁴h攠us敲ebe⁡扬攠Wo⁩湴敲灲整 瑨攠Wy獴敭
晥fTb慣欠瑯
T整敲e楮攠楦⁴i攠慣瑩on⁰ oTu捥搠che
T敳楲敤⁥晦散e o爠ro?

奥Y


6
.
Press the Back hardware button to go back to the main screen

Will the user know what to do?

Possibly

Place a back button on the
interface so that the menu
button doesn’t need to be
p牥獳r
T

坩汬⁴h攠us敲e歮ow⁨ 眠Wo To⁩琠on⁴h攠楮瑥牦r捥?

奥Y


坩汬⁴h攠us敲ebe⁡扬攠Wo⁩湴敲灲整 瑨攠Wy獴敭
晥fTb慣欠瑯⁤整敲e楮攠楦⁴i攠慣瑩on⁰ oTu捥搠che
T敳楲敤⁥晦散e o爠ro?

奥Y



II
I
.
Usability Experiment

III.I. Usability Experiment

III.I.I.
Usability
Requirement


The user should be able to enter the number of strokes per hole quickly. Operationalized: It should take
the user no more than 15 seconds to pull out the phone, activate it, and enter the number of strokes for
the hole; no more than 5 seconds
to enter a score if the phone is already activated.

III.I.II.
What data did we collect?

We recorded the time it takes for a test user to enter a score for a single golfer on a single hole in our
application.

We recorded this data for three different scenar
ios:

Scenario 1: The phone initially has a locked screen and is in the test user’s pocket or sitting on a
table if the test user doesn’t have pockets. The app has not been started, and will not have any
saved state. This means that when the app is
started, it will initialize to the start menu. There
will be saved games already in the phone’s memory, however, so that the user will not have to
go through the process of creating a new game.

COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


13

|
P a g e


Scenario 2: The phone is initially unlocked and is in the te
st user’s hand. Like in Scenario 1, the
app has not been started, and will not have any saved state.

Scenario 3: Like in Scenario 1, the phone initially has a locked screen and is in the test user’s
pocket or sitting on a table if the test user doesn’t h
ave pockets. Unlike Scenario 1 and 2, the
app will have already been started on the phone and navigated to the edit hole screen. This
means that when the phone screen is unlocked, the edit hole screen will appear instead of the
phone’s main menu.

III.I.I
II
.
Why did we choose this data to collect?

We chose to collect data on how long it takes test users to enter scores because the usability
requirement specifically states a maximum length of time that task should take. Once empirical data on
how long the
task normally takes was acquired, it became a trivial task to determine whether the
requirement was met or not.

III.I.
I
V.
How did we collect the data?

The data was collected by first placing the test user in a qui
e
t environment with minimal distractions.
Then, using a phone that had the app installed on it, the user was given instruction on how to use the
application until the user indicated he/she understood the app. Then the user was allowed two minutes
to practice using the app.

Next, Scenario 1 was ex
plained to the user. Once the test user indicated he/she understood the
scenario, the initial conditions of the scenario were set. We started a stopwatch and signaled the user
to begin at the same time. When the user had successfully completed the scena
rio, the stopwatch was
stopped and the time was recorded.

Scenario 1 was then repeated four

more times, resulting in
five

total times for Scenario 1.

Next, the same procedure was done for Scenario 1 was repeated for Scenarios 2 and 3.

III.I.V.
How did w
e analyze the data to decide if our design met the usability requirement?

As was mentioned before, once empirical data on how long it takes test user’s to enter scores into the
app is acquired, it is trivial to decide whether the usability requirement is m
et. If the data says the
normal time it takes is less than what is stated in the requirement, then the requirement has been met.

III.I.VI. Data

Scenario 1

Time
\

User

1

2

3

1

10.4

11.8

10.8

2

11.6

12.4

11.2

3

12.4

11.5

11.7

4

10.4

10.8

12.1

COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


14

|
P a g e


5

9.1

11.1

10.7

Scenario 2

Time
\

User

1

2

3

1

6.5

6.1

6.3

2

5.3

6.3

5.6

3

6.3

6.0

5.9

4

5.4

5.3

6.2

5

4.9

6.8

5.3

Scenario 3

Time
\

User

1

2

3

1

3.4

3.8

3.6

2

3.7

3.7

3.1

3

2.9

3.4

2.7

4

3.8

3.0

3.2

5

3.5

3.2

3.0


III.II. User Experience
Experiment

III.
I
I.I. User Experience Requirement

The user

should feel that the app is as

easy to use as a paper scorecard. Operationalized: On a scale
from 1 to 5, users should rate the ease of use of the application compared to paper scorecards at least a
4.

III.
II.II.

What data did we collect?

We collected a Likert scale responses to stat
e
m
ents about the ease of use of the application for each
test user.

We asked each test user how much they agreed with each of these stat
e
ments:

The golf scorecard app is as easy to use as a paper scorecard.

Recording scores in the golf scorecard app is as q
uick as doing it on a paper scorecard.

The golf scorecard app’s scorecard display is as easy to understand as a paper scorecard’s.

Paper scorecards are more frustrating to use than the golf scorecard application.

III.II.III
.

Why did we choose this data to collect?

The user experience requirement states that the test user’s opinion of how easy the app is to use in
comparison to a paper scorecard should be high. One of the most common methods used to collect
data about people’
s opinions is Likert scales. Once we acquired the quantitative data that the Likert
scales provided, we were able to evaluate whether the app met the requirement.

III.II.IV
.

How did we collect the data?

COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


15

|
P a g e


We collected this data by first allowing test users
fifteen minutes to learn and use the app. Once the
test users had satisfied themselves that they had fully explored the app, we gave them a short
questionnaire consisting of the statements above. They were asked to indicate, on a scale of 1 to 5, how
muc
h they agreed with each statement.

III.II.V. How did we analyze the data to decide if our design met the usability requirement?

To determine an overall opinion of the apps ease of use for each test user, we calculated the average
value of their responses.

We then calculated the average of all test user’s responses. It was then easy
to compare this number with the minimum average rating the requirement stipulated.

III.II.VI. Data

Question
\

User

1

2

3

The golf scorecard app is as easy to use as a paper sc
orecard.


4

4

3

Recording scores in the golf scorecard app is as quick as doing it on a paper scorecard.


5

5

4

The golf scorecard app’s scorecard display is as easy to understand as a paper scorecard’s.


5

3

2

Paper scorecards are more frustrating to
use than the golf scorecard application.


3

3

3


IV.
Comparison Experiment



Comments

Null Hypothesis

Users will take more
time to enter a score
using the app when
compared to using a
paper scorecard


Alternative
Hypothesis

Users will take less time
to
enter a score using
the app when compared
to using a paper
scorecard.

One
-
tailed because it specifies
only one direction of difference

Independent
Variable(s)

Which method is used to
record scores

Possible Values: Application,
Paper. These two are also t
he
corresponding experimental
conditions because there is only
one independent variable.

COMP 6620 Project
-

Android Golf Scorecard App

Dusten Doggett, Patrick Carpenter,
James McCracken


16

|
P a g e


Dependent
Variable(s)

Time it takes to enter a
score

Possible Values:

Time in seconds measured using a
stop watch

Experimental
Design

and
Justifications

-
Same par
ticipants with
counter
-
balancing


-
No need to worry about
experience. We want experience
people.

-
Want most accurate comparison
so use same person, same
abilities

Counterbalance

Half of the participants
will do paper scorecard
first while the other half
will do the application
first.


Analysis

Use the average times
for analysis

We will be able to compare times
to reject/accept the null
hypothesis

Conclusion

If the null
-
hypothesis
could be rejected, we
can conclude that the
application is faster.



V
II
.

Appendix


VII.I. Appendix A


Usability testing data

and analysis