0 Course Introduction - Electrical and Computer Engineering

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Dec 14, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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MTE 241

Introduction to





Computer Structures and






Real
-
time Systems

Douglas Wilhelm Harder,
M.Math
. LEL

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

University of Waterloo

Waterloo, Ontario, Canada


ece.uwaterloo.ca

dwharder@alumni.uwaterloo.ca


© 2012 by Douglas Wilhelm Harder.
Some rights reserved.

Welcome


Welcome to MTE 241

Course Introduction

2

Welcome


Course description:


Introduction to computer organization, basic real
-
time concepts,
process management, interprocess communication and
synchronization, memory management, resource management,
interrupt handling, concurrent programming, file systems.

Course Introduction

3

Course Text


Course text:



Gary Nutt,
Operating Systems
, 3
rd

Ed., Addison Wesley, 2004.

Course Introduction

4

Course Topics


We will cover the first thirteen chapters:

1.
Introduction

2.
Using the operating system

3.
Operating system organization

4.
Computer organization

5.
Device management

6.
Implementing processes, threads, and resources

7.
Scheduling

8.
Basic synchronization principles

9.
High
-
level synchronization and interprocess communications

10.
Deadlock

11.
Memory management

12.
Virtual memory

13.
File management

Course Introduction

5

Course Topics

1.
Introduction

2.
Using the operating system

3.
Operating system organization

4.
Computer organization

5.
Device management

6.
Implementing processes,
threads, and resources

7.
Scheduling

8.
Basic synchronization principles

9.
High
-
level synchronization
and
interprocess communications

10.
Deadlock

11.
Memory management

12.
Virtual memory

13.
File management

Course Introduction

6

Introduction to computer organization

basic real
-
time concepts

process management

interprocess communication

synchronization

memory management

resource management

interrupt handling

concurrent programming

file systems

Course Description

Topics

Course Topics


Of course, each topic will discuss other issues


Issues with real
-
time systems will be addressed throughout the
course


Interrupt handling will be dealt with in numerous topics


Concurrent programming will also be an underlying theme


Course Introduction

7

Additional Chapters


Material in the balance of the book covers:

14.
Protection and security

15.
Networks

16.
Remote files

17.
Distributed computing

18.
Distributed programming runtime systems

19.
Design strategies

20.
The Linux kernel

21.
The Windows NT kernel

Course Introduction

8

Course Laboratories


There are five laboratories in this course:


Laboratory “0” is next week: it does not count


I am currently looking at having Laboratories 1
-
4 running in

weeks 6, 8, 10, and 12



Laboratories may be done in groups
of two



There is no course project



Course Introduction

9

Course Web Site


The course web site:

http://ece.uwaterloo.ca/~mte241/



This takes you to:

http://ece.uwaterloo.ca/~dwharder/icsrts/



This contains numerous resources:


Schedule (preliminary)


Lecture slides


Tutorials


Simulations


Resources


Course Introduction

10

Marking Scheme


The marking scheme is not quite standard:


Laboratories





L


Mid
-
term examination


M


Final examination




F



Examination grade




Course Introduction

11

Marking Scheme


If
L

≥ 60
and
E

≥ 60
,



If
E + L
≤ 120
,





G
= min(
L,

E
)



If
E + L
> 120

but
L

< 60



If
E + L
> 120

but
E

< 60


Course Introduction

12

Marking Scheme


The two curves in between form a continuous surface


An increase of 1 % in either the examination or the laboratory
component will not increase your final grade by more than 1 %


Course Introduction

13

Marking Scheme


Basically, if you fail either the examination component or
the laboratory component, you fail the course unless you
get over 70 % in the other component, in which case,
there is some grace

Course Introduction

14

Plagiarism Detection


We will be using MOSS for plagiarism detection:


It is hosted at the Stanford University in California



You may request in the first two weeks to not having your
submissions sent to Stanford


In this case, I will be personally inspecting your code



You may read the paper that MOSS is based on:



S.
Schleimer
, D.S.
Wilerson
, and A. Aiken,


Winnowing: Local Algorithm for Document Fingerprinting



Available freely on the web for your download and perusal

Course Introduction

15

Acceptable and

Unacceptable Collaboration


Groups should work independently on the laboratories



If a group is unable to complete a laboratory without help
from just the TAs and receives help from another group:


Both the mentor and the group receiving help must acknowledge
this


The group receiving help will receive a maximum grade of 85 %
on the laboratory


The mentor will receive some form of bonus

Course Introduction

16

Summary


So we begin...



Course Introduction

17