Presented by: Susan Zirpoli

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Dec 10, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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PROJECT READ

Presented by: Susan Zirpoli

Summer, 2013



AGENDA

AM


WHO


WHAT


Materials


SYLLABLE TYPES


SYLLABLE
DIVISION


PM


PROCEDURES


HANDS ON
PRACTICE


LESSON PLANS


MASTERY TESTS


NEXT STEPS

WHO

Spec. Ed. students grades K
-
12.


Decoding/Encoding deficits


Limited vocabulary


Deficits in Phonological Awareness


WHAT

Project Read Phonics
is an explicit and
systematic methodology used for teaching
phonics. It is designed to be used in all tiers
of instruction. Originally designed for grades
K
-
3, in CCPS used most frequently with LFI
students, students with low to low average
cognition with deficits in decoding and
encoding.

PROJECT READ is:



Based on Principles of ORTON
GILLINGHAM (VAKT)


Direct & Explicit


Structured and Sequential


Systematic Multisensory Phonics



MULTISENSENSORY
TECHNIQUES


V
-

visual


A
-

auditory


K
-

kinesthetic


T
-

tactile


VAKT
-

common to programs based on
principles of Orton
-
Gillingham


SCOPE AND SEQUENCE


VOLUME 1: Closed Syllables (CVC words),
digraphs, glides, floss rule,
-
ck

spelling, beginning
consonant blends.


VOLUME 2: Ending blends, Consonant
Clusters,
-
tch
, r control, open syllables,
-
CE
syllables, VCCV and VCV syllable division.


VOLUME 3: y as a vowel, vowel
teams,schwa
,
-
le
syllable,
-
dge
, diphthongs, hard and soft sounds of
c and g.


Alignment to CCSS


Materials




Phonics Guide




Phonics Sound Pack


Jewel Box Words
(can create on index
cards)


Treasure Chest Sentences


Red Words
(can make with index cards)


Spell Tabs
(can make with folders/post its)


Bonnie Kline Stories


BREAK

Syllable Types:

7 in Project Read

OPEN/CLOSED SYLLABLES


Closed Syllable
-

single vowel followed by a
consonant, digraph or blend
-

vowel is short.

Ex: cat, ship, meg, tic


Open Syllable
-

vowel alone or after a
consonant, blend or digraph

Ex: ne, u, a, hi, I, ra

OPEN/CLOSE DOOR ACTIVITY CARDS


R Control Syllable

I’m the Bossy “R”.

I tell the vowels what sound to make. But…

As a polite gentleman, I always let the vowel
go first.

ar

as in start, garden

er
,
ir, ur

and in fern, girl, turkey

or

as in corn, forlorn




VCE Syllable
:
Second condition of
long vowel

I’m the magic e

I hang around at the end of words

And never make a peep.

But OOHH the magic I perform

When over 1 consonant l leap

To make the long vowel speak.




Syllable Type:VOWEL TEAMS


The /I/ team: ie


The /A/ team: ai, ay


The /O/ team: oa, ow, oe boat, snow, toe


The /E/ team: ee, ea, ie, ey

2 vowels work as a team

Diphthong: Syllable Type


A Diphthong is a vowel combination that
represents a special vowel sound.

/oi/ oi, oy: oil, toy

/ou/ ow, ou: around, town

/oo/ ue, ui, oo: blue, juice, food

/au/ au, aw: cause, saw

/oo/ look, hood

-
cLE Syllable and Syllable
Division



The schwa can always be found in words that end
with consonant le as in


Apple bottle table kettle


The SCHWA hides between the two consonants.
It becomes the vowel sound for the cLE syllable.


“CONSONANT LE, COUNT BACK 3.”

Divide: ap/ple ta/ble


Syllable Division:

Cutting Patterns



SYLLABLE DIVISION: VCCV



Words like: rabbit, picnic, napkin


Underline the talking vowels and swoop
between the vowels.


Pull down the consonants between the
talking vowels.


Divide


Mark Vowels with a breve


Blend and read word:



SYLLABLE DIVISION: VCV


Ti/ger or cam/el words



80% of the time VCV words are divided
V/CV
-

always try this first.


20% of the time VCV words are divided
VC/V


try this next.





VCCCV, VCCCCV Syllable
Division


Always keep digraphs and blends together


Ex: Sub/tract
-

blends usually go with the
second syllable.

Ex: In/struct
-

note the blend is in the second
syllable.



VV Syllable Division

Cut Between 2 vowels if not a double vowel
or diphthong

Ex: Ne/on

Ex: Cray/on
-

ay is 1 ‘talking vowel’



ACTIVITY TIME

Open/Closed Syllable


Story


Post Its


Index Cards


Syllable Division:

* Mark and cut cards

Common Orthographic Concepts

Let’s learn some of the common and first
taught orthographic (spelling) concepts taught
in Project Read.


There are many others.


See the spelling calculator (spelling options)

THE FIRST SPELLING RULE:
-

ck



Present k = /k/


Present c = /k/


Now we will learn that /k/ can also be
spelled

ck


Reinforce with VAKT


Smack the table:
“ At the end of a one
syllable word right after a short vowel.”



Auditory Practice for each part of
the

ck rule


What sound are you listening for?
-

/k/

Do you hear that sound in
cap, cake, pick, back, hug,
cup?


We need to hear it at the end of the word. Do you
hear /k/ in the end of
stick, kite, cane, or pack
?


Does the vowel sound like the hand signal or short
vowel sound?


lick or lake// bike or back// rack or rake


Do you hear /k/ right after the vowel in


sick or silk// pick or pink // shack or shank



FLOSS RULE: f, l, s, z


F, L, S,and Z are doubled in words “right after
the short vowel at the end of the word”.


When a word ends in me, F, L, S or Z,
double that letter as quick as can be.


Exceptions: as if of is pal has


quiz, gas

Note: same conditions as
-
ck

LONGER STRONGER
SPELLING RULES


-
CK


FLOSS RULE: F, L, S, Z


/ch/ at the end of a

one syllable

word “right
after the

short vowel”

= tch Ex: Pitch,
match


/j/
at the end
of a one syllable word “right
after the short vowel = dge Ex: dodge

QU= /kw/



qu always goes together.


“[q] broke it’s leg as seen by the bend in the
stick and needs [u] to hold it up.


or


[q] is the
“chicken letter




afraid to go by
itself.




GLIDES

* Slide activity
-

Glides (vowel sound
changes)


Ex: ank, ink, onk, unk,

(add: ank, ink, onk, unk on cards to build new
words
-

hammer and blend) and add to
sound deck


Demonstrate finger spelling of glides.


DIGRAPHs: The “H” brothers


ch, wh, th, sh


All end in “h”


Digraph
-

2 letters with one sound.


Finger blending: ch


1 finger


Consonant blends


A consonant blend is a consonant combination
representing two combined consonant sounds.



Skywrite and blend consonant sounds in blends.



Finger spelling: a consonant blend is represented
by one finger even though it has 2 separate
sounds
-

use stirring motion with finger.




HARD and SOFT sounds of C


C says /k/ before a, o, u


Ex: cat, cot, cut


C says /s/ before e, i, y


Ex: cent, city



HARD and SOFT sounds of G


G says /g/ before a, o, u


Ex: game, goat, gum


G says /j/ before e, i, y


Ex: gym, germ, gin



Y as a vowel.


One syllable open syllable
-

Y is a wannabe
vowel
-

wants to be long [i]. Ex: fly


When Y is at the end of a word as in penny,
Y is a wannabe vowel


wants to be long
[e]. Ex: penny

Also: remember
“cry baby”


When Y is in the middle of a word, Y is a
wannabe vowel


wants to be short [i].



FLUENCY


Automaticity
-

single word level





Prosody
-

fluid reading with expression.


Phrasing


read in groups of words


Penciling
-

Scoop words into phrases.




PROCEDURES

Use Phonics Guides

DVDs are helpful!

Phonics Sound Pack


Purpose: Produce sounds automatically


Procedure:


Watch and Listen


teacher produces sound


Remember to clip consonants


Vowels


hand signal


Do and Say


Student Repeats sound (3 times)


Letter Formation


Skywrite













Build Words


Hammer and
blend


Using Spell Tabs (1:1 or small Groups)


Pocket chart with phonics sound pack
(larger groups)



Finger Blending


demo time

(Some use Wilson tapping here)




Jewel Box Words

Purpose:


Automaticity of applying taught skills at the
word level.


Vocabulary Development

Procedure: Display on table or pocket chart.

Have students read. Ask questions re:
concepts and vocabulary. Use words in
sentences frequently.

Red Words

Purpose: Read Sight Words/ High Frequency
Words. (You may wish to supplement with
CCPS Sight Word List)


Procedure: Teach for reading and spelling.
Use multiple VAKT methods. Arm tapping,
sky writing, felt paper, etc.)



Treasure Chest

Sentences

Purpose:

To apply taught skills in controlled text. Develop
prosody, vocabulary and comprehension at sentence
level.


Procedure:
Have student read, scooping into
phrases. Apply decoding as needed. Question for
meaning. Echo/Choral Read. Always include spiral
review.


Dictation Words: Encoding

Materials: Spell tabs or paper

Purpose: Apply phonics orthographic rules.

Procedure:

Teacher dictates words

Student repeats

Student finger spells with non dominant hand

Student writes word or uses spell tabs.



Dictation: Sentence Level

Movie Time: Vol. 2, Disc 3 Unit 20, Lesson


Write Procedures in Notes while watching
DVD.


Practice Time


LESSON PLANNING

Plan wisely. Use
Phonology Guide
and/or Lesson Plans.

Try to incorporate both
decoding and
encoding daily using


a variety of
multisensory strategies

Be Diagnostic: Teach to
trouble spots.



DIAGNOSTIC TEACHING

Data Collection:

Daily Data Collection: see handout

End of Book informal assessment



Monitoring Progress

Mastery Tests: End of Unit/Volume


(Can be used as pre/post tests)

Houghton Mifflin


elementary phonics
benchmark


Daily Data collection: Create notes on lesson
plans

RATE OF PROGRESSION


Always start from the beginning. You may
progress from one unit to the next rapidly
depending on student’s knowledge of consonants.


Don’t go too fast, especially with short vowels.


Student’s dictation work a good indicator of
mastery (suggest 80%).


Use spiral teaching, continuing to reteach/teach
trouble spots as you move ahead.


THANK YOU

Whenever you need me, just email !

Best of luck with PROJECT READ!

You’ll be off and running in no time!