CMPE 330: Electromagnetic Waves and Transmission

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Nov 16, 2013 (3 years and 4 months ago)

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CMPE 330:
Electromagnetic
Waves and Transmission


Catalog description:

An introduction to waves, transmission lines, and electromagnetics
is made with the focus on computer engineering and communications applications. The
physical limits on Kirchhoff’s
Laws are discussed. Phasor
and vector
analysis is
reviewed. Transmission lines are studied in the time domain and the frequency domain.
Elect
rostatics, magnetostatics, and the calculation of the capacitance and inductance in
transmission lines are then
studied. Time
-
varying fields, and the integral, differential,
and phasor forms of Maxwell’s equations are introduced. Plane waves are studied.


Semesters offered:

Spring


Course prerequisites:

ENEE 206,
MATH 2
25
, MATH 251


Level:

Undergraduate


Credit
s:

3


Class times:

Two 75 minute lectures


Text
:

Fundamentals of Applied Electromagnetic Fields and Energy

by Fawwaz T. Ulaby


Course
Goals

and Performance Measures
:

(1)
Goal:

Students understand the uses of electromagnetics in modern computer



engin
eering and in their own careers; they can communicate that



understanding.


Performance Measure:

Two
-
page brief describing an application of electro
-




magnetics of interest to him or her, why it is of interest, and its societal


impact.


Program

Outcomes Advanced:

ABET e,
g, h
, j

(2)

Goal:

Students have a basic understanding of the history of electromagnetics
and how it has evolved. They understand that it will continue to
evolve and hence they need to continue to study it.


Perfor
mance Measure:

Class discussion of classic experiments, followed by

a visit to the History of Electronics Museum. A four
-
page paper in


which students discuss the classic experiments and how they relate to


modern applications


Program

Outcomes Ad
vanced:

ABET g, i

(
3
)

Goal:

Students understand the physical limit
s on Kirchhoff’s laws and when
an electromagnetic analysis is necessary


Performance Measure:

Problem set


Program

Outcomes Advanced:

ABET
a, e,
f,
h, k; IEEE 3, 4

(
4
)

Goal:

S
tudents know the basics of complex analysis, phasor analysis, and
vector calculus


Performance Measure:

Problem set
s (2)


Program

Outcomes Advanced:

ABET a, h, k; IEEE 2, 3, 4

(
5
)

Goal:

Students know how to analyze transmission lines in the ti
me domain
and the frequency domain


Performance Measure:

Problem set


Program

Outcomes Advanced:

ABET a, e, k; IEEE 2, 4

(
6
)

Goal:

Students have a basic understanding of magnetostatics and electrosta
-
tics and can calculate the capacitance and
inductance of simple geome
-

tries.


Performance Measure:

Problem set


Program

Outcomes Advanced:

ABET a, e, k; IEEE
2,
3, 4

(
7
)

Goal:

Students have a basic knowledge of Maxwell’s equations and its
physical meaning in its integral, differential
, and phasor forms.


Performance Measure:

Problem set


Program

Outcomes Advanced:

ABET a, h, k; IEEE 2, 3, 4

(
8
)

Goal:

Students know the basic properties of electromagnetic plane waves
and their application
s.


Performance Measure:

Proble
m set


Program

Outcomes Advanced:

ABET a, e, k; IEEE 2, 3, 4

NOTE:

The course objectives that are addressed by the exams will change from
year to year.

So, they are not listed as a performance measure for particular goals.

Summary of
ABET and IEEE
outcomes addressed

and by which course goals
:


Course Goals

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

ABET outcomes









a



×

×

×

×

×

×

b









c









d









e

×


×


×

×


×

f









g

×

×







h

×


×

×



×


i


×







j

×








k



×

×

×

×

×

×

IEEE outco
mes









1









2




×

×

×

×

×

3



×

×


×

×

×

4



×

×

×

×

×

×

5










Topics and numbers of lectures:

I. Introduction (4 lectures)


1. Why study waves and electromagnetics?





Why circuit analysis is not enough (wireless transmissions, dela
ys)



Applications (Taflove): military, computer interconnects, communica
-

tions, photonics,
medicine



WRITING ASSIGNMENT: Applications of waves and electromagnets to
future careers (two page essay)


2. Course philosophy and background



The professor



Cou
rses it uses: ENEE 206, MATH 225
, MATH 251



Courses it complements: PHYS 122, CMPE 314, CMPE 323



Courses that require it: All communications track electives



ABET, IEEE Required outcomes


3. Textbooks:





F. T. Ulaby, FUNDAMENTALS OF APPLIED ELECTROMAGNE
TICS





[required]

o

Advantages: begins with transmission lines, useful software, simple
mathematics

o

NOTE: 2001 Media Edition preferred; CD is required





C. Paul, ELECTROMAGNETICS FOR ENGINEERS

o

Advantages: clearly stated chapter objectives, discussion
of
applications, simple mathematics

o

Used for transmission line SPICE examples, transmission line
examples, some problems


4. Waves and complex numbers




Basic wave parameters


o

Amplitude, wavelength, frequency, wavenumber, phase offset



Dispersion relations
: Relations between wavelength, loss, and frequency



Electromagnetic spectrum



Spectral analysis



Review of complex numbers



Phasors


5. ASSIGNMENT: Problem Set


II. Transmission Lines (6 lectures)


1. Basics





Lumped Model





Types of lines





Propagati
on equations


2. Time Domain





Current and voltage evolution





SPICE calculations


3. Frequency Domain (Phasors)



Current and voltage transmission



Voltage standing wave ratio



Power flow


4. Smith Chart



Parametric equations



Impedance matching


5. Lossy L
ines


6. Applications


7. ASSIGNMENT: Problem Set


8. MID
-
TERM 1


III. Vector Analysis (3 lectures)


1. Motivation



Charges + currents


Fields


Forces + measurable effects



Electric and magnetic fields are described by vectors


2. Laws of vector algebra





Addition, subtraction, dot product, cross product





Position vectors


3. Coordinate systems





rectangular, cylindrical, spherical


4. Line and surface integrals


5. ASSIGNMENT: Problem Set


IV.
Classic E&M Experiments (1 lecture)


1. Historical Pers
pectives





Electrostatics: Franklin, Coulomb, Galvani, Volta





Magnetostatics: Oersted, Ampere





Dynamics: Faraday, Henry, Lenz





Maxwell’s Equations: MAXWELL





Waves: Hertz, Marconi


2. Historical Electronics Museum Experiments





Oersted’
s Experiment





Faraday’s Experiment





A motor: (a) a moving wire, (b) a complete motor





A generator


3. WRITING ASSIGNMENT: Analyze the workings of HEM experiments (two



page essay)


V. Static Fields (6 lectures)


1. Electrostatics





Charge an
d Coulomb’s law





Electric field





Dielectric materials





Gauss’s law


2. Voltage and capacitance





Charge distributions





Capacitance calculations


3. Magnetostatics



Current and Biot
-
Savart law



Magnetic field



Magnetic materials



Ampere’s law



Gaus
s’s law


4. Applications


5. ASSIGNMENT: Problem Set


6. MID
-
TERM 2


VI. Time
-
Varying Fields (4 lectures)


1. Faraday’s Law



Physical expression



Differential form


2. Ampere’s Law



Physical Expression



Differential Form


3. Gauss’s Law: Differential Form


4
. MAXWELL’S EQUATIONS



Comparison of integral and differential forms



Power Density: Poynting Vector



Boundary conditions



Phasor form: sinusoidally varying fields


5. ASSIGNMENT: Problem Set


VII. Wave Propagation (4 lectures)


1. Uniform plane waves





L
ossless and lossy media





Power flow





Skin Depth


2. Reflection and transmission





Normal incidence





Snell’s laws


3. Applications


4. ASSIGNMENT: Problem Set


Specialization:

This course is required for the communications track and available a
s an
elective to other computer engineering majors


Additional course features:

Class demonstrations


Assessments:

Problem

sets, exams, two
-
page essays


Grading:


2 two
-
page essays



20%



8

problems sets


4
0%



2

mid
-
term exam
s



20%



1 final exam


2
0%


Actions taken to improve the course:

Changed lecture/essay topic from ethics to E&M
history, added more computational problems, added experimental demos (via the
Historical Electronics Museum), changed textbook


Relation to program objectives:

This
course directly addresses the first three objectives
and addresses items 1 and 4 of the fourth objective.


Syllabus prepared by:

C. Menyuk


Version Date
:

0
517
/0
6


Course Committee:

C. Menyuk (
chair
)
, L. Yan, and G. Carter