Hopkins Biology Syllabus - Propel Schools

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Dec 12, 2012 (4 years and 8 months ago)

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Braddock Hills High School


1500 Yost Boulevard, Suite 2

Braddock

Hills, Pennsylvania 15221



Mandatory Course Materials


Students will not be given a textbook for
this course but will be using the Glencoe Biology book in the
classroom from time to time. Most coursework will be distributed via a hardcopy or on my website. Students
will be required to check my website for homework assignments, pr
oject requirements, pr
oject due dates
, and
test dates. In addition to internet access (either in school or at home), students will need to come to class
everyday with the following items:



Science
Composition
Notebook



Pencil



Laptop (unless otherwise instructed)


Please Note:
Students will be given one composition notebook at the beginning of the school year but will be
required to provide additional composition notebooks after your first notebook is full. Students will also be
required to provide their own writing utensils. St
udents will be given 5 points everyday for coming prepared to
class but will lose points if they come to class without their required materials.


Description of The Course


In Biology, students will be introduced to the diversity of living organisms by in
vestigating life structure and
function, cellular process, genetics, taxonomy, energy transfer in living organisms, systems, and biological
evolution. This course explores Earth’s major biological principals while students learn how to think
scientifically
. In this course, students will conduct laboratory investigations with an inquiry based approached.

Textbook: Glencoe Biology

Part
nerships: Dr. Charles Vukotich
,

Senior Project Manager University of Pittsburgh Social Mixing and
Respiratory Transmission i
n Schools (SMART Schools)

University of Pittsburgh CMIST Program

Pennsylvania Society for Biomedical Research

Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative

ASSET



Course

Syllabus

Course Grade
Level:

11
th


Course Title:

Biology


Course Year:

2012
-
2013

Prerequisite Course(s):

Algebra I

Course Instructor:

Erin Hopkins


Room Number:

172

Course Instructor’s Email:

ehopkins@propelschools.org



Course Instructor’s Web Page
:
www.schoology.com


Course Instructor’s Classroom Telephone

Number and Extension:

(412) 271
-
3061 ext. 472

Purpose and Goals of The Course


Purpose:

The purpose of this course is to
immerse

students in the study of life using a hands
-
on, inquiry
-
based
approach to learning. Students will begin their study of living organisms by first learning to discern between the
living and non
-
living world. Once students have a concrete understanding of wh
at is life, they will learn about
the first living cells and eventually students will come to understand how those cells gave rise to multicellular
organisms. In this biology course, students will engage in a number of hands
-
on investigations and laborator
y
activities that will allow them to experience the beauty of life first hand so that they may gain a deeper
appreciation for the world we live in.


Course Goals:

After taking this course, students should be able to:




Evaluate the application of scientific

reasoning, inventions, tools, and new technologies in the study
of biology.



Analyze structural and functional similarities and differences between prokaryotes and eukaryotes.



Evaluate the relationship between structure and function at various levels of bi
ological organization.



Analyze the unique properties of water and how they support life on Earth.



Evaluate the relationship between structure and function at various levels of biochemical
organization.



Analyze and predict how enzymes can regulate biochemic
al reactions within a cell.



Analyze how organisms use feedback and response mechanisms to maintain homeostasis.



Compare and analyze the three stages and outcomes of the cell cycle.



Analyze and predict how genetic information is inherited, altered, and expr
essed.



Analyze the processes associated with protein synthesis.



Predict the impact of genetic engineering on medicine, forensics, and agriculture.



Apply the scientific concepts of observation, hypothesis, inference, law, theory, principle, and fact.



Evalua
te the mechanisms and sources of evidence related to the theory of evolution.



Compare ecological levels of organization in the biosphere.



Analyze interactions and relationships in an ecosystem as they relate to energy flow, biotic
components, biochemical c
ycles, and limiting factors.



Predict changes in an ecosystem in response to natural and human disturbances.


These goals are set forth by the Keystone Performance Level Descriptors and coincide with students
performing at the advanced level in biology. As
an instructor, I set high expectations for my students and
believe that all students should strive to reach this level of performance

and understanding
.


Course Objectives


The following is a list of big ideas in Biology that students should be able to
understand and explain after taking
this Biology course:




Organisms share common characteristics of life.



New cells arise from the division of pre
-
existing cells.



Hereditary information in genes is inherited and expressed.



Evolution is the result of many random processes selecting for the survival and reproduction of a
population.



Life emerges due to the chemical organization of matter into cells.



Cells have organized structures and systems necessary to su
pport chemical reactions needed to
maintain the living condition.



Structure is related to function at all biological levels of organization.



Through a variety of mechanisms organisms seek to maintain a biological balance between their
internal and external environments.



Eukaryotic cells can differentiate and organize making it possible for multicellularity.



Organisms obtain and use energy
to carry out their life processes.



Organisms on Earth interact and depend in a variety of ways on other living and nonliving things in their
environments.



DNA segments contain information for the production of proteins necessary for growth and function of
cells.



First

Trimester: The Building Blocks of Life

Common Characteristics of Life



Standards:



3.1.10.A1. Explain the characteristics of life common to all organisms.



3.1.B.A1. Describe the common characteristics of life. Compare and contrast the cellular structures a
nd
degrees of complexity of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Explain that some structures in
eukaryotic cells developed from early prokaryotic cells (e.g. mitochondria, chloroplasts).



3.1.C.A1. Explain the chemistry of metabolism.



3.1.12.A1. Relate ch
anges in the environment to various organisms’ ability to compensate using
homeostatic mechanisms.

Form and Function



Standards:



3.1.10.A5. Relate life processes to sub
-
cellular and cellular structures to their functions.



3.1.B.A5. Relate the structure of c
ell organelles to their function (energy capture and release, transport,
waste removal, protein synthesis, movement, etc.). Explain the role of water in cell metabolism. Explain
how the cell membrane functions as a regulatory structure and protective barri
er for the cell. Describe
transport mechanisms across the plasma membrane.



3.1.12.A5. Analyze how structure is related to function at all levels of biological organization from
molecules to organisms.

Energy Flow



Standards:



3.1.10.A2. Explain cell
processes in terms of chemical reactions and energy changes.



3.1.B.A2. Identify the initial reactants, final products, and general purposes of photosynthesis and
cellular respiration. Explain the important role of ATP in cell metabolism. Describe the relat
ionship
between photosynthesis and cellular respiration in photosynthetic organisms. Explain why many
biological macromolecules such as ATP and lipids contain high energy bonds. Explain the importance
of enzymes as catalysts in cell reactions. Identify how

factors such as pH and temperature may affect
enzyme function.



3.1.C.A2. Describe how changes in energy affect the rate of chemical reactions.



3.1.12.A2. Evaluate how organisms must derive energy from their environment of their food in order to
survive.

C
ell Cycles



Standards:



3.1.10.A4. Describe the cell cycle and the process and significance of mitosis.



3.1.B.A4. Summarize the stages of the cell cycle. Examine how interactions among the different
molecules in the cell cause the distinct stages of the cell

cycle which can also be influenced by other
signaling molecules. Explain the role of mitosis in the formation of new cells and its importance in
Pennsylvania State Standards Addressed In The Course

maintaining chromosome number during asexual reproduction. Compare and contrast a virus and a
cell. Relate the

stages of viral cycles to the cell cycle.



3.1.C.A4. Relate mitosis and meiosis at the molecular level.



3.1.12.A4. Explain how the cell cycle is regulated.

Life Cycles



Standards:



3.1.10.A3. Compare and contrast the life cycles of different organisms.



3.1.
B.A3. Explain how all organisms begin their life cycles as a single cell and that in multicellular
organisms, successive generations of embryonic cells form by cell division.

Organization



Standards:



3.1.10.A6.
I
dentify the advantages of multi
cellularity in

organisms.



3.1.B.A6. Explain how cells differentiate in multicellular organisms.



3.1.12.A6. Analyze how cells in different tissues/organs are specialized to perform specific functions.

Molecular Basis of Life



Standards:



3.1.10.A7. Describe the
relationship between the structure of organic molecules and the function they
serve in living organisms. Explain how cells store and use information to guide their functions.



3.1.B.A7. Analyze the importance of carbon to the structure of biological macromo
lecules. Compare
and contrast the functions and structures of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Explain
the consequences of extreme changes in pH and temperature on cell proteins.



3.1.C.A7. Illustrate the formation of carbohydrates, lipid
s, proteins, and nucleic acids.



3.1.12.A7. Evaluate metabolic activities using experimental knowledge of enzymes. Describe the
potential impact of stem cell research on the biochemistry and physiology of life.

Second Trimester: Genetics

Reproduction



Stand
ards:



3.1.10.B2. Explain the process of meiosis resulting in the formation of gametes. Compare and contrast
the function of mitosis and meiosis.



3.1.B.B2. Describe how the process of meiosis results in the formation of haploid gametes and analyze
the impor
tance of meiosis in sexual reproduction. Compare and contrast the function of mitosis and
meiosis. Illustrate that the sorting and recombining of genes in sexual reproduction results in a great
variety of possible gene combinations in offspring.



3.1.12.B2.

Evaluate the process of sexual reproduction in influencing genetic variability in a population.

Heredity



Standards:



3.1.10.B1. Describe how genetic information is inherited and expressed.



3.1.B.B1. Explain that the information passed from parents to offs
pring is transmitted by means of
genes which are coded in DNA molecules. Explain the basic process of DNA replication. Describe the
basic process of transcription and translation. Explain how crossing over, jumping genes, and deletion
and duplication of ge
nes results in genetic variation. Explain how mutations can alter genetic
information and the possible consequences on resultant cells.



3.1.12.B1. Explain gene inheritance and expression at the molecular level.



3.1.10.B5.
PATTERNS

Use models to demonstrate

patterns in biomacromolecules. Compare and
contrast Mendelian and non
-
Mendelian patterns of inheritance.



3.1.B.B5.
PATTERNS

Describe how Mendel’s laws of segregation and independent assortment can be
observed through patterns of inheritance. Distinguish a
mong observed inheritance patterns caused by
several types of genetic traits (dominant, recessive, codominant, sex
-
linked, polygenic, incomplete
dominance, multiple alleles).

Molecular Basis of Life



Standards:



3.1.10.B3. Describe the basic structure of DNA

and its function in genetic inheritance. Describe the role
of DNA in protein synthesis as it relates to gene expression.



3.1.B.B3. Describe the basic structure of DNA, including the role of hydrogen bonding. Explain how the
process of DNA replication resu
lts in the transmission and conservation of the genetic code. Describe
how transcription and translation result in gene expression. Differentiate among the end products of
replication, transcription, and translation. Cite evidence to support that the genet
ic code is universal.



3.1.C.B3. Describe the structure of the DNA and RNA molecules.



3.1.12.B3. Analyze gene expression at the molecular level. Explain the impact of environmental factors
on gene expression.



3.1.B.B5.
CONSTANCY AND CHANGE

Explain how the p
rocesses of replication, transcription, and
translation are similar in all organisms. Explain how gene actions, patterns of heredity, and reproduction
of cells and organisms account for the continuity of life.
SCALE

Demonstrate how inherited
characteristic
s can be observed at the molecular, cellular, and organism levels.



3.1.C.B5.
PATTERNS

Use models to demonstrate patterns in biomacromolecules.



3.1.12.B5.
PATTERNS
Relate the monomer structure of biomacromolecules to their functional roles.

Biotechnology



St
andards:



3.1.10.B4. Explain how genetic technologies have impacted the fields of medicine, forensics, and
agriculture.



3.1.B.B4. Explain how genetic technologies have impacted the fields of medicine, forensics, and
agriculture.



3.1.12.B4. Evaluate the soci
etal impact of genetic engineering techniques and applications.

Third Trimester: Evolution and Ecology

Natural Selection



Standards:



3.1.10.C1: Explain the mechanisms of biological evolution.



3.1.B.C1: Describe species as reproductively distinct groups o
f organisms. Analyze the role that
geographic isolation can play in speciation. Explain how evolution through natural selection can result
in changes in biodiversity through the increase or decrease of genetic diversity within a population.
Describe how th
e degree of kinship between species can be inferred from the similarity in their DNA
sequences.



3.1.12.C1: Analyze how natural selection leads to speciation.

Adaptation



Standards:



3.1.10.C2: Explain the role of mutations and gene recombination in
changing a population of
organisms.



3.1.B.C2: Describe the theory suggesting that life on Earth arose as a single, primitive prokaryote
about 4 billion years ago and that for the next 2 billion years, a huge diversity of single
-
celled organisms
evolved. A
nalyze how increasingly complex, multicellular organisms evolved once cells with nuclei
developed. Describe how mutations in sex cells may be passed on to successive generations and that
the resulting phenotype may help, harm, or have little or no effect o
n the offspring’s success in its
environment. Describe the relationship between environmental changes and changes in the gene pool
of a population.



3.1.C.C2: Use molecular models to demonstrate gene mutation and recombination at the molecular
level.



3.1.1
2.C2: Analyze how genotypic and phenotypic variation can result in adaptations that influence an
organism’s success in an environment.

Ecology



Standards:



4.1.10.A: Examine the effects of limiting factors on population dynamics. Analyze possible causes of

population fluctuations. Explain the concept of carrying capacity in an ecosystem. Describe how
organisms become classified as threatened or endangered. Describe how limiting factors cause
organisms to become extinct.



4.1.10.B: Explain the consequences o
f interrupting natural cycles.



4.1.10.C: Evaluate the efficiency of energy flow in a food web. Describe how energy in converted from
one form to another as it moves through a food web (photosynthetic, geothermal).



4.1.10.D: Research practices that impact

biodiversity in specific ecosystems. Analyze the relationship
between habitat changes to plant and animal population fluctuations.



4.1.10.E: Analyze how humans influence the pattern of natural changes (e.g. primary / secondary
succession and desertificat
ion) in ecosystems over time.



4.1.10.F:

Compare and contrast scientific theories. Know that both direct and indirect observations are
used by scientists to study the natural world and universe. Identify questions and concepts that guide
scientific investigations. Formulate and revise explanati
ons and models using logic and evidence.
Recognize and analyze alternative explanations and models.


Course Schedule



First Trimester:


Week

Dates

Topic

Standards

Assignments

Assessments

1

August

20


24

Diversity of Life
:
What is Life?

3.1.10.A1.

3.1.B.A1.



Presentation of Syllabus,
C
lassroom Rules and
Expectations, and Lab
Safety Contract



Mystery Box Marvels



DOL Investigation 1: Part 1



DOL Investigation 1: Part 2



Syllabus Quiz



D
OL Quick Write:
Definition of Living
Things

2

August


27


31


Diversity of Life

3.1.10.A1.

3.1.B.A1.



Stations: Living/Nonliving
Game, Mid
-
Summative
Exam 1, Reading: Life on
Earth, page 21 in DOL
Resource Book & question
sheet


HW: Living or
Nonliving handout



DOL Investigation 2: Part 1



DOL Investigation 2: Part 2



DOL Investigation
2: Part 3



DOL: Mid
-
summative Exam 1



DOL: Mid
-
summative Exam 2

3

September
4


7

Diversity of Life

3.1.10.A1.

3.1.B.A1.



DOL: Investigation 3: Part 1



DOL: Investigation 3: Part 2



DOL: Investigation 3: Part 3



DOL: Mid
-
summative Exam 3

4

September
9



13

Cellular
Structure and
Function

3.1.10.A5.

3.1.B.A5.

3.1.12.A5.



DOL: Investigation 4: Part 1



DOL: Investigation 4: Part 2



Cell Structure and Function
Prezi



Cell Structure and
Function Pre
-
Test
(Chapter 7)



DOL: Mid
-


Cell Metaphor Riddle

summative Exam 4

5

September
17


21

Cellular
Structure and
Function

3.1.10.A5.

3.1.B.A5.

3.1.12.A5.



Cell Metaphor Project



Cell Metaphor Presentation



Cell Structure and
Function Post
-
Test
(Chapter 7)

6

September
24


28

Cellular Energy

3.1.10.A2.

3.1.B.A2.

3.1.C.A2.

2.1.12.A2.



Photosynthesis Prezi (Light
and Dark Reactions)



Photosynthesis Project
(Fast Plants)



Properties of water and
how they support life on
Earth

Project



Photosynthesis

Pre
-
Test (Chapter
8)



Photosynthesis
Post
-
Test (Chapter
8
)

7

O
ctober

2


5

Cellular Energy

3.1.10.A2.

3.1.B.A2.

3.1.C.A2.

2.1.12.A2.



Cellular Respiration Prezi
(Glycolysis, the Krebs
Cycle, and the Electron
Transport Chain)



Pearson LabBench Activity:
Cell Respiration Alcoholic
Fermentation in Yeast Lab



Cellular
Respiration
Pre
-
Test (Chapter
8)



Cellular Respiration
Post
-
Test (Chapter
8)

8

October

8


12

Cellular
Reproduction

3.1.10.A3.

3.1.B.A3.

3.1.10.A4.

3.1.B.A4.

3.1.C.A4.

3.1.12.A4.



Modeling Mitosis from Pitt
BioOutreach



Mitosis Stations (Direct
Instruction,

Individual
Handout, Group Handout,
Stages of Mitosis Slides)



Onion Cell Lab



Cellular
Reproduction Pre
-
Test (Chapter 9)

9

October

15


19

Cellular
Reproduction

3.1.10.A3.

3.1.B.A3.

3.1.10.A4.

3.1.B.A4.

3.1.C.A4.

3.1.12.A4.



Meiosis Stations



(Direct
Instruction,
Individual Handout, Group
Handout, Stages of Meiosis
Slides)



Sea Urchin Lab from Pitt
BioOutreach



Cellular
Reproduction Post
-
Test (Chapter 9)

10

October

22


26

Cellular
Organization

3.1.10.A6.

3.1.B.A6.

3.1.12.A6.



Pittsburgh Tissue
Engineering Initiative
(PTEI) Lessons 1


5



Cellular
Organization Pre
-
Test

11

October
29


November
2

Cellular
Organization

3.1.10.A6.

3.1.B.A6.

3.1.12.A6.



Regenerative Medicine
(PTEI) from Pitt
BioOutreach



Cellular
Organization
Post
-
Test

12

November
5


9

Biological
Macromolecules

3.1.10.A7.

3.1.B.A7.

3.1.C.A7.

3.1.12.A7.



Lipids, Proteins,
Carbohydrates, and
Nucleic Acids Stations


video, interactive
simulation, puzzle, and
direct instruction with 2
-
column notes for each
macromolecule



Macromolecules
Pre
-
Test



Macromolecules



Post
-
Test

13

November
12


16

Trimester Final

All
standards
listed
above.



Trimester Final Review
Due November 12



Trimester Final
November 13 & 14


PLEASE NOTE: This is a tentative course schedule and
as such is subject to change.



Expectations
:



Be Respectful

o

Students should respect the personal property and opinions of others.

o

Students should engage in classroom discussions by listening to others when they are
talking
and acknowledging that we can express our views while still respecting the views of others.



Be Responsible

o

Students should arrive on time to class with their science notebook and a pencil in hand.

o

Students should make sure that homework assignments

and projects are turned in on time.



Be
Safe

o

Students should be aware of their surroundings and should make sure not to put themselves or
others in
harm’s

way.

o

Students should follow the lab safety guidelines when completing a lab and should not touch
any
chemicals or lab equipment without permission from the instructor.


Classroom Breaks:

My instructional time is valuable, so students are expected to use transition times between classes for
bathroom breaks. Nevertheless, I do understand that emergencies ha
ppen, so students will be permitted up to
2 classroom breaks a week. If a student needs to leave the classroom, he/she must have his/her agenda,
which must be signed by the classroom instructor before leaving the room. Students who do not have their
agenda
s will not be permitted to leave the classroom at any time.


Homework Policy:

Students are expected to complete up to three homework assignments each week, so students should expect
homework on a regular basis. Homework should be turned in at the beginning

of class on the assigned due
date by placing the homework assignment in the homework box. The homework box is located next to the door
of the classroom and will be labeled by class. Homework will only be accepted on the due date; students will
not receive

credit for late homework assignments unless there are extenuating circumstances that have been
discussed with the instructor.


Technology Utilization and Expectations


Laptops:

Students are given a personal laptop for SCHOOL USE ONLY. Since these
computers are school property and
do not belong to any individual student or faculty member, we must use this technology appropriately. Students
should only being using laptops to access teacher web

pages, school web

pages, to complete class
assignments or

projects, or for research that is related to a classroom assignment or project. Students should
only use laptops when asked to do so by their instructor and only for assignments related to the class they are
currently in, meaning that students should not
be working on any other coursework during their Biology class. If
students fail to follow these guidelines, they will be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with the school
wide technolo
gy usage policies which may result in the temporary or perman
ent loss of the student laptop.


Electronic Devices:

Students are expected to be engaged in the lesson and should not be using cell phones, MP3 players, IPOD’s,
IPAD’s, headphones or any other personal electronic devices in the classroom. In the science cl
assroom, we
will be conducting hands on laboratory investigations, we will be participating in group discussions, we will be
working in learning stations, and more. None of these activities will require the use of personal electronic
devices, so I do not e
xpect to see these devices in the classroom. The science classroom contains equipment
and chemicals that may be harmful if not use appropriately, so I need to make sure that students are not
distracted and that students are following the classroom rules an
d procedures at all times. Removing these
personal electronic devices from my classroom will ensure that I can maintain a safe environment for my
students where all students can be active listeners. Therefore, if I SEE one of these devices in my classroom,

I
will confiscate the item until the end of the school day. Students who may have had an item taken will then be
responsible for coming to pick up that item at dismissal time.


Non
-
Negotiable Student Expectations

Instructional Methodology


During this Biology course, I will employ a variet
y of instructional strategies to elicit the most advanced level of
understanding from all types of learners. As part of my instructional methodology, I utilize a variety of
instructional tools including but not limited to hands on investigations and labs,
virtual simulations, teaching
stations, guest speakers, the Pitt BioOutreach program, the Pitt Mobile Lab program, live dissections, virtual
dissections, and online teaching tools such as Prezi, Discovery Education, Pearson LabBench, and much
more. All of
these tools are used for the express purpose of making students active learners. I believe that as
an educator, it is my job to engage students with experiences that will make them ask questions and want to
learn more about the world we live in through the

sciences. In doing so, I am hoping to teach students scientific
reasoning skills that will allow them to make observations and investigate those observations in order to gain a
better understanding of the world around them.


Course Evaluation


Grades
will be based on the following
relative
percentage weights earned from assignments, quizzes, exams,
class participation and attendance.

Grades
will

be u
pdated on a
weekly basis
and will be available to students
and parents/guardians on Skyward
.




Assignment Domain

Percentage Weight

Attendance and Participation

10%

Homework

10%

In Class Assignments

10%

Tests

20%

Projects/Labs

20%

Final Exam

30%


The following grading scale will be utilized to measure student performance.


A

90
-

100

B

80
-

89

C

70
-

79

F

A Grade of 69 or Below





















Parent and Student Syllabus Acknowledgement Form


In an effort to save trees, Propel BHHS has decided to post out syllabi on the Propel BHHS website
as well as the schoology

website. We ask that you access these syllabi by going to
www.propelschools.org/braddockhills
. In the future, students and parents will have access to the
schoology website and will be able to vie
w course schedules, assignments, class calendars, and
much more.


By signing my name below, I certify that I have received a copy of the syllabus for
Biology

and that I
understand ALL expectations, policies and requirements set forth in this course. Furth
ermore, I
understand that the instructor reserves the right to modify this syllabus at anytime throughout the
school year and it is my responsibility to stay abreast of and adhere to any changes made.


I also understand and acknowledge that it is the perso
nal responsibility of the parent and student to
utilize resources provided to me by Propel Braddock Hills High School to remain apprised of all grade
postings and academic progress throughout the duration of this course. This in no way excuses
teachers’ ob
ligation to effectively communicate with parents and students. This does however, place
shared responsibility with the parent(s) and student(s) involved to ensure and strengthen the
connection between the teacher, student and parents.



Student Name Printe
d: _____________________________________
___
___________________
_
__


Student N
ame Signed: _____________________
__________
____
____ Date: ______
___
__
_______

Parent(s) Name Printed: ______________________________________
______________________


Parent(s) Name S
igned: ________________________
____________
_ Date: _____
___________
_
_