FdEng Network Computing and Software Development - Foundation ...

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Oct 26, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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FdEng Programme Handbook 2013/2014
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Programme Handbook

201
3

1
4

FdEng Network Computing


P11481

FdEng Software Development


P11482















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WELCOME

TO THE ICT CURRICULUM AREA

Foundation Degree in Network
Computing

Foundation Degree in Software Development





















This booklet contains general information about the College and more specific information on the Programme.
We hope that you will find it useful. If you have any
queries please do not hesitate to ask a member of staff for
further information.

Please not that this booklet is intended to be read in conjunction with the School of
Engineering online student handbook. This online copy supplements any hard copy handbooks

which may be
issued to students.

This documen
t is prepared according to the U
niversity
QA
guidelines
2011
section D8

-

Essential Information for Students

In Partnership

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CONTENTS


Item









Page


1.

Host School, with contact details





5



2.

Programme details







6



3.

Permitted length of registration





6



4.

Programme Specification






6



5.

Course Specifications






10



6.

Personal and tutorial support arrangements




10



7.

Arrangements and Opportunities for students to give feedback


10



8.

Assessment arrangements






11



9.

Web references to University Policies





11



10.

Greenwich Graduate Attributes





13



11.

Additional information for Collaborative Programmes



14



12.

External Examining and your
Course and
Programme
s

of Study


15



Appendix

A

Assessment Schedule






17


Appendix B Course Specifications






19












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1.

The
H
ost School


1.1

School of Engineering



Link Tutor
:


Kanti Chhabhadiya

Senior Lecturer

Computer Networking & Communications

Tel: +44 (0) 1634 883964

Fax: +44 (0) 1634 883153

Email: hk04@gre.ac.uk

Room: P149



1.2
Bromley College
Programme Team
:


Name

Contact Details

Courses Taught

Clive Gould

(Programme
Leader)

Room 114

Tel: 020 8295 7000 x7144

Email:
clive.gould@bromley.ac.uk


Operating and Database Systems

Work Related Case Study

Computer Systems

John Flegg

(Lecturer)

Room 114

Tel: 020 8295 7000 x7146

Email: john.flegg@bromley.ac.uk


Software Engineering Practice

Philip Mann

(Lecturer)

Room 251

Tel:

020 8295 7000 x7169

Email: philip.mann
@bromley.ac.uk


Networking
and Web Technology

Network Configuration & Administration

Barry Spencer

(Lecturer)

Room 114

Tel: 020 8295 7000 x7146

Email: barry.spencer@bromley.ac.uk

Software Development

Object Oriented
Software Development

Work Base
d

Learning Project




1.3

Bromley College
School Office
:


Room
G17

Tel: 020 8295 7040

Text: 07940 487747

Email:
g17
@bromley.ac.uk










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2.

Programme details


2.1

Awards




FdEng Software Development



FdEng Network Computing



2.2

Modes of Study




2 years full
-
time over a standard academic year



Part
-
time (see section 3)



3

Permitted length of registration



The part
-
time structure is for the two year programme, however after discussion with the
Programme Leader and under indiv
idual circumstances students may take a minimum of 30 credits
in one year. This allows part
-
time students to take between two and six years to complete the
FdEng, providing the flexibility required meet the needs of both students and their employers.


4

Prog
ramme Specification


4.1 Aims and Outcomes


The aims and outcomes of the programmes are




To develop knowledge of computer and communications concepts;



To develop an appreciation of network communication/ software development;



To develop critical insight

of management issues relating to the computer networking/
computing industry;



To develop a knowledge of leading
-
edge ICT tools and techniques;



To provide the ability to progress to the next level of study as appropriate.



4.2
Progression


Progression f
rom the Foundation Degree to an Honours Degree Programme is seen as an important
design element of the proposed programmes. Both Foundation Degrees have been designed in
conjunction with the Medway School of Engineering to allow graduates of either FdEng w
ho meet
the required academic standard direct entry onto the final stage of the BSc (Hons) ICT programme
offered at the Medway School of Engineering:


Additionally graduates of the FdEng Software Development who meet the required academic
standard will be
allowed direct entry onto the final stage of the BSc (Hons) Computer Systems and
Software Engineering programme offered at the Medway School of Engineering.


Graduates of the FdEng Network Computing who meet the required academic standard will be
allowed d
irect entry onto the final stage of the BSc (Hons) Computer Networking programme
offered at the Medway School of Engineering.

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4.3 Programme Structure


Software Development (F/T)

credits

Stage 1


Stage 2

Credits

30

Software Development


Object
Orientated Software
Development

30

30

Network
ing and Web
Technology




Software Engineering
Practice

30

30

Operating and Database
Systems


Computer Systems

30

30

Work Related Case
Study


Work Based Learning
Project

30


Software Development (P/T)


Credits

Stage 1

Summer

Credits

Stage 2

Summer

30

Software Development


30

Object Orientated Software
Development


30

Network
ing and Web
Technology


30

Software Engineering Practice


30

Operating and Database
Systems

30

Computer Systems



30

Work
Related Case Study

30

Work Based Learning Project





Part time structure

The part
-
time structure is for the two year programme, however after discussion with the
Programme Leader and under individual circumstances students may take a minimum of 30 credits
in one year. This allows part
-
time students to take between two and six y
ears to complete the
FdEng, providing the flexibility required meet the needs of both students and their employers.


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Network Computing (F/T)

credits

Stage 1


Stage 2

Credits

30

Software Development


Object Orientated Software
Development

30

30

Network
ing and Web
Technology



Software Engineering
Practice

30

30

Operating and Database
Systems


Network Configuration and
Administration

30

30

Work Related Case
Study


Work Based Learning Project


30


Network Computing (P/T)

Credits

Stage 1

Summer

Credits

Stage 2

Summer

30

Software Development


30

Object Orientated Software
Development


30

Network
ing and Web
Technology


30

Software Engineering Practice


30

Operating and Database
Systems

30

Network Configuration and
Administration


30

Work
Related Case Study

30

Work Based Learning Project







Part time structure

The part
-
time structure is for the two year programme, however after discussion with the
Programme Leader and under individual circumstances students may take a minimum of 30 credits
in one year. This allows part
-
time students to take between two and six y
ears to complete the
FdEng, providing the flexibility required meet the needs of both students and their employers.






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5

Course Specifications



S
ee Appendix

(Pages
1
9

to
40
)


6

Personal and tutorial support arrangements


Pastoral care for students is through direct contact with the Programme Leader and subject tutors.
Regular contact is maintained both formally and informally, inside and outside the classroom in
order to give assistance with all matters relating to the stu
dents’ academic and personal progress.
Where appropriate the Programme Leader can refer students on for further support
to a
qualified
counsellor within the College.


A system is in place

on the VLE
that allows students to book 1:1 tutorial sessions to add
ress
academic and pastoral issues. It is the student’s responsibility to advance book a tutorial session as
required. Students are required to attend a minimum of two tutorial sessions a year.


Information on pastoral care is disseminated to students duri
ng the induction process, via the
Student Handbook and via the VLE. Student
C
ounselling

and Support Services provide an important
element of pastoral care and these are also introduced to students as part of the induction process.


Information on study ski
lls is disseminated to students during the induction process. A copy of the
Study Skills Pack for foundation degree students can be found on the ICT HE Programme Information
page on the VLE. Study skills are also delivered as part of the work based and wor
k related courses in
the first and second years of the programme.



7

Arrangements and Opportunities for students to give feedback


Each programme year group has an elected student representative. This representative attends the
Programme Committee meetings

and is responsible for providing feedback to the group following
the meetings. A copy of the university Student Representatives handbook can be found on the ICT
HE Programme Information page on the VLE.


Bromley College has two stages of
internal
review of evaluation where student feedback is obtained
by questionnaire.
The first stage
, which takes place in the autumn

and only applies to
first
year
students
, is concerned with pre
-
course information, application, enrolment and induction.
The
second
stage
, which takes place in the spring
, which
applies to all students
, is concerned with
assessment and quality.


There are three Programme Committee meetings each year normally held in November, April and
June. The November and April meetings are timed
to coincide with the
summary
of
the
relevant
stage of the review and evaluation process being available.


At the end of each course the student group review the course.
Each
student

fills in
an end of

course
review
questionnaire on the VLE. The
course rev
iew

statistics
are made available for consideration at
the
June

Programme Committee meeting, which is normally attended by the external examiner.


Additionally, in January/February of their final year, students are invited to take part in the National
Stud
ent Survey. The NSS is provides the opportunity for students to give their opinions on what they
liked about their time at college as well as things that they felt could have been improved.

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8

Assessment arrangements


8.1

Anticipated cycle of as
signments and lik
ely timing of
examinations


Coursework deadlines are published on the appropriate course pages on the VLE. Additionally an
updated
overall
Assessment Schedule
for the programme year is published on the HE Programme
Information page on the VLE.

(See Appendi
x A Page 1
7
).

Examination dates are published on the on
the appropriate course pages on the VLE. End of year examinations normally take place in the last
teaching week in May.


8.2

Assignment Hand in Procedures


All completed assignment work is to be given in by 4 p.m. on the agreed date. Assignment work may
only be given in to the School Office (room
G
1
7
) at specific times of day, which will be advertised.


8.3

Due Dates and ‘No Extension’ Policy


The University does

not allow extensions to coursework deadlines. Any coursework that is not
submitted or late without an extenuating circumstances claim being accepted will receive a ‘NN’
grade (i.e. NN for non
-
submission). If the associated EC claim is then accepted and
the coursework
has been received within the 10 working days, the NN grade will be overwritten by the proper grade
for the coursework.

The decision as to whether the coursework submitted late will be marked, or not, depends upon the
outcome of the Extenuati
ng Circumstances Committee’s deliberations. Students are encouraged to
submit the assignment even if they have yet to hear whether their claim has been accepted.

Similarly missing a test or exam will result in an award of NN but any successful EC claim wil
l then
only result in a later opportunity to retake the assessment if it is necessary to pass the course.


8.4

Web reference to standard University Regulations


The standard University regulations can be found online at the following address:

http://www2.gre.ac.uk/current
-
students/regs






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8.5

P
lagiarism


When you submit work for assessment, we expect this to be your own work and not the work of
others. It is very important that when you refer to the work

of other people, either summarising
their ideas or quoting things they have said, that you clearly identify and acknowledge this. If you do
not clearly identify and acknowledge the work of others, we view this as cheating by
misrepresentation i.e. that yo
u are trying to claim credit for work done by others. This is a serious
offence under the University’s regulations.

To ensure that there is no question about your work, the School of Engineering requires you to use
Numeric Referencing, which has a number
of protocols necessary to avoid plagiarism

You are encouraged to read the University’s plagiarism policy by following the link in section 9
below.


8.6

Extenuating Circumstances


Claims for Extenuating Circumstances will only be accepted, when submitted using
the appropriate
form, in cases of serious illness, accident, bereavement and other unforeseen circumstances which
are serious enough or of sufficient duration to have prevented you from submitting coursework, or
taking an exam, on time.


Regulations govern
ing student claims of extenuating circumstances affecting formal
assessment/examination and a claim form can be found online at the following address:


http:
//www.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/file/0018/25740/Appendix
-
C
-
Extenuation
-
2010.pdf


Completed claims forms plus appropriate supporting evidence should be submitted to the following
address:


School Quality Officer

School of Engineering

The University of Greenwi
ch at Medway

Central Avenue

Chatham Maritime

Kent

ME4 4TB

Tel: 01634 883331

Fax: 01634 883628


9

Web references to University Policies


University policies, including those on C
heating and plagiarism
,
Equal Opportunities
and
Health and
Safety

can be found online at the following address:

http://www2.gre.ac.uk/current
-
students/regs


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10

Greenwich Graduate Attributes

The University of Greenwich has always aimed to provide an environment th
at allows students
to maximise their potential. In meeting the challenges of today's tough and changing world our
consultation with staff and students resulted in defining distinctive characteristics for the
Greenwich Graduate. These explicit behaviours, v
alues, skills and dispositions that we expect
our students to develop will best prepare them for their future careers and help us to reshape
student learning and assessment activities.

The University aims to be a flourishing scholarly community, with an et
hos of sustainability and
a global outlook, full of confident, distinctive students, always learning, always developing. The
Greenwich Graduate Attributes fall into three categories and are listed below.

Scholarship and autonomy

The University of Greenwich

is committed to developing graduates who:



Have an informed understanding of their discipline or professional practice, and the
ability to question its principles, practices and boundaries



Think independently, analytically and creatively, and engage imagi
natively with new
areas of investigation



Appreciate disciplines and forms of professional practice beyond their own, and draw
connections between them



Are intellectually curious, responsive to challenges, and demonstrate initiative and
resilience.

Creativity and enterprise

The University of Greenwich is committed to giving its graduates the confidence to:



Recognise and create opportunities, and respond effectively to unfamiliar or
unprecedented situations or problems



Generate new ideas and develop
creative solutions or syntheses



Communicate clearly and effectively, in a range of forms, taking account of different
audiences



Make use of familiar and emerging information and communication technologies



Seize and shape the opportunities open to them on leaving university.

Cross
-
cultural and international awareness

The University of Greenwich is committed to producing graduates who:



Engage effectively in groups whose members are from diverse backgrounds



Appreciate the importance of behaving sustainably



Move fluently between different cultural, social and political contexts



Value the ability to communicate in more than one language.

Our aim is that the Greenwich Graduate Attributes will be increasingly embedded into the updated
programme in a manner consistent with the university transition policy. The attributes will be used
to inform induction, delivery and assessment as well as fee
dback to students


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11

Additional information for Collaborative Programmes


11.1


Information about library services and resources


Information about
University
library services and resources available to
s
tudents studying at a partner
institution
on a QAA funded

programme
can be found online at the following address
:


http://www.gre.ac.uk/offices/ils/ls/services/oscars/studentinfo


Information on the services and facilities available
in the Learning Resource Centre at Bromley College
can be found online by following the Bromley College LRC link on the front page of the VLE.


11.2


Information about administrative arrangements


I
n person advice and guidance on enrolment, registration and fee

payment may be obtained in the
College by contacting:


Darshna Babla

HE Administrator/Adviser

Tel: 020 8295 7000 ext 7242

Email:
darshna.babla@bromley.ac.uk

Room: G1


11.3

Facilities at the Partner


Info
rmation on the facilities available at Bromley College can be found online at the following address:


https://students.bromley.ac.uk


11.4

Fast Track Admissions


Fast Track admissions is a service that the
U
niversity
of Greenwich
offers to students who are
currently studying at
a
Partner College so that they can progress onto the

BSc top up
without the
need to complete an application form
. More information
can be found online at the following
address:


http://www.gre.ac.uk/courses/programmes
-
nested
-
content/ug/ugapply


11.5

Holiday Dates


Students are requested not to
take holidays during term time

and are asked to
check term dat
es
before booking!


11.
6

Sickness Reporting


If
students are
unwell
they are
asked
to
contact the Programme Leader and let him know. If ill heath
threatens to affect a student’s s
tudies
they should

get a medical certificate from
their

doctor

to
support a
ny claim for extenuating circumstances.




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12.0
External Examining and your
Course

and Programme
s

of Study



External examining at the University of Greenwich provides one of the principal means whereby the
University verifies, maintains, and
enhances the academic standards of the courses and the
programme on which you are studying. They also help the University to ensure that your assessment
processes are sound, fairly operated and in line with the policies and regulations of the University of

Greenwich.

External examiners
-

academic staff from other Higher Education Institutions or from the professions
-

are appointed as reviewers of your courses and your programme of study for a period of 4 years.
They provide the University with a number of
important services. For example external examiners
will



Review and comment on the standard of key elements of assessment that you have been set.




Review samples of student work and confirm whether the standard is at the level expected for
the award you
are studying and whether it is comparable with other Institutions that they
know.




Provide the University with an independent view of how well we conduct our processes for
marking and internal moderation of assessments.




Attend Subject Assessment Panels an
d Progress and Awards Boards (PAB) and contribute to
deliberations for conferring student degree classifications and awards, assisting the University
in treating all students fairly and consistently with regard to our regulations. External
examiners will
endorse the outcomes of PABs based on their scrutiny of the assessments and
the deliberations of the PAB.




Report formally their findings to the University at the end of each year and identify our good
practice as well as making recommendations for improve
ments in the future.


External examiner reports for your programme of study can be obtained electronically by request to
the Learning and Quality Unit at
ns01@gre.ac.uk
. If you want to request a report for the last y
ear,
please state the programme on which you are registered in your request. Undergraduate reports
are usually available from 1
st

September, Postgraduate reports later, and usually
November/December.

External examiners will not mark your work personally a
nd nor will they comment upon individual
students or individual works in their reports or engage in correspondence with individuals in respect
of grades, marking, feedback, degree class and other personal academic matters. For these you will
need to speak

to your tutors and programme leader.




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Appendix
A


Assessment Schedule


T
he assessment schedules for 201
3
/1
4

are provided
here for
guidance

Updates will be published on Bromley College VLE















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Assessment Schedule



Level 4


Assessment Schedule



Level 5



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Appendix
B


Course
Specifications














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Stage 1 Courses

(level 4)




Software Development



Networking
and
Web Technology



Operating and Database Systems



Work Related Case Study


































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COURSE SPECIFICATION



COURSE CODE:





SCHOOL: Engineering

Course Title:


Software Development




Course Coordinator:

Mr Barry Spencer

Level: 4

Credit:


30



Department: Computer and Communications Engineering

Pre
-
requisites:



Introduction and Rationale:

The acquisition of a high level programmin
g language remains an essential aspect for both higher level studies and work in
both industry and commerce. This course provides students with an introduction to modern programming techniques using
an appropriate language. It then proceeds to further dev
elop their knowledge in this field and provide them with experience
in the development of software solutions.



Aims:





To introduce students to basic programming concepts and constructs in structured programming.



To introduce students to writing computer programs using a modern development environment.



To enable students to write simple event driven programs.



To develop the students’ understanding of user interface design.



To give students experience in using comp
lex data structures.



Learning Outcomes:


Having completed this course, students will:




Understand the fundamentals of compilation and the use of IDEs.



Understand the fundamentals of programming structures.



Be able to using design methodologies to produc
e solutions for a given problem.



Be able to design appropriate solutions to basic programming requirements.



Design and implement suitable test strategies.



Develop good practices in user interface design.



Understand the fundamentals of advanced structures
and functions.



Be able to implement a working solution from user specification.



Indicative Content:


The following content will typically characterise the course:


System files, data types, language syntax, compilation and linking, compiling to ANSI and
proprietary standards, display
functions, number handling, string handling, screen display functions, keyboard reading functions, buffered and un
-
buffered
input, I/O streams, arrays, precedence, associativity, functions as reusable code, user defined funct
ions, passing arguments to
functions, passing string to functions. The use of graphics, paper prototyping, using and managing pointers, declaring and
initialising structures, dynamic memory allocation, diskio, opening and closing files, eof, file managemen
t, file position
indicator, date time functions, maths functions, unions, linked lists, enumeration, bit wise operators, server side
programming



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COURSE SPECIFICATION
-

SOFTWARE DEVLOPMENT




Main Learning and Teaching Activities:



The course will be
delivered by a mixture of lectures on key topics and concepts augmented by hands
-
on workshops.


Learning Time (1 credit = 10 hours)


Contact Hours

Lectures

60

Seminars


Practical sessions

100

tutorials


other


Private study

38

Assignments:
course work and other forms of assessment

coursework

50

Laboratory work

50

examinations

2

other




Assessment Details:


Methods of
Assessment

LAST
item of

Assessme
nt (

)

Weighting

Minimum
Pass Mark

Words Length

Outline Details

Coursework

Final
Examination






㜰7


㌰3

40%

overall

㌵〰


Design and coding assignment

2 hours



Keytexts:


ISBN Number

Author

Date

Title

Publisher

0
-
7465
-
7069
-
2

Dan Gookin

Sep 2004

C All
-
in
-
one Desk
Reference for Dummies

IDG Books Worldwide
Inc

0672324482

Peter
Aitken,
Bradley L. Jones

Aug 1998

Teach yourself C

in 21 days

Sams Publishing


9781840783636

Michael McGrath

2008

C Programming in Easy
Steps (Paperback)

Mike McGrath Books

















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COURSE SPECIFICATION



Course Code:


School:

Engineering

Course Title:

Networking & Web Technology

Level:

4

Credit:

30

Department:

Computer and
Communications Engineering

Course Co
-
ordinator:

Mr Mark Trinick

Pre
-
requisites:




Introduction and Rationale:


Computer networks have an important role in the functioning of almost all organisations and most computing applications
are distributed over
networks. It is therefore essential that students understand the basic principles of computer
communications and networks. This course provides a broad based introduction to the subject. Intranet Technologies are
also becoming increasingly important in bot
h industry and commerce. This course will also develop the students’
knowledge in this field and provide them with experience in Web site design, implementation and management.


Aims:


To develop the student’s understanding of computer communications and
both local and wide area networking

To provide the student with practical experience in the configuration and use of computer networks

To provide students with an introductory knowledge in the field of WWW site development, this can then be built upon as
n
ecessary at later stages in the programme


Learning Outcomes:


Having completed this course, students will:


Understand the fundamentals of data communications

Understand the fundamentals of local and wide area networks

Be able to design, build, configur
e and fault find a basic network

Understand the fundamentals of Web Site design and implementation

Appreciate the fundamentals of server side programming

Be able to build Web pages and implement dynamic solutions


Content:


The following content will typi
cally characterise the course:


Terminology, signalling methods, transmission rates and codes. Error detection and correction techniques. Local Area
Networks including, definition, topologies, transmission media, access techniques, standards, protocols and

the ISO model.
IP addressing schemes, router and switch configuration, transport and network layer services. Cascading Style Sheets and
documentation standards. Tags including their use to implement, colours, fonts, backgrounds, lists, hyperlinks, tables,

frames, forms, images, meta tags, and multimedia. Web site design approaches. Scripting to include rollover buttons, slide
shows, random images, popup windows, feedback forms, date and time. Dynamic Web pages including their creation with
high level progr
amming languages, language syntax and constructs, posting and getting data, environmental variables and
database access. FTP including uploading files, managing files and folders. Search Engine Optimisation and accessibility.


Learning and Teaching Activities:

The course will be delivered by a mixture of lectures on key topics and concepts augmented by hands
-
on networking
laboratory sessions.









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COURSE SPECIFICATION
-

Networking & Web Technology





Learning Time (1 cre
dit = 10 hours)


Contact Hours

lectures


60

seminars


practical sessions


100

tutorials


other


Private Study


38

Assignments: course work and other forms of assessment

coursework


50

laboratory work


50

examinations


2

other





Assessment Details:


Methods of
Assessment

LAST item of

Assessment (

)

Weighting

%

Minimum
pass mark

Words
Length

Outline Details

Coursework


Coursework











㐰4

㌰〰


㌰〰

Practical laboratory work


Portfolio assignment




Keytexts:


ISBN Number

Author

Date

Title

Publisher

〹㜹㌸㜳㐵



〱㌲ㄲ㘹㔶



ㄵ㠷ㄳ㈰㠷



ㄴ㈳㤲㜱㠴



ㄸ㐰㜸㌸じ



〳㈱㜸㐰㜳



Harry Newton



Tanenbaum and
Wetherall


Rye, McDonald,
Rufi


Shelly Cashman



Sean McManus



Larry Ullman

㈰ㄱ



㈰㄰



㈰〷



㈰〸



㈰ㄱ



㈰ㄱ



Newton's Telecom Dictionary



Computer Networks 5th Ed



Network Fundamentals, CCNA
Exploration Companion Guide


Web Design: Introductory
Concepts and Techniques


Web Design in Easy Steps



PHP and MySQL for Dynamic
Websites

Flatiron Publishing



Prentice

Hall



Cisco Press



South Western
College


In Easy Steps
Limited


Peachpit Press










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COURSE SPECIFICATION




Course Code:

COMP 1465

School:

Engineering

Course Title:

Operating and Database Systems

Level:

4

Credit:

30

Department:

Computer
and Communications Engineering

Course Co
-
ordinator:

Mr Clive Gould

Pre
-
requisites:




Introduction and Rationale:


The operating system is an integral part of a computer system. It is therefore essential that students understand the princip
les
of operati
ng systems. This course provides a broad based introduction to the subject. The application of database systems is
becoming increasingly important in both industry and commerce. This course will also develop students’ knowledge in the
field and provide th
em with experience in the design and development of database systems.



Aims:


To develop the student’s understanding of operating systems

To investigate the functions and features of operating systems

To design, produce and evaluate customised software
tools for specific tasks

To develop the student’s understanding of database applications

To provide the student with experience in using data modelling methodologies

To provide the student with experience in the use of high
-
level query languages


Learning
Outcomes:


Having completed this course, students will:


Understand the fundamentals of operating systems

Be able interface with different computer operating systems

Be able to design, produce and evaluate customised software tools for specific tasks

Appr
eciate database models and applications

Understand the scope and application of SQL

Be able to use a relational database application and build upon an existing relational database

Be to able apply basic tuning techniques to enhance database performance


Co
ntent:


The following content will typically characterise the course:


Operating systems to include types, purpose and features. Disc storage techniques to include terminology, formatting,
storage efficiency, security, partitions and fragmentation. Graphic
al user interfaces to include, types features and use.
Operating system commands to include commands associated with file, directory, file system and printer management. An
overview of software design and testing methodologies. Command line programming to
include variables, parameters,
commands, language constructs and debugging. Introduce databases from basic components and structure, data and
information, database models, database management systems, data models and visual models, modelling techniques,
da
tabase design, physical designs, access methods, local and distributed applications, application security and integrity,
dealing with concurrency.


Learning and Teaching Activities:


The course will be delivered by a mixture of lectures on key topics and
concepts augmented by hands
-
on laboratory
sessions.



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COURSE SPECIFICATION
-

Operating and Database Systems





Learning Time (1 credit = 10 hours)


Contact Hours

lectures

45

seminars


practical sessions

60

tutorials


other


Private Study

53

Assignments: course work and other forms of assessment

coursework

70

laboratory work

70

examinations

2

other




Assessment Details:


Methods of

Assessment

LAST item
of

Assessmen
t (

)

Minimum

Pass Mark

Weighting
%

Words
Length

Outline Details

Coursework


㌰3

㘰6

㐰〰

Portfolio Assignment

Timed Assignments



㌰3

㐰4

㈰〰

2 hours




40%overall








Keytexts:


ISBN Number

Author

Date

Title

Publisher

㠱㈰㌳㤰㐵

Andrew S
Tanenbaum

㈰〹

Modern Operating Systems

PHI

ASIN:
B0043EWUNE

Matt
Walsh et al

02/200

Running Linux (Kindle edition)

O’Reilly UK

Apfk:
B004lo1ubt

tilliam oK ptanek

0O/O010

tindows Command
-
iine
(hindle edition)

Microsoft mress

Apfk:
B0043duMmt

oobbins and Beebe

1O/O00U

Classic phell pcripting (hindle
edition)

l'oeilly
Media

Apfk:
B0043MROMt

Conrad and
siescas

0U/O010

Microsoft Access O010 fnside
lut (hindle edition)

Microsoft mress

〳㈱ㄹ㜸㐴

CKgK aate

0U/O003

An fntroduction to aatabase
pystems

Addison tesley

Apfk:
B004iomBCh

tilliams and
peyed

06/O009

iearning
Mypni (hindle
edition)

loeilly Media









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27



COURSE SPECIFICATION




Code: OTOP 1008



School:

Course Title: Work Related Case Study



Course Coordinator: Clive Gould

Level: 4



Credit:


30

Subject Group:



Pre
-
requisites




Aims: (these should
be long
-
term and strategic and identify the overall purpose of the course)

The Aim of the Work Related Case Study is to sensitise students to contemporary issues and examples of practice and
enable them to react to these in a professional way. Further the

course will promote a problem
-
based learning approach to
the linking of the solving of work related problems to academic study. Finally it will involve students in working as part o
f
team to solve shared problems.


Learning Outcomes: (statements of what
a learner can do, know and understand as a result of successfully completing the
course)


At the end of this course students will have:

demonstrated understanding and awareness of the issues and contexts of work related issues presented to them;

as part of

a group identified solvable problems or practical applications within the work related issues and developed a
protocol for solution or application;

collected and selected information relevant to the solution of the problem, linking the workplace and aca
demic study;

as part of a team presented findings and suggesting solutions to the problem posed.


Content:

The case study will focus on a work related issue and be chosen to demonstrate current utility in the workplace.
Introductory sessions will cover:

identifying work related issues

background theory and practice

project planning and management

information search and selection

problem solving approach


Learning and Teaching Activities: (these should reflect the learning outcomes and how they may be achi
eved).


A problem

based learning (PBL) approach will be promoted and applied to examples of practice which have current utility
in the workplace.


"The principal idea behind PBL is that the starting point for learning should be a problem, a query, or a p
uzzle that the
learner wishes to solve." (Boud, 1985).


Students undertaking the work
-
based case study will participate in a series of introductory sessions delivered by work
-
place
specialists. Background information and relevant theory and application ma
y be presented in a class situation. Group work
will be encouraged wherever possible, and groups will be essentially self managed, supported by tutors and work place
specialists.












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28



COURSE SPECIFICATION
-

Work Related Case Study




Assessment Details:


Methods of
Assessment

Grading
Mode

Weighting
%

Minimum
Pass Mark

Words Length

Outline Details

Case Study




80%



40%

3,500
-
4,000



A detailed account of a
contemporary work related case
study, issues identified and
suggestions of
solutions or
applications (learning outcomes 1
and 3)

OR

An artefact

Group
presentation


20%

40%

1,000

A group presentation which
outlines relevance of case study
to the work place and
demonstrates ability of the group
to work to common purpose
applications (learning outcomes 2
and 4).


Indicative Texts: (list information in the table) Managed by the participant with guidance from the supervisor


ISBN
Number

Author

Date

Title

Publisher

ASIN:
B004OBZXI
U

Terry Barrett
, Sarah
Moore

2011

New
Approaches to Problem
-
based
Learning: Revitalising Your Practice in
Higher Education

T & F Books US

ASIN:
B005T1LQC
G

Michael J.
Marquardt

2011

Optimizing the Power of Action Learning,
2nd Edition: Real
-
Time Strategies for
Developing Leaders, Building Teams and
Transforming Organizations

Nicholas Brealey
Publishing

ASIN:
B001QEQR1
0

Maggi Savin
-
Baden

2009

A Practical Guide to Problem
-
Based
Learni
ng Online

T & F Books UK

141295004X

John Barell

2007

Problem
-
Based Learning: An Inquiry
Approach

Corwin Press

0749434929

Peter
Schwartz

2001

Problem
-
based Learning: Case Studies,
Experience and Practice (Case Studies of
Teaching in Higher Education)

Routledge

0749425601

Boud &
Feletti

1998

The Challenge of Problem Based Learning


Routledge

9001707300

Moust,,Bouh
ui, Schmidt

1998

Introduction to Problem
-
Based Learning A
Student Guide

Noordhoff Uitgevers

0787999342

Wilkerson &
. Gijselaers

1996

Bringing Problem
-
Based Learning to
Higher Education: Theory and Practice

Jossey Bass






FdEng Programme Handbook 2013/2014
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29


Stage 2 Courses

(level 5)





Object Orientated Software Development



Software Engineering Practice



Computer Systems



Network
Configuration and
Administration



Work
Based Learning Project
































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Page deliberately left blank


























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31



COURSE SPECIFICATION




Course Code:


COMP 1466






School: Engineering

Course Title:


Object Oriented
Software Development




Level:


5






Credit:


30


Department: Computer and Communications Engineering

Course Coordinator:

Barry Spencer





Pre
-
requisites:




Introduction and Rationale:


Modern software development is characterised by the
use of object oriented methods for both system analysis and
implementation, providing cost effective solution through software re
-
use. Students need to gain experience in using an
object oriented approach for software development. Application areas includ
e graphics, event handling and networking. It
looks at the general principles of object orientation and their application to analysis, design and implementation of softwar
e
-
based systems. As a vehicle for teaching, industry standard techniques such as UML

and Java will be used.


Aims:


To be able to understand the principles of object orientation (OO) and their relevance to all phases of software development

To be able to understand and document a user requirement using appropriate techniques

To appreciat
e how a OO software design can be developed from requirements

To develop awareness that OO techniques may be applied to application areas such as GUI environments, networking and
multithreading using existing classes

To understand practical techniques un
derlying modern programming practice

To examine techniques for scheduling and controlling asynchronous tasks.


Learning Outcomes:


Having completed the course, students will:


Have competency in developing user requirements using techniques based on UML

H
ave demonstrated an ability to use develop and implement own classes using suitable techniques

Have managed the design and development of object inheritance through class extensions

Have explored and demonstrated an understanding in the use of inheritance
and abstract classes

Have explored and demonstrated an understanding in the use of interfaces and abstract classes

Be able to develop and apply multi
-
threaded code involving shared resources

Be able to implement and configure programs for use over a networ
k

Have developed competency in programs using a graphical interface and event handling

Be able to develop and deploy effective error trapping and exception handling


Content:


Objects and classes.

Class relationships: generalisation, aggregation, association. Abstract classes and interfaces.
Polymorphism. Use of OO in analysis and design methods. UML techniques such as use cases and class diagrams. OO in
programming languages. Contrast with tradit
ional procedural languages. Inheritance, including the use of abstract classes
and interfaces. Constructors. The concepts of overloading and overriding. Practice in using and extending existing classes
produced by others. Models for class organisation, su
ch as the Java package. Implementation of concurrency using threads,
thread interaction and synchronisation. Implementation of GUI. Event handling techniques. Definition & use of interfaces.
Networking using TCP/IP Serialisation. Error trapping & exception

handling


Learning and Teaching Activities:


The course will be delivered by a mixture of lectures on key topics and concepts augmented by hands
-
on computer sessions.




FdEng Programme Handbook 2013/2014
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32


COURSE SPECIFICATION
-

OBJECT ORIENTED SOFTWARE DEVLOPMENT





Learning Time (1
credit = 10 hours)


Contact Hours

Lectures

60

Seminars


Practical sessions

100

tutorials


other


Private study

38

Assignments: course work and other forms of assessment

coursework

50

Laboratory work

50

examinations

2

other




Assessment
Details:



Methods of
Assessment

LAST
item of

Assessme
nt (

)

Weighting

Minimum
Pass Mark

Words Length

Outline Details

Coursework

Final
Examination






㘰6


㐰4

40%

overall

㌵〰


Design and coding assignment

2 hours



Key texts:


ISBN Number

Author

Date

Title

Publisher

〳㈱ㄹ㌶㠷

Martin Fowler

Kendall Scott

Sept 2005

UML Distilled: A Brief Guide to the
Standard Object Modelling Language

Addison
Wesley

〵㤶〰㜹㔷

Dan Pilone

Neil
Pitman

June 2005

UML 2.0 in a Nutshell


O’Reilly

〵㤶〰㜷0
-
6

aavid clanagan

March O00R

gava in a kutshell Rth bd

O’Reilly

〱㌱㐸㈰㈵

Cay pK
eorstmann

dary Cornell

pept O004

Core gava O, solume 1: cundamentals

mrentice eall

〰㜲㈳ㄸ㤰

eerbert pchildt

kov O004

gava: A Beginner's duide (Beginner's
duide pK)




lsborne

Mcdraw
-
eill

TU0R96 009O0R
㔴㐹R

hathy pierra &
Bart Bates

gune O00R

eead
cirst gava

O’Reilly










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33


COURSE SPECIFICATION




Course Code:

COMP 1467

School:

Engineering

Course Title:

Software Engineering Practice

Level:

5

Credit:

30

Department:

Computer and Communications Engineering

Course Co
-
ordinator:

Mr John Flegg

Pre
-
requisites:




Introduction and Rationale:


Students need to understand the context in which software is developed and appreciate that the whole process is dependent
on the development of a sound specification. How that specification is developed is
intrinsically linked to the type of
system being created and the project development model being used. Understanding of how these factors are related will
underpin the approach to be used.


The course will introduce a range of working practices aimed a en
suring the quality of the product, including VVT
techniques and their place in project planning and management processes such as configuration control and risk
management.


Mathematics provides a suitable language and intellectual framework for describing
much of the theoretical basis for
computing. The course also introduces the use of mathematics as a software engineering tool, so that an appreciation is
gained of a formalised approach to specification, design and verification.


Aims:



To introduce stu
dents to good working practices in software development

To appreciate the range of software engineering techniques available

To appreciate the process of development from user requirements through to coding and testing, and its implications for
maintenanc
e and enhancement

To understand the relevance of VVT techniques at each stage of the life cycle

To introduce project planning, configuration control and concepts of risk management


Learning Outcomes:


Having completed this course, students will:


Be able

to plan a software project using an appropriate model and project management tools

Be able to apply appropriate VVT techniques

Be able to apply the principles of QA to software system development planning

Create policies for change and configuration contr
ol

Demonstrate an understanding of the role of risk analysis in system development

Understand the potential advantages of formally written specifications

Understand the basis of techniques for functional specification using set theory



Content:


The
following content will typically characterise the course:


The need for good practices; development disasters and maintenance problems; role of mathematics in specification; set
theory; logic; functional specification; testing strategies; integration testi
ng; system testing; manual verification and
validation methods; static analysis; managing development; development models: waterfall, prototyping, re
-
use (OO), agile
technologies; QA planning; Risk management; Configuration control.




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34


COURSE SPECIFICATIO
N
-

Software Engineering Practice




Learning and Teaching Activities:


The course will be delivered by a mixture of lectures, individual and team exercises on key topics and concepts, augmented
by hands
-
on computer sessions.




Learning Time (1 credit =

10 hours)


Contact Hours

lectures

45

seminars


practical sessions

60

tutorials


other


Private Study

53

Assignments: course work and other forms of assessment

coursework

70

laboratory work

70

examinations

2

other




Assessment Details:


Methods of
Assessment

LAST item of
assessment

(

)

Minimum
Pass Mark

Weighting

Words Length

Outline Details

Coursework

Final
Examination





㌰3

㌰3


40%
overall

60 %

40 %


㐰〰

㈰〰


Coursework portfolio

2 hours



Key texts:


ISBN Number

Author

Date

Title

Publisher

㤷
-
〰㜱㔴㤴㠶

Steven G.
Krantz

Nov 2008


Discrete Mathematics DeMYSTiFied


McGraw
-
Hill
Professional

㤷
-
ㄹ〶ㄲ㐷㘲

Brian
Hambling et
al.

Oct 2010

Software Testing: An ISTQB
-
ISEB
Foundation Guide

British Computer
Society

㤷
-
〱㌷〵㌴㘹


Ian
Sommerville

Feb 2010

Software Engineering: International
Version

Pearson Education
th edition


㤷
-
〰㜱㈶㜸㈳

Roger S
Pressman

April 200

Software Engineering: A Practitioner's
Approach [Paperback]


McGraw
-
Hill Higher
Education 7 edition
(1)

〷㌵㘱㤶㜰

Steve C.
McConnell

July 2004

Code Complete: A Practical Handbook
of Software Construction

Microsoft Press






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35



COURSE SPECIFICATION




Course Code:

COMP 1464

School:

Engineering

Course Title:

Computer Systems

Level:

5

Credit:

30

Department:

Computer and Communications Engineering

Course Co
-
ordinator:

Mr Clive Gould

Pre
-
requisites:




Introduction and Rationale:


The skills needed by Software Engineers are changing and there is no longer the demand for an in
-
depth knowledge of
assembly language programming and hardware logic. However, it is important that students they have an appreciation of
embedded systems, low level programming techniques and digital logic. This course will provide students with the
necessary underpinning kn
owledge and skills in the above areas.


Aims:


To provide the student with an overview of embedded systems

To familiarise the student with low level programming techniques

To familiarise the student with the elements of digital logic

To provide an appropri
ate methodology for designing and implementing digital systems.

To understand the complex communication between different hardware systems.



Learning Outcomes:


Having completed this course, students will:


Have developed an awareness of embedded systems

Be conversant with and have developed competency in low level programming

Have established an understanding of the concepts underlying digital logic

Be able to design and implement simple logic and microprocessor systems



Content:


The following content w
ill typically characterise the course:


Embedded systems to include hardware components, including processors, memory, buses, and I/O system software,
including device drivers and operating systems. Low level programming to include architectures, addressi
ng modes,
instructions, programming. Digital techniques to include Boolean algebra, logic gates, truth tables, concurrent and sequentia
l
logic, state diagrams, timing diagrams, synchronous, asynchronous; programmable logic languages, system structure; cros
s
discipline communication, collaboration, symbiosis of hardware and software.



Learning and Teaching Activities:


The course will be delivered by a mixture of lectures on key topics and concepts augmented by hands
-
on laboratory
sessions.








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36



COURSE

SPECIFICATION


Computer Systems Engineering




Learning Time (1 credit = 10 hours)


Contact Hours

lectures


60

seminars


practical sessions


100

tutorials


other


Private Study


38

Assignments: course work and other forms of assessment

coursework


50

laboratory work


50

examinations


2

other




Assessment Details:



Methods of
Assessment

LAST item of

Assessment (

)

Weighting
%

Minimum
Pass Mark

Words
Length

Outline Details

Coursework



Exam












㌰3



㌰3

40% overall

㌰〰



Lab work, tutorials and directed
learning worksheets.


2 hour unseen closed book



Key Texts:


ISBN Number

Author

Date

Title

Publisher

1
-
㠴㘵8
-
㌷3
-
3

Israel,
Clements and
Doncheva

㈰〷

Computer and Communication Engineering
Core
Skills Volume II

Pearson (custom
Publication)

㤷
-
0
-

-
37443
-
7



0
-
㌳3
-
㤹㠶
-



㤸
-
0
-
㌲3
-
3207
-
5

Patterson &
Hennessy


M Burrell


Williams R

㈰〸



㈰〴


㈰〶

Computer Organisation & Design: The
Hardware/Software Interface 3rd Ed


Fundamentals of
Computer Architecture


Computer Systems Architecture 2nd

Morgan
Kaufmann


Palgrave


Addison
-
Wesley


〰㜱㌱㘳㤶0



〱㌰㌹㤸㕘


〰㜱㐷㈸㜸


Sandige R



Zwolinski M


Predko M







㈰ㄱ



㈰〳


㈰〷




Fundamentals of Digital and Computer
Design with VHDL


Digital System Design with VHDL


Programming & Customizing PIC
Microcontrollers




McGraw
-
Hill



Prentice Hall


Tab Electronics





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37



COURSE SPECIFICATION





Course Code:

TBA

School:

Engineering

Course Title:

Network Configuration & Administration

Level:

5

Credit:

30

Department:

Computer and Communications Engineering

Course Co
-
ordinator:

Mr Philip Mann

Pre
-
requisites:




Introduction and Rationale:


The skills already developed in networking will be developed and enhanced in this course. It is
essential for all students of
Computer Networking to understand advanced principles of routing in order that they may design, maintain, administer and
troubleshoot computer networks. This course provides an in
-
depth, hands
-
on view of network configuration
and advanced
routing in order that the student may then go on to work in the industry.


Aims:


To equip the student with an enhanced grounding in data communications, local area networking hardware and software,
and network interconnection techniques

To ma
ke the student useful to future employers in the installation, administration and troubleshooting of local area networks

To equip the student with the necessary knowledge and skills to configure a range of network devices


Learning Outcomes:


Having comple
ted this course, students will:


Possess an in depth understanding of routing protocols and concepts

Understand the techniques used in advanced network configuration and the issues surrounding security and wireless
implementation

Be able to analyse a net
work specification and design, implement and configure an appropriate network

Be able to solve problems involving the application and configuration of hardware and software components of a
communications network


Content:


The following content will typic
ally characterise the course:


Networking terms and concepts. Router interface configuration and verification, RIPv1 configuration, classless IP
addressing schemes, advanced router configuration with EIGRP, configuration and routing with RIPv2, distance ve
ctor
routing protocols. Network troubleshooting using the layered approach, network diagram interpretation, switch
configuration, configuration and troubleshooting VLANs, IOS configuration files, wireless network configuration and
implementation, network
security



Main Learning and Teaching Activities:


The course will be delivered by a mixture of lectures on key topics and concepts augmented by hands
-
on networking
laboratory sessions.








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38


COURSE SPECIFICATION
-

Network Configuration & Administration





Learning Time (1 credit = 10 hours)


Contact Hours

lectures


60

seminars


practical sessions


100

tutorials


other


Private Study


38

Assignments: course work and other forms of assessment

coursework


50

laboratory work


50

examinations


2

other




Assessment Details:


Methods of
Assessment

Last item of
Assessment

Weighting

Minimum


pass mark

Words
Length

Outline Details

Coursework





Exam








㜰7





㌰3








40% overall

㌰〰


㌰〰

a) Practical laboratory work


b) Group project

Case study


Practical online open
-
book
assessment



Keytexts:


ISBN Number


Author

Date

Title

Publisher


ㄵ㠷ㄳ㈰㘰





ㄵ㠷ㄳ㈰㜹





Graziani, Johnson





Lewis





㈰〷





㈰〸





Routing Protocols and Concepts,
CCNA Exploration

Companion
Guide



LAN Switching and Wireless,
CCNA Exploration Companion
Guide



Cisco Press





Cisco Press











FdEng Programme Handbook 2013/2014
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39


COURSE SPECIFICATION




Course Code:


School:

Engineering

Course Title:

Work Based Learning Project

Level:

5

Credit:

30

Department:

Computer and Communications Engineering

Course Co
-
ordinator:

Mr Barry Spencer

Pre
-
requisites:




Introduction and Rationale:


In the workplace there is a growing demand for higher levels of skills and increased productivity. At the same time
it is
necessary to ensure quality of service and product delivery. As a result of this attention is focusing increasingly on the
employability of individuals. This course will develop the qualities and competencies which make students more
employable.


Aims: (these should be long
-
term and strategic and identify the overall purpose of the course)


The aims and objectives of this course are devised by the participants in the Learning Contract

The Learning Contract will set out the:


Project methodology

Lea
rning outcomes

Scope of the project and timescales

Activities and resources required

Assessment criteria and method of assessment


Learning Outcomes: (statements of what a learner can do, know and understand as a result of successfully completing the
cours
e)


On completion of the project participants should be able to:


Show competence in identifying the information required for a particular project

Show competence in the use of information literacy analytics

Demonstrate an ability to effectively use an ap
propriate range of resources

Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation in the effective use of presentation and communication techniques

Evaluate, select and apply solutions to a problem from a range of theoretical models

Demonstrate competency in th
e application of theories, models and frameworks to current issues


Manage the design and development of a project through to a successful completion

Demonstrate an appreciation of legal, social, ethical and professional concerns


Content:


Normally the pr
oject will focus on a work related issue. Students will be encouraged to develop a project closely linked to
the subject focus of their programme. Introductory sessions will cover identifying work related issues, writing learning
contracts, project plann
ing and management, self directed learning, linking work
-
based learning to academic context, the
inside researcher, employer involvement, linking projects to academic theories and subject context


Learning and Teaching Activities: (these should reflect the

learning outcomes and how they may be achieved)


Participants will be essentially self

managed and supported by tutors. Support will be negotiated as part of the Learning
Contract. Students will be encouraged to form peer groups to share and discuss project ideas and workplace learning.








FdEng Programme Handbook 2013/2014
P a g e

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40


COURSE SPECIFICATION
-

Work Based Learning P
roject




Learning Time (1 credit = 10 hours)

Contact Hours

lectures

30

seminars


practical sessions

70

tutorials


other


Private Study

60

Assignments: course work and other forms of assessment

coursework

70

laboratory work

70

examinations


other



Assessment Details:

Methods of
Assessment

Grading
Mode

Weighting
%

Minimum
Pass Mark

Words Length

Outline Details

Project



Self evaluation


100%

40%
overall

3,500
-
4,000



1,000

Detailed in learning contract
-

may be portfolio, project
report, review, presentation
etc



Indicative Texts: (list information in the table) Managed by the participant with guidance from a supervisor

ISBN
Number

Author

Date

Title

Publisher

0077129970

Blumberg,
Cooper &
Schindler

2011

Business Research Methods

McGraw
-
Hill
Higher Education

ASIN:
B004PGM9
FE

Judith Bell

2011

Doing Your Research Project (Kindle
Edition)

Open University
Press

0230222501

Jonathan Grix

2010

Information Skills: Finding and Using the
Right Resources

Palgrave
Macmillan

0273710974

Sebastian
Nokes

2007

The Definitive Guide to Project
Management

Financial Times/
Prentice Hall

1412910641

Gavin Reid

2005

Learning Styles and Inclusion

Sage Publications

0852927975

Guile D and
Fonda N

1999

Managing Learning for Added Value

IPD

1848601603

Valsa Koshy

1999

Action Research for Improving Educational
Practice: A Step
-
by
-
Step Guide

Sage Publications
Ltd

0749409541

Laycock M and
Stephenson J

1993

Using Learning Contracts in Higher
Education

Kogan Page

0335100333

Gibbs G

1981

Teaching Students to Learn

OU