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pucefakeAI and Robotics

Nov 30, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Course Website:

http://www.comp.dit.ie/bmacnamee

Problem Solving,

Communication

& Innovation:

Mind Maps

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Contents

Today we will have a look at mind
-
maps and
how they can be used in problem solving


Tony Buzan


Origins of mind maps


How to use mind maps


Popular uses of mind maps


Examples of mind maps


Thinkertoys
-

Da Vinci’s technique

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Tony Buzan

Tony Buzan is another thinking

guru

Buzan has written 82 books

available in 100 countries and

translated into 30 languages


Buzan is also a bit of a TV star and

has featured on the BBC series
In

Search of Genius

and on
Blue Peter

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Origins Of Mind Maps

Buzan developed Mind Mapping while at
University

He was frustrated that traditional note
-
taking
took so much time

Realising that the brain responds extremely
well to key words, colours, and images
Buzan developed a simple set of rules for
capturing topics in a map

His brother, Barry Buzan, then realised that
the technique could also help in creative
thinking

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Origins Of Mind Maps (cont…)

“Use Your Head: Innovative Learning
and Thinking Techniques to Fulfil
Your Potential”, Tony Buzan, 1974

“The Mind Map Book”, Tony Buzan &
Barry Buzan, BBC Active, 1993

“The Ultimate Book of Mind Maps”,
Tony Buzan,
Harper Thorsons
, 2006

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http://www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/


The key points of the book “Orbiting the Giant Hairball” by Gordon MacKenzie

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http://www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/


The key points of the book “The Human Mind” by Robert Winston

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http://www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/


“What is Happiness?” by the illustrator
Paul Foreman

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Maps By Great Thinkers

There is evidence to suggest that many
great thinkers throughout history have used
mind
-
map type techniques

These include Leonardo da Vinci, Pablo
Picasso and Winston Churchill

Images of Da Vinci’s notebooks are available from:
www.bl.uk


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How To Mind Map

1.
Take a blank piece of paper, A4 or larger


Pre
-
drawn lines can restrict us!

2.
Use the paper in landscape orientation

3.
Start in the centre

4.
Make a central image that represents the
topic about which you are writing/thinking


Use at least three colours


Keep the height and width of the central
image to about two inches


Allow the image to create its own shape

Based on
www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/make
-
mind
-
map.htm


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How To Mind Map (cont…)

5.
The main themes (
B
asic
O
rdering
I
deas)
around the central image are like the
chapter headings of a book


Print this word in CAPITALS or draw an
image


Place on a line of the same length
connected to the central image


The central lines are thick,

curved and organic
-

like the

trunk of a tree


Usually about 3


7 themes

Based on
www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/make
-
mind
-
map.htm


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How To Mind Map (cont…)

6.
Start to add a second level of thought
which are linked to the main branch that
triggered them


Connecting lines are thinner


Words are still printed but may be in lower
case

7.
Add third, fourth, … levels of data as
thoughts come to you


Use images as much as possible


Jump around the map as different thoughts
come to you

Based on
www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/make
-
mind
-
map.htm


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How To Mind Map (cont…)

8.
Add emphasis to important points on the
map


Maybe put a box around a point

9.
Outline whole branches of the map as
you see fit


Try using colours here


The colours can be used to show
connections between branches

10.
Make your maps a little more beautiful,
artistic, colourful, or imaginative

11.
Be humorous and have some fun!

Based on
www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/make
-
mind
-
map.htm


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How To Mind Map

1.
Take a blank piece of paper, A4 or larger

2.
Use the paper in landscape orientation

3.
Start in the centre

4.
Make a central image that represents the topic about
which you are writing/thinking

5.
The main themes (
B
asic
O
rdering
I
deas) around the
central image are like the chapter headings of a book

6.
Start to add a second level of thought which are linked
to the main branch that triggered them

7.
Add third, fourth, … levels of data as thoughts come to
you

8.
Add emphasis to important points on the map

9.
Outline whole branches of the map as you see fit

10.
Make your maps a little more beautiful, artistic,
colourful, or imaginative

11.
Be humorous and have some fun!

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Mind Map Exercise

Create a mind map of the Google paper
we’ve just been discussing
-

mind map
either the paper or the discussion

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Mind Maps & Note Taking

Mind maps are a great tool for note taking


Use them at meetings, lectures or when

reading papers/articles

Traditional linear notes are ineffective because:


They obscure keywords


They are naturally difficult remember


Boring and monotonous


They waste time


You have to write them AND you have to read them!


They fail to stimulate creativity

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Advantages Of Mind Maps

Advantages of mind
-
mapping over linear
note making/taking:


Time saved


Noting only relevant words


Reading only relevant words


Reviewing mind map notes


Not having to search for keywords amongst
unnecessary verbiage


Concentration on real issues enhanced


Essential keywords juxtaposed in time and
space


improves creativity and recall

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Advantages Of Mind Maps (cont…)


Clear associations made between key words


The brain finds it easier to accept and
remember visually stimulating multi
-
coloured
mind maps


Mind maps work in harmony with the brain’s
natural desire for completion or wholeness

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Uses For Mind Maps

Uses for mind maps:


Note taking in lectures/meetings or from
books/papers


Group mind mapping


Mind mapping for creativity

Also try using mind
-
maps in conjunction with
other techniques we’ve studied


Mind
-
map based S.W.O.T.


Six hats using mind maps


Mind
-
map based
C
onsider
A
ll
F
actors

“No
-
one needs Mind Maps; they need what Mind Maps can do for them!”


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http://www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/


A mind map of the book “Psycho
-
Cybernetics” by Maxwell Maltz

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http://www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/


The life and work of Marie Curie

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http://www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/


The life and work of William Shakespeare

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http://www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/


A summary of some of the many uses of Mind Maps

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http://www.mind
-
mapping.co.uk/



The key principles of Mind Maps

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Mind Map Exercise

Create a mind map capturing the use of de
Bono’s six thinking hats

White is neutral and objective

Red suggests anger, rage and emotions

Black is sombre and serious

Yellow is sunny and positive

Green is grass, vegetation and abundant
fertile growth

Blue is cool and is the colour of the sky,
which is above all else

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Da Vinci’s Technique


Technique from Thinkertoys to

help with creative thinking


Apparently to generate ideas
da Vinci would close his eyes, relax totally
and cover a sheet of paper with random
scribbles

He would then open his eyes and look for
images, patterns, objects, faces or events in
the scribbles

We can use the same technique to generate
ideas

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How To Use Da Vinci’s Technique

Da Vinci’s technique is used as follows:

1.
Review a challenge you are working on

2.
Relax

3.
Allow your intuition to offer scenes images
and symbols that represent your situation

4.
Provide a format for the challenge by
drawing a boundary

5.
Draw as your mind wants to draw

6.
If one drawing does not seem enough take
another piece of paper and do another one


up to as many as you need

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How To Use Da Vinci’s Technique
(cont…)

7.
Examine your drawing

8.
Write down the first word that comes to
mind for each image, symbol, scribble, line
or structure

9.
Combine all the words and write a
paragraph

10.
Consider how what you wrote relates to
your challenge

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Nature’s Handwriting

“I cannot forbear to mention…a new device for
study which although it may seem trivial and almost
ludicrous, is nevertheless extremely useful in
arousing the mind to various inventions. And that is,
when you look at a wall spotted with stains…you
may discover a resemblance to various landscapes,
beautiful with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees. Or
again you may see battles and figures in action, or
strange faces and costumes, and an endless variety
of objects which you could reduce to complete and
well drawn forms”

-

Leonardo Da Vinci