Grown Garments: 1 Skin 2 Skin

prunemareAI and Robotics

Nov 14, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

88 views

Sarah

Janes

N00201977

Parsons The New School for Design

Bachelor of Fine Arts, Photography

10/06/13





Grown Garments: 1
st

Skin 2
nd

Skin


Abstract:


Humans have been making their own clothing for thousands of years. Using materials
such as foliage, animal

skins, and woven flora, our conscientious ancestors designed and
constructed garments for themselves and their families. After the Industrial Revolution
of
textiles in the mid 18
th

century, garment construction became a factory job, whereas
before it had
been a
n

artisan craft of sorts, only performed by skilled tailors and dress
-
makers. This is when clothing became a mass
-
produced product.
There has been a recent
development in the social interest of DIY fashion

inspired by eco
-
conscious trends. What
could
possibly be more sustainable
and customizable
than materials that you could grow
yourself?

This paper will explore developments in this branch of fashion technology and
the possible positive affects those developments could have in the areas of our
economi
cal, medical, and ecological situations, among others.
Materials discussed will
include: human and animal skin cells, plant cells, and bacteria. The paper will be divided
by these specific substances and will analyze the development of each.


Keywords:


Fa
shion, Technology, Organic, Textiles, Aesthetics, Function
, Biology, Nature,
Biom
imetics
, biotechnology


Research Questions:


How do we turn raw materials into garments?

What are the functional and aesthetic properties of these garments?

How do we make sure the process is eco
-
friendly and sustainabl
e?

How do we market this option (to grow one’s own garments) to the fashionable public?

Are these textiles
safe for long
-
term wear?





Genetically modified soybean plants in a petri dish

BAYER CROPSCIENCE AG



Suzanne Lee,

Biocouture




Sarine Zaken,
“Ecocouture”






References:


Suzanne Lee, Fashioning the

Future: Tomorrow's Wardrobe, Thames & Hudson, 2005


Journal of

Biomimetics, Biomaterials, and Tissue Engineering

http://www.ttp.net/1662
-
1018.html



Stratatech Corp.

http://www.stratatechcorp.com


Bioinspiration & Biomimetics

http://iopscience.iop.org/1748
-
3190



Medical News Today

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/233213.php


Israeli Innovation News

http://nocamels.com/2012/09/israeli
-
fashion
-
student
-
designs
-
with
-
live
-
bacteria/


Generic Modeling of Cooperative Growth Patterns in Bacterial Colonies. Ben
-
Jacob, E.,
Sochet, O., Tenenbaum, A., Cohen, I., Czirok, A., Vicsek, T., Nature 368, 46

49 (1994).


Bacterial Self
-
Organization:

Co
-
En
hancement of Complexification and Adaptability in a Dynamic Environment.

Ben
-
Jacob, E., Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Lond. A Vol. 361, pp
1283

1312 (2003). Theme volume of

2002 Nobel Symposium on "Self

organization: the
quest for the ori
gin and Ben
-
Jacob, E evolution of structures.


Brooks, M. M. (2005). Soya bean protein fibres


past, present and future, In:
Biodegradable and Sustainable Fibres, R.

S. Blackburn, pp. 398

440, Woodhead
Publishing Seri
es in Textiles, No. 47, ISBN 1

85573

916

X (Woodhead Publishing),
Cambridge.



Journal of Forensic Sciences Brinsko, K. M. (2010). Optical charac
terization of some
modern “eco

friendly” fibers, Journal of Forensic Scie
nces, Vol. 55, No. 4, pp. 915
-
923,
ISSN 1556

4029, April 15,


2011,

Availab
le from:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1556
-
4029.2010.01369.x/full