Ministry of Agriculture of the Republic of Azerbaijan AzRIP Azerbaijan Rural Investment Project

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Nov 9, 2013 (4 years and 3 days ago)

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1

Ministry of Agriculture of the Republic of Azerbaijan



AzRIP

Azerbaijan Rural Investment Project





ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN
FRAMEWORK














Baku, April 2011

2


Table of Contents



Background
……
…………

................................
................................
................................
..............

3

Para.A. IBRD Safeguards Policy

................................
................................
................................
....

3

Para.B. Azerbaijan Environmental Legislation and Procedures

................................
................

3

Para.C. Project Description

................................
................................
................................
............

4

Para.
D
. Potential Environmental Impacts of AzRIP Community Projects

...............................

5

Para.
E
. Institutional Arrangements

................................
................................
...............................

7

Para.
F
. Environmental Assessment Implementation Steps

................................
.........................

7

Para.G. Public Consultations


.

.

.
………
.
……
.
……
.
…………………………………….
9

Annex 1: ENV: Screening Checklist

................................
................................
...........................

11

Annex 2: Environmental Review (ER) Checklist

................................
................................
........

13

Annex 3: Limited Environmental Assessment (LEA) Sample Form (Drinking Water)

.........

17

Annex 4: Environmental Management Plan Format (Mitigation Plan)

................................
...

20

Annex 4A: Environmental Management Pla
n Format (Monitoring Plan)

..............................

21

Annex 5: Community Project Check Lists

................................
................................
..................

22

Annex 5.1: Water Supply

................................
................................
................................
..............

22

Annex 5.2: Rural and Suburban Roads

................................
................................
.......................

26

Annex 5.3: Small Road Bridges and Footbridges

................................
................................
.......

30

Annex 5.4: Wastewater, Drainage and Sewerage

................................
................................
.......

34

Annex 5.5: Small
-
scale Irrigation

................................
................................
................................
.

38

Annex 5.6
: Educational Facilities/Community Centers/School/Kindergartens

.......................

42

Annex 5.7: Health Facilities

................................
................................
................................
..........

44


A
ppendix
1: Sample Voluntary Agreement

................................
................................
................................
..........

48

Annex 6: Minutes of Public Consultations

................................
................................
..................

49





3

Background



AzRIP has been a
ssigned environmental category
B

since it is not expected to raise major
environmental issues, and would instead likely contribute to improved environmental conditions
in the project communities. Given that specific activities will only be identified in th
e course of
project implementation, a framework mechanism for screening for environmental impacts,
developing mitigation plans and monitoring environmental progress is needed. This
Environmental Management Plan provides the framework to address environmen
tal
considerations of the Community Projects financed under the AzRIP.


The World Bank requires environmental assessment (EA) of projects proposed for Bank financing
to help ensure that they are environmentally sound and sustainable, and thus improve decis
ion
making (OP 4.01, January 1999). The Bank favors preventive measures over mitigatory or
compensatory measures, whenever feasible.



The coverage and depth of the Environment Assessment (EA) process for AzRIP is determined by
the specific characteristic
s of the proposed Community Projects. It is anticipated that AzRIP
-
funded Community Projects, as a rule, will not trigger a full
-
scale environmental impact
assessment (EIA) process. The EA is an integral part of the process of identifying a potential
commu
nity based Community Project, and of designing, appraising, implementing and evaluating
it.


A

IBRD Safeguards Policy


Key considerations to be taken into account during the EA process include:



Generic initial screening to determine appropriate environmen
tal assessment;




Compliance with existing environmental regulations and law on
State national parks,
reserves and protected areas

in Azerbaijan
;



Linkages with social assessment;



Analysis of alternatives;



Public participation and consultation with affected

people and organizations; and



Disclosure of information.


B.

Azerbaijan Environmental Legislation and Procedures


Activities carried out under the project will conform to current laws in Azerbaijan and sound
environmental principles. In general
,

Community

Projects will not contribute to the degradation of
the physical and human environment.


Environmental protection in Azerbaijan is governed by the Law on Environment Protection
(1999). The Law establishes the main environmental protection principles, an
d the rights and




4

obligations of the State, public associations and citizens regarding environmental protection. It
establishes the requirements for the preparation of environmental impact assessments,
environmental quality standards, requirements for perm
itting the activities that affect the
environment, prevention and reduction of environmental pollution, environmental monitoring and
control, the role of the public and sanctions imposed on law violators. Other laws governing
specific issues such as sanit
ary
-
epidemiological welfare, land reform, energy, health, water,
forests, cadastre and land use, industrial and domestic wastes, fauna, fish breeding, ecological
safety, water supply and wastewater, atmospheric protection and specially protected areas have

been adopted since 1992. In addition, a large number (some 75+) of Decisions of the Cabinet of
Ministers have been issued to help interpret the body of environmental legislation and related
Presidential Degrees and Orders.


According to Article 42 of t
he Law on Environmental protection, the Ministry of Ecology and
Natural Resources (MENR) is the competent authority for reviewing the Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA) request and documentation prepared by independent experts hired by the
project devel
oper prior to initiation of a new investment project. Other key laws forming the legal
basis for EIA are the Law on Ecological Safety (1999) and the Provision on the Process of
Environmental Impact Assessment in Azerbaijan (1996). The EIA application may

be submitted
to the head office of the MOE or to a local branch office. In the process of reviewing the EIA
application the MOE evaluates the following criteria:




Whether the proposed project envisions new technologies;



The volumes and complexity of the
proposed processes or technologies;



The expected environmental consequences;



Whether the proposed project would create significant changes for the local population;
and



Public response to the proposal.


C.

Project Description

The Government of Azerbaijan
has requested the World Bank to finance a follow
-
up to the Azerbaijan
Rural Investment Project (AzRIP). The original AzRIP was designed to improve the living conditions
of the rural poor in Azerbaijan through rural infrastructure upgrading. Building on the

success of the
first project, AzRIP 2, which is currently under preparation, would expand geographical coverage and
include 11 new rayons (see Table 1 below). The project development objective of AzRIP 2 is to
improve access to and use of community
-
driven

rural infrastructure and expand economic activities for
rural households. It is proposed that AzRIP 2 consists of three components: (1) Community Rural
Infrastructure; (2) Technical Assistance for Rural Infrastructure; and (3) Project
M
anagement and
Resul
ts Monitoring.





Table 1.
Newly Added Rayons under AzRIP 2


Region

New rayons

North

Shabran, Siyazan, Khizi, Absheron

Northwest

Agdzhebedi, Beilagan

South

Masally, Lenkoran, Astara, Lerik, Yardymly






5

D
.

Potential Environmental Impacts of AzRIP Commun
ity Projects


The AzRIP Community Projects will likely include rural roads, water supply, sewerage,
electricity, small bridges, small irrigation systems, schools and kindergartens, health centers,
community centers, etc. The community projects which requir
e using private lands of households
will not be financed under AzRİP
. Several rural income generation and livelihood support will be
implemented on a pilot basis. The types of the activities will be determined during the project
implementation, based on th
e community priorities and project eligibility criteria.


There are environmentally sensitive areas in the planned new economic zones

of AzRIP
: 5
nature
reserves
, 7
wildlife preserves

and the Shahdag National Park.
In order to avoid any damage to
ecologic
al balance and relict biodiversity in the sensitive areas,
i
mplementation of community
projects in
nature reserves
is strictly prohibited.
. Some p
rojects
, such as
potable water, artesian and
sub
-
artesian wells, intra
-

and inter
-
village roads and other pro
jects related with agricultural micro
-
corporations,
can be implemented in
the
zones of allowed economic activity o the
Shahdag
National Park
only
upon
written permission
from
the Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources

and other relevant agencies (Minist
ry of Emergency Situations, Economic Development, ExCom
etc.)
,


In such cases mitigatiobn measures will remain the same as specified by Annex 5 for
relevant project types.
.




Mitigating measures that may be adopted for each impact are detailed in the an
nexes for each of
the Community Project types and summarized below. However, as the degree and scope of the
impacts will vary according to their type and scope, the mitigating measures may vary too.


Construction and General Impacts.



In general the e
nvironmental considerations for the construction of each Community Project will
include one or more environmental impacts such as health and safety hazards for the construction
workers and the public; noise; dust


leading to adverse air quality; soil and/
or water pollution
from fuel and oil, waste materials, surface run
-
off, etc; excavation of materials and disposal of
surplus soil/earth and other materials, risks to environmentally sensitive areas
(wildlife refuges,
protected areas, swamps, national parks

etc)
, flora and fauna,
subsoil and surface water
contamination

risks etc.
Construction p
rojects are prohibited in environmentally sensitive areas.
Some Community Projects may also encounter items of cultural value.


As the duration of each Community Pr
oject is expected to be no more than 12 months, and the
works may not take place in each area at the same time, the beneficiaries may only feel some of
the impacts for a short time. However, some impacts may also be long
-
term, e.g.

visual impacts,
noise, i
mpacts to
ecosystems

and electromagnet pollution

etc. These effects/risks will be mitigated
through measures specific to each Community Project, as suggested below and in the relevant
annexes.


Water Supply







6

Impacts associated with the rehabilitation
and construction of water supply systems involve
managing the resource in a sustainable manner, to avoid over
-
utilization and negative impacts on
the associated
ecosystems
, and avoiding contamination of the supply post
-
treatment. There may
also be impacts
from the noise of pumps and the disposal of wastewater. Annex

5.2 summarizes
the most typical impacts and measures that may be used to mitigate them.
.




Rural and Suburban Roads.



Impacts associated with the
repair/
rehabilitation and construction of r
oads generally include
noise, air quality and other such nuisances, vehicle and pedestrian safety, provision of improved
drainage and other supporting infrastructure such as retaining walls, etc., and changes in drainage
and traffic patterns. Annex 5.3 sum
marizes the most typical impacts and measures that may be
used to mitigate them.
Road
construction
is
strictly
prohibited in protected areas (wildlife refuges
,

reserves
).



Small Bridges and Footbridges
.


In addition to the effects associated with roads,

the impacts associated with the rehabilitation and
construction of small bridges and footbridges generally center on potential changes to the river
regime and the riverbanks and on aquatic habitats and water quality around the bridge structures
and downst
ream. Annex 5.4 summarizes the most typical impacts and measures that may be used
to mitigate them.


Wastewater, Drainage and Sewerage



Impacts associated with the rehabilitation and construction of sewerage systems will generally
focus on any treatment

facility that may be provided, notably issues of smell, and the
outfall/disposal point. The latter may include effects to the river regime, as described under
Bridges (above), as well as the effects of pollution by the effluent, especially if inadequately

treated. Annex 5.5 summarizes the most typical impacts and measures that may be used to
mitigate them.


Small
-
Scale Irrigation



Impacts associated with the rehabilitation and construction of irrigation systems will generally be
associated with effects

on the water resources (see Water Supply, above), water logging of the
soil, discharge of the wastewater, especially if to a local watercourse, etc. Annex

5.6 summarizes
the most typical impacts and measures that may be used to mitigate them.
Construction

of
irrigation systems in protected areas
(wildlife refuges and reserves)
is
strictly
prohibited
.



Minor buildings: Health Facilities, Education Facilities, Cultural Centers, Parks
.



Impacts associated with the rehabilitation and construction of minor b
uildings will also be minor,
and apart from any sanitation services provided and the disposal of any other wastes generated,
they will also be relatively local. In this respect it is particularly important that wastes generated at
markets and at health fac
ilities are addressed during Community Project design and monitored




7

during operation. Annexes 5.7 and 5.8 summarize the most typical impacts and measures that may
be used to mitigate them.
All above
-
mentioned projects are prohibited in the protected areas.


Support services for income generation and livelihood strengthening for rural infrastructure





The support services will mainly be

those associated with rural business infrastructure and may
include but not

be limited to fruit collection and storage,
dairy products, carpet making etc.
Specific EMPs will be developed for each of these pilot projects, once the project type is
determined by community. Those projects which are associated with excessive generation of
wastes, use of pesticides, use of toxi
c substances, damage to natural sensitive areas and
ecosystems, will not be eligible for financing under AzRIP2.


Prior to implementing pilot micro
-
projects including support services for income generation and
livelihood strengthening, establishing farm
er associations and collectively cultivated lands,
specific environmental training should be provided to enhance the capacity of involved
stakeholders in environmental management of community projects' development and
implementation.


Micro
-
projects involv
ing purchase
or extended use
of pesticides and related chemical fertilizers
will not be financed

under the project.






E
.

Institutional Arrangements



The AzRIP has been assigned category
B

since it
is not expected to raise major or irreversible
environm
ental impacts.
For a
B

category project, the Bank requires that prior to Community
Project approval, the approving authority should verify that the Community Project is in
compliance with relevant national and local environmental laws and regulations and i
s consistent
with Bank policy and procedures on environmental assessment.


As in the case of economic, financial, institutional and engineering analysis, EA is a part of
project preparation and is therefore the project proponent’s responsibility. The actor
s involved in
the EA are the communities, Community Project designers, and responsible government bodies.
As the owners and operators of the completed Community Projects, the primary responsibility will
lie with the communities.


F
.

Environmental Assessmen
t Implementation Steps


Below, there is a description of actions to be taken by the applicants and the AzRIP team at each
phase of proposal preparation, evaluation, implementation and monitoring. Key steps for the
applicants include initial environmental
screening and assignment of the appropriate EA category,




8

and preparation of relevant EA documents. The EA documents would form part of the initial
Community Project application package.


Environmental Screening
-

Each applicant community will undertake

an initial environmental
screening of the proposed Community Project and will assign an environmental category. The
initial screening would be done prior to submittal of the proposal, and would identify potential
adverse environmental impacts and determi
ne the corresponding level of environmental
assessment needed to address them. The screening checklist is attached as Annex 1. AzRIP staff
or contracted environmental specialists will be available to assist applicants with initial screening.


EA Categor
ies
-

Based on the screening, each Community Project would be assigned one of four
environmental categories:


1.

None



no further environmental assessment.


2.

Environmental Review

(ER)


a standardized checklist of possible impacts and appropriate
mitigation
measures for Community Projects with minimal expected impact. The ER may
be prepared by the Community Project proponent, and would be reviewed by the AzRIP
ROO and or SP environment specialist as part of Community Project appraisal. A generic
ER checklis
t is provided in Annex 2.


3.

Limited Environmental Assessment

(LEA)


for Community Projects likely to have some
environmental impacts and which need to be reviewed by an environmental specialist
provided by the AzRIP. A LEA form will be specific to the typ
e of Community Project,
and mitigation measures recommended by the environmental specialist would be
incorporated at the design stage. Annex 3 provides an example LEA form for a drinking
water supply Community Project. The environmental specialist would
visit the proposed
Community Project site to assess baseline conditions and potential site
-
specific impacts.
Community Projects that require a LEA would require monitoring both during
construction and operation, to ensure that mitigation measures are impl
emented and that no
unforeseen negative impacts occur. Recommended formats for preparing mitigation and
monitoring plans are found in Annex 4 (A & B).


4.

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)



for Community Projects with significant direct
or indirect impa
cts. The necessity of a full environmental review is expected to be very
rare, as these would be Community Projects that would likely be refused funding by
AzRIP, in part due to the cost of the EIA. Examples of projects that would require a full
EIA incl
ude new roads, large
-
scale irrigation projects, and dams, as well as Community
Projects in protected areas. A full EIA usually requires a team of experts and some time to
complete, involving several site visits, development of project
-
specific mitigation
measures, and a detailed monitoring and supervision plan. The EIA would be prepared by
specialists contracted by the AzRIP PIU.






9

The ER, LEA or EIA will be based on the environmental guidelines provided in the Annexes to
this document, and will identify t
he potential environmental impacts for the Community Project,
both positive and negative.

As part of the design process the Community Project designer will be required to mitigate any
negative environmental impacts arising from the Community Project, and

to obtain any necessary
legal permits. The documents produced will include preparation of an Environmental Mitigation
and Monitoring Plan (EM Community Project) in the format specified in Annex 4. AzRIP staff
will be responsible for monitoring the process

to ensure that it complies with the procedures as set
out in this manual and will also assist the beneficiary as needed in this regard.

During both the construction and operational phases of each Community Project the beneficiary
will carry out routine
monitoring to ensure that the requirements of the EM Community Project
and any other environmental requirements specified in the legal permits are complied with. The
beneficiary will be assisted by AzRIP as needed.

To ensure compliance with procedures an
d to advise on any further measures required to mitigate
impacts as much as possible, AzRIP will contract qualified firms and/or NGOs to train
beneficiaries in environmental assessment, assist in preparation of LEAs, and evaluate
environmental aspects of p
roposals. A senior environmental consultant may be recruited by the
PMU to review and advise on environmentally complex Community Projects, advise and assist
ROOs and local evaluation panels on environmental issues.




G.

PUBLIC CONSULTATIONS




The Envi
ronmental Management Plan
for AzRIP 2
was
delivered to the Regional ExComs in
Shabran, Absheron, Masally, Lankaran, Lerik, Astara, Siyazan, Agjabedi, Beylagan, Khizi and
Yardimly rayons, as well as it was posted on
www.
azrip.org
:
www.mqfxeber.az
;
www.azerweb.com
; www.azeco.info websites and highlighted on periodical press.




Environmental Management Plan for AzRIP
-
2 also was presented to

participants during the
Environmental Workshops hold by AzRIP Project Management Unit in Ismayilli, Ganja and
Nakhchivan cities on March 10, 11 and 16, 2011. Workshop attendees were the representatives of
the Regional Departments of the Ministry of Ecolo
gy and Natural Resources, Rayon Executive
Committees, regional NGOs, municipalities, communities and other representatives of the civil
society. See the Annex 6.




10







Formulation

Objective:

Ensure that environmental issues
are considered at the earliest stage
of the community project cycle

Actions:



Prov楤攠瑥捨n楣慬i慳s楳瑡n捥
d楲散瑬y 瑯 捯mmun楴y proj散琠
formu污瑯rs wh敮 n散敳s慲y, or
d楲散琠瑨em 瑯 qu慬af楥i sp散楡汩l琠
who 捡n h敬e 楮 捯mmun楴y
proj散琠tormu污瑩ln




Ensur攠imp慣瑳 and mi瑩ta瑩tn
m敡sur敳e
慲攠捯ns楤敲敤 by
捯mmun楴y proj散琠tropos敲s

Targeting and Promotion

Objective:

Ensure that environmental issues
are introduced to beneficiaries

Actions:



Edu捡瑥tb敮敦楣楡i楥猠in
敮v楲onmen瑡氠issu敳⁡nd
r敱u楲em敮瑳 of AzRIP




Promo瑥t敮v楲onm敮瑡汬y
b敮敦楣楡氠lommun楴y proj散瑳




Ensur攠捯nform楴y
w楴h

n慴楯n慬a
敮v楲onmen瑡氠s瑲慴敧楥s

Figure 1.

Environmental Assessment Process

Evaluation

Objective:

Ensure that environmental impacts
have been analyzed and appropriate
mitigation measures designed

Actions:



卣S敥n propos慬猠瑯 捡瑥tor楺攠
捯mmun楴y proj散瑳 慣捯rd楮g 瑯
瑨攠typ攠of env楲onm敮瑡氠l
敶iew
瑨慴aw楬氠i攠n散ess慲y




Carry out ei瑨er 慮 敮vironm敮tal
review, l業楴ed 敮vironm敮t慬
慳a敳sm敮t
, or a fu汬 敮viron
-
m敮t慬 慳s敳sm敮t report, whi捨
w楬l ident楦y 業pa捴s 慮d d敳楧n
appropriate mit楧慴ion measur敳

Approval

Objective:

Select mo
st needed and
environmentally sound projects for
funding

Actions:



Once commun楴i pro橥ct h慳 been
scre敮ed

慮d 慮y n散敳e慲y
敮v楲onmen瑡氠rev楥w or 慳a敳smen琠
h慳⁢敥n 捯mp汥瑥t, 捯mmunity
proj散琠t慮 b攠慰prov敤 楦 楴im敥瑳
敮v楲on
men瑡氠v楡i楬楴y 捲i
瑥ti愠




In some
捡s敳

approval m慹 b攠
denied 楦 瑨e 敮vironm敮tal
assessm敮t recomm敮da瑩ons have
not be敮 sat楳fa捴ori汹 楮corpo
rated
into commun楴i pro橥ct d敳楧n

Monitoring and Evaluation



Site visits during community project
execution and operati
on to assess how
environmental screening and mitigation
measures are succeeding or have succeeded in
minimizing impacts



䑥瑥rmin攠楦 changes 慲攠n敥d敤 瑯 業prov攠
敮v楲onmen瑡氠ass敳sm敮琠tro捥ss



䵥整ewi瑨 捯n瑲慣瑯rs 慮d 捯mmun楴y
r数r敳敮瑡瑩tes 瑯 g
慴h敲 f敥db慣k

Implementation and Supervision



Prepare contracts with environmental clauses
for companies, organizations, and communi
-
ties to execute community projects



啮d敲瑡t攠si瑥tvis楴i 瑯 ensur攠瑨慴a敮v楲on
-
m敮瑡氠捲楴敲楡i慮d m楴ig慴楯n m敡sur攬

慳a
r敱u楲敤 by 捯n瑲慣瑳, h慶攠be敮 楮捯rpor慴敤
楮瑯 捯mmun楴y proj散瑳



R敱u楲攠捨ang敳⁴e 捯mmunity proj散琠d敳楧n
慮d⽯r imp汥men瑡瑩tn if unfor敳敥e imp慣ts
o捣ur



Approv慬ar敱u楲敤 瑯 楳su攠fin慬ap慹men琠for
捯mmun楴y proj散琠tons瑲u捴楯n





11

Ann
ex 1:

ENV: Screening Checklist


G
eneric Screening Checklist



Recommended Environmental

Assessment Approach
a

Community Project Type

None

ER

LEA

EIA

New Bridges and Rural Roads








Rehabilitation of Bridges and Rural Roads







Wastewater Treat
ment

Fewer than 100 persons

Fewer than 1,000 persons

More than 1,000 persons; existing or planned treatment system

More than 1,000 persons; no treatment system























Drinking Water Supply

Fewer than 100 persons

More than 100 persons; littl
e or no possibility of aquifer contamination

More than 100 persons; possibility of aquifer contamination



















Schools, Kindergartens, etc.

Minor rehabilitation

Rehabilitation w/ major construction or waste disposal considerations

New construc
tions




















Health Centers

Rehabilitation

New constructions













Small
-
Scale Irrigation Community Projects

Rehabilitation; no new construction of canals

Construction of new canals













Electrical Supply Systems






Solid Was
te Disposal

No construction of new waste disposal facilities

Construction of new waste disposal facilities











Small Community Works (sidewalks, pedestrian bridges, etc.)






Forestation/Reforestation

Fewer than 100 hectares

More than 100 hectare
s










Protected Areas/Parks

No infrastructure construction

Construction of new infrastructure

















12


G
eneric Screening Checklist (cont.)


Recommended Environmental

Assessment Approach
a

Community Project Type

None

ER

LEA

EIA

Flood P
rotection Barriers

Only rehabilitation of existing barriers

Construction of new barriers










Rural Business Infrastructure (TBD during project implementation)









Institutional Strengthening and Community Development





a.
ER = Environmental R
eview. LEA = Limited Environmental Assessment. EIA = Environmental Assessment Report.

The suggested EA instruments are only recommendations; special circumstances in a given Community Project may impose
use of a stricter instrument, but it probably would n
ever be appropriate to “downgrade” the recommended EA instrument or
approach.



13

Annex 2: Environmental Review (ER) Checklist




Example of a Generic Environmental Review (ER) Checklist


Type of Expected Impact


Description of Impact

Proposed

Mitigation M
easure

PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

Increased soil erosion


During the implementation of
a
ny
project,

fertile layer of
soil
is
damage
d

and
affected by
wind and water erosions.

Mitigation measures to
minimize the impacts of wind
and water erosions
:



Collect, s
to
re and cover the
excavated
top layer of soil
aside



Minimize the traffic of
heavy machinery



Control dust with water
during the p
roject
implementation

(spray
water)
;



Restore the infrastructure of
the same or adjoining area
,
refill the extracted humus
layer o
f soil, re
-
vegetate the
area and improve aesthetic
view
after the project
completion


Increased sediment load into
receiving waters


Overall
, sediment

load
s
and
acids of other heavy metals
can be
above
sanitation norms
in water from artesian wells
and

any

other
water projects,
which can
have negative
impacts on human health.

All potable waters despite the
type of water projects has to
be:



Stored



Let sediments settle down



Kept under direct sunshine
for
a couple of

hours

Likely contamination of
surface or

subsurface waters


S
urface and subsurface waters
are
contaminated
with toxic
paint and plastic cans, dust in
air and
has negative impact on
human health

during the
project
implementation.

Wastes have to
be:

packed separately despite
their type
and
toxi
city



disposed in appropriate
sites, treated and buried
properly



surrounding
areas
to be
vegetated and wastes to be
cleaned


Excessive dust or noise during
construction

Air is polluted with dust and
various toxic gas, as well as


Minimize the traffic of
heavy machinery



14

Example of a Generic Environmental Review (ER) Checklist


Type of Expected Impact


Description of Impact

Proposed

Mitigation M
easure


noise has negative impact

on
human health and existing
biodiversity during the
construction projects.



Control dust with water

to
minimize dust
;



Restrict
work
ing times of
heavy machines

(work
from
9
.00 am up to 17.00
pm)

and r
e
-
vegetate th
e
project area
to minimize
noise

disturbances


BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT

Removal or disturbance of
natural vegetation


Natural vegetation
is

removed
or

disturbed during the project
implementation
.

It

can result
in decreased oxygen in air and
can
have negat
ive impact not
only for people, but also
for
the whole habitat
.



Choose appropriate site for
project to minimize the
removal or disturbance of
natural vegetation



Minimize the use of heavy
machinery



Clean the project site,
vegetate area and improve
the aest
hetic view and
infrastructure of the area
after completion

Community Project in core or
buffer area of a protected area

disturbs the nature



Natural vegetation and habitat
is removed when community
projects are i
mplement
ed
in
core or buffer area of a
pro
tected area

(wildlife
refuges, reserves). These areas
may be excluded from the list
of protected areas; some
species of plants and animals
included in the Red Book
may

be
removed

1.

Even though it is allowed
by Government,
implementation of any
project in pro
tected areas
should be avoided for the
sake of future generations
and nature.

2.

Even though there is a
State order regarding
implementation of projects
in protected areas, only
artesian well projects can
be implemented in
protected areas, because
such proje
cts

cause little
disturbance in nature



Disruption or disturbance of
animals or any locally
important animal habitat


A
nimal habitat is
a little
disrupted

or disturbed

i
n the
project area



Prior to project start, to
conduct visual inspection
and dete
rmine
available
animal habitat in the area



If road, bridge or water canal
projects are to be
implemented,
to protect
existing tracks of animal



15

Example of a Generic Environmental Review (ER) Checklist


Type of Expected Impact


Description of Impact

Proposed

Mitigation M
easure

habitat
s and
make relevant
passages
for them

SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT

Aesthetic degradation of a
landscape

During th
e project
implementation, e
xisting
aesthetic view of the area is
degraded,
vegetation is
disrupted, wastes are
produced, roads are destroyed
,

water and air is polluted. All
these have negative impact on
human health.
.



Prior to project
implementation, con
duct
monitoring and identify the
potential areas that might be
degraded



Minimize the traffic of
heavy machinery



Build fence around the
protectable areas



Place construction materials
and other goods properly



Restore aesthetic
infrastructure
,

clean and
vege
tate
the

area
,
treat
produced agricultural wastes
and install rubbish bins

Degradation or disturbance of
an historical or cultural site

Existing historical or cultural
sites are more or less
degraded, disturbed or even
disrupted during the project
imple
mentation.



Conduct visual inspection
and find out the location of
existing sites



Build fence to protect the
historical and cultural areas



Restore degraded area
after
the project completion



Improve

previous
aesthetic
infrastructure

by

restoring
and increas
ing disrupted
vegetat
ions,
install rubbish
bins
and keep the area clean
by holding campaigns

Transport or use of toxic
substances that poses a risk to
human health

Regardless of

the type of
implemented projects, air and
soil of the area is polluted with
toxic gas, toxic paint cans and
wastes. It affects flora, fauna,
surface and subsurface waters
and human health.




Place
and cover
transported
construction materials in a
suitable
place beyond
vegetations, water facilities,
dwelling and administrative
buil
dings



Not to use prohibited
asbestos slates and other
toxic paints



Produce biogas and
composts out of agricultural


16

Example of a Generic Environmental Review (ER) Checklist


Type of Expected Impact


Description of Impact

Proposed

Mitigation M
easure

wastes



Choose suitable place for
wastes, clean the site in
timely manner, sort out and
pack treatable wastes
separately, dispose, burn or
bur
y untreatab
le wastes in
appropriate sites, and take
other actions to mitigate and
minimize other risks for
human health



To improve aesthetic
infrastructure of the site
and
vegetate
after the project
completed



Acquisition of private land
1
for the purpos
es of micro
-
project implementation?


If yes, micro
-
project is not
funded / Find alternative site

Does the Community,
Municipality, or relevant state
agency have documents
establishing ownership of the
land?

Community members,
Municipality and State
Agen
cies have relevant
documents notarized by a
public notary establishing
ownership of the land

If no, delay implementation
until title is established /
Micro
-
project is not funded /
Find alternative site

Are people using the land on
which the micro
-
projec
t will
be located (legally or illegally)
for residential (e.g. family
house) or productive (e.g.
crops, fruit trees, animal
pasture and housing etc)
purposes

In general, state or municipal
lands used for community
projects cannot be used by
community mem
bers for
residential or productive
purposes.

If yes, micro
-
project is not
funded / Find alternative site.

Voluntary donation of private
land for the purposes of
realizing a sub
-
project?


If yes, a written voluntary
agreement must be signed
between the p
erson donating
the land and Community
Project Committee and
notarized by a public notary
(see sample voluntary
agreement). Also, PMU
Environmental Specialist must
confirm with the person
donating the land




1

Land acquisition refers to the purchase or taking of land or land affixed assets (e.g. buildings, trees, crops, fences etc)
in order to realize a development project





17

Annex 3:
Limited Environmental Assessment (LEA)
Sample Form (Drinking
Water)



Example for Potable Water Community Projects


Please use short descriptions to respond to the following:


1.0

General Description of Community Project


1.1 Community Project Objective



1.2

Constru
ction Phases, or Community Project Components


Cleaning the source area, removal of vegetation around source area, digging of well, etc.





1.3

Alternatives Rejected by Community Project Presenters



2.0

Baseline Description of

Affected Environment

2.1

Description of Physical
-
Chemical Environment




Current situation of community with respect to potable water, related problems, and
expected beneficiaries.







Initially considered XXX but rejected due to unstable soils.






Water

Air

Soil

Qualitative character
istics of
supply source, quality, uses,
necessity for sanitary
protection, accessibility by
humans and animals,

protection of water source
from contamination.


Characteristics of wind currents,
presence or absence of dust.


Slope grades, uses of soil,
stab
ility, permeability, signs of
erosion
and landslides
.






18

2.2 Description of Biological Environment




2.3

Description of Socioeconomic Environment


3.0

Id
entification of Negative Environmental Impacts

3.1

Impacts on the Physical
-
Chemical Environment




3.2

Impacts on the Biological Environment




3.3

Impacts on the Socioeconomic Environment
Flora and Fauna

Habitats and Communities

Type of vegetation coverage in proposed area.









Forests, natural or protected areas, wildlife refuges.
protected areas and National parks

Water

Air

So
il

Qualitative characteristics
of supply source, quality,
uses, necessity for sanitary
protection, accessibility by
humans and animals,
protection of water source
from contamination


Characteristics of wind currents,
presence or absence of dust


Slope gra
des, uses of soil,
stability, permeability, signs of
erosion


Historical Aspects

Aesthetic Aspects

Public Health Aspects

Infrastructure

Location of cemeteries,
archeological ruins,
historical and cultural
sites.

Characteristics of the
countryside, views
.

Mortality and morbidity
associated with water
consumption, presence
of mud, disposal of
soapy water, etc.

Access to supply source,
plants, and tanks,

principal economic
activities, drainage
systems in the
community.



Water

Air

Soil

Qualitative charact
eristics
of supply source, quality,
uses, necessity for sanitary
protection, accessibility by
humans and animals,
protection of water source
from contamination.


Characteristics of wind currents,
presence or absence of dust.


Slope grades, uses of soil,
st
ability, permeability, signs of
erosion.


Water

Air

Soil

Overexploitation of water source,

Stagnation of water,
contamination etc.







Creation of dust, noise,
electromagnet pollution.

Erosion, landslides, etc.

Historical Aspects

Aesthetic Aspects

Pu
blic Health Aspects

Infrastructure

Location of cemeteries,
archeological ruins,
historical and cultural
sites

Characteristics of the
countryside, views

Mortality and morbidity
associated with water
consumption, presence
of mud, disposal of
soapy water, et
c.

Access to supply source,
plants, and tanks,

principal economic
activities, drainage
systems in the
community



Water

Air

Soil

Qualitative characteristics
of supply source, quality,
uses, necessity for sanitary
protection, accessibility by
humans and a
nimals,
protection of water source
from contamination.


Characteristics of wind currents,
presence or absence of dust.


Slope grades, uses of soil,
stability, permeability, signs of
erosion.


Flora

Habitats and Communities

Impacts on trees or vegetation
.








Impacts on natural areas, protected areas, or wildlife
refuges, preserves and national parks.

Water

Air

Soil

Overexploitation of water source,

Stagnation of water, etc.







Creation of dust, noise

Erosion, etc.

Historical Aspects

Aesthetic As
pects

Public Health Aspects

Infrastructure

Location of cemeteries,
archeological ruins,
historical and cultural
sites

Characteristics of the
countryside, views

Mortality and morbidity
associated with water
consumption, presence
of mud, disposal of
soapy w
ater, etc.

Access to supply source,
plants, and tanks,

principal economic
activities, drainage
systems in the
community





19








Mitigation Measures


Use format for Mitigation Plan in Annex 4A

.

5.0.

Monitoring Plan
--

Use format for Monitoring Plan in Annex 4B.



Historical

Aesthetic

Public Health

Infrastructure

Impacts on monuments,
archeological ruins, etc.

Alteration of the
countryside, vistas, etc.

Health risks from the
formation of water
retention

areas, etc.






Impacts on drainage
systems, etc.

Flora

Habitats and Communities

Impacts on trees or vegetation








Impacts on natural areas, protected areas, or wildlife
refuges

Water

Air

Soil

Overexploitation of water source,

Stagnation of wate
r, etc.







Creation of dust, noise

Erosion, etc.

Historical Aspects

Aesthetic Aspects

Public Health Aspects

Infrastructure

Location of cemeteries,
archeological ruins,
historical and cultural
sites

Characteristics of the
countryside, views

Mortality a
nd morbidity
associated with water
consumption, presence
of mud, disposal of
soapy water, etc.

Access to supply source,
plants, and tanks,

principal economic
activities, drainage
systems in the
community



Water

Air

Soil

Qualitative characteristics
of su
pply source, quality,
uses, necessity for sanitary
protection, accessibility by
humans and animals,
protection of water source
from contamination.


Characteristics of wind currents,
presence or absence of dust.


Slope grades, uses of soil,
stability, perme
ability, signs of
erosion.





20

Annex 4: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN FORMAT


A. MITIGATION PLAN





Cost to:

Institutional Resp
onsibility
to:

Comments

(e.g. secondary or
cumulative impacts)

Phase

Impact

Mitigating

Measure

Install

Operate

Install

Operate


Pre
-
construction
phase












Construction


















Operation


















Decommissioning

























21

ANNEX 4A:
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN FORMA
T


B. MONITORING PLAN








Cost to:

Responsibility to:

Phase

What

parameter
is to be
monitored?

Where

is to be
monitored?

How

is it to be
monitored/
type of
monitoring
equipment?

When

is
it

to be
monitored
-
frequency
or
continuous?

Why

is the
parameter
to be
monitored
(optional
)?

Install

Operate

Install

Operate

Baseline













Construct













Operate














Decommission



















22

Annex 5:
Community Project Check Lists

Annex 5.1:
Check List: W
ater Supply


Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts


Mitigation Measures

Physical Environment



Soils



Damage to soil structure due to
material storage, construction traffic,
etc.



Loss of topsoil during excavation



Effects of excavation for/disposal of
soil and other materials



Erosion or pollution due to
uncontrolled surface run
-
off and
wastewater discharge



Pollution of lands with toxic
substances



Protect non
-
construction areas,
avoid work in sensitive areas
during highly adverse conditions,
provide temp
orary haul roads as
appropriate, restore damaged
areas



Strip topsoil where necessary,
store and replace post
construction



Design drainage and other
disposal facilities to ensure soil
stability

Land



Damage to land during construction
Landslips on embankm
ents, hillsides,
etc.



Impacts from excavation for/disposal
of soil,
toxic, chemical, medical
wastes

and other materials



Protect non
-
construction areas



Design works to minimize land
affected



Design slopes & retaining
structures to minimize risk,
provide a
ppropriate drainage,
soil stabilization/vegetation
cover



Strip topsoil as necessary and
store, replace/reuse post
construction



Take/dispose of materials
from/at approved sites

Water Resources



Over
-
exploitation, causing changes in
resources, flow patterns,

etc., with
possible impact on downstream users/
users elsewhere (if groundwater)



Interruption of surface and
underground drainage patterns during
and post construction, creation of
standing water
Contamination/pollution of resource
and/or supply by constr
uction, human
and animal wastes, including fuel &
oil, hazardous wastes, wastewater,
etc.



Determine sustainable use/yield
(test as required)



Resource planning and
management, in conjunction with
authorities & communities



Careful design
-

maintain natural

drainage where possible, provide
suitable wastewater drainage,
safe/sanitary disposal of
hazardous wastes



Careful design, adequate
protection from/control of
livestock; agriculture, casual
human contact, hazardous
materials
-

fuel (including
storage), et
c.





23

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts


Mitigation Measures

Air, water and soil
quality



Dust and fumes during construction



Impacts from water treatment



Control dust with water, control
construction methods and plant,
timing of works, vehicle speeds



Minimize major works inside
communities



Appropriate design, tr
aining in
O&M, safety

Acoustic Environment



Noise disturbance and electromagnet
pollution from construction works,
pump stations (if near house/s)



Time work to minimize
disturbance



Use appropriate construction
methods & equipment



Restrict through
-
traffic
in
residential areas



Careful siting and/or design of
plant, provide noise barriers e.g.
embankments of waste soil
(green zone)

Biological Environment

Natural Habitats



Disturbance of natural habitats from
construction, e.g. dust, noise,
un
-
seasonal worki
ng, poor siting of
new works, disposal of untreated
wastes, etc.



Changes in water resources regime



Careful siting, alignment, design
of pipelines and structures,
and/or timing of works
(seasonal)



Select disposal areas and
methods carefully Protect
sensiti
ve areas within/close to
site



Ensure compliance with
minimum seasonal flow
requirements

Fauna and Flora



Loss or degradation during and post
construction, especially due to
un
-
seasonal working, changes in
environment regimes, etc (see also
above)




Careful
siting, alignment and/or
design to minimize impacts,
especially for any sensitive/rare
species



Select appropriate construction
methods



Protect sensitive areas
within/close to site





24

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts


Mitigation Measures

Social Environment



Aesthetics and
Landscape



Local visual impact of comp
leted
works and some intrusions into
general manmade and natural
landscape, loss of trees, vegetation,
etc.



Noise, dust, electromagnet pollution,
wastes, etc., during and post
construction



Careful siting and design of
works, screening of intrusive
items



Re
place lost trees, boundary
structures, etc., re
-
vegetate work
areas



Careful de
-
commissioning of
construction areas and disposal
of wastes



See also Soil, Land, Air, Water
Quality and Acoustic

Human Health



Health and safety hazards during and
post construct
ion



Health impacts and diseases from
hazardous construction materials
wastes, contaminated water, improper
water treatment



Appoint experienced contractors.
Incorporate safety and
environmental requirements in
contract documents. Provide
information on mi
tigating
measures. Capacity building to
emphasize need for safe
working, good supervision,
careful planning and scheduling
of work activities, involve
communities, fence hazardous
areas



Correct design and adequate
training in O&M of plant, safety
procedur
es, water testing, etc.



Correct disposal of waste

Historical/Cultural
Sites



Disturbance/damage/degradation to
known and undiscovered sites



Careful siting/alignment of
works; special measures to
project known resources/areas



Immediately halt work in
vicin
ity of discoveries, pending
instructions from relevant
authorities

Acquisition of private
land for the purposes
of micro
-
project
implementation?


If yes, micro
-
project is not funded /
Find alternative site

Does the Community,
Municipality, or
relevant s
tate agency
have documents
establishing ownership
of the land?

Community members, Municipality and
State Agencies have relevant documents
notarized by a public notary establishing
ownership of the land

If no, delay implementation until
title is establishe
d / Micro
-
project is
not funded / Find alternative site





25

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts


Mitigation Measures

Are people using the
land on which the
micro
-
project will be
located (legally or
illegally) for
residential (e.g. family
house) or productive
(e.g. crops, fruit trees,
animal pasture and
housing
etc) purposes

In general, state or municipal lands used
for community projects cannot be used
by community members for residential
or productive purposes.

If yes, micro
-
project is not funded /
Find alternative site.

Voluntary donation of
private land fo
r the
purposes of realizing a
sub
-
project?


If yes, a written voluntary
agreement must be signed between
the person donating the land and
Community Project Committee and
notarized by a public notary (see
sample voluntary agreement). Also,
PMU Environmental

Specialist
must confirm with the person
donating the land







26

Annex 5.2:
Check List: Rural and Suburban Roads




Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Physical Environmen
t



Soils



Damage to soil structure due to
material storage
, construction traffic,
etc.



Loss of topsoil during excavation for/
disposal of construction materials



Erosion and degradation due to
uncontrolled surface run
-
off and
wastewater discharge



Protect non
-
construction areas,
avoid work in sensitive areas
durin
g highly adverse conditions,
provide temporary haul roads as
appropriate, restore damaged
areas



Strip topsoil where necessary,
store and replace post
construction



Design drainage, structures to
ensure soil stability

Land



Damage to land during constructi
on
Landslips on embankments, hillsides,
etc.



Impacts from excavation for/disposal
of soil and other materials



Protect non
-
construction areas



Design works to minimize land
affected



Design slopes & retaining
structures to minimize risk,
provide appropriate
drainage and
soil stabilization/vegetation cover



Strip topsoil as necessary and
store, replace/reuse post
construction



Take/dispose of materials from/at
approved sites

Water Resources



Interruption of surface and
underground drainage patterns during
and po
st construction, creation of
standing water



Contamination/pollution of resource
by construction, human and animal
wastes, including hazardous wastes,
fuel & oil, wastewater, sediments,
etc.



Increase in runoff and risk of flooding



Flooding due to clogging
of drains
and drainage structures, etc.



Careful design, maintain natural
drainage where possible, consider
alternative alignments



Store hazardous materials and
wastes carefully, provide suitable
wastewater drainage and safe
waste disposal



Mitigate run
-
off
velocities and
volumes, provide
retention/sedimentation ponds as
necessary





27

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Air Quality



Dust during and post construction,
according to road surface



Traffic fumes during and possible
increase post construction



Control dust with water



Control construction
methods and
plant, timing of works



Restrict vehicle speeds and
through
-
traffic in residential
areas, during and post
construction



Careful design, especially at
hazardous locations

Acoustic Environment



Noise disturbance from construction
works, traffic


speed, quantity and
type of traffic during and post
construction



Time work to minimize
disturbance



Use appropriate construction
methods & equipment



Restrict vehicle speeds and
through
-
traffic in residential
areas, especially trucks, using
signing and appr
opriate design

Biological Environment

Natural Habitats



Disturbance or loss of natural habitats
and disturbance of protected areas,
during and post construction



Careful
siting/alignment/placement/desig
n of structures (especially for new
roads), and/or tim
ing of works
(seasonal)



Select disposal areas and methods
carefully, Protect sensitive areas
within/close to site

Fauna and Flora



Loss or degradation during and post
construction, especially due to
un
-
seasonal working, changes in
environmental regimes, e
.g.
disruption to wildlife movements
causing increased road kills, etc. (see
also above)



Careful siting and/or design to
minimize impacts, especially for
sensitive/rare species



Consider alternative alignments
and/or location of structures



Select appropri
ate construction
methods



Protect sensitive areas
within/close to site



Work seasonally, as appropriate





28

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Social Environment



Aesthetics and
Landscape



Local visual impact of completed
works and some intrusions into
general manmade and natural
landscape, los
s of trees, vegetation,
etc.



Noise, dust, wastes, etc during and
post construction



Careful siting and design of
works, screening of intrusive
items



Replace lost trees, boundary
structures, etc., re
-
vegetate work
areas



Careful de
-
commissioning and
reinstate
ment of construction
areas, and disposal of wastes



See also Soil, Land, Air Quality
and Acoustic

Human Health



Health and safety hazards during and
post construction



Health impacts from hazardous
construction materials and wastes,
pedestrian and vehicle ac
cidents,



transport of hazardous substances



Appoint experienced contractors.
Incorporate safety and
environmental requirements in
contract documents. Provide
information on mitigating
measures. Capacity building to
emphasize need for safe working,
good s
upervision, careful
planning and scheduling of work
activities, involve communities,
fence hazardous areas



Correct disposal of wastes



Correct design, including safety
measures at hazard points,
fencing, road signs, etc.



Restrict movement of hazardous
mat
erials in residential areas

Human Communities



Social change (new roads)



Appropriate design to minimize
social impact (see generally
above)

Historical/Cultural
Sites



Disturbance/damage/degradation to
known and undiscovered sites



Careful siting/alignment o
f
works; special measures to
project known resources/areas



Immediately halt work in vicinity
of discoveries, pending
instructions from relevant
authorities

Acquisition of private
land for the purposes
of micro
-
project
implementation?


If yes, micro
-
projec
t is not funded /
Find alternative site





29

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Does the Community,
Municipality, or
relevant state agency
have documents
establishing ownership
of the land?

Community members, Municipality and
State Agencies have relevant documents
notarized by a public notary

establishing
ownership of the land

If no, delay implementation until
title is established / Micro
-
project is
not funded / Find alternative site

Are people using the
land on which the
micro
-
project will be
located (legally or
illegally) for
residential

(e.g. family
house) or productive
(e.g. crops, fruit trees,
animal pasture and
housing etc) purposes

In general, state or municipal lands used
for community projects cannot be used
by community members for residential
or productive purposes.

If yes, mic
ro
-
project is not funded /
Find alternative site.

Voluntary donation of
private land for the
purposes of realizing a
sub
-
project?


If yes, a written voluntary agreement
must be signed between the person
donating the land and Community
Project Committee a
nd notarized by
a public notary (see sample
voluntary agreement). Also, PMU
Environmental Specialist must
confirm with the person donating
the land






30

Annex 5.3:
Check List: Small Road Bridges and Footbridges




Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Physical Environment



Soils



Damage to soil structure due to
material storage, construction traffic,
etc.



Loss of topsoil during excavation
for/ disposal of construction
materials



Erosion and degradation due to
uncontrolled surface r
un
-
off



Degradation of riverbanks and bed
post construction, especially through
changed hydraulics and flow patterns
and erosion



Protect non
-
construction areas,
avoid work in sensitive areas
during highly adverse conditions,
provide temporary haul roads a
s
appropriate, restore damaged areas



Strip topsoil where necessary, store
and replace post construction



Design drainage and other disposal
facilities to ensure soil stability



Careful design of abutments, piers
and protecting works

Land



Damage to land du
ring construction
Landslips on embankments, hillsides,
etc.



Impacts from excavation for/disposal
of soil and other materials



Protect non
-
construction areas



Design works to minimize land
affected



Design slopes & retaining
structures to minimize risk,
provi
de appropriate drainage and
soil stabilization/vegetation cover



Strip topsoil as necessary and
store, replace/reuse post
construction



Take/dispose of materials from/at
approved sites

Water Resources



Interruption of surface and
underground drainage pattern
s
during and post construction,
creation of standing water



Contamination/pollution of resource
by construction, human and animal
wastes, including hazardous wastes,
fuel & oil, wastewater, sediments,
etc.



Careful design, maintain natural
drainage and river

flow patterns
wherever possible, consider
alternative alignments and
structures



Store hazardous materials and
wastes carefully, provide suitable
drainage and safe waste disposal



Where possible execute
construction during dry season



Mitigate run
-
off veloci
ties and
volumes, design outfalls
accordingly




31

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Air Quality



Dust and fumes during construction



Traffic fumes post construction (for
road bridge)



Control dust with water



Control construction methods and
plant, timing of works



Restrict vehicle speeds in
resi
dential areas



Appropriate design

Acoustic Environment



Noise disturbance from construction
works and traffic during and post
construction


speed, quantity and
type (for road bridge)



Time work to minimize
disturbance



Use appropriate construction
methods &

equipment



Restrict vehicle speeds in
residential areas, especially trucks,
using signing and appropriate
design

Biological Environment

Natural Habitats



Disturbance or loss of natural
habitats during and post construction
(especially aquatic), due to
hyd
raulics, changed flow patterns,
etc.



Disturbance of protected areas



Careful siting/alignment/ design
(especially for new bridges),
and/or timing of works (seasonal)



Select disposal areas and methods
carefully, Protect sensitive areas
within/close to site

Fauna and Flora



Loss or degradation during and post
construction, especially due to
un
-
seasonal working, changes in
environmental regimes, e.g.
disruption to fish spawning sites, to
wildlife movements (approach
roads), etc. (see also above)



Careful siting
and/or design to
minimize impacts, especially for
sensitive/rare species



Consider alternative alignments
and/or location of structures



Select appropriate construction
methods



Protect sensitive areas within/close
to site



Work seasonally, as appropriate

S
ocial Environment



Aesthetics and
Landscape



Local visual impact of completed
works and some intrusions into
general manmade and natural
landscape, loss of trees, vegetation,
etc.



Noise, dust, wastes, etc., during and
post construction



Careful siting and
design of works,
screening of intrusive items



Replace lost trees, boundary
structures, etc., re
-
vegetate work
areas



Careful de
-
commissioning and
reinstatement of construction
areas, and disposal of wastes



See also Soil, Land, Air Quality
and Acoustic




32

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Huma
n Health



Health and safety hazards during and
post construction



Health impacts from hazardous
construction materials and wastes,
pedestrian and vehicle accidents (for
road bridges),



Transport of hazardous substances



Appoint experienced contractors.
Incorp
orate safety and
environmental requirements in
contract documents. Provide
information on mitigating
measures. Capacity building to
emphasize need for safe working,
good supervision, careful planning
and scheduling of work activities,
involve communities
, fence
hazardous areas



Correct disposal of wastes



Correct design, including safety
measures at hazard points
-

especially pedestrian/vehicle
interaction, e.g. fencing, barriers,
road signs, etc.



Restrict movement of hazardous
materials, in residential a
reas,
apply any load restrictions required
during and post construction

Historical/Cultural
Sites



Disturbance/damage/degradation to
known and undiscovered sites



Careful siting and alignment of
works; special measures to project
known resources/areas



Immed
iately halt work in vicinity
of discoveries, pending
instructions from relevant
authorities

Acquisition of private
land for the purposes of
micro
-
project
implementation?


If yes, micro
-
project is not funded /
Find alternative site

Does the Community,
Mu
nicipality, or
relevant state agency
have documents
establishing ownership
of the land?

Community members, Municipality and
State Agencies have relevant
documents notarized by a public notary
establishing ownership of the land

If no, delay implementation
until title
is established / Micro
-
project is not
funded / Find alternative site




33

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Are people using the
land on which the
micro
-
project will be
located (legally or
illegally) for
residential (e.g. family
house) or productive
(e.g. crops, fruit trees,
an
imal pasture and
housing etc) purposes

In general, state or municipal lands used
for community projects cannot be used
by community members for residential
or productive purposes.

If yes, micro
-
project is not funded /
Find alternative site.

Voluntary do
nation of
private land for the
purposes of realizing a
sub
-
project?


If yes, a written voluntary agreement
must be signed between the person
donating the land and Community
Project Committee and notarized by a
public notary (see sample voluntary
agreement)
. Also, PMU
Environmental Specialist must
confirm with the person donating the
land











34

Annex 5.4:
Check List: Wastewater, Drainage and Sewerage




Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Physical Environment



Soils



Damage to
soil structure due to
material storage, construction traffic,
etc.



Loss of topsoil during excavation
for/ disposal of construction
materials



Erosion due to uncontrolled surface
run
-
off



Pollution at discharge point, possibly
leading to groundwater pollutio
n



raise of subsoil water level



swamping of areas



salination




Protect non
-
construction areas,
avoid work in sensitive areas
during highly adverse conditions,
provide temporary haul roads as
appropriate, restore damaged
areas



Strip topsoil where necessary,

store and replace post
construction



Design drainage, flowing
irrigation canals and other
disposal facilities to ensure soil
stability and appropriate treatment

Land



Landslips on embankments, hillsides,
etc.



Impacts from excavation for/disposal
of soil a
nd other materials



Protect non
-
construction areas



Design works to minimize land
affected



Design slopes & retaining
structures to minimize risk,
provide appropriate drainage and
vegetation cover



Strip topsoil as necessary and
store, replace/reuse post
cons
truction



Take/dispose of materials from/at
approved sites





35

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Water Resources



Changes in regime from excavation
for/disposal of soil, waste materials,
etc



Contamination/pollution from
construction, human and animal
wastes, including fuel & oil,
hazardous was
tes, wastewater and
sewage


especially from discharge
if not connected to existing sewer.



Eutrophication of surface water
leading to habit changes, etc.



Store hazardous materials and
wastes carefully, provide suitable
wastewater drainage and safe
waste di
sposal



Select appropriate technology for
wastewater treatment to minimize
pollution, especially in sensitive
locations, e.g. close to drinking
water source, and operate and
maintain correctly/ according to
agree discharge standards provide
O&M training



Sit
e treatment works
appropriately, or incorporate into
larger wastewater systems,
provide any treatment necessary
to meet required standards, plus
training

Air Quality



Dust and fumes during construction



Hazardous gases in manholes and
during disinfection
(if chlorine gas)



Control dust with water



Control construction methods and
plant, timing of works



Restrict vehicle speeds in
residential areas



Appropriate design



Proper operation, monitoring
system in place

Acoustic Environment



Noise disturbance from con
struction
works and traffic



Time work to minimize
disturbance



Use appropriate construction
methods & equipment



Restrict vehicle speeds in
residential areas, especially trucks

Biological Environment

Natural Habitats



Disturbance or loss of natural
habitat
s and disturbance of protected
areas, during and post construction



Changes due to eutrophication of
surface water



Careful siting/design of structures
and/or timing of works (seasonal)



Select disposal areas and methods
carefully, Protect sensitive areas
wit
hin/close to site





36

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Fauna and Flora



Disturbance or loss, especially
aquatic animals and vegetation from
eutrophication of surface water,
(effect of water pollution)



Careful siting, alignment and/or
design to minimize impacts,
especially for any sensitive/
rare
species



Select appropriate construction
methods



Protect sensitive areas
within/close to site



Abatement of pollution by a
proper effluent treatment and
disposal.

Social Environment



Aesthetics and
Landscape



Local visual impact of completed
works and

some intrusions in general
manmade and natural landscape, loss
of trees, vegetation, etc.



Noise, dust, wastes, etc., during and
post construction



Unpleasant odors from treatment
facility, disposal point and/or
polluted water course



Careful siting and desi
gn of
works, screening of intrusive
items



Replace lost trees, boundary
structures, etc., re
-
vegetate work
areas



Careful de
-
commissioning and
reinstatement of construction
areas, and disposal of wastes
during and post construction,
including proper O&M of
t
reatment facility and training in
both



See also Soil, Land, Air Quality
and Acoustic

Human Health



Health and safety hazards during and
post construction



Health impacts from hazardous
construction materials and untreated
wastes



Appoint experienced contract
ors.
Incorporate safety and
environmental requirements in
contract documents. Provide
information on mitigating
measures. Capacity building to
emphasize need for safe working,
good supervision, careful
planning and scheduling of work
and O&M activities,

involve
communities, fence hazardous
areas



Careful siting and design of
works



Correct disposal of wastes, based
on selection of most appropriate
technology; training in O&M
operation and maintenance plans





37

Environmental
Components

Possible Impacts

Mitigation Measures

Human Communities



Impacts may be concentrated
dow
nstream in other communities



Adequate treatment prior to
discharge



Adequate consultation of
potentially affected communities

Historical/Cultural
Sites



Disturbance/damage/degradation to
known and undiscovered sites



Careful siting/alignment of
works; specia
l measures to project
known resources/areas



Immediately halt work in vicinity
of discoveries, pending
instructions from relevant
authorities

Acquisition of private
land for the purposes of
micro
-
project
implementation?


If yes, micro
-
project is not funded

/
Find alternative site

Does the Community,
Municipality, or
relevant state agency
have documents
establishing ownership
of the land?

Community members, Municipality and
State Agencies have relevant
documents notarized by a public notary
establishing o
wnership of the land

If no, delay implementation until
title is established / Micro
-
project is
not funded / Find alternative site

Are people using the
land on which the
micro
-
project will be
located (legally or
illegally) for
residential (e