Future activities-Potential Projects - Amity

porcupineideaBiotechnology

Dec 16, 2012 (4 years and 6 months ago)

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Future activities
-
Potential
Projects

Dr. Sunil Saran

Selection of states


Basis


Agro climatic diversity


Requirement for horticulture
development


Unexploited potential


Huge number of small and marginal
farmers


Lack of post harvest and marketing
infrastructure


We have selected 15 states for the proposed project

Uttar Pradesh



Horticulture Scenario


Uttar Pradesh contributes to 18 % in the National Basket of
horticulture crops


36.74 % in vegetables (ranks 1st)


10.48 % in fruits (ranks 2nd)


44.13 % in Potato (ranks 1st)


33 lakh hectares under horticulture crops which is 12 % of the
total cultivated area of the state


Area and production of horticulture crops 14.75 lakh ha 237.44
lakh tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 3.16 lakh ha prod 37.57 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 9.60 lakh ha Production 197.90 lakh tonnes


Problems


Inadequate availability of quality planting material


Poor post harvest management and marketing facility


Lack of infrastructure and marketing facility

Uttarakhand


Horticulture Scenario


The hill areas are capable of growing off
-
season vegetables that
have a great demand in the plains.


Proximity to Delhi and other North Indian urban centres


Area and production of horticulture crops 267.5 lakh ha 1017.9
lakh tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 1.71 lakh ha prod 7.17 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 0.80 lakh ha Production 10.36 lakh tonnes


Problems


Transportation and transaction costs are prohibitively high for a
small farmer


lack of irrigational infrastructure


Lack of sufficient agro processing units and agro industries in the
state


Unseasonal or heavy rains sometimes completely destroy the
vegetables before they are ready for harvesting.


Hailstorms regularly destroy a significant part of the output from
fruit orchards and vegetable farms.

Bihar


Horticulture Scenario


Presently fruits and vegetable crops cover about 19.5% of the net
cropped area and 14% of gross cropped area of the state.


Now the state ranks fourth in fruit production and third in
vegetable production in the country.


Area and production of horticulture crops 11.21 lakh ha 173.34
lakh tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 2.86 lakh ha prod 32.52 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 8.23 lakh ha Production 140.67 lakh tonnes


Problems


inadequate infrastructure for horticulture produce


Cold storages located very far about 50 km


Given the bad transportation facilities, it is unattractive for the
horticulture producers to keep their produce in cold storage


lack of access to big markets


Processing facilities not accessible

Rajasthan


Horticulture Scenario


State has made considerable progress in the
development of horticulture


State government is taking a keen interest in horticulture
development in the state


There has been a significant development in terms of
marketing infrastructure and transportation


Area and production of horticulture crops 9.21 lakh ha
18.40 lakh tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 0.27 lakh ha prod 4.01 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 1.35 lakh ha Production 8.18 lakh tonnes


Spices Area 5.56 lakh0 ha Production 5.20 lakh tonnes


Problems


More focus needed on processing and value addition
activities

Himanchal Pradesh



Horticulture Scenario


Horticulture generates gross domestic income of
about Rs. 2200 crore annually


Area and production of horticulture crops 2.84 lakh
ha 18.99 lakh tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 2.02 lakh ha prod 7.13 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 0.63 lakh ha Production 11.50 lakh
tonnes


Problems


Transportation and transaction costs are
prohibitively high for a small farmer


Lack of irrigation infrastructure


Lack of post harvest, processing and marketing
infrastructure


Orissa


Horticulture Scenario


Area and production of horticulture crops
1257.4 lakh ha 9975.9 lakh tonnes
respectively


Fruits Area 2.65 lakh ha prod 12.75 lakh
tonnes


Vegetables Area 6.60 lakh ha Production 82.14
lakh tonnes


Spices 1.47 lakh ha Production 1.99 lakh
tonnes


Problems


Lack of irrigation facilities in dry land and
rainfed areas


Lack of agro processing, post harvest and
marketing facilities


Lack of quality planting material

 Declining land ownership
Sikkim


Horticulture Scenario


Most potential crops
-
Sikkim Orange, Large Cardamom,
Ginger, Bird’s Eye chilli


Area and production of horticulture crops 12.20 lakh ha
198.21 lakh tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 0.92 lakh ha prod 0.14 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 0.20 lakh ha Production 0.95 lakh tonnes


Spices 15.56 lakh ha Production 5.20 lakh tonnes


Problems


Sikkim suffers from horticulture research backup, as there
is no Agriculture College or University with the exception
of ICAR sub
-
center and Spices Board


Lack of irrigation facility


Lack of food processing and value addition facilities

Mizoram


Horticulture Scenario


Out of the cultivable area, potential area for horticultural activities
is found to be 6.31 lakh hectares, which consist of gentle to
moderate slope


Area and production of horticulture crops 1.01 lakh ha 6.85 lakh
tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 0.22 lakh ha prod 2.19 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 0.01 lakh ha Production 0.37 lakh tonnes


Problems


Jhum cultivation (shifting cultivation)


Non
-
availability of Quality Planting Material


Lack of awareness about the potentiality of horticultural crop as
commercial crops


Lack of irrigation facility, production and marketing infrastructure


Lack of food processing and value addition facilities


Lack of awareness of new technology


Difficult transportation


Lack of research and development facilities


Assam


Horticulture Scenario


Horticulture play a crucial role in the states economy


About 90% of the farmer belongs to small and marginal group,
the average operational holding being 1.37 hectares.


Area and production of horticulture crops 5.83 lakh ha 60.89 lakh
tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 1.22 lakh ha prod 14.10 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 3.28 lakh ha Production 44.74 lakh tonnes


Problems


Non
-
availability of Quality Planting Material


Lack of awareness about the potentiality of horticultural crop as
commercial crops


Lack of irrigation facility


Lack of production and marketing infrastructure


Undulated topography and small land holdings


Lack of food processing and value addition facilities


Lack of awareness of new technology

Meghalaya


Horticulture Scenario


Meghalaya has a lot of potential for horticulture development


Potential crops
-

Ginger, Turmeric, Passion fruit, Orange


Area and production of horticulture crops 100.9 lakh ha 679.5
lakh tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 0.28 lakh ha prod 2.34 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 0.42 lakh ha Production 3.45 lakh tonnes


Spices Area 0.18 lakh ha Production 0.83 lakh tonnes


Problems


Non
-
availability of Quality Planting Material


Lack of awareness about the potentiality of horticultural crop as
commercial crops


Lack of irrigation facility


Lack of production and marketing infrastructure


Undulated topography and small land holdings


Lack of food processing and value addition facilities


Lack of awareness of new technology



Nagaland


Horticulture Scenario


Horticulture crops covers 9.95% of the gross cropped
area .


Of the 58370 ha. under culturable wasteland and 157210
ha. under permanent fallow, an estimated 29lakh ha could
be developed under horticultural crops


Area and production of horticulture crops 0.27 lakh ha
1.44 lakh tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 0.11 lakh ha prod 0.53 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 0.10 lakh ha Production 0.63 lakh tonnes


Problems


Lack of post
-
harvest technology and storage facilities;


inadequate transport and communication


Absence of proper marketing and infrastructure facilities
has further hampered

West Bengal


Horticulture Scenario


Largest producer of pineapple


The state is also the second largest producer of potato
and lychee.


Area and production of horticulture crops 16.58 lakh ha
256.65 lakh tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 1.94 lakh ha prod 27.66 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 13.13 lakh ha Production 224.56 lakh
tonnes


Problems


Lack of irrigation facilities in dry land and rainfed areas


Lack of agro processing facilities


Lack of quality planting material


Declining land ownership

Haryana


Horticulture Scenario


Due to close proximity to National Capital and better
infrastructure facilities existing in the State


Favorable climate for production of quality spices, Kinnow,
Sapota, Mango, Aonla, Guava, Ber


Area and production of horticulture crops 3.20 lakh ha 36.18 lakh
tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 0.33 lakh ha prod 2.40 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 2.74 lakh ha Production 32.77 lakh tonnes


Problems


Water scarcity



Lesser
-
availability of quality seeds of vegetable and spices and
quality planting material of fruits



Poor post harvest management and marketing facilities like cold
storage, pre
-
cooling and waxing centers, processing units etc



Lack of farmer training programmes for horticulture

Madhya Pradesh


Horticulture Scenario


Horticulture crop covers 2.6% of the gross cropped area in the
State


Area and production of horticulture crops 4.72 lakh ha 45.25 lakh
tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 0.46 lakh ha prod 12.37 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 2.09 lakh ha Production 29.19 lakh tonnes


Problems


There is inadequate power supply in many parts of the state


The linkage between farmers and R&D institutions is currently
weak.


There is low focus on post harvest management and facilities like
cold storage, pre
-
cooling and waxing centers, processing units
etc.


The marketing channels are not well developed


This is limited focus on farmer training programmes for
horticulture.


There is a lack of awareness on Hi
-
tech horticulture / quality
consciousness among growers


Dwindling water resources

Jharkhand


Horticulture Scenario


The horticulture scenario of the State is not very good


Cropped area is only 22 lakh hectares


Area and production of horticulture crops 16.23 lakh ha 115.41 lakh
tonnes respectively


Fruits Area 0.37 lakh ha prod 3.82 lakh tonnes


Vegetables Area 2.38 lakh ha Production 36.39 lakh tonnes


Problems


The technology available at the state level was in operation at district
level also.


The linkage between farmers and R&D institutions is currently weak.


There is low focus on post harvest management and facilities like cold
storage, pre
-
cooling and waxing centers, processing units etc.


The marketing channels are not well developed


This is limited focus on farmer training programmes for horticulture.


There is a lack of awareness on Hi
-
tech horticulture / quality
consciousness among growers

Problems in appropriate income
realization


Pre
-
Harvest:



Inadequate planning regarding planting and
harvesting dates.



Growing cultivars that mature when market
prices are lowest.




Use of poor quality planting materials.




Indiscriminate fertilizer use


Use of flooding as an irrigation method




Poor orchard and field sanitation practices


Lack of orchard management


Lack of IPM

Harvesting & Curing


Harvesting at inappropriate maturity



Use of rough and/or unsanitary field containers.



Rough handling, dropping or throwing produce,
fingernail punctures.


No use of support



Leaving long or sharp stems on harvested
produce



Long exposure to direct sun after
harvesting.


Over
-
packing of field containers




Lack of curing or improper curing of root and
tuber crops before storage


Improper drying of bulb crops


Packing house operations


Lack of proper sorting




Lack of cleaning, washing or sanitation


Rough handling


Improper trimming


Misuse of post harvest treatments (over
-
waxing,
misuse of hot water dips for pest management)


Inadequate concentrations of chlorine in wash water


Use of inappropriate chemicals or misuse of registered
compounds


Long delays without cooling


Lack of accepted and/or implemented quality grades or
standards for commodities


Lack of quality inspection


Packing and Packaging Material


Use of flimsy or rough packing containers


Lack of liners in rough baskets or wooden crates



Over
-
use of packing materials intended to cushion
produce (causing interference with ventilation)


Containers designed without adequate ventilation


Over
-
loading containers


Use of containers that are too large to provide
adequate product protection


Misuse of films for Modified Atmosphere
Packaging (MAP)


Over
-
reliance on MAP versus appropriate
temperature management


Cooling and Storage


General lack of cooling during packing, transport, storage or
marketing of fruits or vegetables



Inadequate monitoring of temperature and chlorine levels in
hydro
-
cooler water


General lack of storage facilities on
-
farm or at wholesale or
retail markets in developing countries


Lack of ventilation and cooling in existing on
-
farm facilities


Poor sanitation


Inadequate management of temperature and relative
humidity (RH) in larger scale storages


Over
-
loading of cold stores


Stacking produce too high for container strength


Mixing lots of produce with different temperature/RH
requirements


Lack of regular inspections for pest problems,
temperature/RH management


Transportation


Over
-
loading vehicles.


Use of bulk transport or poor quality packages
leading to compression damage.


Lack of adequate ventilation during transport.


Lack of air suspensions on transport vehicles.


Rough handling during loading


Lack of cooling during delays.


Ethylene damage and/or chilling injury resulting
from transporting

mixed loads


Destination handling


Rough handling during unloading


Lack of sorting, poor sanitation, improper
disposal of culls.


Improper de
-
greening of citrus crops and
misuse of ripening practices.


Lack of protection from direct sun during
direct marketing.


Open horticultural markets exposed to
sun, wind, dust and rain.


Over
-
cooling in supermarket displays of
chilling
-
injury susceptible produce

Integrated Post Harvest Centre


Need


The production of fruits and vegetables is significant
only when they reach the consumer in good
condition at a reasonable price


Considerable gap between the gross production and
net availability of fruits & vegetables due to heavy
post harvest losses


The success of production lies in:



Loss reduction


Prevention of market gluts


Proper distribution of the produce


Subsequent use


100% utilization of the production


To bring quality awareness


Adoption of low cost processing/ preservation
technique

Integrated Post Harvest Centre


Aims & Objectives


Act as light house to the small and marginal
farmers


Communicate the latest technical knowledge


Reduce post harvest losses for increasing
farmer income by using low cost
technologies


Establishment of basic infrastructure in value
chain


Promote fruits and vegetable preservation
and processing by awareness campaign,
orientation of farmer groups/associations,
training and exposure visits


Act as training centre for farmers/ growers,
small traders & entrepreneurs


Act as a common facility for small and
marginal farmers on payment basis

Integrated Post Harvest Management

Harvesting


Fresh Marketing


Processing


Packing station


Processed products. Canned, frozen, Dried,
Pulps, Beverages,
Ketchups, Sauces etc

.


Sorting, grading & primary processing
e.g.

Trimming, removal of undesirable
parts

Waste: Seed,
peel, Pomace
etc.

Value added products e.g. Food
colours, enzymes, essences, Pectins
etc


Animal feed


Pre
-
treatments


Waxing, antisprouting fungicide treatments, ripening,
fumigation, VHTetc.

Bulk packaging

(Pallet bins)

Unit packaging


Palletization


Pre
-
cooling


Transport for Wholesale/
Retail
marketing

Cold Storage for future
marketing


Cattle

Feed

Wastes


Cull/damaged


Value added
products

Minimal
Processing

Reefer

van

/

container

Proposed infrastructural facilities


Collection and sorting unit


Integrated pack house with primary and
minimal processing facilities




Low cost evaporative cool chamber


Cold room


Transport Vehicle (Evaporatively cooled)


2
Ton Capacity


Low cost processing/preservation unit


Solar Drier


Laboratory Facilities


Estimated budget
-

Rs. 50 lacs


Potential Partners


NERAMAC
-

North Eastern Regional Agricultural
Marketing Corporation Ltd. Contact
-

Shri S.
Bhattacharjee Phone:+91 361 2341427


IFFCO
-
Contact
-

Indian Farmers Fertiliser Co
-
operative Limited Dr. U.S. Awasthi

Ph.
011
-
42592626,26542625


NHRDF
-

National Horticulture Research and
Development Foundation
-
Dr. R. P. Gupta
-

Ph
-

02550
-
237816, 237551, 202422


Indian Institute of Packaging Contact
-

Mr. Mohan
Singh Kathayat Ph
-

022
-
22166703


Potential Partners
(contd..)


APEDA
-

Agricultural and Processed
Product Export Development Authority
-

Shri Asit Tripathi
-

91
-
11
-
26513204


NHB
-

National Horticulture Board Shri
Bijay Kumar Ph
-
0124
-
2342992, 2343414


HARC
-
Himalayan Action and Research
Centre Ph
-
Contact
-

Mahendra Singh
Kunwar 91
-
135
-
2760121


State Agriculture Universities


IVRI
-

Indian Vegetable Research
Institute
-
Contact
-

Dr. Mathura Rai
-
91
-
0542
-
2635247

Participatory NGOs


Himalayan Environmental Studies &
Conservation Organization Dr. Anil
P. Joshi Ph
-

0135
-
2642391


Madhya Pradesh Vigyan Sahba, Dr.
Ajay Kumar 0755
-
2738681


Society for Technology &
Development Ph
-

01905
-
246154

Model Projects (Solar drying)


Solar drying of fruits and vegetables under polyethylene
cover retains better quality compared to open sun
drying


0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
Sun dried under black
polyethylene
Open sun drying
Total chlorophyll

Sun dried under black
polyethylene
Open sun drying
Retention of Chlorophyll

0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
Sun dried under black
polyethylene
Open sun dried
Sun dried under black
polyethylene
Open sun dried
Retention of
𝛽
-
carotene (Pro
-
Vitamin A)

Utilization of leafy portion of certain
vegetables


It is known that leafy vegetables can be rich
consolidated sources of micronutrients such as
calcium, iron carotene and vitamin
-
C compared
to


other vegetables.




It will not be out of place to highlight that the
leafy portion of some of the important vegetables
are rejected and fleshy portion are consumed
regularly without knowing that a rich source of
micronutrients such as calcium, iron, vitamin
-
C
and carotene is being discarded (Details on
continuing slide)


When half of World’s under nourished live in Asia
how can India afford to lose this valuable as
waste.


This entire leafy portion can be suitably solar
dried and used in food fortification.



Nutrient value of leafy vegetable


Calcium

Mg/100g

Iron

mg/100g

Carotene

?g/100g

Vitamin
-
C

mg/100g

Colocasia

40

0.42

24

0

Colocasia leaves

227

10.0

10,278

12

Drumstick

40

0.18

110

120

Drumstick leaves

440

7.0

6,780

220

Knol khol

20

1.54

21

85

Knol
-
khol green

740

13.5

4,146

157

Radish

35

0.4

3

15

Radish leaves

265

3.6

5,295

81

Turnip

30

0.4

0

43

Turnip green

710

28.4

9,396

180



Utilization of Mango Waste


Mango

processing

industry

produces

40
-
50
%

waste

which

constitutes

peel,

fibre

and

stone

during

processing

(Plate

15
)
.


The

valuable

waste,

if

not

properly

utilized

can

create

lots

of

environmental

problems
.


Methods

can

be

standardized

to

take

water

extract

pulp

adhered

to

peel,

fibre

and

stone
.



The

water

extract

(containing

pulp)

thus

obtained

are

utilized

for

making

different

mango

products

viz

nectar,

ready

to

serve

beverage,

mango

wine,

vinegar

etc
.



The

peel

and

stone

free

from

adhered

pulp

could

also

be

utilized

for

making

various

value

added

products

like

starch,

pectin,

dietary

fibre
,

fat,

flour

etc
.


On

the

basis

of

the

result

obtained

it

is

very

useful

to

utilize

the

wastage

generated

during

processing

of

mango
.


This

approach

will

add

value,

reduce

cost

of

processed

products,

prevent

environmental

pollution,

generate

employment,

increase

income

of

processer/farmer

and

thereby

bring

ultimate

benefit

to

the

country
.

Pulp

Fiber

AMITY participatory institutions


Amity Institute of Rural Management

has adopted


28
villages in


Haryana and 40 in Madhya Pradesh under “Providing
Urban Amenities In Rural Areas (PURA) ” scheme promoted
by


the Former President of India, Dr. A.P.J. Kalam.


This
Institute has already organized two international study


tours


to
Australia and New Zealand


for


farmers and agricultural officers
in agricultural marketing .


Amity Institute of Microbial Technology
, has well
established, internationally acclaimed Centre on symbiotic
mycorrhiza for augmenting


yields in various crops.


Amity Centre for


Bio
-
Control & Plant


Disease
Management
is actively involved in demonstration and training
of farmers on their fields in the area of soil amendment for
control of nematodes and


other fungal diseases.


Amity Institute for Environmental Toxicology, Safety and
Management


is working on a project


funded by the Ministry of
Environment & Forest which deals with pesticide residues on
vegetables cultivated in National Capital Region besides ground
water contamination caused by


seepage of sewage and


city
municipal waste.


Amity Institute of Biotechnology
is running several
projects


related to genetic engineering in crop plants.


AMITY participatory institutions


Amity Institute of Food Technology
is fully equipped

to handle

all
aspects of


Food Processing


through use of pilot plants etc.


Amity Institute of Organic Agriculture
has developed a strong
linkage with farmers by organizing nearly 20 training and
demonstration programs in which Postharvest Technology


was one
of the themes. These programs have been


funded by the Central
Government.


Amity Centre


for Extension Services


is being


funded by Uttar
Pradesh,


Department of Horticulture for organizing


workshops
/trainings to the farmers


of District of


Ghaziabad under its
Agricultural Technology Management Agency. (ATMA)


One such
program is going to be held


in November in which 100 farmers of
District Ghaziabad


will be participating


in a one day program
dealing with nutritive values of


fruits and vegetables, minimizing
postharvest losses and marketing supported under UP DASP.


Under
Amity Science, Technology & Innovation Foundation
, Dr.
Kuldeep Singh, a renowned


soil scientist is already conducting soil
testing for nutrient for farmers of District of Gautam Budh Nagar
targeting NPK


as well as micronutrients.


Amity Institute of Bio
-
Organic Research & Studies
is working
on an effective method


for controlling diseases caused by
Alternaria
species