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L 501: Intro to Information Science



1

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum






Time: 5:45
-
8:30 M










Place: SLIS 033

Howard Rosenbaum










Office: SLIS 023

Email: hrosenba@indiana.edu







Office hours: 4:00
-
5:30 M, T

Web: http://www.slis.indiana.edu/hrosenba/www/Home/home.html





Phone: 855
-
3250

Syllabus:

http://www.slis.indiana.edu/hrosenba/www/l501/syll/syll3.html


SLIS
Bulletin Description


Information Science students are introduced to the dynamic and shifting information professions, complex
organizations, and emerging careers in the field. Issues in

information management, user
-
oriented systems
design, socio
-
technical concepts, and usability are major themes for the course.


Introduction


You have made an important decision in your lives and have chosen to spend the next year and a half to two years
studying to complete a Masters of Information Science degree. During this time you will take a wide range of
courses that are intended to prepare you to work in the information professions. Coursework in the MIS degree
program covers information architectu
re, human
-
computer interaction, information retrieval, and strategic
information management and leadership. Two basic themes run through these different domains of information
science and form the underlying assumptions of the degree program and this cours
e; these are


1. a socio
-
technical orientation to technology, and

2. a focus on the people who design, manage, and use technologies.


Considering the first of these themes, here at SLIS, we take a socio
-
technical approach to information and
communication
technologies (ICTs), meaning that technologies must always be considered in their social and
organizational contexts. For example, it is clear that ICTs are assuming an increasingly important role in our work
and social lives. Recent studies indicate that
the private sector is highly wired and is now becoming wireless.
According

to Rainie (2000)


Some 38 million full
-
time workers in the nation have Internet access at their jobs and two
-
thirds of them (67%)
go online at least once per day. When they are onli
ne, most are doing job
-
related research and using email.
Seventy
-
two percent of full
-
time workers with Internet access at work say it has improved their ability to do
their jobs.


Most schools and public libraries have internet connectivity. Almost two
-
thi
rds of all American households have at
least one computer and more than half have internet access. An increasing number of people are using multi
-
functional cell phones for voice communication and data exchange. According to Horrigan (2003), “28” of
Americ
an adults are wireless ready” and, considering wireless
-
enabled laptops, “
18% of Internet users said they had
used such a device … 29% of cell phone users said they had used a cell phone in the past month that can send and
receive emails.” What this means
is that ICTs are quickly becoming routine information appliances in our lives.
According to NTIA (2000),


The Internet is becoming an increasingly vital tool in our information society. More Americans are going online
to conduct such day
-
to
-
day activities
as business transactions, personal correspondence, research and
information
-
gathering, and shopping. Each year, being digitally connected becomes ever more critical to
economic, educational, and social
advancement.


L 501: Intro to Information Science



2

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum


For many of us, work would not be possib
le (or would be much more difficult) without modern digital technologies.
In addition, ICTs are becoming more integrated into the rest of our lives. Many people have adopted mobile
communications devices, others routinely use wireless technologies and thei
r laptops to do work and conduct
business, and
we are becoming increasingly immersed in what researchers call “pervasive computing.”
In fact, a
recent study found that for many people, the internet is indespensible (WebMetro, 2004):


Family members from 1,
000 US households that took part in the "Internet Deprivation Study," conducted by
Ipsos
-
Insight for Yahoo! and the advertising conglomerate OMD, found out that living without the Internet was
far more difficult than they expected, 'and in some cases impos
sible, because the tools and services the Internet
offers were firmly ingrained in their daily lives.'


Participants found that many daily activities were influenced and impaired, including booking travel, checking
sports scores, communicating with friends

and family and paying bills.


In a complementary quantitative study fielded by Conifer Research, which only had 28 participants, one
-
half of
the respondents indicated they could not go without the Internet for more than two weeks and the median time
respo
ndents could go without being online is five days. Exactly 48% of the respondents indicated they could not
go without the Internet for more than two weeks.


The second theme is that we are always concerned with the people who design, implement,

and manage
the ICTs
and with the people who use them in their work and social lives. This is represented in our courses as a “person” or
user
-
centered” approach. The instances described above are part of a trend that is changing the way we, as
individuals, interact w
ith each other and our society. What is interesting at this moment is that we do not have a
clear understanding of the types of changes that are taking place and how these changes are affecting us at work, at
home, and out in the social world. Researchers
working in a variety of disciplines are studying how ICTs work, the
relationships between ICTs, the people who design, implement and use them, and the various social contexts in
which they are used. One
important discipline within which this type of work i
s being done is information science
and one important approach used in our discipline to study these issues is social informatics.


At SLIS, we assume that to design, implement, and manage ICTs and the systems of which they are a part, you
should have a so
und understanding of theoretical approaches to information, information and communication
technologies, and the complex organizations within which information systems and services operate. We also
assume that this knowledge should be augmented by practical

knowledge of the processes of ICT and systems
development and use, and of the positive and negative outcomes that occur as people use real systems in real
organizational and social settings. Therefore, this course provides a general introduction to inform
ation science as
we practice it here at SLIS. In this course, you will learn about the intellectual disciplines that study information,
where information science “fits” into this range, the relationships among information science and its cognate
discipline
s, and about the range of information professions for which you are preparing in this program. You will
find out that information science is an interdisciplinary field that draws upon many other disciplines and covers all
phases of the information life cyc
le. You will also develop a background in information science theory and research
that will prepare you for the next courses that you will take in your MIS program.


Sources:


Horrigan, J. (2004). 28% of American adults are wireless ready: A PIP Data Memo.

Pew Internet and American Life
Project.


http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/127/report_display.asp


National Telecommunications and Information Administration. (2000). Falling Through the Net: Toward Digital
Inclusion


http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ntiahome/digit
aldivide/execsumfttn00.htm


Rainie, L. (
2000).
Wired Workers: Who They Are and What They're Doing Online. Pew Internet and American
Life Project.


http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/20/report_display.asp



L 501: Intro to Information Science



3

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum

WebMetro. (2004). My Kingdom for the Internet!


h
ttp://www.webmetro.com/news1detail1.asp?id=1101


Course Objectives



At the end of this course, you will:




Have a clear conception of theoretical foundations and interdisciplinary nature of information science




Have a deeper understanding of the Masters in

Information Science program here at SLIS including where it "fits"
in relation to other related programs




Understand the importance of taking socio
-
technical and user
-
centered approaches to studying ICTs




Understand the range of careers that are open to y
ou with an MIS degree




Be aware of and familiar with the range of information resources (research and professional/popular writings) that
information professionals rely on in their work



Course Requirements



To receive a passing grade in this course, you

must turn in all of the assignments and the term project and complete
any and all presentations. You cannot pass this course without doing all of the assigned work (which includes the
final presentation), however, turning in all of the work is not a guara
ntee that you will pass the course. Grades of “I”
(Incomplete) may be assigned in this course after discussion with the instructor, but depending on the circumstances,
there will be a penalty applied at the discretion of the instructor.


All papers and as
signments must be submitted on the dates specified in this syllabus. If you cannot submit an
assignment or cannot deliver a presentation on the date it is due, it is your responsibility to discuss your situation
with the instructor, preferably in advance.
Given that your reasons or problems are legitimate, arrangements for the
completion of the outstanding work can be made; this will occur at the discretion of the instructors.


There will be a penalty for work turned in after the assigned date, and this wi
ll also be applied at the discretion of
the instructor.


Your written, web
-
based, and oral work will be evaluated according to four criteria; it must:




Be clearly written, marked up, and/or presented and spell
-

and grammar
-
checked;




Demonstrate insight
into the concepts, issues, and trends in both the areas you investigate in the assignments and
in the course content;




Demonstrate originality in your reviews, analyses, and projects; and




Display familiarity with current and/or classic literatures where

appropriate.


Borderline grades will be decided (up or down) on the basis of class contributions and participation throughout the
semester.


Academic dishonesty



L 501: Intro to Information Science



4

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum

There is extensive documentation and discussion of the issue of academic dishonesty in the
Indiana University
"Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct" available online at:
http://campuslife.indiana.edu/Code/Part_3all.html
.

Of particular relevance is the section on plagiarism:


3. Plagiarism


A student must not adopt or reproduce id
eas, words, or statements of another person without appropriate
acknowledgment. A student must give credit to the originality of others and acknowledge an indebtedness
whenever he or she does any of the following:


a. Quotes another person's actual words,
either oral or written;


b. Paraphrases another person's words, either oral or written;


c. Uses another person's idea, opinion, or theory; or


d. Borrows facts, statistics, or other illustrative material, unless the information is common knowledge.


From:

http://campuslife.indiana.edu/Code/Part_3all.html


Plagiarism is the use of someone else's ideas, words, or opinions without attribution. Any assignment that contains
plagiarized material or indicates any other form of academic dishonesty will receive, at

a minimum, a grade of F. A
second instance will result in an automatic grade of F for the course. Penalties may be harsher depending upon the
severity of the offense. See Indiana University's "Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct" [link to

code]


There is more to avoiding plagiarism than simply citing a reference. To aid students both in recognizing plagiarism
and in avoiding the appearance of plagiarism, Indiana University's Writing Tutorial Services has prepared a short
guide entitled "Pl
agiarism: what it is and how to recognize and avoid it
". This guide is available at:
http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html. It provides explicit examples of plagiarism and offers strategies
for avoiding it. Each student should be familiar with th
is document and use it as a guide when completing
assignments.


Dr. Russel Williams, at Florida State University, offers tips on
avoiding inadvertent plagiarism


<
http://askew.fs
u.edu/programs/courses/pad5700/5700williams.pd>:




1. If you take material that is not yours, from any source whatsoever, and copy it into assignments for this class,
you must provide an appropriate footnote, endnote, parenthetical, and/or bibliographic r
eference to the source of
the material.




2. Any material quoted verbatim from other sources must be enclosed in quotation marks and its source
attributed as noted in item #1 above.


3. Material not taken verbatim from a text, but is paraphrased must also

be attributed in the manner indicated in
item #1


Indiana University and School of Library and Information Science policies on academic dishonesty will be
followed. Students found to be engaging in plagiarism, cheating, and other types of dishonesty will
receive an F for
the course. As a rule of thumb, when in doubt, cite the source!


The following definitions of letter grades have been defined by student and faculty members of the Committee on
Improvement of Instruction and have been approved by the facu
lty (November 11,1996) as an aid in evaluation of
academic performance and to assist students by giving them an understanding of the grading standards of the School
of Library and Information Science:


Grade

GPA

Meaning

A

4.0

Outstanding achievement
. Stud
ent performance demonstrates full command of the course

L 501: Intro to Information Science



5

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum

materials and evinces a high level of originality and/or creativity that far surpasses course
expectations

A
-

3.7

Excellent achievement
. Student performance demonstrates thorough knowledge of the cou
rse
materials and exceeds course expectations by completing all requirements in a superior manner

B+

3.3

Very good work
. Student performance demonstrates above
-
average comprehension of the
course materials and exceeds course expectations on all tasks as d
efined in the course syllabus

B

3.0

Good work.

Student performance meets designated course expectations, demonstrates
understanding of the course materials and is at an acceptable level

B
-

2.7

Marginal work
. Student performance demonstrates incomplete un
derstanding of course
materials.

C+

C

2.3

2.0

Unsatisfactory work
. Student performance demonstrates incomplete and inadequate
understanding of course materials

C
-

D+

D

D
-

1.7

1.3

1.0
.07

Unacceptable work
. Coursework performed at this level will n
ot count toward the MLS or MIS
degree. For the course to count towards the degree, the student must repeat the course with a
passing grade.

F

0.0

Failing
. Student may continue in program only with permission of the Dean.



Other Information



There are t
hree ways you can get in touch with us outside of class:


1.
My office is Room 005B in the School of Library and Information Science, Bloomington campus, and my office
hours are
11:30
-
1:00 PM on Monday and 12:30
-
2:00 PM on Thursday
.

I can also meet with y
ou by appointment if
these hours are not convenient.


2. My office phone number at SLIS is 812
-
855
-
3250. I have voice mail, so you can always leave me a message.


3. My email address is hrosenba@indiana.edu. I will check the mail at least twice daily and w
ill respond to
messages when I read them. This is a good way to for you to communicate with me privately
-

email messages do
not get lost!


There is a class list, called hrosenba_infosoc, to which we will all be subscribed. By sending an email message to
h
rosenba_infosoc@majordomo.ucs.indiana.edu, you can communicate with everyone else simultaneously.


There is a class list, called hrosenba_infosoc, to which we will all be subscribed. By sending an email message to
hrosenba_infosoc@listserv.indiana.edu, yo
u can communicate with everyone else simultaneously.


To subscribe to the list, send your email address to hrosenba@indiana.edu


Use your preferred email address for this list. I will close it so that only subscribers can post, so we should not be hit
with

any spam.


I will use the mailing list to send messages to the class; typically, these will be clarifications of questions about
assignments and other important information, such as when I must alter or cancel office hours. I'll also send
interesting pos
tings that cross my desktop from time to time. You will use the list to ask questions of and discuss
issues with your colleagues as the semester progresses.


I suggest that you check your e
-
mail every day!



Assignments




L 501: Intro to Information Science



6

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum

You will have four assignments in
this class. For two of these assignments, you will work with a group. You will do
two assignments on your own. These assignments are described below, and will be discussed in greater detail in
class.


Group assignments


By
Friday, September 2
, you will be
randomly divided into a group of no more than five people. At this time, you
will receive email with the names and email addresses of your fellow group members. You should contact each
other and have at least introduced yourselves by class on
Monday. Septe
mber 5.

You will work with this group for
the rest of the semester on the following two assignments.


CRITICAL

ARTICLE

REVIEWS


1. Select and critically review two articles from the readings for the week to which you have been assigned (see the
table below
). As you read and discuss these articles with your group members, try to engage with the key issues in
each article. As you analyze these articles, you should try to answer the following questions for each article:




What is the main point of the article?




How does the author develop a persuasive argument to convince the reader of the importance of this point?




Is this argument persuasive? Why or why not?




What types of evidence are offered?




What background is required to understand and make use of this re
search?




What is its significance to the field or to Information Science as a whole?




What critiques have been offered (or could be offered) regarding its approach?


The tool that we will use for this assignment is a wiki. Briefly, a wiki is


An "open
-
e
diting" system where the emphasis is on the authoring and collaboration of documents rather than
the simple browsing or viewing of them. The name "wiki" is based on the Hawaiian term "wiki wiki", meaning
"quick" or "super
-
fast". The basic concept of a Wiki
WikiWeb (or "wiki") is that (almost) anyone can edit any
page. While at first this sounds like a recipe for complete anarchy, the truth is that sites using this system have
developed surprisingly complex and rich communities for online collaboration and co
mmunication. Yes, it's
possible for someone to go and destroy everything on a page, but it doesn't seem to happen often. And, many
systems (including this one) have built
-
in mechanisms to restore content that has been defaced or destroyed.


The point of th
e system is to simply make it as quick, easy and rewarding as possible to create or edit online
content.


Using any standard Web browser, a person can edit (almost) any page on the system using relatively simple
TextFormattingRules. (PmWiki, 2005:
https://
ella.slis.indiana.edu/g/info_sci/pmwiki.php?n=PmWiki.WikiWikiWeb)


The class wiki is here:
https://ella.slis.indiana.edu/g/info_sci/index.php
.

We will discuss the intricacies of working
wit
h a wiki in class.


When you have answered these questions, write up your review as an essay of ~1000 words and post the essay to the
class Wiki by the
Friday afternoon

before the
Monday class

where the readings will be discussed. This way we
can all read
your work before class and it will serve as a reader's guide for all of us.


In class, your group will be expected to actively participate in the discussion of the articles.



L 501: Intro to Information Science



7

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum

Each group will review a set of articles for three class sessions. The class date
s and review due dates are in the tables
below.







9/12

9/19

9/26

10/3

10/10

10/17

10/24

10/31

11/7

11/14

11/21

11/28

Group 1

X




X




X




Group 2


X




X




X



Group 3



X




X




X


Group 4




X



X





X

Group 5

X




X




X




Group 6


X




X




X



Group 7



X




X




X


Group 8




X





X



X

Group 9


X




X




X



Group 10



X




X




X



Articles discussed in class

Review is due:

September 12

September 9

September 19

September 16

September 26

September 23

October 3

September 3
0

October 10

October 7

October 17

October 14

October 24

October 21

November 7

November 4

November 14

November 11

November 21

November 18

November 28

November 27


This assignment is worth
35%
of final grade,
10%

for each
review
and
5%

for your gr
oup's participation in the
discussion of these articles.


INVESTIGATION

OF

MIS

CAREERS


2. Investigate at typical career that is characteristic of the track to which you have been assigned. During class on
Monday, September 5
, you will have time to meet in

your group to rank the four tracks in the MIS program
(information architecture, human
-
computer interaction, information retrieval, and strategic information management
and leadership) in order of preference. One member of each group will send email with
the group’s rankings to the
instructor by
Tuesday, September 6
. Your group will be assigned to a track by

Friday, September 19.
By
Monday, September 19
, your group will submit a list of three job titles that interest you in the track.


By
Wednesday, Septe
mber 21
, you will receive confirmation from the instructor with the job title that you will
investigate. Job titles may include programmers, consultants, systems analysts, software engineers, usability
analysts, webmasters, web architects, information syst
ems developers, database administrators, information
managers, IT directors, etc. As you begin your investigation, you should try to answer these questions:




What are some typical job descriptions?




What kind of work do these people do?




What are their ty
pical working conditions and job responsibilities?



L 501: Intro to Information Science



8

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum



What are some examples of academic and professional resources that these people are likely to use (Briefly
describe each resource)?




What are typical career paths in these jobs?




What sorts of background
and experience are required or expected at each step?




What are some professional organizations that these people are likely to join (
ACM, ASIS&T, AIS, SIGCHI,
CPSR, SCIP, etc


briefly describe the organization)
?




What is the job outlook like for these c
areers?


When you have completed this assignment, you will distill the information into a
10 minute

presentation that you
will give in class on
Monday, November 28

and
Monday, December 6
. Presentation times will be assigned on
Monday, November 7.
In your p
resentation, your goal should be to make the careers associated with this track the
most interesting for the class. You should plan to use PowerPoint slides or similar presentation software in your
presentations. We will have a computer in class, so you ca
n run the presentation from a disk. You will send your
presentation to the instructor it will be uploaded to the web.


This assignment will be worth
20%

of
final grade.
15%

or the presentation materials and
5%

for the in
-
class
presentation


Individual assi
gnments


There are two assignments that you will do on your own.


IT

APPLICATION

ESSAYS


3. You will write two short essays on topics relevant to the course materials. Each essay will be
~1500 words

and
will be due at the end of month in which it is assign
ed. Each essay will focus on the work that we have done in that
month.
The assigned readings, class discussions and small group activities are intended to create a learning
community and to promote critical literacy skills among all students
--

skills of r
eading, writing, listening, speaking
and thinking. The success of these activities will require substantive and meaningful contributions from all students.
In these essays you have an opportunity to demonstrate what you have learned. As you write these ess
ays, make
explicit reference to readings that you find to be relevant to the issues raised by the essay question.


When your essay is completed, you will send it to the instructor as an email attachment.


Three

possibilities are offered below. You will wri
te about
two

of them. Note when the essays are due!


a. Essay #1: Using principles and insights from our study of information architecture and human
-
computer
interaction, select a web site and critically review it. By
Monday, September 12
, send the URL of
the site you wish
to investigate to the instructor. You will receive confirmation of your site by
Wednesday, September 14
.


In your essay, clearly discuss the criteria that you are using to review the site. You should have at least five criteria
and you sh
ould attribute these criteria to their sources.


This essay will be due in
Friday, October 14

and will be worth
15%
of the final grade.


b. Essay #2: Conduct a comparison of three search engines. Select a set of 3 related terms and search each of them
indi
vidually on three different search engines. Describe your results. To what extent was there overlap in the
response sets? To what extent were there differences among the response sets? Using principles and insights from
our study of information retrieval,
try to explain the reasons for the results that you obtained. In this explanation, be
sure to describe the search engines you
used.

Do not use a meta
-
search engine for this assignment.


By
Monday, October 10
, send the URL of the search engines you wish to
compare to the instructor. You will
receive confirmation of your choices by
Wednesday, October 12
.


L 501: Intro to Information Science



9

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum


In your essay, clearly discuss the criteria that you are using to explain the similarities and differences among these
search engines. You should have at le
ast three criteria and you should attribute these criteria to their sources.


This essay will be due in
Friday, November 11

and will be worth
15%
of the final grade.


c. Essay #3: Search the popular and trade literature and find an article (or articles) de
scribing a large scale
implementation of an information system in an organization that is either being proposed or has recently been
implemented. Describe the organization and the information system and explain what the system is intended to do.
Using prin
ciples and insights from our study of information management and leadership provide your informed
opinion about what the benefits of this system might be for the organization. Also discuss the challenges that you
see in this example of system implementatio
n. Make sure that you discuss these benefits and challenges for at least
two groups of stakeholders
-

those who use the system and those who manage it.


By
Monday, November 7
, send a brief description of the system you wish to investigate to the instructor
. You will
receive confirmation of your choices by
Wednesday, November 9
.


In your essay, clearly discuss the criteria that you are using to explain the benefits and challenges that may occur as
the information system is implemented and used. You
should ha
ve at least three criteria and you should attribute
these criteria to their sources.


This essay will be due on
Monday, December 6

and will be worth
15%
of the final grade.


WIKI

COMMENTARY


Over the course of the semester, the groups in the class will be
posting reviews of articles we will be reading. By
October 24
, almost every group will have posted two of the three assignments they have to complete. By this time,
you will have had a chance to read these postings.


For this assignment, you will add your
informed commentary to at least
three

of these postings. This commentary
will be brief
-

keep it to
two or three paragraphs
.


In your commentary, react to what you have read. You may agree with the group's comments about the article(s).
You may disagree wi
th either part of the summary or with the overall critical points raised about the article(s). You
may want to reinforce the review. Perhaps you want to add more pointed criticism or defend the article(s). You may
want to comment on other people's commenta
ries. Everything is fair game. Whatever you decide to do, be sure to
back up your commentary with references to articles we have read or that you have found on your own.


You will sign your commentary. You will not edit the text of the posting to which you

are responding.


You will have your postings completed by
Friday, December 2.


This assignment will be worth 10% of the final grade


Grading



Each student’s final grade will be calculated according to the following key:


Assignment



Value

Number


% o
f final grade


Group



Critical reviews of articles

10%


3


35%



Discussion of articles in class


5%



Investigation of MIS careers

15%


1


15%


L 501: Intro to Information Science



10

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum



Presentation




5%


Individual



IT application essays


15%


3


30%



Wiki commentary



5%


1


10%



Class participation



5%


1


5%


NOTE:

5%

of the overall grade that has been allocated for class participation. For the purposes of this class,
participatin is defined as contributing to class discussion or demonstrating in oth
er ways that you are making an
effort to succeed in this class. In addition, as a professional, you will be expected to articulate your ideas in both
written and oral form, therefore it is important that you think critically and present your ideas through
out the
duration of the class.


Required Texts



There are no required texts for this course. Readings are on the web or will be made available in the SLIS Library.



Topic Outline



The
URL

for the ereserve readings is
http://ereserves.indiana.edu/coursepage.asp?cid=2804



The password is ******



NOTE: The URLs for the readings were last checked on August 26, 2005



August 29



Introduction: Information science and the MIS


Assignments



All assignments discussed in class



Receive group assignments (September 2)



Sep
tember 5



What is information science?


Topics:


A brief history of information science


What is information science?



Basic concepts





Representation, augmentation, mental models


Readings:



Bates, M.J. (1999).
The invisible substrate of informatio
n science
. Journal of the American Society for
Information Science. 50(12). 1043
-
1050.


L 501: Intro to Information Science



11

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum


Buckland, M. (1991).
Information as thing
. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 42, 351
-
360.

http://www.sims.berkeley.edu/~buckland/thing.html



Capurro. R. (1992).
What is Information Science for? A Philosophical Reflection
. In: P. Vakkari, B. Cronin Eds.:
Conceptions of Library and Information Science. London: Taylor Graham. 82
-
96.


http://www.capurro.de/tampere91.htm



Debons, A. (2000).
Information science: Forty years of teaching.

ISECON 2000


http://isedj.org/isec
on/2000/412/ISECON.2000.Debons.pdf


Dervin, B. (1999).
Chaos, order and sense
-
making: A proposed theory for information design
. In R. Jacobson
(Ed.), Information design (pp. 35
-
57). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.


http://alexia.lis.uiuc.edu/gslis/allerton/95/dervin.draft.html


Engelbart, D. C. (1963).
A conceptual framework for the augmentation of man's intellect
. In P. W. Howerton
(Ed.), Vistas in information handling (pp. 1
-
29). Was
hington, D.C.: Spartan Books.


Winograd, T., & Flores, F. (1986).
Chapter 6: Towards a new orientation (pp. 70
-
79). Chapter 7: Computers
and representation (pp. 83
-
92)
. In Understanding computers and cognition. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing.


Assignments:




Meet with group to rank tracks




Send ranking to instructor (September 6)




Group is assigned to a track (September 9)



September 12



Information architecture


To
pics


What is information architecture?

Basic concepts and principles


Organization and order


Hypertext


Navigation and labeling


Readings:



Brown, J. S., & Duguid, P. (1998).
Organizing knowledge
. California Management Review. 40()3). 90
-
112.


Clerwall,

C. (2003).
Information architecture: A descriptive overview
. In: Pettersson, J.S. (ed.) HumanIT 2003.
Karlstad University Studies, Karlstad University. 93
-
110


Dillon, A. (2002).
Information architecture in JASIST: Just where did we come from?
. Journal of

the American
Society for Information Science and Technology, 53(10), 821
-
823.


Dillon, A. (1996).

Myths, misconceptions, and an alternative perspective on information usage and the
electronic medium
. In Rouet, J.F. et al. (Eds.), Hypertext and cognition (
pp. 25
-
42). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence
Erlbaum.



L 501: Intro to Information Science



12

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum

Jacob, E. K. (1991).
Classification and categorization: Drawing the line
. In Kwasnik, B. H. and Fidel, R. (Eds.),
Advances in classification research, 2 (pp. 67
-
83). Washington D.C.: American Society for Informati
on Science.


Meyer, T. (2002).
Information architectureconcepts: Myths explained
. IBM Developerworks.


http://www
-
106.ibm.com/developerworks/usability/library/us
-
inarch.ht
ml

Morville, P. (2001, January 30).

The speed of information architecture
. Senmantic Studios.


http://semanticstudios.com/publications/semantics/speed.html


Assignments



If you
are writing IT application essay #1, email the URL of the site you intend to review to the instructor.




Receive confirmation of your site (September 14)



September 19



Information architecture continued


Topics


Designing information architecture


Information spaces


Information interaction

Information architecture careers


Readings:



Dillon, A. (2000)
Spatial semantics and individual differences in the perception of

shape in information space
.
Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 51,6, 521
-
528.


Garrett, J.J. (2003).
The elements of user experience: User
-
centered design for the web

(pp. 6
-
36 and 160
-
173
only). Boston, MA: New Riders.


Haverty, M.
(2002).
Information architecture without internal theory: An inductive design process
. Journal of
the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 53(10), 839
-
845.


http:/
/www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi
-
bin/jissue/96515937


Toms, E.G. (2002).
Information interaction: Providing a framework for information architecture
. Journal of
the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 53(10), 855
-
862.


http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi
-
bin/jissue/96515937


Toub, S. (2000).
Evaluating information architecture: A practical guide to assessing web site organization
.
Argus Associates.


http://argus
-
acia.com/white_papers/evaluating_ia.pdf


Travis, I.L. (2000).
Information Architecture Practice: An Introduction
. Bulletin of the American Society for
Information Science and Technology

26(6). [Read all five interviews that follow]


http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Aug
-
00/index.html


Assignments



Submit job titles to instructor




Receive confirmation from instructor (September 2
1)




L 501: Intro to Information Science



13

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum

September 26



Human computer interaction


Topics:

What is HCI?

Basic concepts and principles


Usability


Contextual design


Visualization


Readings:



Beyer, H. a
nd Holtzblatt, K. (1999). Contextual design. Interactions. 32
-
43.


Blandford, A., Keith, S., Connell, I., Edwards, H. (2004).
Analytical usability evaluation for digital libraries: A
case study
. Proceedings of the 2004 Joint ACM/IEEE Conference on Digital
Libraries. 27
-
36


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/996350.996360


Dray, S. and Siegel, D. (2004).
Remote possibilities?: international usability testing at a distance
. Interactions.
11(2). 10
-
17


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/971258.971264


Gershon, N.; Eick, S.G., and Card, S. (1998).
Information visualization
. Interactions, 5(2).


http://www.acm.org/pubs/articles/journals/interactions/1998
-
5
-
2/p9
-
gershon/p9
-
gershon.pdf


Herrmann, T., Kunau, G., Loser, K
-
U., Menold, N. (2003).
Socio
-
technical walkthrough: designing technology
along work processes
. Proce
edings of the Eighth Conference on Participatory design: Artful Integration:
Interweaving Media, Materials and Practices
-

Volume 1. 132
-
141


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1011870.1011886


Irestig, M.,

Eriksson, H., Timpka, T. (2003).
Methodological considerations: The impact of participation in
information system design: a comparison of contextual placements
. Proceedings of the Eighth Conference on
Participatory design: Artful integration: Interweaving

Media, Materials and Practices
-

Volume 1. 132
-
141


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1011870.1011883


Sauro, J. (2004).
Premium usability: Getting the discount without paying the price
. Interactions 11(4
), 30
-
37


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1005261.1005276



October 3



Human
-
computer interaction continued


Topics
:


A new agenda for HCI


HCI careers


Readings:


Cockton, G. (2004).
Value
-
centred HCI
. Proceedings of the third Nordic conference on Human
-
computer
interaction. 149
-
160.


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/
1028014.1028038


DePaula, R. (2003).
A new era in human computer interaction: the challenges of technology as a social proxy
.
Proceedings of the Latin American Conference on Human
-
Computer Interaction, 219
-
222


L 501: Intro to Information Science



14

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum


http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=944543&coll=ACM&dl=ACM&CFID=26492297&CFTOKEN=33096192


Kantner, L., Sova, D.H., Rosenbaum, S. (2003).
Field studies: Alternative methods for field usabilit
y research
.
Proceedings of the 21st Annual International Conference on Documentation. 68
-
72.


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/944868.944883

Martin, D. and Sommerville, I. (2004).
Patterns of cooperative in
teraction: Linking ethnomethodology and
design
. ACM Transactions on Computer
-
Human Interaction, 11(1), 59
-
89


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/972648.972651


McNeese, M.D. (2003).
New visions of human
-
compu
ter interaction: making affect compute
. International
Journal of Human
-
Computer Studies, 59(1
-
2)


http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1071
-
5819(03)00059
-
4


Nardi, B.A. (2001).
Activity theory and human
-
computer interaction
. In Nardi, B.A. (Ed.), Context and
consciousness: Activity theory and human
-
computer interaction. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press


http://www.ics.uci.edu/~corps/phaseii/nar
di
-
ch1.pdf



October 10



Information retrieval


Topics


What is Information Retrieval?

Basic concepts and principles


Theories of IR


Evaluation IR systems


Readings:



Buckland, M. (1999).
Vocabulary as a central concept in library and information science
. In Arpanac, T. et al.
(Eds.), Digital libraries: Interdisciplinary concepts, challenges, and opportunities. Proceedings of the Third
International Conference on Conc
eptions of Library and Information Science [CoLIS3], May 23
-
26, 1999,
Dubrovnik, Croatia, (pp 3
-
12). Zagreb: Lokve.


http://www.sims.berkeley.edu/~buckland/colisvoc.htm


Batty, D. (1998).
W
WW
--

Wealth, weariness or waste: Controlled vocabulary and thesauri in support of
online information access
. D
-
Lib Magazine, November.


http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d
-
lib/dlib/november98/11batty.html


Cleverdon, C.W. (1991).
The Cranfield tests on index languages
. Proceedings of the 14th annual international
ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval.


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/122860.122861


Sparck Jones, K., & Willett, P. (1997).
Overall introduction (pp. 1
-
4). History (pp. 9
-
13). Key concepts (pp. 85
-
91), Models (pp. 257
-
261), Evaluation (pp. 167
-
174)
. Readings in Information. Re
trieval. San Francisco, CA:
Morgan Kaufmann.


Assignments



Essay #1 due (October 14)


If you are writing IT application essay #2, email the URls of the search engines you wish to compare to the
instructor




Receive confirmation of your choices (October 1
2)


L 501: Intro to Information Science



15

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum






October 17



Information retrieval continued


Topics


Digital libraries


Filtering


Semantic web: metadata and ontologies


Searching

IR careers


Readings:



Bern
ers
-
Lee, T., Hendler, J., & Lassila, O. (2001, May 17).
The Semantic Web
. Scientific American, 501.


http://www.scientificamerican.com/print_ver
sion.cfm?articleID=00048144
-
10D2
-
1C70
-
84A9809EC588EF21


Bishop, A.P. Mehra, B., Bazzell, I., and Smith, C. (2000).
Socially Grounded User Studies in Digital Library
Development
. First Monday. 5(6).


http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue5_6/bishop


Duval, E. et al. (2002).
Metadata principles and practicalities
. D
-
Lib Magazine, 8(4).


http://www.dlib.org/dlib/april02/weibel/04
weibel.html


Marshall, C.C. and Shipman, F.M. (2003).
Which semantic web?
. Proceedings of the Fourteenth ACM Conference
on Hypertext and Hypermedia, 57
-
66


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/900051.900063


M
cGuinness, D.L. (2002).
Ontologies come of age
. In Fensel. D. et al. (Eds.), Spinning the Semantic Web:
Bringing the World Wide Web to its full potential. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.


http://www.ksl.stanford.edu/people/dlm/papers/ontologies
-
come
-
of
-
age
-
mit
-
press
-
(with
-
citation).htm


Mostafa, J. (2005).
Seeking better web searches
. Scientific American. January 24.


http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleID=0006304A
-
37F4
-
11E8
-
B7F483414B7F0000


Reih, S.Y. (2004).
On the Web at home: Information seeking and Web searching in the home environment
.
Journal of the

American Society for Information Science and Technology, 55(8), 743
-
753.


http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi
-
bin/fulltext/107628782/PDFSTART



October 24



Social informatics and information science


Topics
:


What is social informatics?


What is organizational informatics?

Basic concepts and principles


Sociotechnical approaches to
ICTs


IT and social change


Information ecologies


L 501: Intro to Information Science



16

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum






Readings:



Davenport, E. (2005)
Social Informatics in Practice: A Guide for the Perplexed
. Bulletin of the American
Society for Information Science and Technology. 31(5)


http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Jun
-
05/davenport.html


Hanseth, O. and Monteiro, E. (1998).
Understanding Information Infrastructure: Ch 6. Socio
-
technical webs
and actor network theory
.


http://www.ifi.uio.no/~oleha/Publications/bok.6.html#pgfId=913144


Kling, R. (2000).
Learning about information technologies and social change: The contribution of social
informatics
. The Information Society,
16(3), 217
-
232


http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/utis/2000/00000016/000000
03/art00005


Kling, R. (1999).

What is Social Informatics and Why Does it Matter
? D
-
Lib magazine. 5(1)


http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january99/kling/01kling.html


Nardi, B.A. and O'Dell, V.L
. (1999). I
nformation Ecologies: Using Technology With Heart. Ch. 4: Information
Ecologies
. First Monday. 4(5).


http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue4_5/nardi_chapter4.html


Saw
yer, S. (2005).
Social Informatics: Overview, Principles and Opportunities
. Bulletin of the American
Society for Information Science and Technology. 31(5)


http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Jun
-
05/sa
wyer.html



October 31



NOTE: No class today
-

Instructor is attending the
Annual Meeting

of the America
n Society for Information Science
and Technology



November 7



Strategic information management and leadership


Topics:


What is SIML?

Basic concepts and principles


Ma
naging


Leadership


IT infrastructure, design, and work


Readings:



Abell, A. (2000).
Skills for knowledge environments
. Information Management Journal, 34(3), pp.33
-
41.


Available through EBSCO


Blair, G. (1993).
What makes a great manager?

IEE Engineeri
ng Management Journal.


http://www.ee.ed.ac.uk/~gerard/Management/art9.html



L 501: Intro to Information Science



17

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum

Cascio, W.F. (2000).
Managing a virtual workplace
. Academy of Management Executive,14(3), pp81
-
91.


Available th
rough EBSCO


Frank, F.D. and Taylor, C.R. (2004).
Talent management: Trends that will shape the future.
. Human Resource
Planning, 27(1), 33
-
41.


Leana, C.R. (2000).
Stability and change as simultaneous experiences in organizational life
. Academy of
Managem
ent Review, 25(4), pp. 753
-
760.


Available through EBSCO


Symon, G. (2000).
Information and communication technologies and the network organization: A critical
analysis
. Journal of Occupational & Organizational Psychology, 73(4), pp. 389
-
415.


Available th
rough EBSCO


Tillquist, J. (2000).
Institutional Bridging: How Conceptions of IT
-
Enabled Change Shape the Planning
Process
. Journal of Management Information Systems, 17(2), pp. 115
-
153.


Available through EBSCO


Waldman, D.A., Ramirez, G.G., House, R.J. a
nd Puranam, P. (2001).
Does leadership matter? CEO leadership
attributes and profitability under conditions of perceived environmental uncertainty
. Academy of
Management Journal, 44 (1), p134
-
144.


Available through EBSCO


Assignments:



Essay #2 due (Nove
mber 11)




Group final presentation times assigned


If you are writing IT application essay #3, email a brief description of the system you wish to investigate to the
instructor




Receive confirmation of your choices (November 9)



November 14



SIML continued


Topics:


IT, work, and communication


Communities of practice


Strategic intelligence


IT and organizations; learning from failure

SIML careers


Readings:



Cron
in, B. (2000).
Strategic intelligence and networked business
. Journal of Information Science, 26(3), 133
-
138.


http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/26/3/133


Huang, J., Makoju, E., Newell, S., Gallie
rs, R.D. (2003).
Opportunities to learn from 'failure' with electronic
commerce: a case study of electronic banking
. Journal of Information Technology, 18(1) 17
-
26


http://konstanza.ingentaselect.com/vl=11479952/cl=42/nw=1/rpsv/cw/routledg/02683962/v18n1/s2/p17


Hughes, J.A., O'Brien, J., Rouncefield, M., & Tolmie, P. (1998).
Some "real" problems of "virtual" teamwork
.

L 501: Intro to Information Science



18

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum

Lancaster, England: Authors


www.lancs.ac.uk/fss/sociology/ papers/hughes
-
et
-
al
-
problems
-
of
-
teamwork.pdf


Nardi, B.A. Whittaker, S.,

& Bradner, E. (2000).
Interaction and outeraction: Instant messaging in action
. In
Proceedings of the 2000 ACM conference on computer
-
supported cooperative work (pp. 79
-
88). New York: ACM
Press.


http
://doi.acm.org/10.1145/358916.358975


Schwen, T., and Hara, N. (2003).
Community of Practice: A Metaphor for Online Design?
. The Information
Society, 19(3) 257
-
270


http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/utis/2003/00000019/00000003/art00006


Wegner, E. (2000).
Communities of practice and social learning systems
. Organization. 7(2), 225
-
246.


htt
p://org.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/7/2/225



November 21



Ethics and IT careers


Topics:


What is the study of ethics?


What are major ethical positions?


Ethics and comp
uting


Readings:



Beghtol, C. (2004).
Ethical decision
-
making for knowledge representation and organization systems for global
use
. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 56(9),Ê903
-
912


http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi
-
bin/fulltext/110471102/PDFSTART


Cavalier, R. (2000).
Section 8: Utilitarian Theories



http://
caae.phil.cmu.edu/Cavalier/80130/part2/sect9.html


Cavalier, R. (2000).
Section 9: Deontological Theories


http://caae.phil.cmu.edu/Cavalier/80130/part2/sect8.html


Cavalier, R. (2000
).

Section 10: Contractarian Theories


http://caae.phil.cmu.edu/Cavalier/80130/part2/sect10.html


LaFollette, H. (1991).

The Truth in Ethical Relativism
. Journal of Social Philosophy,

146
-
54.


http://www.stpt.usf.edu/hhl/papers/relative.htm


McDonald. M. (2001). A

Framework for Ethical Decision
-
Making: Version 6.0.

Ethics Shareware


http://www.ethics.ubc.ca/mcdonald/decisions.html


Newton, K.S., Wingreen, S.C., and Blanton, J.E. (2004).
The impact of organizational ethical climate fit on
information technology professional's job satisfaction and organizational c
ommitment research in progress
.
Proceedings of the 2004 SIGMIS Conference on Computer Personnel Research: Careers, Culture, and Ethics in a
Networked Environment, 35
-
38


http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/9823
72.982380


Smith, H.J. and Hasnas, J. (1999).
Ethics and Information Systems: The Corporate Domai
n. MIS Quarterly,
23(1), 109
-
28


Available on EBSCO



L 501: Intro to Information Science



19

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum


November 28



IT,

communication, and social networks


Topics:


Social networks and IT use

Socio
-
technical interaction networks


Readings:



Barabasi, A
-
L. (2002).
Introduction. Linked: The new science of networks
. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing.


http://www.nd.edu/~networks/linked/chap1.pdf


Haythornthwaite, C. (1998).
A social network study of the growth of community among distance learners
.
Information Research, 4(1)


http://InformationR.net/ir/4
-
1/paper49.html


Kling, R., McKim, G., and King, A. (2003).
A bit more to IT: Scholarly communication forums as socio
-
technical interaction networks
. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and T
echnology, 54(1),
47
-
67.


http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi
-
bin/jissue/102521784


Olson, G.M., & Olson, J.S. (2000).
Distance matters
. Human
-
Computer Interaction, 15(2), 139
-
17
8


http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=4792814&db=buh


Rodden, T., Rogers, Y., Halloran, J., and Tay
lor, I. (2003).
Designing novel interactional workspaces to support
face to face consultations
. Proceedings of CHI'03 conference on computer human interaction (pp. 57
-
64). New
York: ACM Press.


http://
doi.acm.org/10.1145/642611.642623


Wellman, B. (2001).
Computer networks as social networks
. Science, 293(5537), 2031
-
2034.


http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/reprint/293/5537/2031


Assignment
s:



Group MIS career presentations



Wiki commentaries completed



December 5



Conclusions and presentations



Assignments:



Group MIS career presentations



Essay #3

due








L 501: Intro to Information Science



20

Fall 2005: Rosenbaum






Assignments, Grading, and Due Dates



This table shows the assignments you have to do, the dates that they will be discussed in class, other important
dates, and the percentage each is worth towards the final grade, and the dates the assign
ments are due.


Assignment





Value


Date due


Group assignments


Critical reviews of articles





35%


Various times



Discussed in class






August 29


Receive group assignments





September 2


Investigation of MIS careers



20%



December 5



Discussed in class






August 29


Meet with group to rank tracks





September 5


Send rankings to instructor





September 6


Assigned to a track






September 9


Submit job titles to instructor





Septemb
er 19


Receive conformation from instructor




September 21


IT application essays




45%



Discussed in class






August 29


Essay #1: Web site review



15%


October 14



Email URL of site to instructor





September 12



Receive co
nfirmation






September 14


Essay #2: Search engine comparison


15%


November 11



Email URLs of search engines to instructor



October 10



Receive confirmation






October 12


Essay #3: Information systems evaluation

15%



De
cember 3



Email description of system to instructor



November 7



Receive confirmation






November 9


Wiki commentary





5%


Beginning October 24, finished December 2


Discussed in class






August 29


Class participation





5%


Throughout