Seaholm Girls Basketball Strength & Conditioning Manual

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Seaholm Girls Basketball

Strength & Conditioning Manual

















Head Coach

Steve Hasler


Strength & Conditioning

Bob Carleton MAT CSCS CPT


















Goals for the Strength & Conditioning Program




Injury Prevention



Improved

a
thletic a
bility specific to basketball



Better overall health and well being




Expectations for the players:




Participate in basketball activities



Take part in strength training at least twice a week



Commit to a healthy lifestyle



It is
your

responsibility to cont
act Coach Carleton to find out when you can
strength train.


Coach Carleton has a website on the Birmingham Public Schools Webpage.


You can email him: RC04bps@birmingham.k12.mi.us to set up times or to
find out when the team is working out.




















The female athlete and injuries:


With the passing of Title IV o
n

June 23, 1972,

participation of females in sports has
increased dramatically.

Unfortunately, f
emale athletes
have had a high
frequency of
injury compared to male athle
tes. This fact ha
s led the strength and

conditioning
community to
help to

prevent
these injuries
,

especially ACL injuries.


What are ACL injuries?

ACL injuries are tears or ruptures to the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee. This
ligament is essential for knee stabiliz
ation as it connects the femur to the tibia. Research
has shown that the female athlete is 4 to 6 times

more

likely to have an ACL injury than
male athletes (Fisher 44).






Why do female athletes have more risk?

Researchers and others are still debati
ng this topic
,

here is a list of theories:



Poor m
otor control development
-

(Bad c
oordination)



Lower levels of Glycolytic Capacity
-

(Get fatigued faster)



Asymmetric strength in legs. (One leg stronger than the other)



Valgus or knock kneed landings (5 degree
s increases the load on ACL 6x)



Larger Q angle (above 15 degrees) (Longer femurs seem to more a risk)



Weakness the Hip Abductors and outward rotators.


How do we help to prevent ACL injuries?


Basically, we will work to improve strength, coordination and
conditioning.


This program is specifically designed to help to prevent ACL injuries.



Improve athletic abi
lity and basketball performance


We will improve the following athletic abilities:


Explosive power:



Jump Progression to
pl
yometrics



Power exercises
-

Olympic lift progressions



Multi
-
joint exercises


Agility
-



Agility progression using hoops to teach proper form



Agility progression without hoops and unpredictable cuts


Conditioning:



Improve a
naerobic conditioning
-

Interval training



Improve Overall Hea
lth and Well
-
Being


Stronger Bones and Connective Tissue:



Strength t
raining leads to a higher peak bone mass (Baechle p62)


General Nutrition Rules



Obviously, no alcohol, drugs or tobacco



No Pop
-

Studies have shown this can lead to lower bone mass

(USDA)



D
o not eat at restaurants with drive thru windows



Eat
protein

at breakfast (This means you have to eat breakfast)



Eat enough calcium

and iron

(Check with your Dr. for your intake level)



Drink water
-

co
nsume at least 1 pint of water

2 hours before you play
.



No Red Bull, Rock Star, Monster energy drinks.


If you have specific questions about nutrition and/or supplements please ask your doctor
or
a
register
ed

dietitian or nutritionist.













Workout Overview


Mission Statement: I will train high school a
thletes using the most modern methods,
based on science and research to build better athletes and to help them resist injury.


Goal: Help to make better athletes by reducing injury and enhancing performance.


Cornerstones:

1.

Use proper progressions

2.

Train the

body to be functionally correct

3.

Strengthen injury prone areas.

4.

Train to be functionally strong

5.

Focus on the proper physiology for the sport.

6.

Build balance.

7.

Train unilaterally and bilaterally


Workout:

1.

Soft Tissue

2.

Dynamic Warm up

3.

Mobility

4.

Glute Activation

5.

Core training

6.

Scapula stabilization

7.

Jump Training

8.

Agility Power Training

9.

Strength

a.

Knee Dominant

b.

Hip Dominant

c.

Pull

d.

Push

e.

Lunge

f.

Rotation


12. Conditioning














Soft Tissue







Why
?


Directions:

Take a foam roll, tennis ball or other implements

to

Roll out the muscle prior to exercise.

Go back and forth across the muscle with 3 or 4

strokes. This should take 3 or 4 minutes to complete.


Foam Roll

1.TFL/IT Band




2.Quad/Hip Flexor



3.
Adductor

4.Upper Back/Rhomboids


5.Lats



Tennis Ball

1.Glute

Medius




2.Calves



.

3.
Infraspinatus (Under shoulder)






To see these exercises: Go to Coreperformance.com under fitness and exercises of the day or go to Eric
Cressey’s blog 7/1/2008 and check out the foam roll series.


Dynamic Warm up







Why Not
Stretch?

Directions:

Use the ex
ercises to ready the body for m
ovement and sport.

Do each exercise for 10
-
20 yards
.
This should take 5
-
7 minutes


Benefits of Dynamic Warm up by Michael Alter
:

• Increased body and tissue temperature

• Increased blood flow t
hrough active muscles by reducing vascular bed resistance

• Increased heart rate, which will prepare the cardiovascular system for work

• Increased metabolic rate

• Increases in the Bohr effect, which facilitates the exchange of oxygen from hemoglobin

• In
creased speed at which nerve impulses travel, and thereby facilitation of body movements

• Increased efficiency of reciprocal innervation (thus allowing opposing muscles to contract and relax faster and more
efficiently)

• Increased physical working capaci
ty

• Decreased viscosity (or resistance) of connective tissue and muscle

• Decreased muscular tension (improved muscle relaxation)

• Enhanced connective tissue and muscular extensibility

• Enhanced psychological performance


Exercises

1.Handwalks




2.Forw
ard Lunge Elbow To Instep

3.
Inverted Hamstring Backward

4.Walking Lunge


5.Tin man




6.Knee Hug

7.Carioca


8
.Backwards

Soft tissue work or self
-
myofascial release helps to
improve the quality of the
muscle. It helps to remove
‘knots’ to help keep fu
ll
range of motion.

Research (1,2 ) has
shown that long static
stretching inhibits power
development. It may also
inhibit your stretch
reflex which may lead to
injury. We will stretch
after a workout
.

Mobility

Directions

M
obility exercise
s

will

increase range of motion

of the Ankle, Hip and Thoracic Spine.


The Ankle needs more mobili
ty in the Sagittal plane

(back and forth). The # 2 predicator of ankle injury


is a loss of dorsi
-
flexion (The ability to pull your

toes toward your knee.)

The Hip needs mobility in the transverse plane

(Rotation).

The T
-
spine needs mobility in both extens
ion and

Rotation
.


Exercises:

Ankle

Self wall m
obilization

Hip

Hip s
wings

T
-
Spine

Quadruped extensio
n & r
otation






Glute Activation







What is Glute Amnesia?

Directions:

Activation of the glute muscles is important for injury prevention.

We will
use a couple exercises to activate and strength
en

the Hip Abductors

and outward rotators.


Strengthening the hip muscles is important part of many

ACL injury prevention programs.


Exercises









Muscles of Hip


Quadruped Hip Extensions

1 or 2 Leg Glute Bridge

Band Walks
-

Sti
ff Legged

45 Forward 45 Backward

Band Walk Bent Knee

Joint by Joint needs by

WB Kibler

Foot



Stability

A
nkle



Mobility

Knee


Stability

Hip



Mobility

Lumbar Spine

Stability

Thoracic Spine

Mobility

Scapula

Stability

Shoulder Joint

Mobility

Elbow


Stability


The theory that
constant sitting
makes our glutes
inactive. Th
is leads
to synergist
dominance

or u
sing
‘helper’ muscles to


more

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楮捬ud攠fT b慮d
syndrom攬
䡡ms瑲楮g pu汬s
,
L3
-
L5 injuries

etc…



Core Training






No Sit ups?














Overview:

The main job of the core muscles is to resist movement.

We will train with a combination of isometric planks and flex
ion

e
xercise
s

originating at the legs.


Exercises:


Progression

1

2

Front Bridge 40 seconds

Alternate Arm 30 Sec

Stability ball rollout
/

Ab Wheel

Side Bridge 30 seconds

Side Bridge with Rotation 12

Pallof Press 2 leg to 1 leg

Reverse Crunch

TRX Pull In

Hanging Knee up









Scapula Training


This section is important if you play volleyball, swim or play softball.


The Scapula works with the thoracic spine and the rotator cuff to make the shoulder function properly. An
imbalance, weakness or mobility/
stability issue can cause dysfunction. As mentioned earlier we trained the
thoracic spine for increased mobility, we now will train the scapula for strength and stability.

We want to
balance our program for shoulder health.



1.
Wall Slides




2.
Band Pull a
parts

3. YT
WL







Scapular Retraction

Scapular Protraction

All Rowing*

All Bench Pressing

Rear Delt Fly**

All Flyes

Prone Trap Raise Variations***

Dips

Face Pulls


Scapular Depression

Scapular Elevation

Scapular Wall Slides

Shrugs

Prone Trap Rais
e Variations

Upright Rows*

Behind
-
the
-
Neck Band Pulldowns

Cleans and Snatches

Prone Cobras to 10&2 (held for time)

Seated DB Cleans

Straight
-
Arm Lat Pulldowns (strict!)

Cuban Presses





Basically, sit ups with
spinal flexion
reinforce poor posture.
Repeated spinal
flexion can damage
spinal discs.



Jump Training










Proper Landing Form

We will use this pro
gres
sion to teach the proper form of how to

jump



and land. The first part of

jump training

will consist of exercises designed

to help the athlete learn to absorb force. The second part will

use the stretch
-
shortening cycle for power development.




Jum
p with stick landing






Plyometrics

Linear

Lateral

Jumps In Place

Lateral Rapid response

Horizontal

Jump Matrix



Lateral Agility Training


The lateral training prog
ression we will use

has an emphasis on keeping the hip down and

pushing of the back the foot. This will make

change of direction faster and safer.



4 Hoop Drill

3 Hoop Drill

5 Hoop Drill

7 Hoop Drill

Star Drill

Wave Drill


















Bilateral

Unilateral

Jump to Step

One leg Jump to step

Jumps in Place

Heiden Jump

Proper
La
nding has
knees over
toe
s, chest
over knees.
Knees and
h
ips flexed.

Landing
should

not
have any
sound.



Power

Training






What makes power
?


The p
ower training progression include
s

exercises to




t
each the athlete

the ‘triple extension.’ Explosive power

using

the Hips, Knees and Ankles. Resistance will be light

with an emphasis on

technique and speed
.


Special care will be given to overhead athletes with

e
xercise selection.

The
y

will not clean or snatch.


Progression

1

2

Clean

High Pull

Hang Clean

Snatch

Medicine Ball Toss

CG Hang Snatch







Strength


Strength Training General Programming


Begin
ner

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rep Performed

Stop Set

Rest between

Power

4

6

Stretch Shortening

When speed decreases

2 minutes

Compound

4

8
-
10

Controlled negative,
Explosive p
ositive

1 or 2 reps short of
failure

2
-
3 minutes

Isolation

1
-
2

8
-
12

Constant t
ension

Failure at 1 set

30 seconds


Movement

Bilateral

Unilateral

Overhead Athlete

Knee Dominant

Front Squat

1 Leg Squat

Same

Hip Dominant

Stability Ball/Trx Leg Curl

1 Leg RDL

Same

Vertical Pull

Chin Up

One Arm Pulldown

Same

Horizontal Pull

TRX or Inverted

Row

1 Arm DB Row

Same

Push

Push Up/ Bench Press

DB Bench Press

No Bench w/Bar

Lunge

Walking Lunge

Lunge Matrix

Same


Medicine Ball Progression


Parallel



Perpendicular


Slam


Chest












Power is basically the ability to produce
la
rge amounts of force in a short
amount
of time.

This ability is greatly dependent of the
central nervous sy
stem.


The Henneman size principle states that
smallest force producing motor unit will
be fired first. Only if needed will the
larger units be fired.


This need is

mostly
dependent on the

speed

of the movement.



The fast activation of these larger moto
r
units is trainable. You have to train your
brain to be able to fire these units
quickly.


Ankle









Ankle Injuries








3 way band


Dor
siflexion


Inversion


Eversion


Golf Ball SMR





Rotary Cuff






Muscles of the Rotary Cuff

Lying External Rotation


Cable External Rotation




















Muscle

Supraspinatus

Infraspinatus

Teres Minor

Subscapularis

Origin

Supraspinous fossa

Musc
le fascia

Infraspinous fossa

Muscle fascia

Middle half of scapula's
lateral margin

Subscapular fossa

Insertion

Uppermost of three facets on
the greater tubercle of the
humerus

Middle facet of
greater tubercle of
humerus

Lowest of three facets of
the great
er tubercle of
the humerus

Lesser tubercle of
humerus

Action(s)

Abducts arm through initial
15
-
20 degrees of ROM

Stabilizes the glenohumeral
(GH) joint

External rotation of
humerus

Stabilizes GH joint

External rotation of
humerus

Stabilizes GH joint

Inter
nal rotation of
the humerus

Stabilizes GH joint

Around
85% of ankle
injuries are
lateral
injuries. Most
injuries take
place plantar
flexed and
inverted
.

Supraspinatus

Infraspinatus

Teres Minor

Subscapularis


Bibliography

Training Female Athletes

Zatsiorsky, Vladimir, and Kraemer, William.
Science and Practice of Strength Training
. 2nd ed. Champaign, IL:

Human Kinetics, 2006.

Baechle, Thomas, and Earle, Roger.
Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning
. 2nd ed. Champaign,


Il: Human Kinetics, 2000.

NSCA Position Paper "Strength Training for Female Athletes."
NSCA Journal

11(1989) (43
-
51):

Query, Jennifer. "Training the Female Athlete." Motor City Strength
. University of Detroit, 07 06 2008

Fischer, Donald. "Neuromuscular Training to Prevent ACL Injury in the Female Athlete."
Strength and

Conditioning Journal

28(2006): 44
-
54.

Pettitt, Robert. “Training for Women’s Basketball: A Biomechanical Emphasis for P
reventing ACL



Injury.” Strength & Conditioning Journal 24 (2002) 20
-
29

Boyle, Mike.
Functional Training for Sports
. Human Kinetics, 2004.

Foam Roll Sources:

Verstegen, Mark.
Core Performance
. Rodale, 2004. p165
-
167

Cressey, Eric. "Feel better for 10 buck
s."
T
-
Nation

07 12 2004








http://www.T
-
nation.com/readArticle.do?id=475832

Gentilcore, Tony. “Soft tissue work for tough guys.”
T
-
Nation
09 19 2006

http://www.tnation.com/readArticle.do;jsessionid=C66DB4A13AAB83EBEAEFC61452A6FC90.

Dynamic Warm up Sour
ces:

Alter, Michael.
Science
of Flexibility, 3
rd

Edition
.

Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. 2004

Holt, Brady. "The Impact of Different Warm
-
up protocols on Vertical Jump Performance in Male





Collegiate Athletes."
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Resear
ch

22(2008): 226
-
229.

Winchester, Jason. "Static Stretching Impairs Sprint Performance in Collegiate Track and Field Athletes."
Journal of

Strength and Conditioning Research

22(2008): 13
-
18.

Verstegen, Mark.
Core Performance
. Rodale, 2004.

Radcliffe, Jame
s C.
Functional Training for Athletes at all levels.
Ulysses Press, Berkeley, CA 2007.

Brown, Jim. “The latest research on stretching before exercise.”
Sports Performance Journal
04 09 2007




http://www.coreperformance.com/article.php?p=3&s=1&id=575



Mob
ility Sources
:

Boyle, Mike. "A Joint
-
by
-
Joint Approach to Training ."
T
-
Nation

27 06 2007 <http://www.t
-

nation.com/article/performance_training/a_jointbyjoint_approach_to_training&cr=>.

Falsone, Sue. "Integrated Performance Training for the Overhead Athle
te ." Perform Better. McCormick




Place, Chicago. 20 04 2008.

Brown, Jim “Ankle Sprains”
Sports Performance Journal
. 26 05 2007


http://www.coreperformance.com/article.php?p=3&s=1&id=504

Kibler, WB. The Role of the Scapula in Athletic Shoulder Function
.
Am J Sports Med
,

26, 325
-
337. 1998

Glute Activation
-

Prehab Sources

Patel, Brijesh. "Hamstring Dominance."
Strength Coach.com

http://www.michaelboyle.biz/joomla/index2.php?option=com_content&do_pdf=1&id=66>.

Forsthye, Shad. “Hamstring injuries in soccer.

Strength Coach.com

http://www.strengthcoach.com/members/1360.cfm

Lomando, Anthony. “Reducing the risk of soccer injuries.”
Strength Coach.com



http://www.strengthcoach.com/members/1325.cfm

Boyle, Mike. "Designing strength training programs E
-
Book." 7 J
ul 2008 www.strengthcoach.com

Core Train
ing
Sources

Boyle, Mike. "Anterior Core Training."
T
-
Nation

10 04 2008 <http://www.t
-

nation.com/article/performance_training/anterior_core_training&cr=>.

Cressey, Eric.
Maximum Strength
. Philadelphia. First Da Capp
o Press
.

2008

Renna, Anthony “No More sit
-
ups.”
StrenghCoach.com
.

http://www.strengthcoach.com/members/1455.cfm?sd=15

Cosgrove, Alwyn. "21st Century Fitness Programming ." Perform Better. McCormick Place, Chicago. 19

04 2008.

Scapula Training Sources:

V
erstegen, Mark.
Core Performance
. Rodale, 2004.

Cressey, Eric. "Training Strategies for Overhead Athletes ." Perform Better. McCormick Place, Chicago. 19 04 2008.

Jump Training and Agility training Sources

Boyle, Mike.
Functional Training for Sports
. Huma
n Kinetics, 2004.

ACL Prevention Project."
Santa Monica Orthopedic and Sports Medicine
. 14 May 2008

<http://www.aclprevent.com/aclprevention.htm>.

Twellman, Andy. "Jump Training: More Than Just the Vertical."
Strengthcoach.com


<http://www.strengthcoach.c
om/members/1358.cfm?sd=7>.

Noyes, Frank. "Plyometric Training and Female Athletes."
The American Journal of Sports Medicine

24(1996): 765
-

773.

Kutz, Matthew. "Theoretical and Practical Issues for Plyometric Training."
NSCA Performance
Training

Journal


2
(2006): 10
-
12

Power Training Sources

Taft,Lee. "Olympic lifting and explosive training mini
-
book."
LiftStrong
. CD
-
ROM.2007.

Newton, Harvey.
Explosive Lifting for Sports
. Enhanced. Human Kinetics, 2006.

Strength Sources

Boyle, Mike.
Functional Training for

Sports
. Human Kinetics, 2004.

Cosgrove, Alwyn.
The New Rules of Lifting
. Avery, 2005.

Cressey, Eric.
Maximum Strength
. Philadelphia. First Da Cappo Press
.

2008

Robertson, Mike. "Bulletproof Knees." Perform Better. McCormick Place, Chicago. 20 04 2008.

Ve
rstegen, Mark.
Core Performance
. Rodale, 2004.

Dos Remedios, Robert.
Power Training
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Cosgrove, Alwyn. "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Program Design."

<http://www.alwyncosgrove.com/SevenHabits.html>.

Herring, Matt. "Incorporating Function
into a comprehensive warm
-
up." Perform Better. McCormick Place,




Chicago. 18 04 2008.

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T
-
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30 06 2008 12 Jul 2008 <http://www.t
-

nation.com/article/bodybuilding/the_thib_system_8212_fatigue_and_best_exercises
&cr=>.

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The New Rules of Lifting
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Ankle and Rota
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y Cuff Sources

Smith, Jimmy. "The Ankle Paradox: Building Indestructible Ankles."
T
-
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02 02 2008

<http://www.tnation.com/article/performance_training/the_ankle_paradox_buil
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_ankles&cr=>.

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Place, Chicago. 20 04 2008.

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Workout Card

Workout A

Glute, Core, Scapula, Jump
, Agility

Exercise

Sets Reps






CG Snatch

4 x 6






Front Squat

4 x 6






Glute Ham

3 x 10






Bench Press

3 x 10






TRX Row

2 x 10






Chin Up

2 x 8







Exercise

Sets Reps






CG Snatch

4 x 6






Front Squat

4 x 6






Glute Ham

3 x 10






Bench Press

3 x 10






TRX Row

2 x 10






Chin Up

2 x 8






Workout B

Glute, Core, Scapula, Jump, Agility

Exercise

Sets Reps






Box Jump

4 x 5






1 Leg Squat

4 x 6






1 Leg RDL

3 x 8






DB Bench

3 x 10







DB Row

2 x 10






Pulldown

2 x 8







Exercise

Sets Reps






Box Ju
mp

4 x 6






1 Leg Squat

4 x 6






1 Leg RDL

3 x 8






DB Bench

3 x 10







DB Row

2 x 10






Pulldown

2 x 8