Sustainable Sites: 14 possible points

plumbergamMechanics

Feb 22, 2014 (3 years and 3 months ago)

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Billings, Millea, Victorsson | LEED
-
NC Analys
is: New GSB Campus | Page
1



Sustainable Sites
: 14 possible points

Overview


Goals

Overall, general summary of
LEED
-
NC
Sustainable Site
s

goals go here




Methods

A general summary of how these credits were obtained, with some simple photos goes
here.































Billings, Millea, Victorsson | LEED
-
NC Analys
is: New GSB Campus | Page
2



Su
stainable Sites
: 14 possible points

LEED
-
NC Scorecard


LEED for New Construction v2.2
Registered Project Checklist
Project Name: Stanford GSB: Knight Management Center
Project Address: Stanford, CA

Yes
?
No
Sustainable Sites
14
Points
Y
Prereq 1
Construction Activity Pollution Prevention
Required
Credit 1
Site Selection
1
Credit 2
Development Density & Community Connectivity
1
Credit 3
Brownfield Redevelopment
1
Credit 4.1
Alternative Transportation
, Public Transportation Access
1
Credit 4.2
Alternative Transportation
, Bicycle Storage & Changing Rooms
1
Credit 4.3
Alternative Transportation
, Low-Emitting & Fuel-Efficient Vehicles
1
Credit 4.4
Alternative Transportation
, Parking Capacity
1
Credit 5.1
Site Development,
Protect of Restore Habitat
1
Credit 5.2
Site Development,
Maximize Open Space
1
Credit 6.1
Stormwater Design,
Quantity Control
1
Credit 6.2
Stormwater Design,
Quality Control
1
Credit 7.1
Heat Island Effect,
Non-Roof
1
Credit 7.2
Heat Island Effect,
Roof
1
Credit 8
Light Pollution Reduction
1




Scorecard will get filled in……………………….




Billings, Millea, Victorsson | LEED
-
NC Analys
is: New GSB Campus | Page
3



SS Prerequisite 1: Construction Activity and Pollution Prevention

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO


Prerequisite Intent

Reduce pollution caused by con
struction activities. To demonstrate this,

we will show
what steps will be

taken to control soil erosion, waterway sedimentation, and airborne
dust generated during construction.


Feasibility

This prerequisite must be achieved to receive LEED
-
NC certifi
cation
, therefore it is
pursued. This project will meet this prerequisite by using an Erosion and Sedimentation
Control (ESC) plan, and by meeting the three required objectives:




1. Prevent loss of soil during construction by stormwater runoff and/or wi
nd




erosion, including protecting topsoil by stockpiling for reuse.


2. Prevent sedimentation of storm sewer or receiving streams.


3. Prevent polluting the air with dust and particulate matter.


Analysis

This prerequisite will be met by following S
tanford’s own sustainability guidelines, as
well as the pre
-
schematic design civil narrative provided by Arup.


First, the Stanford Sustainability Guidelines
1

state that soil erosion is to be prevented
before, during and after construction, to be achieved

by controlling stormwater runoff
and/or wind erosion. The guidelines suggest implementing silt fencing, sediment traps,
construction phasing, and maintaining or enhancing vegetation and groundcover. Given
the relatively flat topogra
phy (See Figure XX) o
f the site
,

slope

stabilization methods for
steep grades and hillsides will not need to be considered.


Second, Arup’s pre
-
schematic design civil narrative
2

indicates
that “
t
emporary erosion
and sediment control (TESC) facilities will be provided during th
e construction of the
project, in accordance with the ABAG
Erosion & Sediment Control Manual
.”
Arup’s

narrative continues by suggesting the following
methods: “stabilized construction
entrance, temporary swales, sediment basins, inlet protection, temporar
y seeding,
protection of stockpiled materials.”

This narrative also notes that
“s
ite won excavated
material will be reused for on
-
site fill wherever possible
,” reducing the need to ship
excavated soil off
-
site.


Currently, sediment traps are being used on

other construction projects at Stanford (See
Figure xx). As promoted by Stanford guidelines and outlined in Arup’s narrative, these
sediment traps could greatly reduce soil loss and sedimentation during construction if
used around the perimeter of the co
nstruction site, as shown in Figure xx.









1

Stanford Sustainability Guidelines, Environmental Stewardship Committee. March 2002, pg. 19.

2

Arup: Stanford GSB

Pre
-
SD Civil Narrative, 30 April 2007, pg. 2 and 3.

Billings, Millea, Victorsson | LEED
-
NC Analys
is: New GSB Campus | Page
4



SS Prerequisite 1: Construction Activity and Pollution Prevention

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO

















Figure xx
: Plan view of e
xisting site, before construction.

Red line indicates approx
imate boundary for
new GSB campus as well as areas where sediment traps could be located to limit sedimentation
construction run off.

From Google Maps.



Figure xx: Sediment trap currently used at Stanford during construction of Munger underground parking

garage. Photo by John Millea, 5/10/07.



Figure xx: Existing site, note flat topography. Photo by John Millea, 5/10/07













Billings, Millea, Victorsson | LEED
-
NC Analys
is: New GSB Campus | Page
5



SS Credit 1: Site Selection

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO


Credit

Intent

Choose a development site that minimizes adv
erse environmental impacts by avoiding
undeveloped land and limiting effects on wetlands or endangered species. Give site
preference to previously developed areas to limit or even improve site conditions.


Feasibility

Given constraints imposed by the Stan
ford campus, and the fact that the GSB campus site
has already been selected, there is limited control with this credit. However, in this case,
the Knight
Management Center will be developed on an area composed of primarily
asphalt parking lots. Arup’s c
ivil design narrative
also
notes that “the existing site
consists almost entirely of impermeable surfaces such buildings and asphalt parking lot.”
3

In

general this is beneficial, because
the conversion of this site from parking lots into the
new GSB campus

will likely improve the location’s immediate impact on the
environment
.

Overall, this credit can be obtained.



Analysis

This credit is met by avoiding development on the six types of sites prohibited by LEED
-
NC guidelines, all discussed below.


1. Do no
t develop on

prime farmland as defined by the USDA

T
he new GSB site is not prime farmland
, and is composed of 2 buildings surrounded by
parking lots.


2. Do not develop on p
reviously undeveloped land whose elevation is lower than 5
feet above the elevation

of the 100
-
year flood as defined by FEM
A

This site has been previously developed.











Figure xx: C
ompletely developed GSB site.


3. Land that is specifically identified as habitat for any species on federal or state
threatened of endangered lists.

This site, because it is primarily for vehicle parking, is not listed as habitat for any plant
or animal species on both the Federal and State levels. The only
specifically identified
threatened
species on the Stanford campus is the tiger salamander, but
their habitat area
does not intersect with the GSB site
, as shown on Figure XX below.





3

Arup: Stanford GSB Pre
-
SD Civil Narrative, 30 April 2007, pg. 1.

Billings, Millea, Victorsson | LEED
-
NC Analys
is: New GSB Campus | Page
6



SS Credit 1: Site Selection

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO




















Figure XX:
Tiger salamander habitat outlined with dotted

Line, new GSB campus in red.
4



4. Do not develop within 100 feet of any wetlands.

The new GSB site is completely surrounded (at a radius much larger than 100 feet) by
developed campus area that does not include any wetlands.


5. Do not develop of p
reviously undeveloped land that is w
ithin 50 feet of a body of
water.

Just as requirement 2 states and Figure XX shows, this site was previously developed.


6.
Do not develop on land which prior to acquisition for the project was public
parkland.

Again, this existing site is almost entirely
composed of a parking lot and contains no
public parkland.









4
El Camino Reborn: Stanford Community Plan Issues and Policies.
<
http://www.elcaminoreborn.com/library/Stanford/StanfordCommunityPlan/6
31478pl_stanford06_final_C
P_ResourceConservation.pdf
>

Billings, Millea, Victorsson | LEED
-
NC Analys
is: New GSB Campus | Page
7



SS Credit 2: Development Density & Community Connectivity

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO


Credit

Intent

Ease the burden on existing municipal and transportation infrastructure and pre
serv
e open
spaces by developing in denser urban areas near site users’ homes and basic services
.
This will help to reduce urban sprawl

and may promote a sense of community.


Feasibility

This credit should definitely be pursued, because the Stanford campus alr
eady has a
mature infrastructure (i.e., water, electricity, campus transportation, proximity to student
residences) that promotes the overall

sense of

community connectivity

that lies

at the
heart of this credit.

In short, given the chosen site, it would
be very difficult for the new
GSB campus to remain isolated from the greater Stanford community.

This credit is met
through Option 2: Community Connectivity.


Analysis

To attain this credit through Option 2, several requirements must be met: Construct on
a
previously developed site, be within ½ mile of a residential zone or neighborhood with an
average density of 10 units per acre, be within ½ mile of 10 basic services and allow for
pedestrian access between the buildings and basic services.


1. Construct
on a previously developed site

As shown in previous credits, this site has already been developed.


2. Be within ½ mile of a residential zone or neighborhood with an average density of
10 units per acre.

The Stanford campus is packed with residences, inclu
ding the Schwab Residential Center

for GSB students
, which is directly across the street from the new GSB site.

Dense
multistory
graduate
residences also exist to the southeast of the new GSB, especially in
Escondido Village and the Rains Houses.

These r
esidential areas are shown
as blue
diamonds
in Figure XX below.


3.
Be within ½ mile of 10 basic services

The Stanford campus
has a mult
itude of basic services

in a relatively small area
.
Although there are much more, 11

of those services with
in a ½ mile
radius
from the new
GSB
are shown along with residences in Figure XX below.


4. Provide pedestrian access between the buildings and basic services

The Stanford campus is extremely pedestrian friendly, with minimal vehicle traffic
through the central campus

area southwest of the new GSB campus.

The central campus
area is even blocked off to all but registered vehicles, and the primary modes of
transportation throughout campus are walking or biking

on the well defined sidewalks
and pedestrian paths
.




Billings, Millea, Victorsson | LEED
-
NC Analys
is: New GSB Campus | Page
8




SS

Credit 2: Development Density & Community Connectivity

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO


Figure xx: Campus map with ½ mile radius circle shown. Residences and basic services are marked within
this area.


Fi
gure
XX

Key


Basic Services shown on map














New GSB Campus












Res
idential buildings



or complexes












Schwab Residential


Center















No.

Service

Name

1.

Bank

Stanford Credit Union

2.

Worship

Memorial Church

3.

Conv. grocery

Tresidder Express

4.

Fire Station

Stanford Fire Station

5.

Post Office

Stanford Po
st Office

6.

Pharmacy

Vaden Pharmacy

7.

Restaurant

Multiple

8.

Fitness Center

Arrillaga Rec. Center

9.

Community Ctr

Graduate Comm. Ctr.

10.

Park

The Oval

11.

Museum

Dohrmann Grove Gallery

1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

9

7

8

10

11

Billings, Millea, Victorsson | LEED
-
NC Analys
is: New GSB Campus | Page
9



SS Credit 3: Brownfield Redevelopment

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO




Not a brownfield!




SS Credit 4.1: Alternative Transportat
ion: Public Transportation Acess

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO



SS Credit 4.2: Alternative Transportation: Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO


SS Credit 4.3: Alternative Transportation: Low Emitting & Fuel Efficient V
ehicles

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO



SS Credit 4.4: Alternative Transportation: Parking Capacity

LEED
-
NC Credit:
YES

|
UNSURE

|

NO