Guided Reading Resource Guide - September 2006

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Resource Guide







Grades K
-
6

























Based on theories supporting Balanced Literacy and the ideas of Fountas & Pinnell


Auburn Enlarged City School District:

Implementing Guided Reading

Audience
:


Elementary Classroom Teachers

AIS Reading Teachers


RTI Student Teams




Elementary Administrators

Subject Area Coordinator

Grade Level Tea
m
-
Leaders


Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


2

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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2

PHILOSOPHY

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3

VISION

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3

MISSION

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3

GOALS

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3

B
UILDING
L
EADERSHIP

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3

C
URRICULUM
AND
I
NSTRUCTION

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3

P
ERFORMANCE
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3

DEFINITION

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4

T
EACHER
B
ENEFITS OF

G
UIDED
R
EADING

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4

S
TUDENT
B
ENEFITS OF
G
UIDED
R
EADING

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4

PURPOSE

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4

VALUES

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4

HOW TO (STEPS TO PLA
NNING AND IMPLEMENTA
TION)

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4

MODEL LESSON

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5

LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE
: GUIDED READING (G
R)

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7

O
RGANIZATION
P
AGE

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7

P
ROCEDURES
P
AGE

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...

8

SAMPLE LESSON: PRIM
ARY

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9

O
RGANIZATION
P
AGE

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9

P
ROCEDURES
P
AGE

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..
10

SAMPLE LESSON: INTE
RMEDIATE

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...
11

O
RGANIZATION
P
AGE

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11

P
ROCEDURES
P
AGE

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..
12

THE ESSENTIAL ELEMEN
TS OF GUIDED READING

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13

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

PRIMARY

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14

PRIMARY

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15

S
AMPLE
M
ANAGEMENT
P
LAN
1

(150

MINUTES
)

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15

S
AMPLE
M
ANAGEMENT
P
LAN
2

(150

MINUTES
)

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15

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

INTERMEDIATE

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16

INTERMEDIATE

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.......
17

S
AMPLE
M
ANAGEMENT
P
LAN
1

(150
-
160

MINUTES
)

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..............
17

S
AMPLE
M
ANAGEMENT
P
LAN
2

(150
-
160

MINUTES
)

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..............
17

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

WORK GROUP IDEAS

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.
18

WORK BOARD/POCKET CH
ART

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20

CLASSROOM MAP

GUIDED READING

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21

GUIDED READING LEVEL
S


WWW.SCHOLASTIC.COM

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22

DEVELOPMENT READING
CONTINUUM

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23

GUIDED READING RESOU
RCE LINKS:

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25



Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


3

Philosophy:

Based on the ideas of Iren
e Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell


Learning

is a constructive

activity. The elementary classroom is where children discover the principles of literacy
and develop the skills necessary to think critically about what is read, written, heard, and
spoken.


Visi
on:

As indicated on the Auburn District Website by Mr. John Plume (based on the ideas of
Jim Collins) good is the enemy of great. Good is comfortable, complacent. Great is a
sense of duty to achieve what at first did not seem possible.


How do we assert
ourselves as “great” teachers?


Auburn teachers care about kids and what they teach. Auburn teachers connect with their
students. Auburn teachers have faith in the magnitude of their work.


Mission:

Implement an elementary Guided Reading Program effectiv
e across all elementary grades
throughout the entire Auburn District that is
appreciated by students

as a fun way to
improve their reading skills,
esteemed by teachers

as an efficient, invaluable method for
teaching reading, and
noted by administrators

as
an effective means of meeting the
reading needs of all students.


Goals:

Building Leadership


All administrators will assess current district and building performance data and
put in place the means to achieve the district’s core beliefs and values of supe
rior
achievement and equity for all.


Student gains will be measured and charted to
demonstrate steps taken to achieving success for all students. Guided reading will be
implemented an example of a “means” for achieving the district’s core belief in earl
y
literacy intervention and support for this direct instruction will be provided.

Curriculum and Instruction


Literacy will be an integral part of all content area instruction so that students will
be able to competently apply reading and writing skills t
o a variety of academic and real
life tasks with the ultimate result of improved student achievement.


Guided reading
instruction

will provide students with the skills necessary to read, speak, write, and listen
for understanding so that achieving literac
y in the content areas will be successful.

Performanc
e

Supports for the school community, administrators, teachers, support staff, students, and
parents will be put in place so that the subgroup populations will meet the standard (KPI) in
English Language
Arts and Mathematics as set by the New York State Education Department
.

Students with deficits in reading achievement will receive support in the form of guided reading
instruction so that all students will make gains toward the KPI in ELA and other areas.





Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


4

Definition:

What is Guided Reading?

Guided Reading is a context in which a teacher supports each reader’s development of
effective strategies for processing novel texts at increasingly challenging levels of
difficulty.

Guided Reading is a small grou
p approach to teaching reading. The teacher works with a
small group of students with similar reading ability. The book must be at the students’
instructional level. The teacher spends the first part of the lesson discussing concepts in
the book and sca
ffolding information. This lays groundwork for reading success. (Gay
Su Pinnell, 2005)


Teacher B
enefits of Guided Reading
:



Results in m
ore focused teaching session



Provides o
pportunity to teach and extend children of similar ability



Provides o
pportunity

to observe individuals as they process new texts


Student B
enefits of Guided Reading
:



Helps children learn how to introduce texts to themselves



Empowers individuals with strategies for reading increasingly difficult texts
independently



Provides students w
ith enjoyable, successful experiences in reading for meaning


Purpose:

Enables children to use and develop strategies “on the run.” Focus primarily on
constructing meaning while using problem
-
solving strategies to solve unknown words,
deal with tricky sen
tence structure, and understand concepts or ideas to be met in print.


Values:

Why Guided Reading?



Stimulate teachers by facilitating ways to become unstuck from traditional direct
whole
-
group instruction practices



Improve the quality of reading instructio
n by meeting learner at their own level of
instructional needs



Realize the closing of learning gaps between high and low reading achievers


How to

(steps to planning and implementation)
:


Step 1

Group students together who
use similar processes

and are abl
e to
read similar levels

of text with support

Step 2

Select text for group

--
text not at frustration level, so they
can

read it with the strategies they have, but
provides small opportunity for small amount of new learning

Step 3

Introduce text to small
group

Step 4

Work briefly with individuals as they read text mastering processes, fluency,
comprehension, etc

Step 5

Select one or two teaching points to present to the group following the reading

Step 6

Extend the learning



Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


5

Model Lesson:


Fountas, I.

C. and Pinnell, G.S. (
1996
).
Guided Reading
: Good First Teaching



for All Children
.

Portsmouth
, NH
: Hein
e
mann.


Analysis

“Mike is working with six first graders. All can read texts with natural language patterns
and two or three lines of print per p
age. Each child has a body of “known” words that
she recognizes quickly. The works each child knows are not identical, of course, but
their repertoires overlap. All six children can write their names and many other words;
they can hear sounds in words (
most of the beginning and ending consonants) and use
their letter
-
sound knowledge to construct words as they write their own messages.”


Design

Mike selects a text based on the needs of the students stated above. The text is easy for
the students to read
in order to prevent inaccuracies from becoming an obstacle. Mike
will focus on the problem
-
solving abilities and processing strategies of all six children.


Development

Given the individual reading level of the students, he selects a level C book from h
is level
collection of books at his academic level. Mike will introduce many titles at this level
over a period of time, until the strategies are secure and students are ready to move to the
next reading level. He obtains one copy for each student and one

for himself of
Spider
Spider

by Joy Cowley.


Implement
ation

Mike calls together the small group at the kidney shaped table in his classroom. He
briefly introduces the new title and takes a short picture walk through the book with the
students, briefly d
iscussing each picture along the way. He also uses a bit of the language
from the book in order to introduce the new type of language patterns and words that
might otherwise be difficult for readers new to this level of reading. He is sure to address
the
questions and observations from students as they arise. After the introduction, Mike
distributes a copy of the book to each student, and asks them to walk through the pictures
themselves; addressing more comments and questions.


He asks them to locate

the word “come” on several pages. Then the students are directed
to read the whole book silently while Mike observes. (It is an option for Mike to ask the
students to whisper read to themselves as he hones in on the reading of each and makes
observation
s, but he opts for silent reading this time.) Mike may interact briefly with
some of the students to encourage them to think about the story or to offer strategies to
solve difficult words and phrases, but he tries not to interrupt.


The word “not” prov
es to be a word that needs solving for several students, so Mike
addresses the issue. He waits until the end of the story and takes the students back to
page three to recognize the word “no.” He writes it on a white board and asks the
students to read th
e word. He then leads the students to connect the familiar “no” with
the new “not” and points out the end sound of the new word. Finally Mike asks the
group to read the whole sentence containing both words in unison with fluency and
phrasing.





Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


6

Evaluati
on

As reading levels increase and comfort at the current level increases, students will take
more responsibility for the first reading of a text. The main discussion of the lesson
should take place before or after the reading itself.


While Mike meets w
ith the next group of readers, he dismisses the current group to a
learning center structured around insects, including spiders, complete with activities for
the children to work through. Not all guided reading lessons need to be extended but
working with

the insect center would also extend and revisit a science lesson the day
before, so Mike worked it in for this group.


Mike also noted in his anecdotal records that Akira is due for an independent reading
assessment. It’s been three weeks since he’s se
en her; he tries to get in one or two
individual conferences per day. He plans a running record assessment for the following
day, and he’ll use a book she’s read only once before.


Mike reflects upon the lesson and decides to look for the word “not” in to
morrow’s level
C book to be included for review in the introduction of the text. Mike notices that
Raheed is not being challenged enough by the text and may be ready to read with another
group.















Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


7

W



Where are we
going?

What are we doing?

Why?


H




How do you hook
the students?


E




Exploration and
experience


R



Reflection, revision,
and refinement of
work


E




Evaluation of
student
understanding



Lesson Plan Template:
Guided Reading (GR)




Organization Page


Group name:


Date:



Student names: (GR
-
Step 1)





Level: (Circle)


`

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W




Sta
ndards:





Essential Question(s):







Objective(s):

After completing the lesson, students will know and/or be able to






Assessment:


At the end of the lesson, students will have demonstrated they’ve achieved the objectives by:








Materials: (GR
-

Step 2)


Do you need to borrow books from library?...bookroom?...another teacher?...another building?



















K
-
Gr. 1

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5


Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


8

W



Where are we
going?

What are

we doing?

Why?


H




How do you hook
the students?


E




Exploration and
experience


R



Reflection, revision,
and refinement of
work


E




Evaluation of
student
understanding

Lesson Plan Template:
Guided Reading (GR)


Procedures Page


Warm Up: (GR
-

Step 3)


How will you introduce the book? Goal: engage the stu
dents immediately at the start of lesson






Instructional Procedure: (GR
-

Step 4)









Closing Activity (GR
-

Step 5)


How will the learning be wrapped up and summarized?






What one or two points do you wish to present to the group following the r
eading?

1.


2.




Assignment: (GR
-
Step 6)


Extend the learning.






Teacher Reflection:


How did the lesson promote the achievement of the objective?


What evidence do you have for your conclusion?


How would you change/adjust this lesson for greater effective
ness?




Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


9

W



Where are we
going?

What are we doing?

Why?


H




How do you hook
the st
udents?


E




Exploration and
experience


R



Reflection, revision,
and refinement of
work


E




Evaluation of
student
understanding

Sample Lesson: Primary



Lesson Plan Template:
Guided Reading (GR)



Organization Page


Group name:
Blue Group


Date:
4/7



Student names: (GR
-
Step 1)





Level: (Circle)


`

A B
C

D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W




Standards:



Identify, explain, and evaluate ideas, themes, and experiences from texts
and performances



Identify the characters in a sto
ry and explain what each contributes to the
events of the story




Essential Question(s):


What are some words that use vowel
-
consonant
-
vowel pattern?


W
hich things do dogs like to do?


Why do words that look alike also sound alike?




Objective(s):

After

completing the lesson, students will know and/or be able to...



read
My Dog Willy
, from the Little Readers Series,



recognize the “i consonant e” pattern, and



construct sentences with words from the reading





Assessment:


At the end of the lesson, stude
nts will have demonstrated they’ve achieved the objectives by:



answering comprehensions questions with answers obtained from reading
the story silently to self



writing two sentences that demonstrate what they think “My dog” will like
using the sentence sta
rter from the story





Materials: (GR
-

Step 2)


Do you need to borrow books from library?...bookroom?...another teacher?...another building?


My Dog Willy
, 6 copies may be obtained from Genesee Bookroom with

permission from Bookroom Manager and Building
Principal



Sydney

Jack

Ashley

Danielle

Maddie


K
-
Gr. 1

Grade 1

Grade 2

G
rade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5


Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


10

W



Where are we
going?

What are we doing?

Why?


H




How do you hook
the students?


E




Exploration and
experience


R



Reflection, revision,
and refinement of
work


E




Evaluation of
student
understanding

Lesson Plan Template:
Guided Reading (GR)


Procedures Page


Warm Up: (GR
-

Step 3)


How will you introduce the book? Goal: engage the students immediately at the start of lesson


Using technology,
present PPT slides showing dogs doing what
they like to do.

Discuss with the group.



Instructional Procedure: (GR
-

Step 4)

1.

Go on a picture walk of the story. Discuss.

2.

Point out words dog and like on consecutive pages of the story.

3.

Discuss the word like and the “i consonant e” rule.

4.

Read story o
f
My Dog Willy

in a whisper read while teacher records
observations

5.

Discuss, “What kinds of things does Willy like?”



Closing Activity (GR
-

Step 5)


How will the learning be wrapped up and summarized?


Write two sentences independently describing what Wil
ly likes to do.




What one or two points do you wish to present to the group following the reading?

1.

“My dog Willy,” is a phrase that starts every sentence.

2.




Assignment: (GR
-
Step 6)


Extend the learning.



Work with sentence strips to match animals with t
hings they like to do.



Listen to taped version of the story and read along for fluency and
expression





Teacher Reflection:


How did the lesson promote the achievement of the objective?


What evidence do you have for your conclusion?


How would you chan
ge/adjust this lesson for greater effectiveness?



Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


11

W



Where are we
going?

What are we doing?

Why?


H




How do you hook
the students?


E




Exploration and
experience


R



Reflection, revision,
and refinement of
w
ork


E




Evaluation of
student
understanding

Sample Lesson: Intermediate



Lesson Plan Template:
Guided Reading (GR)



Organization Page


Group name:
Group III


Date:
2/4



Student names: (GR
-
Step 1)





Level: (Circle)


`

A B
C

D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V
W




Standards:



Recognize how new information is related to prior knowledge or
experience




Define characteristics of different genres




Essential Question(s):


Which base words can use a prefix and suffix to change the word?


How can a child be brave?


Why did people react in the ways that they did to Ruby changing schools?




Objective(s):

A
fter completing the lesson, students will know and/or be able to...



read
Through My Eyes
story of Ruby Bridges



recognize the prefixes and suffixes attached to base words



compare and contrast Ruby’s life with their own





Assessment:


At the end of the les
son, students will have demonstrated they’ve achieved the objectives by:



sharing flagged prefix and suffix words



completing the Venn diagram comparing life of self with Ruby’s




Materials: (GR
-

Step 2)


Do you need to borrow books from library?...bookroom
?...another teacher?...another building?


Through My Eyes
, 7 copies compiled from personal collection and home school

bookroom, Venn diagram


National Assessment of Educational Progress Fluency Scale (Appendix A)



Remi

Peter

Catherine

Dane

Joey

Karly

K
-
Gr. 1

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5


Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


12

W



Where are we
going?

What are we doing?

Why?


H




How do you hook
the students?


E




Exploration and
experience


R



Reflection, revision,
and refinement of
work


E




Evaluation of
student
understandin
g


Lesson Plan Template:
Guided Reading
(GR)


Procedures Page


Warm Up: (GR
-

Step 3)


How will you introduce the book? Goal: engage the students immediately at the start of lesson


Using technology, display a video clip of Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a

Dream” speech and discuss the
way in which the world looked, and what life was

like for African Americans at the time. Read a short background info piece on

Ruby Bridges to spark an interest in her unique story.



Instructional Procedure: (GR
-

Step 4)

1.

Review the

photographs in th
e book. Ask students to determine which
photos might be Ruby’s personal photos

2.

Explain base words are related in both spelling and meaning. Prefixes
and suffixes can be added to base words to form new words.

3.

Hi
ghlight info on page 59 that explains “amaz
ing things that began to
happen,” and being able to “contact Ruby through her publisher,” as a
result the publishing of the book in 1995.

discuss the relationship
between “published” and “publisher” Ask students to identify prefixes
that can be added to ma
ke variation of “published.” Repeat process
with the word “public.”

4.

Read story of Ruby Bridges aloud while teacher records observations
of reading fluency using the NAEP Fluency Scale

assign students the
task of highlighting or flagging words with prefixe
s or suffixes

5.

Discuss genre

autobiography



Closing Activity (GR
-

Step 5)


How will the learning be wrapped up and summarized?


Stu
dents complete a Venn diagram comparing their own childhood to Ruby’s.




What one or two points do you wish to present to th
e group following the reading?

1.

Ask students to describe Ruby’s feelings at various points in the story
and how the events of the 1960s influenced Ruby’s life.

2.

Ask students to point out prefix and suffix words they found in the
story



Assignment: (GR
-
Step

6)


Extend the learning.


Revisit the jump
-
rope rhyme from the story. Have students choose an event from

Ruby’s life and write a rhyme or poem about it.





Teacher Reflection:


How did the lesson promote the achievement of the objective?


What evidence

do you have for your conclusion?


How would you change/adjust this lesson for greater effectiveness?







Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


13


The Essential Elements of Guided Reading


Teacher Role

Student Role

Before the
Reading



Select texts that will provide
opportunities for students t
o expand
their processing strategies



Prepare an introduction to the text
that will help readers access and use
all sources of information in a fluent
processing system.



Introduce the whole text or unified
sections of the text, keeping in mind
the demands
of the text and the
knowledge, experience, and skills of
the readers



Leave some opportunities for
students to independently solve
problems while reading (moderate
amount of challenge).



Engage in a conversation about the
text.



Understand the purpose for rea
ding
the text.



Access background knowledge
(personal, literary, world) as they
prepare to read a new text.



Raise questions about the text.



Build expectation for the text.



Notice information in the text.



Make connections between the new
text and the others
they have read.

During the
Reading



May listen to individuals read a
segment orally



Interact with individuals to assist
with problem solving at difficulty.



Interact with individuals to reinforce
ongoing construction of meaning



Observe reading behaviors and

make
notes about the strategy use of
individual readers.




Read the whole text or a unified part
to themselves (silently).



Use background knowledge and
strategies effectively to construct
meaning



Think about what they understand
and questions that they hav
e about
the text.


After the
Reading



Talk about the text with the students
and encourage them to talk with/to
each other.



Invite personal response.



Return to the text for one or two
teaching opportunities such as
finding evidence or discussing
problem
-
sol
ving.



Assess students’ understanding of
what they read.



Invite students to ask questions to
expand their understanding.



Sometimes engage the students in
writing

personal responses,
comments, questions, or other forms
to extend understanding.



Talk with each

other and the teacher
about the text.



Think about what they understand
and questions the text raises.



Check predictions and react
personally to the text.



Raise questions or make comments
to clarify confusion and expand
understanding.



Express personal, tex
t
-
related, and
world
-
related connections.



Revisit the text at points of problem
solving as guided by the teacher.



Revisit the text to provide evidence
for thinking.



Sometimes engage in revisiting or
responding to the text through talk,
writing, or visual a
rts.



Sometimes engage in taking words
apart and discovering how words
work.


Figure 5
-
3

Sample
The Essential Elements of Guided Reading

Pinnell, G.S., Fountas, I. (1996).
G
uided Reading: G
ood First Teaching for All Children.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann


Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


14

Cla
ssroom Management

Primary

Day

Guided Reading
Group
s

Work Groups

Week One


Yellow

Blue

Green

Red

Monday

Jenny’s Group

Browsing Boxes

Browsing Boxes

Listening Center

ABC


Ben’s Group

Buddy Reading

ABC

Browsing Boxes

Listening Center



ABC

Listening Cente
r

Buddy Reading

Browsing Boxes







Tuesday

Alex’s Group

ABC

Browsing Boxes

Browsing Boxes

Listening Center


Lamar’s Group

Listening Center

Buddy Reading

Buddy Reading

Browsing Boxes



Browsing Boxes

ABC

ABC

Buddy Reading







Wednesday

Jenny’s Gro
up

Listening Center

ABC

ABC

Browsing Boxes


Ben’s Group

Browsing Boxes

Listening Center

Listening Center

Listening Center



Buddy Reading

Browsing Boxes

Browsing Boxes

Buddy Reading







Thursday

Alex’s Group

Browsing Boxes

Listening Center

ABC

Browsi
ng Boxes


Lamar’s Group

ABC

Browsing Boxes

Listening Center

Buddy Reading



Listening Center

Buddy Reading

Browsing Boxes

ABC







Friday

Jenny’s Group

Browsing Boxes

Browsing Boxes

Listening Center

ABC


Ben’s Group

Buddy Reading

ABC

Browsing Boxes

L
istening Center



ABC

Listening Center

Buddy Reading

Browsing Boxes







Week Two






Monday

Alex’s Group

ABC

Read Around
Room

Writing Center

Listening Center


Lamar’s Group

Listening Center

Writing Center

ABC

Read Around
Room



Read Around
Room

AB
C

Listening Center

Writing Center







Tuesday

Jenny’s Group

Listening Center

ABC

Writing Center

Listening Center


Ben’s Group

Read Around
Room

Listening Center

ABC

Read Around
Room



Writing Center

Writing Center

Listening Center

Writing Center







Wednesday

Alex’s Group

Read Around
Room

Listening Center

ABC

Read Around
Room


Lamar’s Group

ABC

Read Around
Room

Listening Center

Writing Center



Listening Center

Writing Center

Read Around
Room

ABC







Thursday

Jenny’s Group

Read Around
Room

Re
ad Around
Room

Listening Center

ABC


Ben’s Group

Writing Center

ABC

Read Around
Room

Listening Center



ABC

Listening Center

Writing Center

Read Around
Room







Friday

Alex’s Group

ABC

Read Around
Room

Read Around
Room

Listening Center


Lamar’s Gro
up

Listening Center

Read Around
Room

ABC

Read Around
Room



Read Around
Room

Writing Center

Listening Center

Writing Center

Figure 5
-
4 Sample Rotation
system for guided reading and work time

Pinnell, G.S., Fountas, I. (1996).
G
uided Reading: G
ood First T
eaching for All Children.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann


Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


15

Primary

Sample Management Plan 1 (150 minutes)


Children begin independent reading as they come in

open choice (10 min)


Opening routines: morning message, calendar (5 minutes)


Read aloud (5 minutes)


S
hared reading or interactive writing (15 minutes)


Guided Reading



Two
-
Three groups

per day,

alternating




Work Time (60 minutes)

Red Group


Blue Group


Green Group


Yellow Group

Browsing Box

Group Mtg.

Listening

ABC

ABC

Browsing Box

Group Mtg
.

Word Work

Reading Around
Room

ABC

Browsing Box

Group Mtg.

Group Mtg.

Listening

ABC

Browsing Box

Read Aloud (10 minutes)



Shared reading (5 minutes)


Writer’s Workshop (40 minutes)

Figure 5
-
5 Sample management plan 1


Sample Management Plan 2

(150 minutes)


Children begin independent reading as they come in

open choice (10 min)


Opening routines: song, calendar (5 minutes)


Writer’s Workshop (50 minutes)


Read aloud (10 minutes)


Interactive writing (10 minutes)


Guided Reading


Two
-
Three gro
ups

per day,

alternating




Work Time (60 minutes)

Red Group


Blue Group


Green Group


Yellow Group

Buddy Reading

Poem Box

Ind. Reading

Writing Center

Writing Center

Buddy Reading

Poem Box

Ind. Reading

Poem Box


Computer

Writing Center

Bu
ddy Reading

Ind. Reading

Writing Center

Buddy Reading

Computer

Read Aloud (10 minutes)


Figure 5
-
6 Sample management plan 2



Pinnell, G.S., Fountas, I. (1996).
G
uided Reading: G
ood First Teaching for All Children.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann








Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


16

Classroom Management

Intermediate


Day

Guided Reading
Group
s

Work Groups


Week One



Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Group 4

Monday

Noel’s

Group

(2)

Poetry

Word Work

Listening Center

Writer’s Wkshp


Mike
’s Group
(3)

Ind.

Reading

Writer’s Wkshp

Poetry

Word Work



Writer’s Wkshp

Listening Center

Buddy Reading

Poetry







Tuesday

Noel’s

Group
(2)

Poetry

Browsing Boxes

Browsing Boxes

Listening Center


Colin’s
Group
(4)

Listening Center

Buddy Reading

Buddy Reading

Reader’s Theater



Word Work

Word Work

Word Work

Ind. Reading







Wednesday

Allie
’s Group
(1)

Literature Circle

Ind. Reading

Word Work

Writer’s Wkshp


Mike
’s

Group
(3)

Current Events

Listening Center

Listening Center

Listening Center



Research Center

Browsing Boxes

Writer’s Wkshp

Word Work







T
hursday

Noel
’s Group
(2)

Writer’s Wkshp

Listening Center

Word Work

Poetry


Colin
’s Group
(4)

Current Events

Word Work

Listening Center

Ind. Reading



Listening Center

Buddy Reading

Writer’s Wkshp

Word Work







Friday

Allie
’s

Group
(1)

Literature Circle

Word Work

Reader’s Theater

Research Center


Mike’s

Group
(3)

Ind. Reading

Buddy Reading

Ind. Reading

Writer’s Wkshp



Reader’s Theater

Listening Center

Writer’s Wkshp

Ind. Reading


*Note

1 group meets 3x’s each week for extra support & 1 fluent group me
ets only 2x’s per week. Others rotate 2
-
3x’s per week.


Week Two







Monday

Noel’s Group(2)

Word Work

Current Events

Browsing Boxes

Writer’s Wkshp


Colin’s Group(4)

Poetry

Writer’s Wkshp

Buddy Reading

Word Work



Writer’s Wkshp

Word Work

Word Work

Poetry







Tuesday

Allie’s Group(1)

Literature Circle

Word Work

Word Work

Listening Center


Mike’s Group(3)

Current Event

Listening Center

Listening Center

Reader’s Theater



Ind.
Reading

Writer’s Wkshp

Browsing Boxes

Ind. Reading







Wednesday

Noel’s Group(2)

Word Work

Listening Center

Word Work

Writer’s Wkshp


Colin’s Group(4)

Writer’s Wkshp

Buddy Reading

Listening Center

Listening Center



Listening Center

Word Work

Writer’s Wkshp

Word Work







Thursday

Allie’s Group(1)

Literature Circle


Browsing Boxes

Reader’s Theater

Poetry


Mike’s Group(3)

Word Work

Word Work

Ind. Reading

Ind. Reading



Writer’s Wkshp

Listening Center

Writer’s Wkshp

Word Work







Friday


Noel’s Group(2)

Word Work

Read Around R

Listening Center

Research Center


Colin’s Group(4)

Reader’s Theater

Read Around R

Word Work

Writer’s Wkshp



Ind. Reading

Writing Center

Poetry

Ind. Reading



Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


17


Intermediate

Sample Management Plan 1 (150
-
160 minutes)


Children begin journal/independent writing as they come in (15 min)


O
pening routines: journal share, independent reading (5 minutes)


Word Study (25 minutes)


Reading Mini
-
Lesson (15 minutes)


Guided Reading


Two
-
Three groups

per day,

alternating





Work Time (50
-
60 minutes)

Red Group


Blue Group


Green Group


Yellow Gr
oup

Listening

Group Mtg.

Word Work

Ind. Reading

Ind. Reading

Listening

Group Mtg.

Word Work

Word Work

Ind. Reading

Listening

Group Mtg.

Group Mtg.

Word Work

Ind. Reading

Listening

Read Aloud (10 minutes)



Writer’s Workshop (30 minutes
)


Sample Management Plan 2 (150
-
160 minutes)


Children begin independent reading as they come in (15 min)


Opening routines: poetry share, independent writing (10 minutes)


Writer’s Workshop (30 minutes)


Word Study (20 minutes)


Reading Mini
-
Lesson (15
minutes)


Guided Reading


Two
-
Three groups

per day,

alternating


*Lit Study

for fluent readers


Work Time (50
-
60 minutes)

Red Group


Blue Group


Green Group


Yellow Group

Word Work

*Lit. Study

Ind. Reading

Ind. Reading

*Lit. Study

Technology

Wo
rd Work

Word Work

Read’s Theater


fndK o敡d楮g

䝲oup 䵴jK

Technology

Ind. Reading

Word Work

Read’s Theater


䝲oup 䵴jK

o敡d A汯ud ENM minu瑥猩


Independent Reading
-

selecting books and developing own interests, Fountas and Pinnell’s
Guided Re
aders and
Writers Grades

3
-
6
devote four chapters to independent reading, teacher takes anecdotal notes while listening,
response
journals

integral part of independent reading


Literature

Study
-

Fountas and Pinnell’s
Guided Readers and Writers Grades 3
-
6

u
ses literature to make reading as
rich as possible for fluent readers that are ready to dig deep for text meaning


Reader’s Theater
-
a way to present literature in a dramatic form, provides repeated reading practice and builds fluency
and confidence



Pinne
ll, G.S., Fountas, I. (1996).
G
uided Readers and Writers (Grades 3
-
6)
.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann





Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


18

Classroom Management

Work Group Ideas


Writing Center

Or
ganize writing materials

for accessibility. Include various types and
sizes of paper, correction fl
uid/tape, writing utensils of all kinds, staplers and stapler
removers, dictionaries and thesauruses, letter stamps, scissors, glue and glue sticks, tape,
and rulers. A publishing center may be nearby including technological and artistic
publishing tools.


Technology

Organize a technology center so that students may work independently or
in pairs. Determine ways of using technology as an instructional tool for extending
lessons in all content areas. Software programs with encyclopedia/reference informatio
n
as well as those for creating graphs and charts may be label clearly and organized
according to content area.


Social Studies Spot

Display maps, photographs, or charts of various types.
Collect
items relevant to current curriculum topic and include book
s related to the material.
Keep materials stored until need for use.


Math/Science Spot

Gather magnifying glasses, thermometers, microscopes, measuring
devices, and other equipment useful for performing science investigations. Include a
wide variety of

manipulatives like cubes, blocks, Cuisenaire rods, tangrams, graphic
drawing tools, straws, popsicle sticks, and other tools for building and drawing. Include
books and materials relevant to current area of study. BOCES materials may also be
displayed a
nd organized here when available.


Word Study Area

Word tiles, letter magnets, slates/chalk/whiteboards, sentence strips,
dictionaries, thesauruses spell checkers, and other word and letter tools may be housed
here. If possible the walls of this area may
be dedicated to word walls created and
managed by students under guidance of the teacher.


Poetry Corner

This should be a soft spot that holds poetry anthologies, listening tools,
published poetry books, and student work if desired. Poetry collections may

be b
orrowed
from public library and changed periodically offering new works, authors, and themes.


Word Work

Following a word study lesson, the teacher may have extended learning
activities for students to work on cooperatively or independently. These
ta
sks/assignments may be worked into the work group rotations and completed under
differentiated or similar
instructions.


Independent Reading

Students

read individually and silently, typically selecting their
own texts. Implementing independent reading at
the beginning of a school year may
require many mini
-
lessons on how to select books. While students read, a classroom or
AIS teacher may hold individual conferences to assess and make anecdotal observations.


Buddy Reading

Students work together to share r
eading aloud. Prompts to think
critically about the reading may be included to extend activity.




Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


19

Literature Study

S
mall heterogeneous groups of students with some similar interests
(authors, genres, specific books, etc.)
meet and study a given book. Lit
erature circles
may be used effectively with these fluent readers. Students may even take turns
facilitating the discussions.


Current Events

Students explore and discuss current events topics. Daily newspapers
and Time
for

Kids/Weekly Readers (or simila
r periodicals) may be the focus of a pre
-
set
task or problem for students to solve.


Handwriting Tasks

Pre
-
set mini
-
lessons in handwriting practice may be incorporated
into work group rotations.


Reader’s Theater

Students gather to create and perform a s
ection of current reading;
this may be used with reading material from literature and across all content areas.


Listening
Center

Students may be set up with listening technology of all sorts
(recorders, MP3s, headphones, CDs, tapes, microphones, etc) to l
isten to pre
-
recorded
stories. Have students record their own voices reading a given text and allow students to
listen to their own voice for fluency as they follow along with the text.


Browsing Boxes

Students select books for independent reading or for
reading
enjoyment. This should be a soft area and should be part of the classroom leveled book
collection.


Reading Around the Room

Scavenger hunt for words, objects, signs, messages, etc. that
exist or are strategically placed around the classroom or ev
en around the s
c
hool.


ABC

Another form of word work and word study. For primary students printing
practice, letter formation, and word creation may be the focus of this work task.




















Adapted from:

Pinnell, G
.S., Fountas, I. (1996).
G
uided

Readers and Writers (Grades 3
-
6).
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann


Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


20

Work Board/Pocket Chart



Reading Workshop Work Groups

Blue Group
-

Terry Katie

Jorge Bonnie

Michaila Marty



Yellow Group
-

John

Katie

Serena


Lei

Alanna Dillon



Red Group
-

Brandy Kelli

Vince Dan

Tatiana Mike



Green

Group
-

Nate Sara

Chris Ty

Jamal


Jenna




Browsing Boxes


Word Work


Choice


Writing Center


Word Work


Browsi
ng Boxes


Word Work


Ind. Reading


Choice


Ind. Reading


Browsing Boxes



Buddy Reading


Word Work


Writing Center




Buddy Reading


Browsing Boxes

Choices





Research

Listening Current Events







Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


21



Classroom Map

Guided Reading





Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


22

Guided Reading Levels


www.scholastic.com




Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


23

Development Reading Continuum





Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


24





Grade

Reading a
-
z

Fountas &
Pinnell

Reading
Recovery

DRA

K

aa

A

1

A
-

1

K

A

A

1

A
-

1

K

B

B

2

2

K

C

C

3
-

4

3

1

D

D

5
-

6

4

1

E

E

7
-

8

6
-
8

1

F

F

9
-

10

10

1

G

G

11
-

12

12

1

H

H

13
-

14

14

1

I

I

15

16

1

J

I

16

16

2

K

J

17

18

2

L

K

18

20

2

M

L

19

24

2

N

M

20

28

2

O

M

20

28

2

P

N

21

30

3

Q

N

21

30

3

R

O

22

34

3

S

O

22

34

3

T

P

23

38

4

U

Q

24

40

4

V

R

25

40

4

W

S

26

44

5

X

T

27

44

5

Y

U

28


5

Z

V

29






Reading A
-
Z.com



httpWLLwwwKreadinga
J
zKco洯guidedLcorrelationKht浬


Compiled by: TM Squires

2006

Reviewed by: Auburn Reading Teachers & Assistant Sup
erintendent for Instruction


25

Guided Reading Resource Links
:


Scholastic Guided Reading Program

inf
ormed by scientific research, covers phonemic
awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and more.
http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/guidedrea
ding/pdfs/GR_nclb_alignment.pdf




The Role of Technology in the Guided Reading Classroom
--
how to optimize time while
students are not in groups

http://teac
her.scholastic.com/products/guidedreading/pdfs/Tech_in_the_GR_class.pdf




Scholastic Leveled Books Labels

ready
-
made filled
-
in and ready for specific info

ht
tp://teacher.scholastic.com/products/leveledbookrooms/pdfs/Bookroom_Labels.pdf




Four Block Framework for Reading

Jeanette Mulholland, Reading Specialist for
Jefferson County Schools outlines an infrastructure for balancing literacy in the
classroom in t
he following two links:

Overview of Balanced Literacy


http://classroom.jc
-
schools.net/read/intro_files/frame.htm

Four
-
Block Framework


http://classroom.jc
-
schools.net/read/gr/index_files/frame.html




Reading A
-
Z Leveled Book List

levels fiction and non
-
fiction books from levels A
-
Z

http
://www.readinga
-
z.com/guided/leveled_list.html




Guided Reading

WikEd

suggestions for guided reading group mini
-
lessons and more

http://wik.ed.uiuc.edu/index.php/Guided_Reading




General G
uided Reading Links


http://www.powerbookusers.com/literacy/gr.htm