: More Than Words

photofitterInternet and Web Development

Dec 4, 2013 (4 years and 28 days ago)

104 views

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Google
: More Than Words

How can I use Google better?

References:


Patrick Crispen:
Google 101, Google 201

(web); 2003.


Tara Calishain, Rael Dornfest:
Google hacks

(O'Reilly);

2003.

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

The PageRank Algorithm














)
(
)
(
...
)
1
(
)
1
(
)
1
(
)
(
Tn
C
Tn
PR
T
C
T
PR
d
d
A
PR
Where


PR(A) is the PageRank of Page A


PR(T1) is the PageRank of page T1


C(T1) is the number of outgoing links from the page
T1


d is a damping factor in the range of 0 < d < 1,
usually set to 0.85

Source:
Google Hacks
, p. 295

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

The Biggest Mistake

Typing URLs in the wrong box

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Top 20 search terms

1.
britney spears

2.
victoria gotti

3.
kelly blue book

4.
doom 3

5.
howard stern

6.
dallas cowboys

7.
paris hilton

8.
ebay

9.
google

10.
yahoo

11.
anastasia myskina

12.
anime

13.
mapquest

14.
carmen electra

15.
yahoo.com

16.
ashlee simpson

17.
games

18.
lindsay lohan

19.
nudist+image

20.
jokes


--

Courtesy
WordTracker.com

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

What most people notice

1.
britney spears


2.
victoria gotti


3.
kelly blue book

4.
doom 3

5.
howard stern

6.
dallas cowboys

7.
paris hilton


8.
ebay

9.
google

10.
yahoo

11.
anastasia myskina


12.
anime

13.
mapquest

14.
carmen electra

15.
yahoo.com

16.
ashlee simpson

17.
games

18.
lindsay lohan

19.
nudist+image

20.
jokes


--

Courtesy WordTracker.com

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

What *I* notice

1.
britney spears

2.
victoria gotti

3.
kelly blue book

4.
doom 3

5.
howard stern

6.
dallas cowboys

7.
paris hilton

8.
ebay

9.
google


10.
yahoo


11.
anastasia myskina

12.
anime

13.
mapquest


14.
carmen electra

15.
yahoo.com


16.
ashlee simpson

17.
games

18.
lindsay lohan

19.
nudist+image

20.
jokes


--

Courtesy WordTracker.com

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

The Second Biggest Mistake

Using the wrong tool at the wrong
time

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Three questions



Where would you find the telephone number or
address of the
Bama Six

theatre?



Where you would find the definition of the word
“pestilence?”



Where would you find the name of the war that
the Treaty of Westphalia ended?

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

What would happen if you tried to
look up the definition of the word
“pestilence” in the telephone
book?

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

YAHOO ISN’T A
SEARCH ENGINE!

... it is a directory.

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Directories


Usually human
-
compiled guides to
the web, where sites
are organized by
category


Major directories:


MSN


Yahoo


Netscape ODP



Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

What directories are good for



“What is the Web page address for some
company, organization, or entity?” (or “who
makes product X?”)



“Where can I find a list of Web pages that focus
on a particular, ‘universal’ topic?”



In other words, directories are
GREAT

for
“telephone book” searches.

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

What directories AREN’T good for



Directories are
horrible

for “encyclopedia”
or “dictionary” searches.



The only exception is if the topic is so
universal that the directories have no
choice but to link to a page or two that
discuss that topic (and even then the
selection will be slim.)

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Directories v Search Engines



Directories are


human
-
compiled and


have a small number of pages in their databases
(usually in the low millions)



Search engines are


machine
-
compiled and


have a
HUGE

number of pages in their databases
(usually in the hundreds of millions or even the
billions)

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

The Third Biggest Mistake

Not knowing
how

to use
directories or search engines to
actually
FIND

stuff

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Search engine rule #1

Be specific ... because if
you aren’t specific, you’ll
end up with a bunch of
garbage!

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Search engine rule #2

Use quotes to search for
phrases.


“the tide is
rising”

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Search engine rule #3

Use the + sign to

require.


“the tide is rising” +book

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Search engine rule #4

Use the
-

sign to

exclude.


“the tide is rising” +book
-
drugs

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Search engine rule #5

Combine symbols as often as
possible

(see rule #1).


“the tide is rising” +book

drugs +climate

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

The five rules


1.
Be specific ... because if you aren’t
specific, you’ll end up with a bunch of
garbage!

2.
Use quotes to search for phrases.

3.
Use the + sign to require.

4.
Use the
-

sign to exclude.

5.
Combine symbols as often as possible

(see rule #1).

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Part Two:

More Stuff No One Tells You

Google’s shocking secrets
revealed!

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Part Two: Contents



Google’s Boolean default is AND.


Capitalization does not matter.


Google has a hard limit of 10 keywords.


Google ignores a BUNCH of common
words.


Google does support wildcard searches …
sort of.


The order of your keywords matters.


Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Google’s Boolean Default is AND

But there are ways to get around
that.

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Boolean Default is AND



If you search for more than one keyword at a
time, Google will automatically search for pages
that contain ALL of your keywords.


A search for
disney fantasyland pirates
is the same as searching for
disney AND
fantasyland AND pirates



But, if you try to use
AND

on your own, Google
yells at you
.

Source: http://www.google.com/help/basics.html

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Boolean OR



Sometimes the default
AND

gets in the way.
That’s where
OR

comes in.


The Boolean operator
OR

is
always

in all caps
and goes between keywords.



For example, an improvement over our earlier
search would be
disney fantasyland OR
“pirates of the caribbean”


This would show you all the pages in Google’s index
that contain the word
disney

AND the word
fantasyland

OR the phrase
pirates of the
caribbean

(without the quotes)



Source: http://www.google.com/help/refinesearch.html

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Capitalization Does NOT Matter

The old AltaVista trick of typing
your keywords in lower case is no
longer necessary.

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

How Insensitive!


Google is
not

case sensitive.


So, the following searches all yield exactly
the same results:

disney fantasyland pirates

Disney Fantasyland Pirates

DISNEY FANTASYLAND PIRATES

DiSnEy FaNtAsYlAnD pIrAtEs

Source: http://www.google.com/help/basics.html

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Google Has a Hard Limit of 10
Keywords

Bet you didn’t know THAT!

Source:
Google Hacks
, p. 19

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Google’s 10 Word Limit



Google won’t accept more than 10
keywords at a time.



Any keyword past 10 is simply ignored.



How can you get around this limit? Well,
first you need to remember that …

Source:
Google Hacks
, p. 19

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Google Ignores a BUNCH of
Common Words

Words to avoid

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Stop Words


To enhance the
speed and relevancy
of your Web search,
Google routinely and
automatically ignores
common words and
characters known as
“stop words.”


Source: http://www.google.com/press/guide/reviewguide_7.html

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Stop _ _ Name _ Love



This is certainly not a canonical list, but here are
28 stop words I know about.


a, about, an,
and
, are, as, at, be, by, from, how,
i, in, is, it, of, on,
or
, that, the, this, to, we, what,
when, where, which, with



You can force Google to search for a stop word
by putting a + in front of it (for example
pirates
+of +the caribbean
)

Source: 10/23/02 post by Bill Todd to news:google.public.support.general

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Dealing with the Word Limit


Omit the stop words
in your search terms
and you’ll probably
never run into the 10
word limit.


Another way around
the limit is to use
wildcards.

Image source: http://www.alloyd.com/

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Google DOES Support Wildcard
Searches … Sort Of.

When you wish upon a *.

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Wildcards



Wildcards are characters, usually asterisks (*),
that represent other characters.


Google offers full
-
word wildcards.



For example, if you search Google for
it’s +a
* world
, Google shows you all of the pages in
its database that contain the phrase “it’s a small
world” … and “it’s a nano world” … and “it’s a
Linux world” … and so on.

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

it’s +a * world


The + before
a

is
required because it is a
stop word and would
otherwise be ignored.


Most of the hits are
phrases because that’s
what Google looks for
first.


Oh, and I
defy

you to get
that song out of your
head!

Image source: http://themeparksource.com/

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Wildcards and the Word
Limit



Remember when I said that one way to get
around the 10 word limit was to use wildcards?



Google doesn’t count wildcards toward the limit.



For example, Google thinks that
though *
mountains divide * * oceans * wide
it's * small world after all

is exactly
10 words long.

Source:
Google Hacks
, p. 19

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

The
Order

of Your Keywords
Matters

A me life for pirate’s?

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

How Google Works


When you conduct a
search at Google, it
searches for


Phrases, then


Adjacency, then


Weights.


Because Google
searches for phrases
first, the order of your
keywords matters.


Image source: Google

Source:
Google Hacks
, p. 20
-
22

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

For Example


A search for
disney
fantasyland
pirates

yields the
same number of hits as
a search for
fantasyland
disney pirates
, but
the order of those hits


especially the first 10


is
noticeably

different.

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Part Two: In Summary


Google’s Boolean default is AND.


Capitalization does not matter.


Google has a hard limit of 10 keywords.


Google ignores a BUNCH of common
words.


Google does support wildcard searches …
sort of.


The order of your keywords matters.


Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Advanced Operators

Query modifiers


daterange:


filetype:


inanchor:


intext:


intitle:


inurl:


site:

Alternative query types


cache:


link:


related:


info:

Other information needs


phonebook:


stocks:


define:


Google Calculator

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Other Information Needs

Did you know that Google can look up phone
numbers, stock quotes, dictionary definitions,
and even the answer to math problems?

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

phonebook:


There are actually three
different Google
phonebook operators.


Using
phonebook:

searches the entire
Google phonebook.


Using
rphonebook:

searches residential
listings only.


Using
bphonebook:

searches business
listings only.


Source: http://www.google.com/help/operators.html

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

How to Use the
Phonebook


first name (or first initial), last name, city (state is
optional)


first name (or first initial), last name, state


first name (or first initial), last name, area code


first name (or first initial), last name, zip code


phone number, including area code


last name, city, state


last name, zip code


Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

phonebook:
Data


phonebook:disneyland ca

phonebook:(714) 956
-
6425


Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

stocks:


If you begin a query with
stocks:

Google will
treat the rest of the query
terms as stock ticker
symbols, and will link to a
Yahoo finance page
showing stock information
for those symbols.


Go crazy with the spaces


Google ignores them!

Source: http://www.google.com/help/operators.html

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

stocks:
Symbol1 Symbol2 …


stocks: msft

stocks: aapl intc msft macr

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

define:


If you begin a query with
define:

Google will
display definitions for the
word or phrase that
follows, if definitions are
available.


There can be no space
between
define:

and
the word or phrase you
wish to define.


You don’t need quotes
around your phrases.


Source: http://www.google.com/help/features.html#definitions

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

define:
term


define:pirate

define:barbary coast

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Google Calculator


Simply key in what you'd
like Google to compute
(like
2+2
) and then hit
enter.


Google’s Calculator can
solve math problems
involving basic arithmetic,
more complicated math,
units of measure and
conversions, and physical
constants.

Source: http://www.google.com/help/features.html#calculator

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

3+44

56*78

1.21 GW / 88 mph

100 miles in kilometers

sine(30 degrees)

G*(6e24 kg)/(4000 miles)^2

0x7d3 in roman numerals



For instructions on how to use the Google Calculator, see

http://www.google.com/help/calculator.html

Wed 18 Aug <Science Week>

S. Dekeyser

Advanced Operators

Query modifiers


daterange:


filetype:


inanchor:


intext:


intitle:


inurl:


site:

Alternative query types


cache:


link:


related:


info:

Other information needs


phonebook:


stocks:


define:


Google Calculator