Hazardous Materials - LSU Fire and Emergency Training Institute

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Hazardous Materials

Train the Trainer





























Awareness Lesson Plan


UNIT 1, PAGE
1

LESSON PLAN, PART II, TEACHING GUIDE

X3AZR3E771 018
-
II
-
1

GENERAL



ALP II
-
1





INTRODUCTION





Time: 5 min



ATTENTION:


As a First Responder at a hazardous

materials incident, awareness






of the basic fundamentals of hazardous materials could save your life






and those of others.


REVIEW:


N/A


OVERVIEW:


This is an introduction to the First Responder
-

Awareness Level.


MOTIVATION:

This course uses th
e building block principle. In order for you to






be able to understand and teach others you will need to retain the






knowledge presented in the up coming lessons.


TRANSITION:

Let’s begin.











BODY



Time: 20 min




PRESENTATION:


1.



General





a
.

Without reference determine general principles of the First Responder





Awareness Level with at least 80% accuracy.


LO
-
001

2
-
1.1





(
1
)

Introdu
ction







(a)

First responders at the awareness level shall be trained to







meet all competencies of NFPA 472 Chapter 2.







(b)

Shall receive additional training to meet applicable United







States Department of Transportation (DOT), Environmen
tal







Protection Agency (EPA), and Occupational Safety and







Health

Administration (OSHA) requirements.





UNIT 1, PAGE
2





















USE:

HO X3AZR3E771 018
-
01, Glossary of Terms

SW X3AZR3E771 018
-
II
-
01, Awareness Lesson Plan

Local Emergency Response Pla
n
























UNIT 1, PAGE
3

2
-
1.2


(
2
)

Definition
-

Persons who, in the normal course of their duties, could






be the first on scene of an emergency involving hazardous materials.






Expected to recognize the presence of hazardous
materials, protect






themselves, call for trained personnel, and secure the area.


2
-
1.3


(
3
)

Goal
-

The goal of the competencies at the awareness level shall






be to provide first responders with the knowledge and skill to






perform the following tasks safely.







(a)

Analyze the incident to determine both the hazardous materials







present and basic response information by completing the







following tasks:








1

Detect the presence of hazardous materials.








2

Survey a hazardous materials incident, from a safe








location, to identify the name, UN/NA identification








number, or type placard applied for any hazardous








materials involved.








3

Collect hazard information from the current edit
ion of








the North American Emergency Response Guidebook.







(b)

Implement actions consistent with the local emergency







response plan, the organization’s standard operating







procedures, and the current edition of the North American







Emergency Response Guidebook by

completing the following







tasks:








1

Initiate protective actions.








2

Initiate the notification process.


APPLICATION:

N/A


EVALUATION:

Intersperse oral questions throughout the lesson. Administer specific
written exam.









CONCLUSION




Time: 5 min



SUMMARY:


Reemphasize the importance of the role of the First Responder at






the awareness level and the definition and goals of this level.


REMOTIVATION:

Remember, what you have learned in this
section is the foundation






for what you will learn in future lessons.


ASSIGNMENT:

N/A


CLOSURE:


Let’s continue now with, “Analyzing and Implementing the Incident.”


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
1

LESSON PLAN, PART II, TEACHING GUIDE

X3AZR3E771 018
-
II
-
2/3/4

ANALYZING AND IMPLEMENTI
NG THE INCIDENT



ALP II
-
2/3/4 INTRODUCTION




Time: 5 min



ATTENTION:


Hazardous Materials are widely used throughout the Department of






Defense. Awareness level training is our first defense
for protection






against emergencies involving these materials.


REVIEW:

You have just learned the general principles of a First Responder at the
Awareness level.


OVERVIEW:


Throughout this lesson, you are going to learn the competencies of the






Awareness level responder.


MOTIVATION:

This course uses the building block principle. In order for you to be






able to

understand and teach others, you will need to retain the knowledge






presented in the up coming lessons.


TRANSITION:

Let’s begi
n.











BODY




Time: 12 hours 50 min



PRESENTATION:


2
.

C
ompetencies
-

Analyzing and Implementing the Incident



a
.

Given various facility and/or transportation situations or both, with and without




hazardous materials present, identify principles of analyzing and implementing a





hazardous materials response at the awareness level with at least 80% accuracy.


LO
-
002

2
-
2.1.1




(
1
)

Identify the definition of hazardous materials (Dangerous Goods in Canada).






(
a
)

As defined by the U
S DOT, a hazardous material is one that poses an






unreasonable risk to the health and safety of operating or emergency






personnel, the public, and/or the environment if it is not properly






controlled during handling, storage, manufacture, pro
cessing, packaging,






use, disposal, or transportation.


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
2

























USE:

HO X3AZR3E771 018
-
01, Glossary of Terms

SW X3AZR3E771 018
-
II
-
02, Awareness Lesson Plan

NFPA 471/472 Handbook

Labels and Placard Charts

North American Emergency Respon
se Guidebook

















UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
3





(
b
)

Hazardous Materials
-

Department of Transportation (DOT) term. It






covers all of the hazard classes/divisions.


(c)

Hazardous Substances
-

EPA term for chemicals that, if released into the

e
nvironment above a certain amount, must be reported, and, depending on

the threat to the environment, federal involvement in handling the incident

can be authorized.


(d)

Extremely Hazardous Substances
-

EPA term for chemicals that must be






reported to
the appropriate authorities if released above the threshold






reporting quantity.


(e)

Toxic Chemicals
-

EPA term for chemicals whose total emissions or






release must be reported annually by owners and operators of certain






facilities that manufa
cture, process, or otherwise use a listed toxic






chemical.


(f)

Hazardous Wastes
-

EPA term for chemicals that are regulated under the






Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act.


(g)

Hazardous Chemicals
-

OSHA term that denotes any chemical that would






be a risk to employees if exposed in the work place.


(h)

Dangerous Goods. In Canadian Transportation, hazardous materials are






called dangerous goods.


LO
-
003

2
-
2.1.2




(
2
)

Identify DOT Hazard classes and d
ivisions of hazardous materials and identify





common examples of materials in each hazard class or division.


2
-
2.1.3

(3)

Identify the primary hazards associated with each of the DOT hazard classes and
divisions of hazardous materials by hazard class or di
vision.


2
-
2.1.9

(4)

Identify U.S. and Canadian placards and labels that indicate hazardous materials.






(a)

The DOT has classified hazardous materials

according to their primary






danger and assigned standardized symbols to identify the classes.


(b)

Mate
rials are grouped by their major hazardous characteristic and many






materials will have other hazards as well. Example: A material may be






poisonous, corrosive, and flammable but will only be grouped with






whichever is considered the worst.



UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
4






1

Class 1 (Explosives)








a

Major Hazard: Explosion








b

Definition
-

Explosive means any substance or article,








including a device, that is designed to function by








explosion (i.e., an extremely rapid release of gas and heat)








or that, by chemical reaction within itself, is able to








function by explosion.









1

Division 1.1


Explosives that have a mass









explosion affects almost the entire load









instantaneously.




















Black powder, dy
namite, T
-
N
-
T,










blasting caps, nitroglycerin








2

Division 1.2 Explosives that have a projection








hazard but not

a mass

explosion hazard.












Aerial flares, detonation cord, and









power device cartridges








3

Division
1.3 Explosives that have a fire hazard and








either a minor blast hazard or a minor projection








hazard, or both, but not a mass explosion hazard.












Liquid
-
fueled rocket motors,









propellant explosives








4

Division 1.4 Explo
sive devices that present a minor








explosion hazard. No device in the division may








contain more than 25 grams (0.9 oz) of a detonating








material. The explosive effects are largely confined








to the package and no projection of fra
gments of








appreciable size or range are expected. An external








fire must not cause virtually instantaneous








explosion of almost the entire contents of the








package.












Practice ammunition, signal cartridges








5

Divis
ion 1.5

Very insensitive explosives









substances that have a mass explosion hazard








but are so insensitive that there is very little


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
5








probability of initiation or of transition from








burning to detonation under normal conditions of








transport.












Prilled ammonium nitrate fertilizer
-










fuel oil mixtures, (blasting agents)


6

Division 1.6 Extremely insensitive articles that do








not have a mass explosive hazard. This division is








comprised of articles
that contain only extremely








insensitive detonating substances and that








demonstrate a negligible probability of accidental








initiation or propagation.











Explosive squib devices








c

Placard
-

Orange, bursting ball with the wor
d(s),








“Explosives” or “Blasting Agents”
-

(1.5)







2

Class 2 (Compressed gas)








a

Major Hazards: BLEVE (Boiling Liquid Expanding








Vapor Explosion)








b

Sub
-
hazards: Flammable, oxidizer, poisonous,








and nonflammable
















1

Division 2.1 (Flammable gas) means any material









that is a gas at 20º C (68º F) or less and 101.3









kPa (14.7 psi)

of pressure, a material that has a









boiling point of 20º C (68º F) or less at 101.3 kPa









(14.7 psi)

and that:










a

Is ignitable at 101.3 kPa (14.7 psi) when in a










mixture of 13% or less by volume with air;





















or










b

Has a flammable range at 101.3 kPa










(14.7 psi) with air of at least 12%










regardless

of the lower limit













Inhibited butadienes, methyl











chloride, propane, methane and











hydrogen



UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
6








2

Division 2.2 (Nonflammable, Nonpoisonous









Compressed Gas, Including Compressed Gas,









Liquefied Gas, Pressur
ized Cryogenic Gas, and









Compressed Gas in solution) A nonflammable,









nonpoisonous

compressed gas means any









material (or mixture) that exerts in the packaging an









absolute pressure of 280 kPa (41 psia) at









20º C (68º

F). A cryogenic liquid means a









refrigerated, liquefied gas having a boiling









point colder than
-
90º C (
-
130º F) at 101.3 kPa









(14.7 psi) absolute.












Anhydrous ammonia, cryogenic










argon, carbon dioxide, compressed











nitrogen, neon, and helium.









3

Division 2.3 (Poisonous Gas, toxic by inhalation)









means gases that vaporize easily, that are very









dangerous to life, even in small amounts. A









material that is a gas at 20º C (68º
F) or less









and a pressure of 101.3 kPa (14.7 psi or 1 atm), a









material that has a boiling point of 20º C (68º F) or









less at 101.3 kPa (14.7 psi), and that:










a

Is known to be so toxic to humans as to pose










a hazar
d to health during transportation;












or










b

In the absence of adequate data on humans










toxicity, it is presumed to be toxic to










humans because, when tested on laboratory










animals, it has an LC 50 value of not more











than 5,000 ppm.













Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, arsine











chlorine, and methyl bromide







c

Hazard zones associated with Division 2.3







materials are the following:













Hazard Zone A
-

LC50 less











than or

equal to 200 ppm













Hazard Zone B
-

LC50 greater











than 200 ppm and less than or


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
7











equal to 1000 ppm













Hazard Zone C
-

LC50 greater











than 1000 ppm and less than or











equal to 3000 ppm













Hazard
Zone D
-

LC50 greater











than 3000 ppm and less than or











equal to 5000 ppm









4

Division 2.4


Corrosive gases (Canada)








c

Placards









1

Flammable = Red background, white flame









2

Non
-
Flammable = Green background, whi
te









cylinder









3

Oxidizer = Yellow background, flaming “O”









4

Poison Gas = White background, skull &









crossbones







3

Class 3 (Flammable and Combustible liquids)








a

Major Hazard: Burns readily








b

Definition
-

(fl
ammable liquid
) any liquid having a flash








point of not more

than 60.5°C (141° F).









1

Division 3.1
-

Flash point < 0°F









2

Division 3.2
-

Flash point 0°F to <73°F









3

Division 3.3
-

Flash point 73°F to <141°F













Acetone, a
myl acetate, gasoline,










methyl alcohol, and toluene.








c

Definition
-

(
combustible liquid
) any liquid that does not








meet the definition of any other hazard class and has a flash








point above 60° C (140° F) and below 93°C (200°F)
.











Mineral oil, peanut oil, No. 6 fuel


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
8









oil, pine oil, and plastic solvents.







d

Flammable liquids with a flash point above 38°C (100°F)







may be reclassified as a combustible liquid.







e

Placards


1

Flammable = Red background, wh
ite flame with








the word, “Flammable”








2

Combustible = Red background, white flame








with the word, “Combustible”






4

Class 4 (Flammable Solid)







a

Major Hazard: Rapid combustion with a liberation of mass







quantities of smo
ke (toxic)







b

Division 4.1
-

(Flammable Solid) means any of the







following three types of materials:








1

Wetted explosives
-

explosives wetted with








sufficient water, alcohol, or plasticizer to suppress








explosive properties.








2

Self
-
reactive materials


materials that are liable to








undergo, at normal or elevated temperatures, a








strongly exothermic decomposition caused by








excessively high transport temperatures or by








contamination.








3

Readily combustible solids
-

solids that may cause a








fire through friction and any metal powders that can








be ignited.











Magnesium (pellets, turnings, or ribbons),









nitrocellulose, safety matches, and sulfur.







c

Divisio
n 4.2 (Spontaneously Combustible Material) means







any of the following materials:








1

Pyrophoric material
-

a liquid or solid that, even in








small quantities and without an ignition source, can








ignite within 5 minutes after coming

in contact with








air.


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
9







2

Self
-
heating material
-

a material that, when in








contact with air and without an energy supply, is








liable to self
-
heat.











Aluminum alkyls, charcoal briquettes,









magnesium alkyls, and phos
phorus.







d

Division 4.3 (Dangerous When Wet Materials) means a







material that, by contact with water, is liable to become







spontaneously flammable or to give off flammable or toxic







gas at a rate greater than 1 L/kg of the material,
per hour.











Calcium carbide, magnesium powder,









potassium metal alloys, and sodium hydride.







e

Placards








1

Division 4.1 = Red and white vertical stripes,








black flame and the words, “Flammable Solid”


2

Division 4.2 = White t
op, red bottom, black








flame with the words, “Spontaneously








Combustible”


3

Division 4.3 = Blue background, white flame, with








the words, “Dangerous When Wet”






5

Class 5 (Oxidizers)







a

Major Hazards 5.1: Supports combustion, i
ntensifies fire







b

Major Hazards 5.2: Unstable/reactive explosives







c

Division 5.1 (Oxidizer) means a material that may,







generally by yielding oxygen, cause or enhance the







combustion of other materials.










Ammonium nitrate, br
omine trifluoride, calcium








hypochlorite, chlorate, and permanganate.







d

Division 5.2 (Organic Peroxide) means any organic







compound containing oxygen (O) in the bivalent [
-
O
-
O
-
]







structure that may be considered a derivative of hydr
ogen







peroxide, where one or more of the hydrogen atoms have







been replaced by organic radicals. Materials are assigned







to one of seven types.


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
10







1

Type A
-

can detonate or deflagrate rapidly as








packaged for transport. Transp
ortation of type A








organic peroxides is forbidden.








2

Type B
-

neither detonates nor deflagrates rapidly,








but that can undergo a thermal explosion.








3

Type C
-

neither detonates nor deflagrates rapidly








and cannot undergo
thermal explosion.








4

Type D
-

detonates only partially or deflagrates








slowly, with medium to no effect when heated








under confinement.








5

Type E
-

neither detonates nor deflagrates and








shows low, or no, effect when heate
d under








confinement.








6

Type F
-

will not detonate, does not deflagrate,








shows only a low, or no, effect if heated when








confined, and has low or no explosive power.








7

Type G
-

will not detonate, does not deflagrate,








shows no effect if heated when confined, and has no








explosive power, is thermally stable, and is








desensitized.












Dibenzoyl peroxide, methyl ethyl ketone










peroxide, and peroxyacetic acid.







e

Placards







1

5.1 =

Yellow background, black flaming “O”







with the word, “Oxidizer”







2

5.2 = Yellow background, black flaming “O”

with the words, “Organic Peroxide”






6

Class 6 (Poison)







a

Major Hazards: Toxicity, infectious









1

Division 6.1 (Poi
sonous Materials) means a








material, other than a gas, that is either known








to be so toxic to humans as to afford a hazard to


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
11








health during transport,
OR

in the absence of








adequate data on human toxicity, is presumed to








b
e toxic to humans, including irritating materials








that cause irritation.











Parathion, potassium arsenate, tear gas









candles, xylyl bromide, hydrocyanic acid.








2

Division 6.2 (Infectious Substance) means a viable








microorga
nism, or its toxin, that causes or may








cause disease in humans or animals. Infectious








substance and etiologic agent are synonymous











Anthrax, botulism, rabies, tetanus, and









polio virus.







b

Placard
-

White background, sku
ll & crossbones






7

Class 7 (Radioactive)







a

Major Hazard: Radioactive poisonous burns







b

Definition
-

Radioactive material having a specific activity







greater than 0.002 microcurie per gram (Ci/g)











Cobalt, uranium, plutonium







c

Placard
-

Yellow top, white bottom, black propeller






8

Class 8 (Corrosives)








a

Major Hazards: Burns/emulsification skin damage







b

Definition
-

a liquid or solid that causes visible







destruction or irreversible alterations in huma
n skin tissue







at the site of contact, or a liquid that has a severe corrosion







rate on steel or aluminum.











Nitric acid, phosphorus trichloride,









sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid, and









ammonium hydroxide.







c

Placard
-

White Top, black bottom, two test

tubes, hand,







and steel bar



UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
12





9

Class 9 (Miscellaneous Hazardous Material)







a

Definition
-

a material that presents a hazard during







transport, but that is not included in another hazard class.








1

Any material that has an anesthetic, noxious, or








other similar property that could cause extreme








annoyance or discomfort to a flight crew member so








as to prevent the correct performance of assigned








duties.








2

Any ma
terial that is not included in any other








hazard class, but is subject to the DOT requirements








(a hazardous substance or a hazardous waste).








3

Division 9.1
-

Miscellaneous dangerous goods








(Canada)








4

Division 9.2


Envir
onmentally hazardous








substances (Canada)








5

Division 9.3
-

Dangerous wastes (Canada)











Adipic acid, PCBs, molten sulfur, hazardous









waste







b

Placard
-

Black and white vertical stripes on

top, white







bottom






10

Other Regulated Material (ORM
-
D)







a

Definition
-

a material that presents a limited hazard during







transportation due to its form, quantity, and packaging.











Consumer commodities, small arms









ammunition, and furniture polish.







b

No placard (labels only)






11

Forbidden
-

means prohibited from being offered or accepted for






transportation. Does not apply if the materials are diluted,






stabilized, or incorporated in devices. There is no placard for






these, the
y aren’t transported.











5.2 Type A materials



UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
13





12

Marine Pollutant
-

is a material that has an adverse effect on






aquatic life.






13

Elevated Temperature Material
-

is a material that, when offered






for transportation in a bulk pac
kaging, meets one of the following






conditions:







a

Liquid at or above 100ºC (212ºF)







b

Liquid with a flash point at or above 37.8ºC (100ºF) that is







intentionally heated and is transported at or above its flash







point.







c

So
lid at a temperature at or above 240ºC (464ºF)


LO
-
004

2
-
2.1.4

(5)

Identify differences between hazardous materials incidents and other




emergencies.





(
a
)

Potential for doing great harm since effects are far reaching and severe.





(
b
)

Responders must be specifically trained and equipped to deal with them





properly.





(
c
)

Often have long term effects to the environment, people, and property.


LO
-
005

2
-
2.1.5



(6)

Identify typical occupancies and locations in the community where hazardous




materials are manufactured, transported, stored, used, or disposed of.





(
a
)

Warehouses




(
b
)

Tank Farms




(
c
)

Weapons Depots




(
d
)

Hospitals




(
e
)

Laboratories




(
f
)

Truck Terminals




(
g
)

Flight Line


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
14




(
h
)

Maintenance Facilities





1

Personnel developing the pre
-
incident plans should seek assistance






from the facility manager in identifying hazardous materials






locations and recording them on the plan in a way that will be






useful to the first
-
arriving companies.






2

Hazardous materials that are manufactured, stored, processed,






or used at a particular site are
NOT

subject to regulations






affecting
transported

materials.






3

Hazardous occupancies and probl
em locations should be






identified and evaluated during pre
-
incident planning.


LO
-
006

2
-
2.1.6



(7)

Identify typical container shapes that may indicate hazardous materials.





(a)

Radioactive






1

Protective overpacks







a

Cylindrical configurat
ion








b

Boxlike configuration






2

Casks







a

Rigid metal packaging up to 50 feet long







b

Reinforcing rings and cooling fins





(b)

Pressurized products






1

Cylinders







a

Rounded ends








1

Aerosol containers








2

Uninsulated

cylinders

















b

Cryogenic cylinders (insulated)






2

MC
-
331 pressure cargo tank trailer



UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
15






a

Rounded ends







b

Highway mode of transportation






3

Pressure tank car







a

Rounded ends







b

Heavy dome cover on top






4

Tube tr
ailers/tube modules/high pressure tube cars







a

Several individual cylinders







b

Cylinders plainly visible from side





(c)

Cryogenics






1

Tank
-
within
-
a
-
tank or “Thermos bottle” design






2

Absence of top fittings on most
containers






3

MC
-
338







a

Absence of top fittings







b

Visible compartment at back







c

Ends are dished and not rounded like cylinders






4

Cryogenic tank car







a

Long tank car with no top fittings







b

Fittings enclosed in cabinet on

side of car





(d)

Corrosives






1

Carboys
-

glass or plastic bottles that may be






encased by a protective box






2

MC
-
312







a

Long, thin tank with visible stiffener rings







b

Working platform on top


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
16







c

Ends are not as rounded as th
e pressure tanks





(e)

Flammable Liquids






1

Drums






2

Jerrycans






3

MC
-
306







a

Oval ends







b

Spill rail along top







c

Fittings visible at bottom of the tank when viewed from







side






4

Nonpressure tank car







a

Distinguis
hed by visible fittings







b

Dome on top smaller than dome on pressure car





(f)

Dry Bulk






1

Pneumatic hopper trailer







a

“V” shaped bottom structures







b

Rounded sides and sloping ends






2

Pneumatically unloaded hopper car







a

Flat

or rounded sides and flat

or angular ends







b

“V” shaped structures at bottom


LO
-
007

2
-
2.1.7


(8)

Identify facility and transportation markings and colors that indicate

hazardous materials.





(
a
)

Placards






1

United Nations class numbers (bottom of placard)


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
17






2

Four digit identification numbers on placard or orange panel






3

Symbols and colo
rs






4

Name of material






(
b
)

NFPA 704 markings





(
c
)

Military hazardous materials markings






1

Class 1, Division 1
-

Materials that present a mass detonation






hazard.






2

Class 1, Division 2
-

Materials that present an explosion with






fragmentation hazard.






3

Class 1, Division 3
-

M
aterials with a mass fire hazard






4

Class 1, Division 4
-

Materials that present a moderate fire hazard.






5

Special warnings:







a

Chemical Hazard








1

Highly Toxic








2

Harassing Agents








3

White Phosphorus Munitions







b

Apply No Water







c

Wear Protective Breathing Apparatus





(
d
)

Special hazard communication markings





(
e
)

Pipeline marker






1

Pipeline markers are usually metal signs p
laced adjacent to a






hazardous materials pipeline right of way. They contain






information about:







a

Product and signal word


“Warning”







b

Ownership of the line



UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
18







c

Emergency telephone

number





(
f
)

Container markings






1

Often, markings on a container will provide some indication as to






the type of product it holds. These markings include product






names, such as “Chlorine.”


LO
-
008

2
-
2.1.8

(9)

Given an
NFPA 704 marking, describe the significance of the colors, numbers,




and special symbols.


(a)

NFPA 704
-

Suggested method for the identification of hazardous





materials.






1

Scale of 0
-
4, 4 being the worst possible hazard






2

Used for facilities
only if mandated by local ordinances






3

Colors and their meanings







a

Health: (Blue)







b

Flammability: (Red)







c

Reactivity: (Yellow)







d

Special: (White)
-

Special Information








1

Oxidizer (oxidizing ability)








2

Radioactive








3

Avoid use of water


LO
-
009

2
-
2.1.10.1



(10)

Identify where to find Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS
).





(a)

Why they are necessary






1

Federal hazard communication laws






2

Right to know (Where employees can get to the information easily)


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
19





3

Mandatory local communication on hazards





(b)

OSHA has required all establishments to keep on file
an MSDS for each





chemical stored or used on site






1

Central location at facility






2

With facility manager/employer


LO
-
010

2
-
2.1.10



(11)

Identify basic information on material safety data sheets (MSDS) and shipping




papers that indicates
hazardous materials.






(a)

Basic information on MSDS






1

Manufacturer’s name and location






2

Name and Family of Chemical






3

Hazardous Ingredients






4

P
hysical Data






5

Fire and Explosion Data






6

Health Hazard Data






7

Spill or Leak Procedures






8

Special Protection Information






9

Special Precautions





(b)

Information on shipping papers






1

Shipper’s and receiver’s name and address






2

List of shipped materials


2
-
2.1.10.2



(12)

Identify entries on a material safety data sheet that indicate the presence

of




hazardous materials.






(a)

General Information
-

includes manufacturer’s name, address and





emergency phone number, chemical name and family, and all synonyms


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
20


(b)

Hazardous Ingredient Statement
-

breaks out the active ingredients

by percentage.

Trade secrets

restrictions may sometimes minimize




the amount of information available on an MSDS, although responders

should have access to this data during an emergency.





(c)

Physical Data
-

includes physical properties.





(d)

Fire and Explosi
on Data
-

includes control and extinguishment measures,





proper extinguishing agents, UEL/LEL, auto
-
ignition temperature, etc.





(e)

Spill and Leak Control Procedures


include procedures and precautions





for handling chemical releases as well as

waste disposal methods.





(f)

Special Protection Information
-

includes protective clothing and





respiratory protection requirements.





(g)

Other Special Precautions (as necessary).





(h)

Health and Reactivity Hazard Data (as necessary)
-

inclu
des toxicology





information, signs and symptoms of exposure, emergency care, chemical





incompatibilities, decomposition products, etc.


2
-
2.1.10.3



(13)

Identify entries on shipping papers that indicate the presence of hazardous




materials.





(a)

Proper shipping name





(b)

Hazard class or division





(c)

Product identification number





(d)

STCC number






1

7 digit number






2

Applies to rail only





(e)

CAS number (chemical’s social security number)


LO
-
011/012

2
-
2.1.10.4



(14)

Match the name of the shipping papers found in transportation (air, highway, rail,




and water) with the mode of transportation.



UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
21

2
-
2.1.10.5



(15)

Identify the person responsible for having the shipping papers in each mode of




transp
ortation.


2
-
2.1.10.6



(16)

Identify where the shipping papers are found in each mode of transportation.


2
-
2.1.10.7



(17)

Identify where the papers can be found in an emergency in each mode of




transportation.





(a)

Normal location






1

Highway







a

Called “Bill of Lading”, or “Freight Bill”







b

Person responsible
-

driver







c

Located in cab






2

Rail







a

Called “Waybill” and “Consist”







b

Person responsible
-

conductor or engineer







c

Located in with member of train crew






3

Water







a

Called “Dangerous Cargo Manifest”







b

Person responsible
-

captain or Master







c

Located in the wheelhouse or in a tube
-
like container on a







barge






4

Air







a

Called the “Air Bill”







b

Person responsible
-

pilot







c

Located in the cockpit/flight deck or attached to a package.



UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
22




(b)

Emergencies
-

can be obtained from the shipper/manufacturer or through






CHEMTREC


LO
-
013

2
-
2.1.11



(18)

Identify examples of clues (other than occupancy/location, container shape,




markings/colors, placards/labels, MSDS, and shipping papers) that use the senses




of sight, sound, and odor to ind
icate hazardous materials.





(a)

Sight






1

Visible corrosive actions






2

Chemical reactions






3

Pooling liquids






4

Condensation lines on pressure tanks






5

Injured victims or casualties






6

Fire or vapor cloud





(b)

Sound
-

hissing of pressure releases





(c)

Odor






1

Gas leaks






2

Fire or vapor cloud


LO
-
014

2
-
2.1.12



(19)

Describe limitations of using the senses in determining the presence or absence of




hazardous materials.





(
a)

Close enough to smell
-

risk of injury





(b)

Close enough to see
-

risk of injury


(c)

Touching may cause injury


(d)

Taste
-

not recommended





UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
23

LO
-
015

2
-
2.1.13



(20)

Identify types of locations that could become targets for criminal or terrorist




activit
y using hazardous materials.





(a)

Places of public assembly





(b)

Public buildings





(c)

Mass transit systems





(d)

Places with high economic impact





(e)

Telecommunications activities





(f)

Places with historical or symbolic significance


LO
-
016

2
-
2.1.14



(21)

Identify at least 4 indicators of possible criminal or terrorist activity involving




hazardous materials.





(a)

Hazardous materials or lab equipment that is not relevant to a location






(b)

Intentional releases of hazardous mate
rials





(c)

Unexplained sudden onset illness or death





(d)

Unusual odors or tastes





(e)

Unexplained irritations





(f)

Unusual security measures





(g)

Unexplained vapor clouds





(h)

Unusual signs and symptoms of exposure of hazardous materials


LO
-
017

2
-
2.2.1



(22)

Identify difficulties encountered in determining the specific names of hazardous




materials in both facilities and transportation.





(a)

Facilities






1

Placards or labels missing


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
24






2

Label or placard may show hazard class or division, and no






product identifier







3

Mixed loads of may have only one placard or label






4

Error in placarding or labeling






5

Shipping papers ar
e not accessible





(b)

Transportation






1

Placards or labels missing






2

Placards and labels do not usually list specific product names






3

Mixed loads are not

placarded for all items in the shipment






4

Shipping papers may not be available


LO
-
018

2
-
2.2.2



(23)

Identify sources for obtaining the names of, UN
\
NA identification numbers for, or




types of placard associated with hazardous materials in transportation





(
a
)

North American Emergency Response Guidebook





(
b
)

Shipping papers


LO
-
019

2
-
2.2.3



(24)

Identify sour
ces for obtaining names of hazardous materials in a facility.





(
a
)

Material Safety Data Sheets





(
b
)

Markings on storage containers






(
c
)

Emergency planning documents


LO
-
020

2
-
4.1.3



(25)

Identify the basic precautions to be taken to protect themselves and others in a




hazardous materials incident.





(a)

IAW the Emergency Response Plan (ERP) or SOPs



UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
25




(b)

Take protective action to isolate the
hazard area






1

Evacuate those in danger from the immediate area.






2

Deny entry to unauthorized personnel





(c)

If evacuation is not possible






1

Responders a
re to provide in
-
place protection






2

Keep victims away from doors and windows due to blast hazard


LO
-
021

2
-
4.1.3.1



(26)

Identify the precautions necessary when providing emergency medical

care to




victims of hazardous material incidents.





(
a
)

The victim may be contaminated, therefore, decontamination measures





must be considered.





(
b
)

Awareness level responders may not be we
aring respiratory protection or





any other personal protective clothing.





(
c
)

Understanding your limitations will prevent you from becoming a victim.


LO
-
022

2
-
4.1.3.2



(27)

Identify the typical ignitio
n sources found at the scenes of hazardous materials




incidents.





(a)

Open flames




(b)

Smoking material’s heat




(c)

Cutting and welding operations




(d)

Heated surfaces




(e)

Frictional heat




(f)

Radiant heat




(g)

Static electricity




(h)

Electrical and mechanical sparks


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
26




(i)

Chemical reactions




(j)

Lightning

LO
-
023

2
-
4.1.3.3



(28)

Identify ways hazardous materials are harmful to people, the environment, and

property at hazardous materials incidents.





(
a
)

Thermal




(
b
)

Mechanical




(
c
)

Poisonous




(
d
)

Corrosive




(
e
)

Asphyxiation




(
f
)

Radiation




(
g
)

Etiologic




(
h
)

Psychological

LO
-
024

2
-
4.1.3.4



(29)

Identify general routes of entry for human exposure to hazardous materials.





(
a
)

Contact
-

skin surfa
ce hazard/damage (burns)





(
b
)

Absorption
-

includes entry through the eyes, skin and through





punctures.





(
c
)

Inhalation
-

respiratory function





(
d
)

Ingestion
-

mout
h


INTERIM SUMMARY

*STRESS SAFETY*


b.

Given the name, UN/NA identification number or type placard, a current copy of the



North American Emergency Response guidebook
a local emergency response plan and



standard operating procedures, and a facility or tr
ansportation scenario including



hazardous materials, collect hazard information, initiate protective actions, and initiate



the notification process within 60 minutes IAW AFM 32
-
2003.


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
27


LO
-
025

2
-
2.3.1



(1)

Identify the methods for
determining the appropriate guide page for a specific




hazardous material.





(
a
)

Four
-
digit ID number (yellow
-
bordered pages)






1

A placard






2

An orange panel






3

Shipping papers






4

Packaging





(
b
)

Name of the material (blue
-
bordered pages)






1

Shipping papers






2

Packaging






3

Placard





(
c
)

Placards (Table of Placards)





(
d
)

Dealing with an unknown






1

Guide 111






2

Dangerous placa
rd


LO
-
026

2
-
2.3.2




(2)

Identify the two general types of hazards found on each guide page.





(
a
)

Fire and Explosion Hazard





(
b
)

Health Hazard





(c)


P
” pr
esents a polymerization hazard


LO
-
027

2
-
4.1.4



(3)

Given the identity of various hazardous materials (name, UN/NA identification




number, or type placard), identify the following response information:


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
28





(a)

Emergency actions from

numbered guides in the ERG






1

Fire






2

Spill or leak






3

First aid





(b)

Protective Clothing





(c)

Initial isolation & protective action distances


LO
-
028

2
-
4.1.4.1



(4)

Given the name of a hazardous material, identify t
he recommended personal




protective clothing from the following list:





(a)

Street clothing and work uniforms





(b)

Structural fire fighter’s protective clothing





(c)

Positive pressure SCBA





(d)

Chemical
-
protective clothing and equipment.


LO
-
029

2
-
4.1.4.2



(5)

Identify the definitions for each of the following protective actions:





(a)

Isolate hazard area and deny entry






1

Everybody not directly involved in the emergency response






operations should be kept away
from the affected area.






2

Unprotected emergency responders should not be allowed entry.





(b)

Evacuate






1

The movement of everyone from the threatened area to a safer






place.






2

To perform an evacuation, there must b
e enough time to warn the






people, to get them ready to go, and leave the area.






(c)

Sheltering in
-
place protection


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
29






1

Used when an evacuation cannot be performed






2

When evacuating the public would put them at greate
r risk than






directing them to stay in place.


LO
-
030

2
-
4.1.4.3



(6)

Identify the shapes of recommended initial isolation and protective action zones.





(a)

Initial isolation zone is circular.





(b)

The pro
tective action zone is a square shape.


LO
-
031

2
-
4.1.4.4



(7)

Describe the difference between small and large spills as found in the table of




Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances.





(a)

Small spill






1

Leak or spi
ll from a single small package






2

Small leak in a large package, includes up to a 55 gallon drums or






smaller






3

Small cylinders






4

Small leak from large package






(b)

Large spill






1

Leak or spill from a large p
ackage






2

Spill from many small packages






3

A large spill would be a
-

ton cylinder, a tank truck, or a rail car


LO
-
032

2
-
4.1.4.5



(8)

Identify the circumstances under which the following distances are use
d at a




hazardous materials incident:


(a)

Table of initial isolation and protective action distances



UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
30







Used when entries in yellow or blue bordered pages are






highlighted.


(b)

Isolation distance in the numbered guides







Used when the correct gui
de is found in the blue or yellow

bordered pages and the entry is NOT highlighted the material

presents a hazard of explosion.


LO
-
033

2
-
4.1.4.6



(9)

Describe the difference between the isolation distances in the orange
-
bordered




guide pages and the pr
otective action distances in the green
-
boarded pages




in the document.





(a)

Green
-
bordered or protective action distances are used for materials that





present a toxic by inhalation hazard.





(b)

Orange
-
bordered or numbered guides used to protect

from immediate





hazards.


LO
-
034

2
-
4.1.1



(10)

Location of both the local emergency response plan and the organization’s




standard operating procedures.





(a)

Applicable to each jurisdiction





(b)

Commonly kept with responsible agencies


LO
-
035

2
-
4.1.2



(11)

Role of the first responder at the awareness level during a hazardous materials




incident.





(
a
)

The guidelines for this are found in the:






1

Local Emergency Response Plan






2

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)






3

North American Emergency Response Guidebook


LO
-
036

2
-
4.1.5



(12)

Ide
ntify the techniques used to isolate the hazard area and deny entry to


UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
31




unauthorized persons at hazardous materials incidents.





(a)

Use a vehicle to block a road





(b)

Divert traffic





(c)

Erect barricades





(d)

Close doors and gates





(e)

Pu
blic Address System


LO
-
037

2
-
4.1.6



(13)

Identify the specific actions necessary when an incident is suspected to involve




criminal or terrorist activity.





(a)

Communicate the suspicion during notification of the incident





(b
)

Isolate potentially exposed people





(c)

Document the initial observation


LO
-
038

2
-
4.2




(14)

Given either a facility or transportation scenario involving hazardous materials,






regardless of the presence of criminal or terrorist activities, the f
irst responder at





the awareness level shall identify the appropriate initial notifications to be made





and how to make them, consistent with the local emergency response plan or the





organization's standard operating procedures.


(a)

Must be famil
iar with the notification process


(b)

Must rapidly set the proper notification process in motion



APPLICATION:

Students will practice recognizing placards, labels, and use of the North






American Emergency Response Guidebook.


EVALUATION:

Intersperse oral

questions throughout the lesson. Administer specific






written exam and skills test.











CONCLUSION Time: 5 min





UNIT 2/3/4, PAGE
32


SUMMARY:


Performing these tasks is one of the most important tasks of the first






responder awareness level as it all starts with the first on
-
scene.


REMOTIVATION:

Before actions are implemented, information must be gathered. This






information must be accurate to be useful to the hazardous materials






responder. This lesson i
s the foundation of all training that follows.


ASSIGNMENT:

N/A


CLOSURE:


Let’s take the Awareness CerTest and move on to Operations.