Transition to Kindergarten

peletonwhoopUrban and Civil

Nov 26, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

319 views



0

Transition to
Kindergarten




A Handbook for Parents


Miami
-
Dade County Public Schools

Office of Early Childhood Programs









1

Miami
-
Dade County Public Schools


The School Board of Miami
-
Dade County, Florida



Dr. Solomon
C. Stinson, Chair


Dr. Martha Pérez, Vice Chair


Mr. Agustin J. Barrera


Dr. Lawrence S. Feldman


Ms. Perla Tabares Hantman


Dr. Wilbert “Tee” Holloway


Dr. Martin Karp


Mr. Renier Diaz de la Portilla


Ms. Ana Rivas Logan


Ms. Eboni Finley

Student Advis
or



Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho

Superintendent of Schools


Ms. Milagros Fornell

Associate Superintendent

Curriculum and Instruction


Dr. Magaly C. Abrahante

Assistant Superintendent


Title I Administration, Early Childhood Programs and Summer Services


Dr.
Marisel Elías
-
Miranda

Administrative Director

Office

of Early Childhood Programs






2

Table of Contents



Welcome to Kindergarten

................................
................................
................................
..............

4


A Mes
sage to Kindergarten Parents

................................
................................
...............................

5


Kindergarten Entrance Age

................................
................................
................................
............

6


Registration Requirements

................................
................................
................................
.............

6


Insurance

................................
................................
................................
................................
........

8


What Does “Ready” Mean?

................................
................................
................................
...........

9


Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screener (FLKRS)

................................
................................
....

10


Developmental Characteristics of the Five
-
Year
-
Old

................................
................................
..

11


How Do Young Children Learn?

................................
................................
................................
.

12


What Will My Child Learn in Kindergarten?

................................
................................
..............

13


Kindergarten Grade Level Expectat
ions/Sunshine State Standards

................................
............

15


How Should the Kindergarten Classroom Look?

................................
................................
........

38


Kindergarten Student Report Card Code of Development

................................
..........................

39


Attendance Policy

................................
................................
................................
.........................

40


The Attendance Review Committee

................................
................................
............................

40


Excused School and Class Absences and Tardies

................................
................................
.......

41


Unexcused School Absences

................................
................................
................................
.......

41


Conduct

................................
................................
................................
................................
........

41


Interim Progress Report

................................
................................
................................
...............

42


Homework/Makeup Assignments

................................
................................
................................

42


Out of Area Student Transfer

................................
................................
................................
.......

42


Field Trips and Special Activities

................................
................................
................................

43


Parties in School

................................
................................
................................
..........................

43


Confidential Information

................................
................................
................................
.............

43


Emergency
Contact Information

................................
................................
................................
....
43


Food and Nutrition

................................
................................
................................
.......................

44



3

How Does the Kindergarten Program Help Children with Special Needs?

................................

45


Special Education
................................
................................
................................
.........................

45


Parent Portal

................................
................................
................................
................................
.

47


Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Student Association (PTA/PTSA)

.........................

48


The Parent
Academy

................................
................................
................................
....................

48


School Volunteer Program

................................
................................
................................
...........

49


Title I Administration Parental Program
................................
................................
......................

49


Parents as First Teachers

................................
................................
................................
..............

50


Parents as Teachers Before School Entrance

................................
................................
...............

51


Parents as Helpers at School

................................
................................
................................
........

52


Parents as Helpers at Home

................................
................................
................................
.........

52


After School/When Your Child Arrives Home

................................
................................
...........

54


Before and After
-
School Care Programs at Elementary Schools

................................
................

54


Questions for the Teacher

................................
................................
................................
............

55


Transportation Eligibility

................................
................................
................................
.............

56


Safety and Security

................................
................................
................................
......................

56


Procedures for Addressing Concerns

................................
................................
...........................

57


Citizen In
formation Center

................................
................................
................................
..........

58


Parent
-
Child Summertime, Fun
-
Time Transitional Activities
................................
.....................

58


Read at Home

................................
................................
................................
...............................

60


Books for Prekindergarten to Kindergarten Age Children

................................
..........................

60


Websites for Parents

................................
................................
................................
....................

61


Appendices

................................
................................
................................
................................
....

63



A: Home Language Survey Card

................................
................................
........................

64



B: Student Data Card

................................
................................
................................
..........

65



C: Kindergarten Report Card Sample

................................
................................
.................

66



D: Miami
-
Dade County Public Schools 2010
-
2011 School Calendar
................................
.
67



E: Getting to Know My Child Form

................................
................................
...................

68



4

Welcome to Kindergarten


Entering kindergarten
is an exciting time for children and their parents. Moving from the home
or from a childcare center to the school environment can be an uncomfortab
le experience.
Parents,
teachers

and school administrators

want this transition to be as smooth and pleasant as
possible.


The teachers will welcome the children into their classrooms and gently introduce them to the
kindergarten environment. Parent orientation will make the adults feel more at ease. Children
w
ill be given time to become familiar with the new materials, the new activities and to make
friends. Gradually, the children will gain a sense of comfort and belonging because they know
the routines, the school layout and the people they meet each day.


Th
ere are many new adult faces in kindergarten. Children will meet and talk with the principal,
custodians, secretaries, the media specialist, teacher assistants, cafeteria personnel, teachers at
other grade levels, community volunteers and the children’s pa
rents. This interaction with adults
and children in the school promotes social development.


In all of our schools, the safety of every child is a top priority. Because kindergarten children are
often new to the school environment, special care is taken to

ensure their safety. Each school site
principal informs parents about arrival and departure procedures. Parents should inform the
school if special circumstances arise that might endanger a child’s well being such as illness,
handicaps, or family problems
.


Research tells us that successful transitions
from home to school or

from

a childcare center

to
kindergarten can contribute to long
-
term school success. A successful adjustment to
kindergarten will often influence the child’s perceptions, attitudes, an
d performance in
subsequent school years. Children who enjoy their first school experiences are more likely to
participate in classroom activities, to comply with school rules, and to accept school
responsibilities and behaviors that contribute to achieve
ment in later grades. Since children’s
feelings about school


whether they like school or not


are often developed early in their
school experience and appear relatively stable over time, it is important that the transition to
kindergarten is successful
for children and for their parents.


Early childhood is a significant period in human development. It is a time when children begin
to develop initiative, independence, decision
-
making ability, creativity, early literacy,
numeration skills, the desire to
learn, the ability to relate to others, verbal communication skills,
and feelings of self
-
worth. What young children learn in their fifth year will have a major impact
on successful learning experiences in school, on their personal development, and on fut
ure
success and participation in life and society.





5

A Message to Kindergarten Parents


K


Kindle excitement about kindergarten. Visit your school and meet your child’s teacher.

I


Invite new school friends home to play and help your child build strong
friendships.

N


Never forget safety. Teach your child safety rules.

D


Discuss what your child will be learning in school.

E


Explore your neighborhood together. Talk about the world you live in.

R


Review the good behavior expected of your child,
such as following rules and taking turns.

G


Get involved at your child’s school. Join the Parent Teacher Student Association (PTSA).

Become a volunteer.

A


Answer your child’s questions about school. Reassure your child that school is fun!

R


Read
to your child daily. Visit the library together.

T


Turn every day into a learning experience. Let your child help with everyday chores.

E


Encourage your child to eat well, get enough sleep, bathe daily, and brush his/her teeth
twice a day.


N


Notic
e new things your child is learning to do. Reinforce your child’s progress with praise.








6

Kindergarten Entrance Age


Children who will attain the age of five years on or before September 1 of the current school year
are eligible for admission to
public kindergarten during that school year. In Miami
-
Dade County,
all students attending a public school setting must complete kindergarten prior to entrance into
first grade.


The completion of kindergarten is defined as satisfactory completion in a publ
ic school, non
-
public school, or home education program from which Miami
-
Dade County Public Schools
accepts transfer of credit. A report card, transcript, or other written record from the non
-
public or
home education program indicating that the student has

been promoted to grade 1 or has
satisfactorily completed kindergarten, must be submitted at the time of registration.


Registration Requirements


Before a child can be admitted to kindergarten, parents/guardians must provide or complete the
following
items. Miami
-
Dade County Public Schools is committed to the education of all
children. Your child’s enrollment in school is very important. If you cannot produce any of these
documents, please ask to speak to an administrator.


A.

Age and Legal Name Verificat
ion


Parents must provide
one
of the following:


1.

Duly attested original birth certificate or birth card
-
Must be original; hospital
certificate not acceptable.

2.

Duly attested
Certificate of Baptism with a parent affidavit.

3.

Insurance policy on the child’s life in force for two years.

4.

Bona fide bible record with parent affidavit.

5.

Passport or Certificate of Arrival in the United States showing age of child.

6.

Transcript of school re
cords of at least four years prior, stating date of birth.

7.

Affidavit of age signed by parent and Certificate of Age signed by public health
officer.


B.

Proof of Address


Students in the K
-
12 program are assigned to attend school on the basis of the actual

residence of the parent/guardian and in the attendance area of the school as approved by
the School Board of Miami
-
Dade County, Florida. Verification of residence should be
presented by the parent/guardian at the time of registration.










7

Parents must provide
two

of the following:


1.

Broker’s or Attorney’s statement of parents’ purchase of residence or properly
executed lease agreement.

2.

Current Homestead E
xemption Card

3.

Electric deposit receipt or electric bill, showing name and service address


C.

Health and Immunization Requirements


In accordance with the Florida Plan for School Health Services, all pre
-
kindergarten
through 12
th

grade students must submit documentation verifying that a student’s health
examination was performed within the 12 month period preceding initial entry into a
Florida school.



Parents must provide
both

forms:


1.

Student Health Examination
-
DH 3040 (yellow form) health examination performed
within one year prior to enrollment.


2.

Florida Certificate of Immunization
-
DH 680 (blue card) from a private doctor or l
ocal
health provider. Part A, B, or C or a religious exemption form DH681.



Parents are encouraged to contact their health care provider to schedule an appointment for
children affected by the school immunization requirements. Required immunizations are c
overed
under most health insurance policies.


Miami
-
Dade County Health Department offers “The Special Immunization Program” (SIP) that
provides pediatric immunization services and education/information geared towards the
elimination of the spread of vaccin
e preventable diseases. The following listed are clinics with
pediatric services:




Jefferson Reaves




1009 NW 5
th

Avenue, Miami, FL 33136




Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 8:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.




Wed. 10:00 a.m.


5:00 p.m.




Little Haiti Health Cent
er




300 NE 80
th

Terrace, Miami, FL 33138




Mon., Wed., & Fri. 8:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.




West Perrine Center




18255 Homestead Avenue, Miami, FL 33157




Mon.


Fri. 8:00 a.m.


3:30 p.m.





8

1.

Children whose parents cannot afford to pay for vaccines may
receive
immunizations free of charge at all county health department centers.

2.

To make an appointment or for more information, contact the Special
Immunization Program (SIP) Office of the Department of Health at 786 845
-
0550.

3.

No student will be admitted to
school without presenting tangible documentation
that immunization and health requirements have been met.


D.

Home Language Survey (See Appendix A)


At the time of initial registration parents are asked to complete a Home Language Survey.
Each student is asse
ssed if there is a “Yes” response to any of the questions to determine
if he/she is Limited English Proficient (LEP). The law requires that students classified as
LEP receive appropriate services in order to become proficient in English.


E.

Student Data Card

(See Appendix B)


In the event of an emergency, the school needs to contact parents as quickly as possible.
When completing the Student Data Card, please remember:





Home, work and cell phone numbers must remain up to date.



An emergency contact is requir
ed in the event the school in unable to reach parents. Give
the school emergency contact telephone numbers other than the ones on front of the card.



M
ake sure you

identify those individuals who are authorized and
not
authorized to pick
up your

child from
school.





Insurance

The Student Protection Plan is designed to cover students or injuries while traveling to and from
school or when involved in accidents while engaged in supervised activities on the school
premises. Participation in this program is
voluntary. The school will forward the enrollment
application for the current school year and additional information to the parents
.




9

What Does “Ready” Mean?


Bein
g “ready” for schools means
that your child is able to learn what will be taught in the
kindergarten class that he/she will attend, and can function comfortably with teachers and other
children in that setting. When parents think about school readiness, they sometimes focus too
much on academics. However, the skills that define readiness are

far broader than knowing
letters, numbers, and how to count. To be ready for school, a child needs to have a positive
attitude toward starting school, some understanding of why he or she is there, and be receptive to
learning new things and making new fr
iends. The best way to learn what will be expected of
your child is to contact the school your child will attend and speak with the teachers there.











10

Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screener (FLKRS)


How and Why are Students Assessed in Kindergarte
n?


The purpose of the Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screener (FLKRS) is:



To inform instruction.



To gather information on a child’s overall development and to specifically address the
readiness of each student for kindergarten based on the Voluntary Preki
ndergarten (VPK)
Education Standards.



To calculate the VPK Provider Kindergarten Readiness Rate. The readiness rate measures
how well a VPK provider prepares four
-
year
-
olds for kindergarten based upon Florida’s
VPK Education Standards.


Section 1002.69,
Florida Statutes, describes the Department of Education’s responsibilities
related to statewide kindergarten screening and the calculation of VPK Provider Kindergarten
Readiness Rates. The law requires that the statewide kindergarten screening be administ
ered to
all kindergarten students in the school district within the first 30 days of each school year.
Children who participated in VPK and attend kindergarten at a non
-
public school are also
provided opportunities to participate in the screening.


The com
ponents of The Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screener (FLKRS) are administered in
two parts to assess the readiness of each child for kindergarten. The Early Childhood
Observation System
TH

(ECHOS
TM
) measures a child’s development in seven domains which
in
clude:



Language and Literacy



Mathematics



Social and Personal Skills (Approaches to Learning)



Science



Social Studies



Physical Development and Fitness



Creative Arts


The Broad Screen/Progress Monitoring Tool of the Florida Assessment for Instructions in
Read
ing (FAIR) includes Letter Naming and Phonemic Awareness. The Broad Diagnostic
Inventory includes Listening Comprehension and Vocabulary. These measures gather
information on a child’s development in emergent literacy.


How Will FLKRS Data Be Used by Teach
ers?

The FLKRS data will be used by teachers to:



To determine each child’s readiness for kindergarten



To identify individual learning needs, set instructional goals, and monitor instructional
progress



To inform parents of their child’s readiness for kinder
garten and progress towards the
end
-
of
-
year benchmarks




11

Developmental Characteristics of the Five
-
Year
-
Old

Young children are developing socially, physically, intellectually, creatively, and emotionally.
All these characteristics are related to and depende
nt upon one another. Early childhood is a time
of rapid intellectual growth and development and this development is influenced by the home,
the school, playmates, and various organizations. The kindergarten program provides learning
experiences that meet t
he needs of all children. All children move through similar stages of
development at different rates. In a kindergarten classroom there may be as much as one year’s
difference in age between the oldest and the youngest child.


Social Development

Five
-
year
-
olds are becoming more socially oriented and make friends with children of their own
age. They are learning to share, cooperate, and play in groups. They practice social behaviors
such as being friends, taking turns, being fair and having conflic
ts. Adults, especially family
members, are still very important as their support and approval helps these children adjust to
unfamiliar situations.



Physical Development

Kindergarten
-
aged children are in a period of slow physical growth. They have more
control than
previously of their large muscles and continue to develop the ability to run, skip, and jump. Their
small muscles are slower to develop and they may have difficulty with small materials such as
writing tools, scissors, buttons, and shoelaces.
Their ability to coordinate movements such as
throwing, kicking, and catching a ball is increasing. The five
-
year
-
old is learning to use the
senses more fully. Children this age are full of energy. They tire easily and recover quickly. They
need a balance
between active and quiet times, as sitting still for long periods of time is difficult.


Intellectual Development

Kindergarten children gain knowledge of objects, relationships, and events by doing, observing,
imitating, and exploring. They develop thinkin
g skills related to their direct experiences but their
reasoning, memory, and problem
-
solving skills are not yet developed. Although they are
beginning to plan and think ahead, most often their actions are in the here
-
and
-
now. Most
situations are viewed fr
om their own perspective however; they are developing the ability to
understand the view of others. Their attention span and memory skills are increasing.


Children’s hearing and speaking vocabularies increase rapidly, and they love to talk. This age
child

asks many questions, experiments with the sounds of language and begins to express ideas
in pictures and emergent writing.


Creative Development

Kindergarten children like to express their ideas and feelings, and they need people to listen and
respond to
them. They use materials to explore, experiment, and create. The process of creating
is often more important to them than the end product. The five
-
year
-
old frequently takes part in
music, dancing and movement and likes to engage in dramatic play. They li
ke to experiment
with different roles and in the process discover new solutions to problems.





12

Emotional Development

Emotional development includes experiencing and expressing feelings, and developing
independence, decision
-
making skills and initiative. Ki
ndergarten children display their emotions
easily, intensely, and visibly. They are experimenting with ways to express themselves in a
socially appropriate manner. They are insistent on doing things by themselves, cultivating
independence, and developing
a sense of self. They become anxious when separated familiar
people, places, and things.








How Do Young Children Learn?

Young children see the world differently than older students and adults and they learn best
through direct, sensory experience. Fi
ve
-
year
-
olds need to manipulate, explore and experiment
with real objects. They learn through doing, moving, and talking.


Kindergarten students are active learners who learn through purposeful play. Many educators
refer to play as the serious work of chil
dhood. While playing, children are highly motivated and
concentrate intensely. They are clarifying information, integrating ideas from prior experiences,
and exploring and experimenting with their environment. Play provides children with
opportunities to a
dd their knowledge, learn new skills, and practice familiar ones. They develop
their imagination, creativity, and the ability to problem solve.





13



What Will My Child Learn in Kindergarten?


Reading/Language Arts

Language is the basis of all
communication. Language learning is an active process that begins at
birth and continues throughout life. Children learn language through its use. In kindergarten,
students participate in shared listening, reading, and viewing experiences using picture bo
oks,
fairy tales, stories, photographs, illustrations and video programs. They share stories using
rhymes rhythms, symbols, pictures, and drama to celebrate accomplishments. Students draw,
record, and tell about their ideas and experiences and participate
in group language activities.
They predict and ask questions, and represent and share ideas and information about topics of
interest. They form pictures, represent and share ideas and information. They form recognizable
letters, print their own names, and
explore and experiment with new words and terms.


Mathematics

Mathematics is an academic area that is increasing in importance in our advancing, technological
society. Becoming mathematically literate is essential to problem solving. Kindergarten students
explore numbers, patterns, shape and space, and data analysis by working with appropriate
materials and tools. They count and compare objects, demonstrate awareness of addition and
subtraction through role playing and the use of manipulative. They identify

and create patterns
and learn about measuring, classifying, matching, describing and comparing. Kindergarten
students describe, sort, and build real
-
world objects, and learn to collect and organize
information.




14


Social Studies and Environmental Awareness

Students explore, investigate, and describe their environment and community by asking
questions, solving problems, and using their senses. They identify familiar shapes, symbols, and
sounds, and recognize similarities and differences in living things, obj
ects, and materials.
Kindergarten students explore the design, function, and properties of a variety of natural and
manufactured materials. They explore scientific concepts using sand, water, blocks, clay, and
other materials, and begin to use technology a
ppropriately. Students become aware of diversity
in the uniqueness of self and others. They begin to talk about feelings and emotions. They learn
about homes, family, familiar places, and people who work and help in the community. Students
learn to recogni
ze seasonal changes, colors and shapes in the environment, and familiar animals
in their surroundings.


Children need to learn how to express their feelings in acceptable ways and to show respect and
positive caring toward others. Kindergarten students lea
rn these things by taking turns in
activities and discussions, working cooperatively, giving and receiving help, and taking part in
small and large group activities.


Physical Skills

Physical activity is important to normal growth and development. Five
-
yea
r
-
olds need assistance
to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes that will lead to frequent physical activity. Health and
life skills involve learning about the habits and behaviors that lead to healthy daily living and
well
-
being. In kindergarten, studen
ts begin to develop personal responsibility for health and learn
about personal safety and ways to prevent and reduce risk. Through movement, games, and
activities using equipment such as balls, beanbags, jump ropes, a balance beam, and hoops,
children dev
elop coordinated movement and balance.


These activities improve not only the gross (large motor skills), but strengthen fine motor skills.
Students learn to hold a writing implement and control its movement. Eye
-
hand coordination
increases as students wor
k with small materials, such as buttons, cubes, blocks and beads.


By participating in physical activity, by becoming aware of healthy food choices and by learning
to observe safety rules, students develop attitudes and practice behaviors that promote an a
ctive,
healthy lifestyle.


Creative Expression

Kindergarten children explore and express their thoughts and feelings thought the visual arts,
music, drama, and movement. By viewing and responding to everyday objects and artworks
children learn about how we

see and interpret visual images. Children express themselves
through movement and individual and group musical activities, songs, and games. They listen to
and begin to appreciate a variety of musical instruments and different kinds of music. Through
dram
atic play and movement, children grow in self
-
awareness and self
-
confidence and develop
their imaginative and creative thought. The arts help students connect their own experiences with
forms of artistic expression in the world around them. Finally, stude
nts begin to recognize
diverse family and cultural traditions and the contributions the arts make to these traditions.




15

Sunshine State Standards

Grade Level Expectations

Kindergarten

Reading/Language Arts


Reading


The kindergarten student:




Uses titles
and illustrations to make oral predictions.




Understands how print is organized and read (for example, locating print on a page,
matching print to speech, knowing parts of a book, reading top
-
to
-
bottom, left
-
to
-
right,
sweeping back to left for the next lin
e).




Knows the names of the letters of the alphabet, both upper and lower cases.




Knows the sounds of the letters of the alphabet.




Understands the concepts of words and constructs meaning from shared text, illustrations,
graphics, and charts.




Understand
basic phonetic principles (for example, knows rhyming words; knows words
that have the same initial and final sounds; knows which sound is in the beginning,
middle, end of a word; blends individual sounds into words).




Understands that print conveys meanin
g.




Identifies frequently used words.




Identifies words that name persons, places, or things and words that name actions.




Identifies and sorts common words from within basic categories (for example, colors,
shapes, foods).




Uses a variety of sources to
build vocabulary (for example, word walls, other people, life
experiences).




Develops vocabulary by discussing characters and events from a story.




Uses strategies to comprehend text (for example, retelling, discussing, asking questions).




Knows the main i
dea or essential message from a read
-
aloud story or informational piece.




Select materials to read for pleasure.




16



Supports oral and written responses with details from the informative text.




Understand that illustrations reinforce the information in a text
.




Know alphabetical order of letters.




Uses pictures, environmental print (for example, signs, billboards), and people to obtain
information.




Ask “how” and “why” questions about a topic.


Writing




Uses prewriting strategies (for example, drawing,
pictures, recording or dictating
questions for investigation).




Generates ideas through brainstorming, listening to text read by teacher, discussing.




Dictates messages (for example, news, stories).




Uses basic writing formats (for example, labels, lists,
notes, captions, stories, messages).




Demonstrates ability to sequence events during shared writing exercises.




Revises by adding details to pictures, dictation, or letters.




Uses spelling approximations in written work.




Uses directionality of print in wr
iting (including but not limited to left
-
to
-
right, top
-
to
-
bottom, spacing between words).




Identifies and attempts to use end punctuation (for example, the period, questions mark,
exclamation point).




Dictates or writes with pictures or words a narrative a
bout a familiar experience.




Contributes ideas during a shared writing activity.




Dictates and writes with pictures or words to record ideas and reflections.




Uses basic computer skills for writing (including but not limited to using a mouse,
locating numb
ers/letters on keyboard, turning computer on/off, and locating and opening
application icon).




Dictates or writes simple informational texts (for example, descriptions, labels, lists).




17

Listening, Speaking, Viewing




Follows two
-
step oral directions.




Listen to oral language in different forms (for example, stories read aloud, audio tapes,
nursery rhymes, songs).




Knows personal preferences for listening to literature and other material (for example,
nursery rhymes, songs, stories).




Follows rules of co
nversation (for example, taking turns speaking and listening).




Listens for specific information, including sequence of events.




Understands the main idea in a nonprint communication.




Understands simple nonverbal cues (for example, smiling, gesturing).




S
peaks clearly and used appropriate volume in different settings (for example, choral
speaking, informal conversations, shared readings).




Asks and responds to questions.




Uses basic speaking vocabulary to convey a message in conversation (for example,
numb
ers, adjectives, action words, shapes, colors, categories).




Use eye contact and appropriate gestures to enhance oral delivery.


Language




Knows patterns of sound in oral language (for example, rhyming, choral poetry, chants).




Knows different functions of

language (for example, expressing oneself, describing
objects).




Recognizes the differences between less formal language that is used at home and more
formal language that is used at school and other public settings.




Understands that word choice can shap
e ideas, feelings, and actions (for example, story
language, descriptive words).




Uses repetition, rhyme, and rhythm in oral and written texts (for example, reciting songs,
poems, and stories with repeating patterns; substituting words in a rhyming pattern
).




Understands the use of alliteration.




18



Understands that the use of more than one medium can influence how one thinks and
feels (for example, music, illustrations).




Knows various types of mass media (for example, film, video, television).


Literature




K
nows a variety of familiar literary genres (for examples, fiction, nonfiction, picture
books, fairy tales, legends).




Knows the sequence of events, characters, and setting of stories (for example, read
-
aloud
stories).




Relates characters and simple events
in a read
-
aloud book to own life.




Uses a variety of personal interpretation to respond to stories and poems (for example,
talk, movement, music, art, drama, writing).




Know rhymes, rhythms, and patterned structures in children’s text (for example,
repetit
ive text, pattern books, nursery rhymes).



















19

Sunshine State Standards

Grade Level Expectations

Kindergarten

Mathematics


Number Sense, Concepts, and Operations


The kindergarten student:




Counts up to 10 or more objects using verbal names and

one
-
to
-
one correspondence.




Reads and writes numerals to 10 or more.




Knows that cardinal numbers indicate quantity and ordinal numbers indicate position.




Uses numbers and pictures to describe how many objects are in a set (to 10 or more).




Uses
languages such as before or after to describe relative position in a sequence of
whole numbers on a number line up to 10 or more (for example, 4 is before 5, 5 is after
4).




Compares two or more sets (up to 10 objects in each set) and identifies which set
is equal
to, more than, or less than the other.




Uses sets of concrete materials to represent quantities, to 10 or more, given in verbal or
written form.




Uses concrete materials to represent fractional parts of a whole (one half, one fourth).




Represents
equivalent forms of the same number, up to 10 or more, through the use of
concrete materials (for example, 5 can be represented as 1 + 4, 2 + 3, 0 + 5; five pennies
equal one nickel and ten pennies equal one dime).




Counts orally to 100 or more by 1s, 2s,
5s, and 10s using a hundred chart or concrete
materials.




Uses concrete materials, pictures, and numerals to show the concept of numbers to 10 or
more.




Counts backward from ten to one.




Groups objects in sets of 2 or more.




Knows the relationships between

larger numbers and smaller numbers.




20



Demonstrates and describes the effect of putting together and taking apart sets of objects
(for example, 3 cubes and 4 cubes is 7 cubes).




Creates and acts out number stories using objects.




Knows strategies for
solving number problems.




Demonstrates an awareness of addition and subtraction in everyday activities (using
concrete objects, models, drawing, role playing).




Estimates and verifies by counting sets that have more, fewer, or the same number of
objects (f
or example, using a reference set of objects, comparing cards with different
numbers of dots, estimating whether sets are more or less than a given number such as
five).




Builds models to show that numbers are odd or even (up to 10).


Measurement




Knows ho
w to communicate measurement concepts.




Measures length of objects and distance using nonstandard concrete materials.




Weights objects to explore concepts of heavier and lighter.




Describes concepts of time (for example, before or after, day or night).




De
scribes concepts of temperature (for example, hot or cold).




Compares and demonstrates the concept of capacity (for example, full or empty).




Uses nonstandard objects, such as cubes, marbles, paper clips, and pencils, to measure
classroom objects (for exam
ple, table length is 10 crayons or four pencils).



Uses direct (side
-
by
-
side) comparisons to sort and order objects by their lengths.




Uses indirect comparisons to compare lengths of objects that cannot be physically
compared (side
-
by
-
side) (for example,
compares height of counters in classroom and
cafeteria by using string or in reference to child’s own body).




Compares and orders classroom objects by their weights, determining which objects
weigh more, less, or about the same.




Uses uniform nonstandard u
nits to measure common classroom objects.




Uses nonstandard units to estimates, and verifies by measuring, the length and width of
common classroom objects.



21




Knows the time of day or day or night; morning, afternoon, or evening; and yesterday,
today, or to
morrow.




Knows which of two daily activities takes more or less time.




Knows and compares the values of a penny (1 cent), nickel (5 cents), and dime (10
cents).




Uses nonstandard units appropriately (for example, pencil, cubes, scoops of rice).




Knows vari
ous measuring tools for measuring length, weight, or capacity.




Knows ways to measure time, including calendar, days, weeks, months, and days of
week.


Geometry and Spatial Sense




Knows two
-
dimensional shapes (for example, circles, squares, rectangles, tri
angles),
describing similarities and differences.




Sorts three
-
dimensional objects by varied attributes or according to their geometric
shapes (for example, cubes, spheres, cylinders, cones).




Recognizes symmetry in the environment and uses concrete
materials to make
symmetrical figures (for example, paper fold, paint blot).




Matches objects to outlines of their shapes.




Knows spatial relationships (for example, in or out; above or below; over or under; top,
bottom, or middle).




Identifies left and ri
ght hand.




Follows directions to move or place an object in relation to another (for example, next to,
to the right of).




Uses concrete objects to explore slides and turns.




Recognizes, compares, and sorts real
-
world objects or models of solids.




Knows the

attributes of circles, squares, triangles, and rectangles (for example, edges,
corners, curves).




22



Locates known and unknown numbers on a number line from 0 to 10 or more (for
example, finding what number your are on if you move 2 numbers forward or 3 numb
ers
back).


Algebraic Thinking




Identifies simple patterns of sounds, physical movements, and concrete objects.




Sorts and classifies objects by color, shape, size, or king.




Identifies objects that do not belong to a particular group (for example, blue li
d in set of
red lids).




Predicts and extends existing patterns using concrete materials.




Uses concrete objects to create a pattern.




Transfers patterns from one medium to another (for example, actions, sounds, or concrete
objects).




Knows that symbols can be uses to represent missing or unknown quantities (for
example, fill in the missing number in 5, 6,

, 8).




Uses informal methods, such as pictures, concrete materials, and role playing, to solve
real world problems.




Uses one
-
to
-
on
e matching to determine if two groups are equal.


Data Analysis and Probability




Displays answers to simple questions involving two categories or choices using concrete
materials or pictures on a graph or chart(for example, in a class, number of boys and
g
irls, students with buttons and students with no buttons).




Interprets data exhibited in concrete or pictorial graphs.




Uses concrete materials, pictures, or graphs to show range and mode (for example, on a
human, block, or picture graph showing number of
brother and sisters, range is from zero
to highest number of siblings; mode is number of siblings most common in class).




Collects, displays data, and makes generalizations (for example, determines number of
pockets on 5 children; predicts how many 10 stud
ents or the whole class will have).




Knows the likelihood of a given situation (for example, Could a lion come visit you? Will
we have school tomorrow? Will it rain today?).




23



Participates in games or activities dependent upon change (for example, using spi
nners or
number cubes).




Knows if a given event is more likely, equally likely, or less likely to occur (for example,
chicken nuggets or pizza for lunch in the cafeteria).




Displays the answer to a simple class question with two categories using concrete
materials, a pictograph, or chart (for example, hot or cold; wings or no wings).




Determines through class discussions questions for a simple two
-
choice survey so that the
collected information will answer the questions.
























24

Sunshine Stat
e Standards

Grade Level Expectations

Kindergarten

Science



The Nature of Matter


The kindergarten student:




Knows that objects have many different observable properties:

o

Color

o

Shapes (circle, triangle, square)

o

Forms (flexible, stiff, straight, curved)

o

Textures (rough, smooth, hard, soft)

o

Sizes and weights (big, little, large, small, heavy, light, wide, thin, long, short)

o

Positions & speeds (over, under, in, out, above, below, left, right, fast, slow)




Knows that matter exists in different states (solid,

liquid, gas)




Knows that materials can be changed by cutting, folding, bending, and mixing.




Knows that some objects are made up of many different materials.


Energy




Knows the effects of sun and shade on the same object (for example, crayons, ice,
chocolate).




Knows that light can pass through some objects, but cannot pass through other objects.




Understands that a terrarium or an aquarium is a model of a system.



Knows some processes where heat can be released (for example, playing a radio, burning
a candle).




Understands that people eat food to survive.


Force and Motion




Understands that different things move at different speeds (bicycle/motorcycle, car/plane,
tortoise/hare).




Knows the names of objects that roll, slide, or fly.




Knows that the mot
ion of an object (for example, toy truck, toy car, ball, marble) can be
changes by a push or a pull.



25




Knows that vibrations caused by sound waves can be felt (for example, on a speaker
when music is played, the head of a drum when it is hit, or a tuning fo
rk).


Processes that Shape the Earth




Knows that the surface of the Earth is composed of different types of solid materials (for
example, sand, pebbles, rocks, clumps of dirt).




Knows that life occurs on or near the surface of the Earth in land, water, and

air.




Uses charts to display daily changes in the weather.




Knows ways to care for the Earth at home and in school (for example, limiting use of
paper towels, turning off water while brushing teeth, turning off lights when no one will
be in the room).


Earth and Space




Knows that the sky looks different during the day than it does at night.




Knows that the position of the Sun in the sky appears to change during the day.




Knows some of the objects seen in the night sky (for example, stars, Moon).


Process
es of Life




Knows some of the basic needs of living things, (for example, food, water, space).




Knows ways of living things change and grow over time (for example, seed to flowering
plant, tadpole to frog).




Knows that plants and animals are found in diffe
rent kind of environments and are often
hidden.




Knows selected characteristics of plants and animals (for example, shape, size, color).




Knows names for animal offspring (for example, puppies, kittens, cubs, calves, chicks,
children).




Knows that plants a
nd animals may live in different habitats.




How Living Things Interact with Their Environments




Understands ways that animals obtain food from plants and other animals.




26



Knows that if living things do not get food, water, shelter, and space, they will die.



The Nature of Science




Knows that learning can come from careful observation.




Repeats events several times and compares the findings.




Works with a partner or small group to collect information.




Shares findings about scientific investigations with oth
ers.




Poses questions, seeks answers, draws pictures of observations, and makes decisions
using information.




Knows that the five senses (taste, touch, smell, hearing, sight) allow us to take in and
respond to information in order to learn about out surrou
ndings.




Understand that continuous patterns occur in nature (for example, seasons, phases of the
Moon, blooming flowers.




Knows some appropriate tools for collecting information and extending the senses.














27

Sunshine State Standards

Grade Level
Expectations

Kindergarten

Social Studies


Time, Continuity, and Change (History)


The kindergarten student:




Listen to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media about people from other
places and times.




Understands that history tells the story

of people and events of other times and places.




Knows selected roles of family members in various settings (for example, work, play,
home).




Distinguishes among past, present, and future.




Understand basic modes of communications (for example, gestures,
oral, written,
symbols).




Understands basic modes of transportation (for example, walking, riding animals, various
kinds of animal
-
drawn wagons, boats, trains, bicycles, cars, airplanes, space shuttles).




Listen to, views, and discusses stories, poems and
other media about selected men and
women during the historical period before the Renaissance.




Listens to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media about selected scientists
and invertors during the historical period since the Renaissance.




Kno
ws selected art forms from various cultures (for example, dances, musical styles).




Understands that the art can differ in various cultures.




Knows selected patriotic songs associated with the United States.




Listens to, views, and discusses stories, poems
, and other media about selected men and
women in the periods of United States history before 1880.




Listen to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media about people and events
prior to 1880 honored in commemorative holidays (for example, Colum
bus Day,
Thanksgiving Day, Flay Day, Independence Day).




Listens to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media about selected American
symbols that have emerged from past events, legends, and historical accounts (for


28

example, the eagle, the Libe
rty Bell, George Washington as the “father of our country,”
the American flag).




Listens to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media about changes that
occurred in people’s lives when they moved from faraway places to the United States




Listen

to, views, and discuss stories, and other media about selected men and women in
the historical period of United States history since 1880.




Listens to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media about selected important
buildings, statues, and m
onuments associated with state and national history.




Listens to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media about people and events
after 1880 honored in commemorative holidays.




Listens to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media a
bout changes in
community life over time.


People, Places, and Environments (Geography)




Knows terms that describe relative location (for example, near, far, up, down, left, right,
behind, in front).




Knows the locations of various places in the school
(for example, office, library,
playground, cafeteria, bathrooms).




Knows that the globe is a model of the earth.




Identifies physical and human features of familiar places.




Knows types of shelter, food, and clothing used by people in the community.




Knows

basic needs of families (for example, food, shelter, clothing, companionship).




Listens to, views, and discusses stories, and other media about modes of transportation
used to move people, products, and ideas from place to place, their importance, and the
ir
advantages and disadvantages.



Government and the Citizen (Civics and Government)




Understands why rules are necessary.




Listens to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media about qualities of a good
citizen.




29



Knows some actions associated
with good citizenship (for example, taking turns,
sharing).




Knows that a responsibility is a duty to do something or not to do something.




Knows examples of situations involving responsibility (for example, in the home,
classroom).




Knows examples of
privacy.


Production, Distribution, and Consumption (Economics)




Knows some examples of scarcity.




Knows simple descriptions of work and jobs that people do.




Understands the basic concept of exchanging money for goods.




Understands the concept of saving m
oney for future needs and wants.



















30

Sunshine State Standards

Grade Level Expectations

Kindergarten

Art

Skills and Techniques


The kindergarten student:




Creates works that are personally meaningful and draw from experience, observation, or
imagination.




Draws with chalk, crayon, marker, and pencil.




Paints using tempera, watercolor, and fingerpaint.




Uses a variety of painting tools (for example, brushes, sponges, fingers).




Draws and paints on large paper with a variety of brushes, crayons,

pencils, and makers.




Prints by stamping one surface against another.




Uses tearing, cutting, and folding techniques.




Uses gluing and pasting techniques.




Uses forming techniques with materials such as clay and paper.




Uses basic computer technology
related to visual arts.




Works with art tools and materials safely.




Explore tools/materials appropriately.




Follows directed cleanup procedures.




Recognizes differences among art materials and processes.




Identifies elements of art (for example, line, sha
pe, color, texture).




Identifies principles of design (for example, pattern, repetition).




Identifies good craftsmanship.




Creation and Communication




Knows that subject matter can be real or imaginary.



31




Knows that visual symbols are used to convey meaning
.




Knows that pictures tell a story.




Knows that people can express themselves visually.




Interprets personal experiences visually using selected media.




Describes choices made in his/her artwork.




Experiences artwork that is created for varied, specific
purposes (for example, storybook,
illustrations, stained glass).




Knows that work of art express an idea.




Uses specific elements of art and principles of design to communicate an idea.




Cultural and Historical Connections




Views and discusses art from var
ious cultures, time periods, and places.




Identifies one or more well
-
known artists and their artwork.


Aesthetic and Critical Analysis




Distinguishes between non
-
art objects and works of art (for example, a tree and a
painting of a tree).




Makes observati
ons about artworks using elements of art and principles of design.




Experiences artworks in a variety of styles (for example, Tanner’s Banjo Player and
Picasso’s Three Musicians).




Identifies original artworks.


Application to Life




Examines examples

of everyday objects designed by artists.




Understands that artists’ creations influence home, school, and work life.




Identifies a career in art (for example, artists, designers, architects, teachers).




Uses good observation and listening skills during a
museum visit, and/or classroom art
presentations.




32


Sunshine State Standards

Grade Level Expectations

Kindergarten

Music


Skills and Techniques


The kindergarten student:




Sings melodic patterns and songs within a four
-
note range (F
-
D) using sol, la, and
mi.




Echoes simple melodic patterns, using sol, la, and mi and maintaining the tonal center.




Demonstrates healthy use of the singing. Speaking, whispering, and calling voice with
appropriate volume for the young child.




Sings simple unison songs, with and

without accompaniment, with accurate pitch,
accurate rhythm, and appropriate tone quality.




Sings, along with others, a diverse repertoire representing various cultures and styles (for
example, folk songs, poems, play
-
party games, patriotic songs, student
-
created songs,
nursery rhymes).




Demonstrates expressive qualities appropriate to the music, using dynamic contrast and
tempo change.




Performs a steady beat based on a personal and/or group sense of pulse.




Echoes rhythmic patterns using quarter notes, q
uarter rests, and two eight notes on simple
rhythm instruments.




Echoes simple melodic patterns on instruments (for example, barred instruments).




Performs with appropriate posture and position to produce a characteristic tone quality on
non
-
pitched instru
ments (for example, rhythm sticks, triangle, wood block).




Performs simple rhythmic patterns and sound effects on instruments to accompany
poems, rhymes, chants, and songs.




Demonstrates expressive qualities (for example, loud
-
soft, fast
-
slow) while playin
g
classroom and ethnic instruments.




Recognizes and performs sounds having long and short duration in response to visual
representation.




33



Recognizes and perform s high and low sounds in response to visual representation.




Demonstrates melodic direction
(upward, downward, and same) and register (high and
low) through physical response and visual representation.




Represents long and short sounds visually that have been performed by someone else.


Creation and Communication




Improvises a short rhythmic patt
ern in response to a musical prompt.




Improvises a short melodic pattern in response to a musical prompt.




Improves a short free
-
form song.




Creates sound effects for songs, poems, and stories.




Cultural and Historical Connections




Knows that music is diff
erent in other places.




Recognizes music of contrasting cultures.




Understands that music can differ in various cultures.




Knows that music is a part of celebrations and daily life.


Aesthetic and Critical Analysis




Responds to selected characteristics of
music, including fast and slow, soft and loud, high
and low, and upward and downward, through purposeful movement.




Differentiates between speaking and singing voices.




Identifies classroom instruments by sound source, including wood and metal.




Identifies

a variety of environmental sound sources.




Describes specific music characteristics using appropriate vocabulary (fast
-
slow, loud
-
soft, high
-
low, and upward
-
downward).




Describes feelings communicated through music.




Uses simple criteria for evaluating pe
rformance (for example, like or dislike, happy or
sad).




34



Evaluates one’s own and others’ performance and describes what was successful.


Applications to Life




Demonstrates basic understanding of concepts in music and the visual arts that are similar
(for
example, repetition).




Identifies ways in which language arts relates to music (for example, rhyming words,
song storybooks).




Understands the use of music in daily life (for example, birthday parties, holidays).




Demonstrates appropriate audience behavior

in such settings as classroom and school
performances (for example, listening quietly during a performance, clapping at the end of
a performance).




Identifies a personal preference for a specific song.




Identifies musicians in the school and community.

















35

Sunshine State Standards

Grade Level Expectations

Kindergarten

Physical Education


Movement Competency


The kindergarten student:




Use a variety of locomotor skills to travel in personal and general space.




Strike objects using body parts
forcefully.




Balance a lightweight object on a paddle while moving.




Strike and object forcefully using a modified, long
-
handled implement of various sizes,
weights, and compositions.




Use two hands to bounce and catch a large playground ball.




Participate

in a variety of introductory water skills.




Catch a variety of self
-
tossed objects.




Roll and throw a variety of objects using an underhand motion.




Throw a variety of objects forcefully using an overhand motion.




Perform a creative movement sequence with

a clear beginning shape, at least one
movement concept, and a clear ending shape.




Balance on a variety of body parts.




Perform a variety of rolling actions.




Move in a variety of ways in relation to others.


Cognitive Abilities




Recognize locomotor
skills.




Recognize physical activities have safety rules and procedures.




Recognize technology can be utilized during physical activity.




36



Recognize there are deep and shallow areas of a poll and understand the dangers of
entering a body of water without su
pervision.




Recognize the concept of a dominant hand/foot for throwing/striking patterns.




Recite cues for a variety of movement patterns and skills.




Identify personal and general space.




Recognize movement concepts.




Identify body parts.


Lifetime Fitnes
s




Participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on a daily basis.




Identify opportunities for involvement in physical activities both during and after the
school day.




Describe physical activity goal
-
setting.




Invite others to participate i
n physical activities with them.




Recognize that physical activity is good for you.




Verbally state the search (look left, look right, look left again) used before crossing a
roadway.




Recognize that strong muscles help the body perform physical
activities.




Recognize the physiological signs of physical activity.




Recognize the difference in the activity of the heart during rest and while physically
active.




Participate in a variety of games that increase breathing and heart rate.




Recognize that
flexibility is important.




Differentiate between healthy and unhealthy food choices.




Responsible Behaviors and Values




Treat others with respect during play.




37



Practice specific skills as assigned until the teacher signals the end of practice.




Use equipme
nt safely and properly.




Identify sharing with a partner as a way to cooperate.




Identify physical activities that are enjoyable.




Willingly try new movements and motor skills.




Continue to participate when not successful on the first try.




Enjoy
participation alone and with others.


















38

How Should the Kindergarten Classroom Look?


A kindergarten classroom should be bright, cheerful, colorful, and busy. A variety of spaces
should be available for independent, small group, and large grou
p activities. As most students
need to be active in the classroom environment, the kindergarten classroom will have different
typ
es of learning centers. The following is a list of suggested centers and materials.


Library and Listening

A
variety of books
and tapes for

students to read and listen to


Mathematics

M
anipulative materials and tasks for students to sort, count,
classify,

measure and learn number sense


Writing

P
aper, pencils, markers, crayons, typewri
ter, computer, paper
clips, etc.


Science
and Exploration

M
aterials such as seeds, plants, rocks
, magnifying glass, pencil,
etc.


Computer

Two to six
computer stations for children to work
independently on installed programs designed to meet
individual students’ needs and monitor their progress


呥ache爠ie搠de湴敲猠⡔䱃i


獭慬氠瑡t
汥l 景f 景f爠瑯t 獥癥n

獴畤敮瑳s 睨wre 瑨攠瑥tc桥r
灲p獥湴猠潲o牥癩e睳w獫楬汳l 扡獥搠潮o楮摩癩v
畡氠湥e摳⸠ ie獳潮s
a牥 de獩sned

acc潲摩og 瑯t da瑡t c潬oec瑥搠 晲潭o 癡物潵r
a獳敳獭敮
瑳⁴漠晡c楬楴a瑥t獴畤敮琠s牯r瑨


m桯湥浩c⁁
睡re湥獳sm桯湩捳

A
c瑩癩v楥猠 景f 獴畤敮瑳 瑯t 浡湩灵污瑥 汥
瑴er 湡浩湧Ⱐ 汥瑴l爠
獯畮摳Ⱐ睯wd

灡r
瑳Ⱐ牨y浩湧 睯w摳d 景爠e浥rge湴

灲p
J
rea摩d朠
a湤⁲na摩dg⁳歩汬s


周q 景汬潷楮g ce湴敲猠浡y be
灲p獥湴n 楮i 獯浥 歩湤敲ga牴rn
c污獳l潯浳W



C潮獴牵r瑩潮

B
汯捫猬l
浡湩灵污瑩癥 瑯ys 景f 獴畤敮瑳 瑯t 摥獩杮Ⱐc牥a瑥Ⱐa湤n
扵楬d


䑲a浡瑩挠偬ay

m
牯灳r景f a 桯畳h a湤⽯n 獴潲sⰠ灵灰p瑳ta湤n摲e獳
J
異uc汯l桥猠景爠
獴畤敮瑳

瑯⁦tc楬楴a瑥⁩浡t楮慴楶攠灬iy


䝡浥m

m
畺z汥猠 a湤n 瑡扬t 条me猠 景f 獴畤敮瑳s 瑯t 獨sreⰠ 瑨t湫Ⱐ a湤n
灲潢汥洠m
潬癥o






39

Kindergarten Student Report Card Code of Development

Kindergarten teachers use the electronic gradebook, to communicate individual student growth
and development without student comparison to the progress of others. Symbols stated in the
Code of
Development and parent conferences should serve as the primary means of
communicating student progress and achievement of the standards for promotion. A student’s
development progress should reflect the teacher’s most objective assessment of the student’s
social, emotional, and academic achievement.


Code of Development:


E = Excellent progress


Code “E” (90
-
100%) indicates that the kindergarten student has demonstrated mastery of
instructional objectives appropriate for the kindergarten program. The studen
t consistently
performs at a level above that which is expected in the kindergarten program.


G = Good progress


Code “G” (80
-
89%) indicates that the kindergarten student has demonstrated above average
mastery of instructional objectives appropriate for th
e kindergarten program. The student
consistently performs at a high level in the kindergarten program.


S = Satisfactory progress. Progressing toward grade level expectations


Code “S” (70
-
79%) indicates that he kindergarten student has made satisfactory p
rogress in
mastering instructional objectives appropriate for the kindergarten program. The student is
performing at a level which will permit him/her to successfully complete the essential objectives
of the kindergarten program.


M = Minimal progress


Cod
e “M” (60
-
69%) indicates that the kindergarten student has mastered the minimal
instructional objectives for the kindergarten program. The student consistently performs at the
lowest acceptable level in the kindergarten program.


U = Unsatisfactory
progress


Code “U” *59% and below) indicates that the kindergarten student has not mastered the minimal
instructional objectives for the kindergarten program. The student consistently performs below
acceptable levels in the kindergarten program.


When a n
umerical equivalent to an assigned letter grade of “E,” “G,” “S,” “M,” or “U” is used,
the following apply and shall be communicated to the student and his/her parents:






40

GRADE

NUMERICAL VALUE

VERBAL INTERPRETATION

GRADE POINT
VALUE

E

90
-
100%

Outstanding

progress

4

G

80
-
89%

Above average progress

3

S

70
-
79%

Average progress

2

M

60
-
69%

Lowest acceptable progress

1

U

0
-
59%

Failure

0



Sample Kindergarten Report Card

(See Appendix C)


Attendance Policy


Board Rule 6Gx13
-

5A
-
1.041

Student attendance is
a means of improving student performance and critical in raising student
achievement. Together, the staff of Miami
-
Dade County Public Schools, students, parents and
the community must make every effort to lessen the loss of instructional time to students.
In
order to accomplish this goal, on April 18, 2007, the School Board of Miami
-
Dade County,
Florida approved a new Student Attendance Board Rule, which is stated below.


The Attendance Review Committee

The Attendance Review Committee is comprised of a
minimum of a student services
representative and an administrator or administrative designee and will provide guidance and
support to students with significant absences. They are expected to:

1.

Provide early intervention by convening when students reach an a
ccumulation of five (5)
unexcused absences in a semester or ten (10) unexcused absences in an annual course.

2.

Convene a minimum of six (6) designated times per year.

3.

Give consideration to all extenuating circumstances surrounding student absences. The
Atten
dance Review Committee is charged with the responsibility of prescribing activities
designed to mitigate the loss of instructional time and has the authority to recommend the
following:

a.

Issuing of quarterly, semester or final grades.

b.

Temporary withholding
of quarterly, semester or final grades. The following are among
possible options:

(1)

Make
-
up assignments

(2)

Attendance probation for the following grading period(s)

(3)

Completion of a school service project

c.

Permanent withholding of quarterly, semester or final grad
es and credit. The student is
to be informed of his/her right of final appeal to the Region superintendent or designee.

4.

Review attendance history for student(s) exhibiting patterns of excused and/or unexcused
absences and provide appropriate referrals and
counseling support.









41

Excused School and Class Absences and Tardies

1.

Student illness: Students missing 5 or more consecutive days of school due to illness or
injury are required to provide a written statement from a health care provider. The written
statement must include all days the student has been absent from school. If a student is
continually sick and repeatedly absent from school due to a specific medical condition, he or
she must be under the supervision of a health care provider in order to r
eceive excused
absences from school.

2.

Medical appointment: If a student is absent from school due to a medical appointment, a
written statement from a health care provider indicating the date and time of the appointment,
must be submitted to the principal.

3.

Death in family

4.

Observance of a religious holiday or service when it is mandated for all members of a faith
that such a holiday or service be observed.

5.

School
-
sponsored event or educational enrichment activity that is not a school
-
sponsored
event, as deter
mined and approved by the principal or principal’s designee: The student must
receive advance written permission from the principal or the principal’s designee. Examples
of special events include: public functions, conferences, and region, state and nation
al
competitions.

6.

Subpoena by law enforcement agency or mandatory court appearance.

7.

Outdoor suspensions

8.

Other individual student absences beyond the control of the parent/guardian or student, as
determined and approved by the principal or the principal's de
signee. The principal shall
require documentation related to the condition.


Unexcused School Absences

Any absence that does not fall into one of the above excused absence categories is to be
considered unexcused. Any student who has been absent from schoo
l will be marked unexcused
until he/she submits required documentation as specified above. Failure to provide required
documentation within three school days upon the return to school will result in an unexcused
absence. Unexcused absences include:

1. Abse
nces due to vacations, personal services, local non
-
school event, program or sporting
activity

2. Absences due to older students providing day care services for siblings

3. Absences due to illness of others

4. Absences due to non
-
compliance with immunizati
on requirements (unless lawfully exempted)


Conduct

Conduct grades are to be used to communicate to both students and their parents/guardians the
teacher’s evaluation of a student’s behavior and citizenship development. These grades are
independent of acad
emic and effort grades.









42

Interim Progress Report

Interim progress reports must be sent home
at any time

the student is performing
unsatisfactorily in academics, conduct, or effort, and are disseminated to all students at mid
-
grading period.