The contribution of ACFE for a more inclusive Australia

parisfawnAI and Robotics

Nov 17, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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The contribution of ACFE for a
more inclusive Australia


Rowena Allen

Chairperson

Adult Community and Further Education
(ACFE) Board

1. ACFE overview

2. National recognition of adult community education

3. Supporting a more inclusive Australia

4. How is ACFE contributing to inclusion?

5. Questions

ACFE’s role post
-
school

ACFE overview



100,000 learners each year



8,000 staff and volunteers right across the state



Over 320 not
-
for
-
profit

Learn Local organisations



20 years legislated function to support the sector



ACFE Board: 12 members



8 Regional Offices that support 8 Regional Councils
and Learn Local organisations



2 Adult Education Institutions


CAE and AMES

Learn Local in VET

Student contact hours
TAFE
71%
Private
21%
ACE
8%
Learners
TAFE
61%
Private
26%
ACE
13%
Figure 1 Government funded VET activity in 2010

Types of training offered

Pre
-
accredited training



Quality assured by ACFE Board



Increase confidence and skills



Programs of at least 20 hours



Pathways to further education and employment



20% of ACE delivery (hours) in this form of
training


Accredited training



A range of courses offered under the Victorian
Training Guarantee



Around 80% of ACE delivery (hours) in
accredited training

ACFE overview: qualifications

Figure 2.4 ACE market share by qualification level: 2010
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
Module only
VCAL
Cert I
Cert II
Cert III
Cert IV
Diploma+
Module only
VCAL
Cert I
Cert II
Cert III
Cert IV
Diploma+
Student contact hours
Course enrolments
1. ACFE overview

2. National recognition of adult community education

3. Supporting a more inclusive Australia

4. How is ACFE contributing to inclusion?

5. Questions

National recognition of community based learning is stronger

2011 Victorian Families Statement

“Nothing is more important for the
future prosperity of families than a
good education, starting in early
childhood.”


“By making it a priority and getting our
education system right, the
Government is making the best
possible investment in our future…”


“In today’s world, having the right skills
is increasingly important to securing
and keeping a good job.”


1. ACFE overview

2. National recognition of adult community education

3. Supporting a more inclusive Australia

4. How is ACFE contributing to inclusion?

5. Questions

A small but significant number of Australians face
multiple disadvantages

5
% of persons aged 18
-
64 years
reported having
3 or more
areas of
disadvantage, and they...

















were concentrated in disadvantaged locations







reported greater difficulty accessing services

Social inclusion in Australia: How Australia is faring, 2010

Where you live matters...

Service access is more
likely to be an issue

for those living outside
major cities.

Only 18% of people in
major cities reported
difficulties compared to
28% in inner regional
areas and 39% in other
areas which includes
outer regional and
remote locations

Costs, waiting
times or
unavailability
and difficulty
accessing
transport or the
distance
needed to travel
were common
issues cited.

A social inclusion approach

What is social inclusion?

...a socially inclusive society is one
where all individuals have the
opportunities, capabilities
and

resources
to participate fully in their
community

An effective

social inclusion agenda

uses a range of initiatives to:


develop people’s resources


address resourcing gaps


encourage participation to
learn, work, engage, have a
voice


invest in support systems &
reform


measure and evaluate
progress

1. ACFE overview

2. National recognition of adult community education

3. Supporting a more inclusive Australia

4. How is ACFE contributing to inclusion?

5. Questions


Hard to Reach Learners

Culturally and
Linguistically
Diverse (CALD)

Disabled

Disengaged
youth

Early school
leavers

Indigenous

Low socio
-
economic
status localities

Males over 45

Vulnerable
workers

Unemployed

Hard to reach learner profile

Figure 3 Hard to reach learner profile: 2010
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
CALD
Disabled
Disengaged
youth
School
leavers
Indigenous
Low SES
Males
over 45
Vulnerable
workers
ACE
Private
TAFE
Outcomes from Learn Local pathways

Labour Force Transitions

Learner Satisfaction

Increased Income

Labour Force improvement

Among unemployed ACE learners





68 per cent gained skills to get a job


58 per cent obtained a job.


63 per cent of females undertaking ACE
study were in full time or part time
employment compared to 52 per cent for
women with less than ACE level
education.



Ratings of course quality consistent at
around 95 per cent


83 per cent learners achieve their
study goals




$8,316


$12,829 for males (in 2007
dollars)


$1,336


$2,205 for females (in 2007
dollars)

Among employed learners





73 per cent study helped with work

tasks



61 per cent taught them skills to help

them get a better job



47 per cent helped get a new job, and



26 per cent study helped them to set up
or run a business

What would the VET system look like without ACE?



Less

support for hard to reach learners



More limited pathways from informal to informal
learning



Fewer local learning options



Missed opportunities for locally developed
training to meet local needs



Mark’s pathway from Waverley Adult Literacy Program to
employment

Inclusion through adult literacy training for improved work
pathways

Inclusion through industry partnerships

Continuing Education Bendigo working with Care beyond
Measure

Inclusion through university pathways



Partnerships between Learn Local organisations and
universities

Inclusion through community learning

GEST’s Renew and recycle Program helping local
disadvantaged community members

Challenges and opportunities for ACE




Seeking greater recognition of the contribution of the sector in
general, and to social and economic outcomes




Recognition


funding




Enhancing learner pathways more systematically than at present




Supporting Learn Local organisations to deliver in a training market



1. ACFE overview

2. National recognition of adult community education

3. Supporting a more inclusive Australia

4. How is ACFE contributing to inclusion?

5. Questions?