SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES (June 3-10, 2013 ...

panelgameSecurity

Dec 3, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

110 views

SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
 
1. US to crac
k down on virtual currency tax fraud (June 10, 2013) the Financial Times
1
 
By Kara Scannell in New York 
 
US officials are targeting virtual currencies due to fears that Americans are using them to evade taxes, 
opening a new front in the crackdown on tax fraud. 
 Virtual currencies such as Bitcoin and the exchanges where they trade have come under increased 
scrutiny since last month’s arrest of five individuals associated with Liberty Reserve, a Costa Rican‐based 
digital currency business, on charges of running a $6bn money laundering scheme. 
Authorities alleged Liberty Reserve was the “bank of choice” for drug traffickers, computer hackers, 
child pornographers and identity thieves.  
Now US authorities have signaled they believe that virtual currencies – which can be traded 
anonymously – are being used improperly in other ways including to evade tax. 
“Clearly the increasing use and misuse of cyber‐based currency and payment systems to anonymously 
transfer illicit funds as well as hide unreported income from the IRS is a threat that we are vigorously 
responding to,” Victor Lessoff of the Internal Revenue Service told the Financial Times.  
Mr. Lessoff, the director of an IRS unit that investigates cyber threats, was expanding on remarks made 
at a conference run by New York University on Friday. 
“The globalization and digitalization of our currencies is a significant emerging threat,” Mr. Lessoff said 
at the conference.  
“It doesn’t take much of a leap [to think] that these currencies would be used for tax evasion,” he added.  
Mr. Lessoff said the IRS could demand that taxpayers say whether they are doing any business using 
non‐traditional methods su
ch as using PayPal accounts that allow for the virtual transfer of money. 
“That’s one of the things on the horizon,” he said. 
The targeting of virtual currencies follows an aggressive crackdown by the IRS and US Department of 
Justice on citizens who evade taxes by stashing money in offshore bank accounts.  
Around 70 individuals, including clients, bankers and lawyers, have been criminally charged in 
connection with schemes to evade taxes and an investigation is still ongoing. More than $5bn in unpaid 
taxes has been collected from a voluntary IRS disclosure programme. 
The actions have altered the landscape: foreign banks are turning over the names of US clients to the 
DoJ. Switzerland is in talks with the DoJ to resolve a long‐running dispute concerning the country’s strict 
bank secrecy laws.  
                                                           
 
1
 http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/5c7a453e‐cf97‐11e2‐a050‐00144feab7de.html#axzz2VultIbDV 

 
SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
As people aro
und the globe use computers to access bank accounts, file fraudulent tax returns and 
move money it has heightened the need for global co‐operation.  
“We need to expand our efforts to catch cyber criminals as they’re doing the crime,” Mr. Lessoff said. He 
said the IRS “
needs to work closely with foreign regulators” to follow IP addresses to catch the person 
behind computer screens red handed. 
2. Battle Over Bitcoin: China Backs US Startup Coinbase And US Falls Behind In Virtual Currencies (June 
8, 2013) International Business Times
2
 
By Alexander C. Kaufman and Sophie Song 
 
Seven months ago, Fred Ehrsam pitched his bitcoin‐based startup Coinbase to more than a dozen Silicon 
Valley investors. Although those potential backers were known for being forward‐thinking ‐‐ and they 
had a lot of money to invest in high‐tech ventures ‐‐ Ehrsam got more than a few blank stares. He spent 
more of his time explaining the concept of peer‐to‐peer currency, which is emerging as the world’s 
default platform for digital money, than describing his plans for the company itself. So he and his co‐
founders turned to the Chinese, specifically, to IDG Ventures. To the Beijing‐based venture capitalists, 
the PayPal‐like service for buying, selling and accepting bitcoins was a perfect fit. 
“They said, ‘We’re sold on digital currency; we just want to know if you’re the right people,’” Ehrsam 
told International Business Times as he paced a San Francisco rooftop terrace on a recent windy 
afternoon. “It was a very different starting point.” 
Indeed, virtual currencies are nothing new to the Chinese. For example, more than 100 million people 
on the social platform QQ have used the Q coin for more than 10 years. And after China’s state‐run 
China Central Television, or CCTV, ran a half‐hour‐long docume
ntary on bitcoins, downloads of apps for 
processing and “mining” bitcoins soared in the world’s second‐largest economy. 
  
Bitcoin, long the plaything of the Western uber‐nerd, now appears poised to grow substantially in China 
and other markets, like the euro zone, where government meddling in native currency valuations has 
left many distrustful of the money in their bank accounts. 
  
Americans don’t have this problem ‐‐ yet. And that may be a problem in itself. According to bitcoin 
proponents, if the U.S. tries to ignore the nascent currency, writing it off as a financial fad with less value 
than the see
mingly stable dollar, Americans risk ceding to the Chinese and others control of the future 
of what could be the most disruptive force in monetary exchanges since the credit card. In turn, the 
dollar and the ability of the U.S. to navigate global currency conflicts could be seriously weakened. 
  
“Here’s the bottom line: Bitcoin has much higher popularity outside the U.S. and much higher potential 
outside the U.S.,” observed Andreas M. Antonopoulos, of the Bitcoin Foundation. “If you go to an 
                                                           
 
2
 http://www.ibtimes.com/battle‐over‐bitcoin‐china‐backs‐us‐startup‐coinbase‐us‐falls‐behind‐virtual‐currencies‐
1297147 

 
SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
American and say, ‘Hey, there’s this ne
w thing, bitcoin, they say, ‘Well, what’s wrong with the dollar?’ 
That question is different in other countries.” 
  
Bitcoins are a finite, Web‐based currency created in 2009 by a group of hackers working under the nom 
de Internet Satoshi Nakamoto. Exactly 10,952,975 bitcoins are in circulation, all of which have been 
purchased on exchange networks or mined. The currency is mined using software that processes 
transactions on the bitcoin network, adding groups of transactions, called blocks, to the chain. Miners 
are paid about 25 bitcoins per block. That digital money can then be used to purchase a variety of goods 
online, from legitimate software to heroin on the infamous virtual black‐market Silk Road. 
  
Bitcoin surged in value to $266 last month, thrusting the currency into the mainstream spotlight as 
investment poured in from sources as diverse as the hapless Brothers Winklevoss (of Facebook infamy) 
and Union Capital Ventures principal Fred Wilson (an early investor in Zynga, Twitter and Kickstarter). 
Suddenly, everyone was talking about buying bitcoins. But the bubble burst in late April, and in the U.S. 
at least, bitcoin faded from the news. That was not the case in China, where Antonopoulos said 
downloads of bitcoin clients have eclipsed those in the U.S. 
  
Bitcoins are mined in several steps. After downloading a bitcoin client, such as Coinbase (which serves as 
a wallet in which to store the bits of code that constitute the digital money), miners often join pools 
where they share computing power to decode algorithms in which bitcoins are hidden. The concept of 
bitcoins and bitcoin mining is cryptic for many people, even some otherwise forward‐thinking American 
investors. The irony is that, for now, American startups are leading the bitcoin charge, and the U.S. 
government was the first to issue guidance on using the currency as payment ‐‐ a seemingly tacit 
recognition of bitcoin’s validity as legal tender. 
 
Why China Poses a Threat 
  
Feng Li, the IDG partner who chose to fund Coinbase, said the Chinese have yearned for access to a 
virtual currency since the central govern
ment cracked down on the use of Q coins. 
  
Q coins were introduced in March 2002 by Tencent Holdings Ltd. (HKG:0700), the parent company of 
the country’s most popular instant‐messaging service, QQ, and they currently average an annual 
transaction value of more than 1 billion yuan ($163 million). That value is growing at a rate of about 15 
percent to 25 percent a year. 
  
Q coins, purchased with yuan, are predominantly used to buy virtual products and services in QQ and its 
related online games and social media. Originally, Tencent regulations prevented Q coins from being 
traded between users or converted back to yuan but allowed users to trade points and purchase Q coins 
with their game accounts, then use the black market to convert them into cash. That caused concerns at 
the People’s Bank of China, China’s central bank. In January 2007, converting game points to Q coins was 

 
SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
banned, an
d Tencent reiterated that Q coins constitute a product, not a currency, which seemed to 
satisfy the concerns. 
  
“There has already been proof with the Q coin,” Feng said of the Chinese likeliness to start using bitcoin. 
“It’s been very well circ
ulated and very well adopted.” 
  
Already, shops on Taobao ‐‐ the Chinese equivalent to eBay Inc., owned by Alibaba.com Ltd. ‐‐ accept 
bitcoins as payment for goods, as does the similar service, Tencent’s PaiPai.com. 
  
The Chinese are embracing bitcoins in other ways. The first bitcoin fund began to raise money in June, 
with the goal of raising 20 million yuan. The fund’s investment threshold is 10,000 yuan, and it will 
mature in four years. 
  
Q coin’s popularity isn’t the only reason bitcoin has appeal in China. As it turns out, China is the perfect 
place for bitcoin mining. While much of the developed world is well into the transition from personal 
computers to mobile devices, China’s PC market is still thriving, which provides the necessary computing 
power to run a successful business converting electricity into mined coins. Price caps on electricity 
already create wasteful use of energy in China, so running a code‐crunching computer for hours on end 
isn’t as costly an investment as it would be in the U.S. And so‐called gold‐mining or gold‐farming 
businesses already exist in China’s cybersphere. None of that will come as a surprise to any “World of 
Warcraft” player: Gamers in Chinese urban sweatshops are known to sit in front of glowing blue screens 
for hours, slaughtering players in the game for their spoils or mining gold deposits found in the 
sprawling milieu of Blizzard Entertainment’s international blockbuster. Those treasures are then sold to 
players in the game for real money. 
  
China has a heavily control
led currency, which also makes bitcoin attractive.   
 “The more controlled the currency is, the harder the transactions are, the more friction there is in the 
national currency, the more appealing the coin is,” Antonopoulos said, noted that the most appealing 
place to use bitcoin would be a country whose economy is a veritable train wreck ‐‐ like Zimbabwe, 
except that the southern African nation lacks the necessary technology. “I would say China is perfect,” 
he said. “It’s got the penetration, it’s got the smartphones, it’s got the Internet and the people are 
familiar with virtual currencies. And, it’s got the not‐as‐appealing national currency.” 
 
Regulation in the U.S. 
  
Guidance issued in March by the U.S. Treasury Department said that companies issuing or exchanging 
online cash, including bitcoin, would be subject to the same scrutiny as traditional firms such as the 
Western Union Co. to prevent money laundering. 
  
Less than two months later, the Department of Homeland Security proved that edict had teeth. 
  

 
SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
Federal officials obtained a warrant Tuesd
ay to seize an account tied to Mt.Gox, the Tokyo‐based 
exchange company that handles about 80 percent of all bitcoin trades. Authorities accused Mt.Gox’s U.S. 
subsidiary, Mutum Sigillum LLC, of failing to register as a money‐services company with the Treasury’s 
Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. An account held by the online‐payments firm Dwolla was 
subsequently seized. 
  
Many feared the warrant execution could cast a chill over the bitcoin industry as a sector centered on a 
borderless, decentralized money came under the scrutiny of the federal government. 
  
That proved not to be the case, Coinbase’s Ehrsam said. “For bitcoin to go mainstream, or as it goes 
mainstream, it will be used in a higher and higher amount of transactions,” he said, adding that 
Coinbase is registered as a money‐services firm. “There’s no way there will be all this money flowing 
through an unregulated system.” 
  
Chris Larsen ‐‐ the CEO of OpenCoin, a fellow San Francisco‐based payment platform that processes 
most national currencies as well as bitcoin and its own virtual cash, Ripple ‐‐ agreed. “They definitely are 
regulating them, [and] we actually think that’s a really good thing for the industry,” he told IBTimes. “I 
thought the guidance was a good idea. One of the things the guidelines seem to make clear for the first 
time is that a virtual currency could be used for goods and services.” 
 
The Price of Regulation 
  
But such regulation is a slippery slope, said Jerry Brito, a senior research fellow at the Mercat
us Center 
at George Mason University. 
  
Perhaps it begins with measures to prevent money‐laundering, he said. But what measures would the 
government take to prevent the untraceable currency from being used for child pornography or human 
trafficking? 
  
“Bitcoin has the potential to be a disruptive technology that would be beneficial to the economy, and 
we don’t want to kill off that potential to get at the other potential for bad stuff,” he observed. Brito, 
who plans to speak next month at a conference on virtual currencies organized by the National Center 
for Missing and Exploited Children, added: “We’re already the first country to enforce money‐laundering 
laws against bitcoin. But the U.S. would be shooting itself in the foot if it went too far [with regulations] 
and either outlawed bitcoin or made the legal guidelines impossible to comply with.” 
 
Will China Step In? 
  
So far, Chinese bitcoin merchants have little to fear. For many, the CCTV segment on bitcoin seemed to 
be a signal from Beijing, which heavily controls the channel’s content, that the currency is worth 
exploring. 

 
SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
Some of those interviewed speculated that the Communist Party wants to see bitcoin stockpiled in 
China, allowing the governmen
t to invest in it if, or when, the dollar is shaken from its perch as the 
world’s reserve currency. 
  
It re
mains to be seen whether ‐‐ or, more likely, when ‐‐ China will intervene in the trade of bitcoin in its 
own economy. But for the U.S. to experience widespread adoption of the currency, which is considered 
a necessary step for gaining a grasp on the bitcoin market, limited government control will have to allow 
the money, li
ke the Internet that birthed it, to develop organically. 
  
3. Apple to create virtual currency ‘iMoney’ (June 7, 2013) the CoinDesk
3
 
By William McCanless 
 
Yesterday, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Organization published a patent application from Apple for – 
wait for it – iMoney. Apple looks to get into the digital currency game in a way similar to Amazon Coins. 
The patent is a combination of virtual currency and digital wallet technology. It allows users to store 
money in the cloud and make payments with their iPhone. 
Some possibilities for the patent include making money by viewing ads, where the user will receive 
tokens of iMoney that can be applied toward their mobile carrier costs or redeemed for Apple products 
and services. There may also be NFC ‐ Near Field Communication ‐ technology in the mix to 
communicate with point‐of‐sale terminals, which is something Apple has resisted adding to the iPhone 
for a long time. NFC allows smartphones to establish radio communication with each other by touching 
them together or bringing them in close proximity. 
Many people consider this as Apple trying to nudge into the digital currency arena, after already refusing 
to support mobile Bitcoin wallets or apps that allow Bitcoin trading, causing many Bitcoin enthusiasts 
and users of alt‐currency to switch over to Android. 
 Apple’s official anti‐bitcoin policy is infuriating many of its users as the digital currency continues to 
become more main stream. The company actually removed two Bitcoin wallet applications from its app 
store in May, prompting Bitpak’s developer, Rob Sama, to lament, “[It is] extremely unfortunate that 
Apple has chosen to take this stand.” Blockchain for iPhone was also deleted from the app store. 
Apple later explained to advocates that, “Apps must comply with all legal requirements in any location 
where they are made available to users. It is the developer’s obligation to understand and conform to all 
local laws.” Of course, Bitcoin is an unregulated currency with no laws prohibiting it. 
This is all typical of Apple – they’re like the too‐cool‐for‐school kids in the High School lunch room that 
all sit at a table together and don’t interact with anyone around. They’ll make fun of you for wearing a 
new hat. Then, the next day, they’ll all be sporting the same hat and claim that it was totally their idea. 
                                                           
 
3
 http://www.coindesk.com/apple‐to‐create‐virtual‐currency‐imoney/ 

 
SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
In this case, they’re doing everything they can to completely ref
use to have anything to do with Bitcoin, 
while at the same time filing a patent for their very own digital currency. They obviously like the idea, 
but want to keep it in the Apple family and, knowing Apple, they’ll try to market this new virtual 
currency as some kind of better alternative to “unstable and volatile Bitcoin.” 
Josh Seims, just one iPhone user angry about Apple’s anti‐Bitcoin policy, submitted a petition on 
Change.org back in April that, so far, has received 317 supporters (with 183 more needed in order to 
reach its goal). I got in touch with him earlier today to ask for his feedback. 
  “The iMoney patent is an example of both good and bad effects of the concentration of power. On the 
good side, Apple’s dominant power puts them in a good position to build a valuable and easy‐to‐use 
mobile payment system. They can customize their hardware to support this system, they can embed it 
into their operating system, and they can likely convince many merchants and banks to play along. 
These serious competitive advantages may result in significant end‐user benefits. 
 On the other hand, this power can also be used to prevent competition. They may use this patent to 
attack anyone else building mobile payment solutions. And, by trying to collect a piece of transactional 
revenue, Apple is likely to oppose decentralized payment solutions like Bitcoin.” 
 I asked Josh if he thought Apple’s patent was an initial step in trying to create their own competing 
digital currency while deciding not to play nice with others and corner the market. “They might,” he 
wrote back. “I wouldn’t consider such a currency a big threat to Bitcoin since it will have all the same 
weaknesses that a decentralized currency like Bitcoin addresses.” 
I’m a little weary of not considering Apple a threat, though. Time and time again Apple has come out 
with products and services that at first seem completely absurd (remember how stupid the iPad 
sounded? Then, remember how stupid the Mini iPad sounded?) but that begin picking up speed, 
creating entire new markets, and disrupting other ones, which they accomplish by an almost cult 
following, generational brand loyalty, and savvy marketing. 
 Only time will tell, but one thing seems certain – Apple would rather ignore and alienate a vast and 
growing demographic of Bitcoin users by not only striking down any apps that allow BTC storage and 
trading, but creating their very own digital currency, which is basically a final giant middle finger to 
anyone that was holding out hope that Apple would eventually change its mind on the Bitcoin issue. 
4. Digital currency firms rush to adopt anti‐money laundering rules amid global crackdown (June 4, 
2013) Reuters  
By Thomson Reuters Reporting Team ‐These are unsettling times for digital currency businesses and the 
venture capitalists backing them. 
  
On Tuesday, the authorities in Spain, Costa Rica and New York arrested five people at the digital 
currency firm Liberty Reserve, including its founder Arthur Budovsky, and seized related bank accounts 
and Internet domains.  

 
SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
It was a further wake‐up call for those in
volved in digital currencies, such as the most prominent, Bitcoin, 
that they need to comply with anti‐money laundering rules or risk facing a crackdown. 
  
They had already been put on notice – first by an April 2012 report from the U.S. Federal Bureau of 
Investigation that explained how Bitcoin was being used by criminals to secretly transfer money around 
the world, and then this March by the U.S. Treasury Department. Its anti‐money laundering arm, the 
Financial Crimes and Enforcement Network (FinCEN) stated that digital currency firms needed to comply 
with the same anti‐money laundering rules as other financial institutions, including monitoring 
customers and reporting suspicious activity to the government. 
  
As regulators tighten the screws, businesses built around digital currencies are trying to satisfy new 
monitoring requirements without letting public enthusiasm for the technology‐based concept slip away. 
  
“I think the whole ecosystem is maturing very quickly and we have young companies that are just 
beginning to understand how to navigate the regulatory issues,” said David A. Johnston, co‐founder and 
executive director of BitAngels, a new venture which only this week announced it had raised $6.7 million 
to fund startups tied to Bitcoin. 
  
Digital currency is electronic money that can be passed between individuals without the use of the 
traditional banking or money transfer system. 
  
Different currencies are structured in different ways. Some, like Liberty Reserve’s “LR” digital currency, 
use units of value that are tied to an existing hard currency, such as the U.S. dollar. By contrast, the 
value of Bitcoin, the best known virtual currency, fluctuates according to supply and demand. 
  
Bitcoin, which has been embraced by a number of venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, exists through an 
open‐source software program that any users with enough skill and computing power can access. It is 
not managed by a single company or government. Users can buy bitcoins through exchanges that 
convert real money into the virtual currency. 
  
Liberty Reserve, which was closed last week, however, was a firm that U.S. prosecutors said created a 
platform that enabled criminal gangs to launder more than $6 billion. 
  
Bitcoin’s supporters cite a host of legitimate reasons for using a digital currency: It can be transferred 
using less  infrastructure than traditional currencies, and with fewer service fees. A virtual currency 
could also be safer than using a re
gular credit card for online purchases, because it is not attached 
directly to any bank account. 
 

 
SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
But law en
forcement officials see Bitcoin as another vehicle for criminals to anonymously transfer 
money. 
  
FinCEN’s statement in March set off a rush inside the community to learn about anti‐money laundering 
rules and figure out how to comply with them. At the 2013 Bitcoin Conference in San Jose, California 
two weeks ago, discussion focused heavily on regulatory compliance – its intricacies and its costs. 
 
“That was a big theme of the whole conference,” said Jerry Brito, director of the technology policy 
program at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. Brito said businesses exchanging Bitcoins 
were coming to terms with the fact that they would now need to get licensed as money transmitters in 
48 U.S. states, a process requiring in‐person interviews in each state, thanks to FinCEN’s guidance. 
  
“Everything I’m telling you, I’ve learned over the past couple of months as I’m racing to learn,” said Brito, 
who attended the Bitcoin Conference in San Jose. “I think that’s what the Bitcoin community is doing 
too.” 
 
Charlie Shrem, chief executive of Bitcoin transfer firm BitInstant.com, told the conference about the 
importance of complying with the new rules. 
  
“You have to know your cu
stomer,” he told the audience, according to a video posted on the Internet. 
“Whether or not you agree with the laws or not, you’ve got to follow them.” 
  
The FinCEN statement means companies that exchange Bitcoins for hard currency must now hire full‐
time compliance officers to verify the identities of users, especially those looking to transfer Bitcoins out 
of the digital world and back into dollars or other hard currencies. Estimates vary on how much it costs 
to get compliant, but licensing and registration fees alone can total in the tens of thousands of dollars, 
an adde
d heavy cost for small startup businesses. 
  
Brito said the Bitcoin community is also trying to increase its contact with law enforcement and 
regulators. The Bitcoin Foundation, a Bitcoin advocacy group made up of Bitcoin‐related business 
owners and software programmers, is looking to hire a full‐time lawyer based in Washington to make its 
case to regulators and lawmakers. 
  
Some members of the community are declining to discuss regulation. Jon Matonis, the Bitcoin 
Foundation’s secretary who is identified on the group’s website as one of two spokesmen for press 
inquiries, told Reuters: “I am electing to take a brief break from commenting on issues such as this.” 
  

 
SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
U.S. law en
forcement officials are looking first and foremost to unmask criminals operating in 
cyberspace and arrest them, wherever they may be in the world, and they’re looking to digital currency 
businesses to help. 
 Ed Lowery, special agent in charge of the U.S. Secret Service’s criminal investigative division, said the 
agency is working “aggressively with our international partners” to pursue cyber crime and the 
companies that permit the misuse of digital currencies. He declined to comment specifically on Bitcoin. 
 Liberty Reserve has not been the only recent target for the authorities. The Tokyo‐based firm Mt. Gox, 
the world’s largest exchanger of U.S. dollars with Bitcoins, had two accounts held by its U.S. subsidiary 
seized this month by agents from the Department of Homeland Security on the grounds that it was 
operating a money transmitting business without a license. 
 Mt. Go
x on Thursday announced it would require all of its users accounts to be verified before allowing 
them to perform any more deposits or withdrawals. Its founder declined to comment for this story. 
 Other companies are simply trying to avoid having to comply with U.S. rules by keeping away from the 
country. Foll
owing FinCEN’s statement, two digital currency firms structured similarly to Liberty Reserve 
– Russia‐based WebMoney and Panama‐based Perfect Money – restricted access to their services from 
inside the United States. 
Vyacheslav Andryushchenko, a spokesman for WebMoney in Russia, said each of the company’s 20 
million users had to agree to prohibitions against money laundering and illegal trade when signing up for 
an account. Users who violate the rules are cut off, and all actions inside WebMoney’s system are 
recorded, the spokesman said. A user is blocked if there are any suspicions of anything illegal. In 
addition, the less personal information the user provides, the fewer services are available to him or her, 
the spokesman said. 
 Several messages on the li
sted number on Perfect Money’s website were not returned. The company’s 
address is an empty suite in an office block on the northwestern side of Panama City. A secretary in a 
neighboring office said she had never s
een anyone go in or out. 
5. Anti‐Money Laundering Tools Lag (June 3 2013) The Wall Street Journal
4
 by Joel Schectman  
U.S. authorities have been cracking down on the use of online payment systems by money launderers. 
But researchers say businesses do not yet have effective technology to prevent drug dealers or scam 
artists from using payment transfers to legitimize ill‐gotten cash. 
The Federal Reserve is looking into risks associated with online payment systems like Bitcoin and PayPal, 
a Fed official said today. Th
e comments came as U.S. regulators have heightened efforts to guard 
against money laundering in the virtual payment sector. In March, the U.S. Treasury Department ruled 
                                                           
 
4
 http://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2013/06/03/anti‐money‐laundering‐tools‐lag/?mod=WSJ_hps_sections_cio 
Federal Reserve initiates investigation into PayPal, Bitcoin for security risks 
10 
 
SELECTION OF PRESS ARTICLES ON VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
(June 3‐10, 2013) 
11 
 
that firms issuing or exchanging online currency would be subject to the same anti‐money laundering 
rules as traditional payment providers such as Western Union Co., like reporting transactions above 
$10,000. Last week, U.S. authorities brought charges against managers of Liberty Reserve, a virtual 
currency site that allegedly helped criminals launder $6 billion. 
But U.S. efforts to prevent criminals from using online payment systems to disguise dirty money may 
prove a daunting challenge. Paypal, a unit of eBay Inc. , said in an email that the company has “zero 
tolerance for the use of our system for an
y illegal materials and services” and maintains a large 
compliance team that assists authorities. For example, a sudden change in purchasing habits might tip 
Paypal off to fraudulent behavior. But security experts say anti‐money laundering technology is far less 
advanced than the tools banks and businesses like Paypal use to prevent fraud. 
Both fraud and money laundering can sometimes be detected through Big Data searches for suspicious 
anomalies amongst millions of transactions. But banks and online payment providers, which usually 
reimburse victims of fraud, have devoted “an extraordinary effort” to analyze patterns associated with 
stolen ide
ntity and fake transactions, said Daniel Weitzner  a former White House deputy chief 
technology officer, now a researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Companies have “taken it on themselves to spot fraudulent transactions. The result is they have 
invested billions in incredibly sophisticated Big Data techniques,” Mr. Weitzner said 
But institutions have not thrown as much resources into using data analytics to spot money laundering, 
Mr. Weitzner said. “They have reporting obligations over a certain dollar amount and they report 
suspicious activity. But the understanding is the government will do the analysis to spot money 
laundering,” Mr. Weitzner said. 
Ed Schlesinger, a computer science researcher at Carnegie Mellon University said the technology to 
effectively flag money laundering “just does not exist yet.” 
For example, at Heritage Auctions, where collectible pieces can sell for more than $3 million, the firm 
will run credit checks, and risk score analyses of bidders to detect if they are attempting to make a 
purchase from a fraudulent account, said CIO Brian Shipman. The New York Times reported last month 
that high priced art is a growing tool for money transfer by criminals. But Mr. Shipman says he is 
unaware of technology specifically designed to detect if purchasers or sellers are attempting to launder 
money. The auction house tries to thwart such activity by establishing a rapport with large buyers and 
sellers. “We establish a relationship – it’s a gut feeling. But if someone was very smooth they could 
make a purchase or a sale and we wouldn’t know what their intent was,” Mr. Shipman said.