TRANSITION: IPv4 TO IPv6

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Jun 30, 2012 (4 years and 11 months ago)

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TRANSITION: IPv4 TO IPv6
AUDIENCE: Chief Information Officers, Information Technology Managers, Network Managers
AUTHOR: Greg Davies – Senior Technology Architecture Specialist, Chief Technology Office, Telstra
jUly 2009
AN OveRvI ew Of The New I NTeRNeT AddReSSI Ng PROTOcOl ANd I TS I mPlI cATI ONS fOR buSI NeSS ANd gOveRNmeNT
whITe PAPeR
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
2
IPv4 is the dominant addressing protocol used on the Internet and most private
networks today. however, public IPv4 addresses are running out. global run-out of
public IPv4 is expected early in 2011. Regional Internet Registries will begin running
out in 2012 and will not be able to allocate any more addresses to service providers.
Individual service provider run-out will depend upon how well they manage their
address pools and the rate of broadband growth.
The transition from IPv4 to IPv6 is a known issue which the industry will have to
manage over the coming years. The transition will take time as it will require IPv6
support by an industry end-to-end eco-system including cPe, modems/home
gateways, networks, systems (OSS/bSS, tools), content and applications.
Telstra has been planning for this transition for a number of years. we have a well-
defined transition strategy and a well-advanced IPv6 implementation program.
Our strategy for IPv6 introduction is based on the dual-stack approach, allowing
both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to co-exist until the transition to IPv6 is complete.
This approach will make sure that the transition occurs with minimal impact on
customers, i.e. customers are not forced to move to IPv6 overnight and can deploy
and migrate to IPv6 as they become ready. Telstra is already testing dual-stack
technology on a number of key networks and products to seamlessly introduce IPv6.
businesses face a similar challenge to service providers in undertaking a complex
transition of their IP ecosystem without impacting services. It is advisable that
businesses start preparing their IPv4 to IPv6 transition strategies.
Telstra commits to providing timely information and updates on its program of work
to assist customers, suppliers and others in the industry to manage their transition.
This white paper provides an update on the current industry status of IPv6, how the
IPv4 to IPv6 transition will affect some organisations, and Telstra’s perspective on
the transition.

ExECuTIvE SuMMAry
IPv4 is the dominant addressing protocol
used on the Internet and most private
networks today. Global run-out of public
IPv4 is expected early in 2011.
This is a known industry issue and Telstra’s
strategy for IPv6 introduction is based on the
dual-stack approach, allowing both IPv4 and
IPv6 addresses to co-exist until the transition
to IPv6 is complete.
Telstra will continue to provide timely
information to assist customers to
manage their transition
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
3
Executive Summary 2
1. What is IPv6? 4
1.1 IP Address formats 4
1.2 Public and Private Addresses 4
2. IPv4 run out 5
3. What happens when IPv4 addresses run out? 6
4. Coexistence of IPv4 and IPv6 7
5. Government Mandates 8
5.1 North America 8
5.2 europe 9
5.3 Asia 9
5.4 Australia 9
6. Industry Readiness for IPv6 10
6.1 Network equipment 10
6.2 Internet Infrastructure 10
global IPv6 backbones 10
domain Name Servers 10
Service Providers 11
enterprise vPNs 11
broadband 11
6.3 customer environment 11
consumer modems and IP devices 11
mobile handsets 11
Operating Systems 11
6.4 Applications and content 12
Applications 12
content Providers 13
7. What does the transition mean for business? 13
8. What is Telstra’s approach to the transition? 14
8.1 TId and IP vPN Services 14
8.2 bigPond broadband including bigPond wireless broadband 14
8.3 mobiles including Telstra mobile broadband 14
8.4 Applications and content 15
9. What should businesses do now? 15
10. Conclusion 16
11. For more information 16
12. About the Author 16
13. References 17
Graphs & Charts
graph 1 forecast end of public IPv4 address allocations 5
graph 2 The relationship between Address Allocation and Address demand 6
chart 1 IPv6 ecosystem 7
chart 2 example of a dual-stack access to the Internet 8
TAblE Of CONTENTS
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
4
IPv6 is the new Internet protocol that will replace IPv4. It was designed during the
mid-1990s, when it was realised that IPv4 address size constraints would be a major
impediment for the continued growth of the Internet.
IPv6 was first known as the Next generation Internet Protocol (IPng) during
development within the Internet engineering Task force (IeTf). Since 1998, it has
officially been known as IPv6.
The main difference between IPv6 and IPv4 is the address size. IPv6 addresses
comprise 128 bits, whereas IPv4 addresses have 32 bits. This difference results in a
huge expansion in IP addresses:

IPv4: 2
32
addresses equals 4.3 billion addresses (less than the global human
population of 4.7 billion)

IPv6: 2
128
addresses. because the last 64 bits are used to allocate addresses
within a subnet. That leaves 2
64
, which equals 18 billion billion subnet
addresses
1.1 IP Address formats
IPv4: 32 bits. Addresses are shown as 4 decimal numbers (dot decimal notation) e.g.
144.135.19.10
cIdR (classless Inter-domain Routing) notation indicates how many of the bits are used
for the network identifying prefix with the remaining bits being used to identify a host
within that network (or subnet), e.g. 62.0.0.0/8. The “/8” indicates that the first eight bits
are used for the prefix and 24 bits are used for the host address within that network.
IPv6: 128 bits. Addresses are shown as 8 groups of 4 hexadecimal characters,
e.g. 2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334
1.2 Public and Private addresses
IPv4: in IPv4, specific address ranges were allocated for use in private networks
(e.g. within an enterprise or home). The ranges are 10.0.0.0/8, 172.16.0.0/12, and
192.168.0.0/16). Network Address Translation (NAT) is used to translate these
addresses to public addresses when accessing the broader Internet.
IPv6: IPv6 does not include private network features such as NAT because of the very
large number of IPv6 addresses. In this case, private networks will actually use public
IPv6 addresses and use security solutions such as firewalls to keep them private.
whilst IPv6 performs the same address function as IPv4, it is not backwardly
compatible. Therefore, a particular IP data session must use either IPv4 or IPv6. IPv6
can only be used when it is supported end-to end.
1. WhAT IS IPv6?
IPv6 is the new Internet protocol that
will replace IPv4.
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
5
The limited addressing range of IPv4 combined with the exponential growth in
Internet users worldwide is leading to the expiry of available public IPv4 addresses.
This is the major driver for IPv6 introduction.
graph 1 - forecast end of public IPv4 addresses
Graph 1 - Run-out of public IPv4 addresses
No more addresses for IANA to
allocate to RIRs (e.g. APNIC)
No more addresses for RIRs to
distribute to Service Providers
Available
Addresses (/8s)
2009 2008
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
IANA
10
20
30
40
RIRs
Timing as at 1 June 2009 – Source: http://www.potaroo.net/tools/ipv4/index.html

*Indicative timing only. Actual timing subject to address demand
(global, Regionally and within service providers)
The current prediction is that run-out of the remaining IPv4 address pools held by
IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority) will occur by early 2011.
APNIc (Asia Pacific Network Information centre) is the Regional Internet Registry
which allocates IP addresses in the Asia-Pacific region. Once it can no longer get new
addresses from IANA it, too, will run out of IP addresses. unfortunately for Australia,
Asia-Pacific is the highest growth region for IP address allocation and their addresses
will probably be the first to run out (forecast for early 2012). At that point, there will
be no more IPv4 addresses available to Telstra or other providers in the region.
2 IPv4 ADDrESS ruN-OuT
The remaining IPv4 address pools held by
IANA is predicted to run out by early 2011
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
6
Internal enterprise networks using private IPv4 addresses will not be impacted. Nor
will the run-out impact existing IPv4 networks and IPv4 based services: they will
continue to operate normally.
however, when no more IPv4 addresses are available, none can be allocated for
service providers like Telstra. Nevertheless, these providers will still have their
existing pool of addresses. depending on how well they manage them and the rate
of broadband growth, these addresses may not run out immediately.

graph 2 - The relationship between Address Allocation and Address demand
Graph 2 – The relationship between Address Allocation and Address
Demand
* Indicative timing
only. Actual timing
subject to address
demand (Global,
Regionally and within
service providers)
Address allocation and address demand will determine if
and when individual Service Providers run out of public
IPv4 addresses
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Service Providers
Address demand
Addresses used
2008
Address allocation
Source: Telstra
*Indicative timing only. Actual timing subject to address demand (global,
Regionally and within service providers)
Once service providers have run out of public IPv4 addresses, they may have
to implement alternate solutions which share public IPv4 addresses between
users. however, that will add more complexity and may impact some consumer
applications. The Internet engineering Task force (IeTf) is currently addressing this
issue.
3. WhAT hAPPENS WhEN
IPv4 ADDrESSES ruN OuT?
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
7
The transition from IPv4 to IPv6 is a known issue which the industry will have to
manage over the coming years. The transition will take time as it will require IPv6
support by an industry end-to-end eco-system including cPe, modems/home
gateways, networks, systems (OSS/bSS, tools), content and applications.
chart 1 - IPv6 ecosystem
Chart 1 - IPv6 Ecosystem
Public IPv6
Content/Apps
Carrier/ISP
Systems
& tools
Modems Content/Apps
Operating systems
Systems & tools
Client apps Network vendors
Servers
Mobile handsets
Consumer
Electronics
IPv6 is the accepted solution, however,
moving the entire ecosystem to IPv6 will take many years
Global
Internet
Source: Telstra

It is expected that IPv4 and IPv6 will co-exist for many years. unlike Y2K, there is no
drop-dead date for ceasing using IPv4 and different regions and industry players will
move to IPv6 at different rates.
A critical impact on all countries outside of North America is that most Internet
content is currently located on very large server farms in the uSA. because of early
Internet development, North America has a large allocation of IPv4 addresses. It has
enough under-used addresses that can be reassigned to meet its broadband growth
requirements for many years. consequently, the uS transition to IPv6 is expected
to be less urgent than other regions, and uS content is likely to remain IPv4-based
well past the forecasted IPv4 run-out date. consumers will continue to need an IPv4
address in order to access IPv4 content and services.
To allow IPv4 and IPv6 traffic to co-exist during the transition period, technology
solutions were developed in conjunction with the development of the IPv6 protocol
in the mid-1990s.
There are three categories of transition technologies:

Tunnelling – carries IPv6 inside tunnels across legacy IPv4 networks

Protocol Translation – translates packets between IPv6 and IPv4

dual-stack – support both protocols in parallel on one service
4. COExISTENCE Of
IPv4 AND IPv6
It is expected that IPv4 and IPv6 will
co-exist for many years.
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
8
dual-stack (IPv6/IPv4) remains the accepted industry direction for the introduction of
IPv6. Tunnelling has sometimes been used by early IPv6 adopters where native IPv6
has not been available end-to-end.

chart 2 - example of a dual-stack access to the Internet
Chart 2 - Dual-Stack enables a smooth transition
IPv4 content
/apps
Domestic
Backbone
Global
Internet
backbones
Customer Global Internet
LNS
Service
Provider
PoP
Apps, Content
& Systems
Service Provider
Modem
ADSL
Modem
CMTS
DNS
LNS
Dual-stack
content/apps
Cable
Wireless
Content
Providers
Large installed base of
IPv4-only CPE
Large installed base of
IPv4-only content/apps
IPv6 content
/apps
Dual-Stack
Outside Service
Provider Control
Outside Service
Provider Control
Dual-Stack enables a smooth transition, supporting both IPv6 and IPv4
Source: Telstra
Recognising the importance of a well managed transition from IPv4 to IPv6, and the
necessity for this to occur prior to the run-out of IPv4 addresses, many governments
have introduced mandates for the implementation of IPv6.
The importance of continued Internet growth has been recognised by many
governments due to its critical role for areas such as e-commerce, healthcare
services and public information dissemination. This has led some governments to
set IPv6 technology mandates, to promote adoption of technologies that will ensure
continued Internet connectivity for all of their citizens.
The technology mandates have been primarily targeted at enterprises, institutions
and departments that provide governments with their Internet connectivity
services. Only recently have IPv6 mandates for consumer broadband services been
issued.
5.1 North America
In August 2005, the uS Omb (Office of management and budgets) issued
memorandum m 05 22: Transition Planning for Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6), to
set the uS federal Agencies a hard deadline for compliance to IPv6 on their core IP
networks. The date for IPv6 compliance was 30th June 2008.
5. GOvErNMENT
MANDATES
Recognising the importance of a well
managed transition from IPv4 to IPv6,
many governments have introduced
mandates for the implementation of IPv6.
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
9
This mandate led many major uS Service Providers (e.g. AT&T, Sprint, verizon, Qwest,
NTT America) to develop government and enterprise solutions to allow agencies to
buy IPv6 products and services to meet their core connectivity requirements.
In practice, the mandate was met by all of the agencies because they were able to
demonstrate that their backbone networks were capable of carrying IPv6 packets by
the agreed deadline. however, there was no need to actually implement IPv6 based
services. A draft roadmap for IPv6 adoption by the uS government has recently been
prepared which provides a plan of transition from IPv4 to IPv6 based services within
the 2010-2011 timeframe, with all services being available over IPv6 by 2012.
5.2 europe
The european commission communicated an IPv6 action plan in may 2008. The
target is to have 25% of european customers accessing the Internet using IPv6 by
2010. It challenges all players (ISPs, content providers, customer premise equipment
vendors, governments and organisations) to work towards the target.
5.3 Asia
many Asian countries, including china, Japan and Korea have been early adopters
of IPv6 due to government mandates. for example:

chinese government Strategy: china Next generation Internet (cNgI) sets out
a 5 year plan (2006-2010) for the early adoption of IPv6

The Korean government has the strategic IPv6 Promotion Plan II which sets a
vision of deploying IPv6 for the public sector by 2010
5.4 Australia
AgImO (Australian government Information management Office) has set the
following timeframes for IPv6 adoption within the Australian government and its
departments:

Preparation Jan 2008-dec 2009

Transition Jan 2010-dec 2012

Implementation Jan 2013-dec 2015
The Australian department of defence has also mandated a move to IPv6 to be
completed by the end of 2013.
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
10
Industry globally has been slow to adopt IPv6 due to the lack of commercial drivers.
by its very nature, the Internet involves a huge number of disparate groups and thus
a co-ordinated approach has been difficult to achieve. The lack of a commercial
imperative has led to a ‘chicken and egg’ situation: why support IPv6 in the
equipment if there are no IPv6 services, and why create an IPv6 service if nobody
can use it?
This situation is now changing as the IPv4 run-out approaches. Nevertheless, while
many parts of the industry are now supporting IPv6, others are lagging behind. The
following is a brief analysis of the readiness of key industry sectors:
6.1 Network equipment
In the main, network equipment vendors already provide IPv6 support (dual- stack)
for the core and edge of networks. Key vendors have been hardware and software
ready for several years, with equipment deployed in small-scale trials.
even though IPv6 capability has existed in most network routing equipment for
some time, it has often not been enabled for use. however, network control path
functions like dNS, dhcP, and RAdIuS are not yet uniformly supported for IPv4/IPv6
dual-stack across all vendors. These remain among the ‘work in progress’ issues for
the industry.
6.2 Internet Infrastructure
global IPv6 backbones
As IPv4 and IPv6 do not interwork, it is essential that there is global IPv6
interconnectivity similar to the IPv4 Internet today. fortunately, a number of global
IP backbone providers already support IPv6:

Native IPv6 transit (e.g. NTT, global crossing, level 3, france Telecom and
Telecom Italia)

IPv6 transit service by tunnelling across IPv4 (e.g. AT&T, Sprint, verizon)
domain Name Servers
A critical step along the path to IPv6 was implemented on 4th of february 2008,
when IcANN (Internet corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) assigned IPv6
addresses and provided IPv6 connectivity to six of the Internet’s root domain name
servers (dNS). Similar enhancements are being made to other top-level dNS (e.g. for
.com and .org). The APNIc servers for the .au domain also have IPv6 connectivity.
These enhancements to dNS will allow IPv6 devices to resolve Internet domain
names into IP addresses entirely using IPv6.
6. INDuSTry rEADINESS
fOr IPv6
In the main, network equipment vendors
already provide IPv6 support (dual- stack)
for the core and edge of networks. Key
vendors such as Cisco and Juniper have
been hardware and software ready
for several years.
As IPv4 and IPv6 do not interwork, it is
essential that there is global IPv6 intercon-
nectivity similar to the IPv4 Internet today.
Fortunately, a number of global IP back-
bone providers already support IPv6.
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
11
Service Providers
To connect to the global IPv6 Internet, customers will need to use a service provider
that supports IPv6 and provides the required connectivity through to the global IPv6
backbones.
enterprise vPNs
Service providers in the uS have begun offering dual-stack vPN services, largely to
support federal agencies as a result of uS government mandates (e.g. Sprint, verizon
and NTT).
broadband
There are few ISPs worldwide currently providing dual-stack consumer broadband
services, Japan being the main exception.
6.3 customer environment
consumer modems and IP devices
In general, very few modem gateways and other consumer cPe appliances currently
support IPv6. The main exception includes some high-end PdA mobile phones
running windows mobile, and some cPe made for specific markets (e.g. Japan).
In the vast majority of cases, these IPv4-only devices will not be economically
upgradeable to support IPv6. This is because the device is not upgradeable in any
way, or because additional resources (e.g. flash memory or RAm) are required to
support IPv6. IPv6 capability from many consumer gateway vendors will not be
available until late 2009 or early 2010.
The long lifespan of broadband modem gateways means that many consumers
will not have IPv6 connectivity capability for several years unless they opt to replace
their modem with a dual-stack capable gateway.
mobile handsets
Only some high-end mobile handsets support IPv6 today, however dual-stack IPv4/
IPv6 capability is expected to become more widespread across new handsets during
2010/11. because of the relatively short changeover time for mobile handsets, the
transition to IPv6 capability is not expected to have much impact on consumers.
Operating Systems
most mainstream consumer and business operating systems have IPv6/IPv4 dual-
stack capability:

microsoft windows – consumer/workstation editions: The most prevalent
versions of microsoft windows used by consumers and in office environments
are windows XP and windows vista. both of these OS support IPv6, however,
the implementation in XP is not enabled by default and has some limitations
Most IPv4-only devices will not be
economically upgradeable to support IPv6.
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
12
(e.g. limited support for IPsec over IPv6, no support for file and print sharing,
no support for dhcPv6, command line configuration). hence, microsoft
recommends using vista for large-scale IPv6 deployments. earlier editions of
windows (95, 98, me, 2000) have no support for IPv6

microsoft windows – Server editions: windows Server 2003, being internally
similar to windows XP, supports IPv6, albeit incompletely. Server 2008 has
full IPv6 capability equivalent to that in vista. windows Server 2000 does not
support IPv6

Sun Solaris versions 8, 9 and 10 are primarily used for application hosting,
especially those that also use the Java runtime environment. All of these
versions of Solaris support IPv6

linux is used for both server and consumer purposes. most distributions
of linux support IPv6, although many do not make a point of exposing
IPv6 configuration parameters during installation. even so, most recent
distributions quietly enable IPv6 and will acquire an IPv6 address if the host
network offers it

Apple mac OS X supports IPv6
6.4 Applications and content
Applications
Applications have to be specifically written to take advantage of IPv4/IPv6 dual-
stack capabilities in the underlying operating system. In many cases, applications
will work correctly when used over an IPv6 network, but others will need to be
checked and modified to meet the dual-stack requirements.
Applications can be divided into the following major categories:

Server applications: Servers typically include web servers, database servers
and mail servers but can also include others such as those used for massive
multiplayer online gaming. The applications running on these servers
respond to requests from client applications which are carried across IP
networks

client applications: end users run client applications which initiate requests
to server applications across IP networks (the web browser being the most
common example)

Peer-to-peer applications: In this case the end user application acts as both a
client and a server and can communicate directly with other users across IP
networks
most applications (server, client and peer-to-peer) interface at the IP socket layer and
won’t care whether the transport is IPv4 or IPv6. however, some applications may
have been originally written in a way that ties them to IPv4 and these will have to be
modified. Some examples include:

use of hard coded IPv4 addresses
Applications have to be specifically written
to take advantage of IPv4/IPv6 dual-stack
capabilities in the underlying
operating system.
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
13

IP address data structures that only cater for IPv4 size addresses

user Interfaces that display an IP address, or allow an IP address to be entered
only in IPv4 format
many applications, including web browsers, already support dual-stack function.
Others are subject to the planned timing by the application developer. Ideally,
applications should be agnostic to the use of IPv4 or IPv6. An application that
supports dual-stack will usually give preference to IPv6 if it is available, otherwise it
will fall back to using IPv4.
content Providers
most major Internet content providers are yet to make the move to a dual-stack
architecture. Some have established specific IPv6-only versions of their site to
enable IPv6 access to users who have IPv6 connectivity, and who deliberately
choose to use that site (e.g. ipv6.google.com).
multinational enterprises and those that deal with government departments are
most likely to be impacted by government mandates. This will drive the need to
support IPv6 (e.g. Australian government departments implementing IPv6 from
2013 to 2015).
Public IPv4 address shortages will have minimal impact on enterprise vPNs due to
the prevailing use of private IPv4 addressing. The IPv4 public address run-out will
mostly affect businesses in their external connections to consumers and the broader
Internet. each business needs to consider whether to deliver IPv6 based services to
consumers who prefer to use IPv6.
consumers will move to dual-stack cPe configured with an IPv6 address as well
as an IPv4 address (either public or private) in order to access both IPv4 and IPv6
content. businesses that host applications accessible via the Internet will need to
cater for consumers with IPv4 or IPv6 public addresses. Since each protocol needs
to work end-to-end, for businesses the transition does not end with deployment of
dual-stack devices at the enterprise edge. It also requires enterprise network design
changes to make the communication path IPv6-capable from the enterprise edge to
where IPv6 supported applications are hosted.
businesses face a similar challenge to service providers such as Telstra in making the
IP addressing transition. Transitioning to IPv6 requires the full ecosystem to move (i.e.
network equipment, modems, consumer devices, operating systems, applications,
content servers, IT systems, etc). Therefore, the transition from IPv4 to IPv6 will be
a large and complex task that will require significant coordination across the full
spectrum of players involved in end-to-end IP services.
7. WhAT DOES ThE
TrANSITION MEAN
fOr buSINESS?
Multinational enterprises and those that
deal with government departments are
most likely to be impacted by government
mandates. This will drive the need to
support IPv6
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
14
Telstra has been planning for this transition for a number of years. we have a well-
defined transition strategy and a well-advanced IPv6 implementation program.
Our strategy for IPv6 introduction is based on the dual-stack approach, allowing
both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to co-exist until the transition to IPv6 is complete.
This approach will make sure that the transition occurs with minimal impact on
customers, i.e. customers are not forced to move to IPv6 overnight and can deploy
and migrate to IPv6 as they become ready. Telstra is already conducting testing on a
number of key networks and products to seamlessly introduce IPv6.
Timing for implementation in each product will be dependent on business drivers
and equipment availability (e.g. cPe). It covers services across Telstra Internet direct
(TId), enterprise, consumer broadband and mobiles.
8.1 TId and IP vPN Services
The benefits of dual-stack technology for Telstra TId and IP vPN customers will be as
follows:

continued service availability even as IPv4 addresses run out

Smooth transition to IPv6, at own pace

Native IPv6 connectivity which provides better performance than IPv6
tunnels

essentially unlimited Internet addressing

leverages the Telstra Next IP™ network
8.2 bigPond broadband including bigPond wireless broadband

most consumer broadband customers will be more interested in the content
and applications they use, than which IP addressing protocol is being used

for many, the transition to IPv6 will occur smoothly and transparently as
each of the components of the end-to-end service move to dual-stack (e.g.
modems, Pcs, content)

It is unlikely that any significant content will be IPv6-only
8.3 mobiles including Telstra mobile broadband

There is no immediate driver for IPv6 in mobiles. widespread availability of
IPv6 capable handsets is not expected until 2010/11

In future, there may be developments in self-contained mobile solutions
which will drive IPv6 (e.g. large sensor networks)

It is unlikely that any significant content will be IPv6-only and will be
predominantly dual-stack
8. WhAT IS TElSTrA’S
APPrOACh TO ThE
TrANSITION?
Telstra has a well-defined transition strat-
egy and a well-advanced IPv6 implementa-
tion program. Our strategy for IPv6 introduc-
tion is based on the dual-stack approach,
allowing both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to
co-exist until the transition
to IPv6 is complete.
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
15
8.4 Applications and content
Telstra applications and content will also transition to be offered over IPv6 (to
achieve end-to-end IPv6) as well as IPv4.
businesses can begin to prepare for their own IP addressing transition through the
following steps:
1. conduct an IPv6 readiness assessment:

Network hardware

Servers, Pcs (e.g. operating systems)

Network management and security

Applications

IT systems

Organisational capability (IPv6 skills)

understand coexistence implications (performance, resources)
2. Prepare an IP addressing strategy

develop a high-level view of transition approach for the business
3. develop an end-to-end program view

Network, IT, devices, applications, etc.

Processes to minimise impacts

communication of the IPv6 strategy within the business

maintain network security through the transition to IPv6

work with vendors, system integrators and service providers to define detail
and align timings (e.g. link hardware upgrades to lifecycle processes to
minimise costs)

Analyse transition costs and develop a transition budget
4. formulate Implementation Plan

Identify dependencies and major milestones

use phased approach – based on priorities and timings
5. Progress Implementation

work in close coordination and consultation with network provider

Telstra commits to providing timely information and updates on its program
of work to assist customers, suppliers and others in the industry to manage
their transition
9. WhAT ShOulD
buSINESSES DO NOW?
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
16
The transition from IPv4 to IPv6 is a known issue which the industry will have to
manage over the coming years. The transition will take time as it will require IPv6
support by an industry end-to-end eco-system including cPe, modems/home
gateways, networks, systems (OSS/bSS, tools), content and applications.
Telstra has been planning for this transition for a number of years. we have a well-
defined transition strategy and a well-advanced IPv6 implementation program.
Our strategy for IPv6 introduction is based on the dual-stack approach, allowing
both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to co-exist until the transition to IPv6 is complete.
This approach will make sure that the transition occurs with minimal impact on
customers, i.e. customers are not forced to move to IPv6 overnight and can deploy
and migrate to IPv6 as they become ready. Telstra is already conducting testing on a
number of key networks and products to seamlessly introduce IPv6.
businesses face a similar challenge to service providers in undertaking a complex
transition of their IP ecosystem without impacting services. It is advisable that
businesses start preparing their IPv4 to IPv6 transition strategies.
Telstra commits to providing timely information and updates on its program of work
to assist customers, suppliers and others in the industry to manage their transition.
Contact your Telstra Account Executive
Call 1300telstra (1300 835 787)
greg davies is a Senior Technology Architecture Specialist in Telstra’s chief
Technology Office. In his 24 years with Telstra he has been involved in a broad
range of technology areas with a particular focus on new and emerging network
technologies. for the past 18 months he has been part of a cross-company team
developing Telstra’s strategy for IPv4 to IPv6 transition.
10. CONCluSION
Industry will have to manage the w to IPv6
transition over the coming years.
Telstra has a well-defined transition
strategy and a well-advanced IPv6
implementation program.
11. fOr MOrE
INfOrMATION
12. AbOuT ThE AuThOr
IPv4 TO IPv6 TrANSITION
17
1. global IPv6 Strategies - from business Analysis to Operational Planning by
Patrick grossetete, ciprian Popoviclu, fred wettling, cisco Press, June 2008
2. deploying IPv6 Networks by ciprian Popoviclu, Patrick grossetete,
eric levi-Abegnoli, cisco Press, february 2006
13. rEfErENCES
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