SOCI 3344/01 - Kennesaw State University

onwardhaggardBiotechnology

Dec 12, 2012 (4 years and 8 months ago)

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BIOTECHNOLOGY AND SOCIAL CHANGE


SOCI 3344:
MAYMESTER

20
1
2

SO 3007

Instructor
: Linda A. Treiber, Ph.D.


Class Meetings
:
2:00

PM
-
5
:45 PM MTWR
F

(5/
1
4

5/2
5
)

Office
: Social Science
4070


hours MW
12
-
1

and by appointment


Meeting Place
: Social Science Building room
2030

Email Address
:
ltreiber@kennesaw.edu

S
CJ

Webpage:
http://www.kennesaw.edu/sga/index





COURSE DESCRIPTION

Modern biotechnology, a “revolutionary” innovation in science, is having major transforming effects on
society. It is impacting the dinner table, agriculture, health and medicine, reproduction and has far
-
reaching implications for other areas of social li
fe. This course is designed to examine the multiple
manifestations of biotechnology and their social change implications. The course begins by locating
the biotechnology “revolution” in the broader socio
-
historical context within which it is emerging, and

explores its links to the new knowledge
-
based economy. The course then focuses on the
examination of the ways in which the development and application of biotechnology in its various
manifestations are transforming the cultural and institutional characte
r of modern societies. This will
include an examination of the ways in which policy issues (social, ethical, legal/legislative and moral)
raised can be practically addressed.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

1.

To help

students understand how key stakeholders including or
ganizations
, business,
government
, citizens/consumers/clients assess the social significance of biotechnologies.

2.

To help students understand how biotechnology relates to the discussion of nature versus nurture.

3.

To provide students with an understanding of

the sociological issues involved in the development
and deployment of biotechnologies, particularly in terms of “who benefits?”, and “who loses?” as
a result of such technologies.

4.

To engage students in discussions of the unintended consequences of
technologies, including the
effects of technology on social relationships and interactions, threats to privacy and security,
health risks of technology, and the challenge to traditional values and beliefs.

5.

To engage students in discussions on how the socia
l issues may be practically addressed.

REQUIRED TEXT
S



2



Fukuyama, Francis. 2002.
Our Posthuman Future
. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
(Read and summarize Chapters 1
-
3, 4
-
6,

and 10
-
12)



Levine, Carol 20
13
.
Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Bioethical

Issues
.

1
4
th edition. Boston:
McGraw
-
Hill


REQUIRED READINGS (O
n

Georgia View Vista)




Almeling, Rene. 2007. "Selling Genes, Selling Gender: Egg Agencies, Sperm Banks, and the
Medical Market in Genetic Material."
American Sociological Review

72:319
-
340.




(Read and S
ummarize)



Carpenter, Janet E. 2010. “Peer
-
reviewed Surveys Indicate Positive Impact of Commercialized
GM Crops” (
read
).
Nature Biotechnology

28:319
-
321.



Conrad, Peter. 2005. "The Shifting Engines of Medicalization."
Journal of Health and Social
Behavior

46:3
-
14.



Volti, Rudi 2006.
Society and Technological Change, Fifth edition
. New York, NY: Worth.
(
R
ead
Chapters 1, 2, and 7

I will lecture on this material)



(
RECOMMENDED
)
:

Clarke, Adele E., Janet K. Shim, Laura Mamo, Jennifer Ruth Fosket, and
Jennifer R. Fishman. 2003.
"Biomedicalization: Technoscientific Transformations of Health, Illness and U.S. Biomedicine."
American
Sociological Review

68:161
-
194.

Rifkin, Jeremy. 1998.
The Biotech Century: Harnessing the Gene and Remaking the World
. New York, NY: Jeremy
P. Tarcher/ Putnam.


REQUIREMENTS/EVALUATION


Percent of Grade

Written
Summaries
/

Reaction Papers
(including 3
Discussion Q
uestions) of Selected Course Readings (
3
-
4

page
length)


40
%


Attendance and Participation
:
Class
Exercises,
and
A
ctivities
.


I
nclud
es

Serving as Discussant

for
Class D
iscussion
,
Debates
/
Post
-
Presentation Debriefing

3
0
%

Final Exam

in class

May 2
5
, 20
1
2

3
0
%

TOTAL

100%



All written material will be graded on both style and content

1.

Proper documentation of evidence (see SGA website for guidelines on using ASA referencing
format)

2.

Systematic presentation of ideas

3.

Spelling and proof
-
reading

4.

Double
-
spaced 10
-
12 point font Times New Roman

5.

Late points

(
5 points per day
) will be deducted
for work that is not turned in on time.



6.

“On time” means that a hard copy is delivered prior to morning session on date due.










3

ATTENDANCE:
Attendance
and participation=

3
0
% of your grade.


Final GRADES:

Grades will be based upon your percentage of the total number of points on final exam, written work,
and participation/attendance.

A= 90
-
100%; B= 89.99
-
80%; C= 79.99
-
70%; D= 69.99
-
60%; F= Below 60%.


ACADEMIC INTEGRITY STATEMENT:

Every KSU student is resp
onsible for upholding the provisions of the Student Code of Conduct, as
published in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs, Section II of the Student Code of Conduct
addresses the university’s policy on academic honesty, including provisions regarding pl
agiarism and
cheating, unauthorized access to University materials, misrepresentation/falsification of University
records or academic work, malicious removal, retention, or destruction of library materials,
malicious/intentional misuse of computer faciliti
es and/or services, and misuse of student
identification cards. Incidents of alleged academic misconduct will be handled through the
established procedures of the University Judiciary Program, which includes either an “informal”
resolution by a faculty me
mber, resulting in a grade adjustment, or a formal hearing procedure, which
may subject a student to the Code of Conduct’s minimum one semester suspension

requirement.

DISABILITIES:

If you have other academic or testing needs, please make an appointment wi
th me so that we may
work together to serve those needs.



CONDUCT:

Several rules of classroom conduct should be followed
:



Please give the speaker, lecturer, or discussant your full attention and respect.



Raise your hand if you have a comment. Do not ta
lk out of turn, particularly when someone
else has the floor.



Please do not use cell phones during class.



DO NOT USE LAPTOPS DURING CLASS
.



If you have a disability that requires you to use a laptop computer to take notes, then please
provide the
required paperwork.



Arrive on time and do not leave early.
I will take attendance several times during the day.



If an instructor (including me) or any of your peers says or does anything that you consider
racial or sexual harassment, notify the instructor

immediately. If this happens in class, you
may write me an anonymous note or contact me in person.



Belligerent, abusive, profane, threatening and or inappropriate behavior is a violation of the
KSU student council regulations. I value and respect your
contributions. Please do the same
for others in the class.


TENTATIVE
COURSE OUTLINE

NOTE: This outline may change if necessary.


Class date

Topic

Assignment:

May 1
4

please look at syllabus and do the following readings:


Please get
the text
books and

read.


Assignment:


4

Review
Volti 1,2, and 7


(
Please read
-
NO Summary
)

Course Overview;

Issues in Biotechnology and Social
Change


Film: “Biotechnology”


Winners and Losers:

Historical Perspectives on the
Technological Revolution


Debate Teams Assigned


May 1
5

Genetic Engineering

Nature versus Nurture

Bioengineering


Class exercise in the computer lab


Film: “Fed Up! Genetic Engineering, Industrial Agriculture
and Sustainable Alternatives”



Reading
Assignment
s
:

Fukuyama 1,2,3




Conrad, Peter. 2005. "The Shifting
Engines of Medicalization."
Journal
of Health and Social Behavior

46:3
-
14.

(GA View)


May 1
6

Role of Genetically modified foods in our future


Film: “The Future of Food”


GUEST:
Dr.
Sam Abaidoo, Kennesaw State University

3:30
-
4:45


Our PostHuman Future:

Control of Behavior through Drugs

Medicalization and Biomedicalization



Debate 1:
Does direct to consumer advertising enhance
patient choice?



Summary
and Reaction
1 due

on
Fukuyama 1,2,3


Read
“Peer
-
reviewed surveys
indicate positive impact of
commercialized GM crops”
in
Nature Biotechnology


Read also: I
ssue 3, D
oes Direct to
-

Consumer Advertising Enhance
Patient Choice? (BOTH Yes and No)
in Levine


See also relevant materials in
Fukuyama



May 1
7

Ethics of Biotechnology


Debate 2:
Should Genetically Modified Organisms be part
of our food supply?


GUEST:
Dr.
Gillian Hue
,
Emory University

2
-
3:30 pm


Reading
Assignment:

Fukuyama 4,5,6


Read:

“Guess What’s Coming to
D
inner
?”

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/harvest/comi
ng/


May
18

Biotech Products

Promotional films from

CryoLife


Summary

and Reaction

2 due

on
Fukuyama 4,5,6


Review CryoLife website on WebCT


5

EAT SOMETHING

BEFORE THE TOUR!


SITE VISIT TOUR CRYOLIFE, INC
.

Be there by 2:30 sharp!

We will return to campus after the
tour for our debate.




Debate 3:
Should there be a market in human organs?


Reading
Assignment:

Fukuyama 10, 11, 12

(Summary
3
and
Reaction Paper on
this material due May 2
1
)


Read
“Should There be a Market in
Human Organs? Issue 17

in Levine


Directions to Cryolife (1655 Roberts
Blvd. NW, Kennesaw, GA 30144)
from Kennesaw State University
.

Estimated time: Around 12 minutes

Distance: 3.27 Miles

Take Chastain Road NW about 1.3
miles till it becomes McCollum
PKWY NW.

Turn LEFT at the light onto Old
Hwy 41/GA
-
293/S

Main St. NW
(first light past McCollum Airport).

Go about 0.8 miles, then turn LEFT
onto North Roberts Blvd. NW
(Hooters is on the left corner).

Follow North Roberts Blvd. about
0.3 miles until it dead ends into
Roberts Boulevard. Cryolife will be
straight ahead.




May
2
1

Vaccines as Big Business

Historic Moments in Biotechnology:
Film:
“In Search of the
Polio Vaccine”

Organizations and the Regulation of Biotechnology


Debate 4:
Should Vaccination for HPV Be Mandated for
Teenage Girls?

Summary and Reaction Paper
3

on
Fukuyama 10, 11, 12

due



Read also issue 1
1
,


Should
Vaccination for HPV Be Mandated for
Teenage Girls?

in Levine


May
2
2



Ethics and Biotechnology

Film: “The Missing Women”




Assignment:

Ameling 2007

on GA View Vista



May
2
3


Debate 5:
Should we be able to clone humans?



Selling eggs and sperm


Legal aspects of Biotechnology



Review materials in Fukuyama for
debate


6

May 2
4

Dystopias and Losing our Humanity?

Film: “G
ATTACA



Debate
6
:
Should a Pregnant Woman Be Punished for
Exposing Her Fetus to Risk?


REVIEW FOR FINAL

Summary and Reaction Paper 4
on
Ameling 2007
due


Read: “
Should a Pregnant Woman Be
Punished for Exposing Her Fetus to
Risk
?”
Issue 8 in Levine

May 2
5

Last day of class



FINAL EXAM


All written material due in class

Final exam
in class