MSc Biosciences - e:Vision - University of Wolverhampton

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1



SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCES

COURSE GUIDE


M.Sc. Agricultural Biotechnology

M.Sc. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

M.Sc. Molecular Biology with Bioinformatics


Section 1: Course Specific Information


About this guide


Welcome


About the Course

Course Structure

Module Descriptions


Course Management


Staff Involved with the Programme


Learning, Teaching and Assessment


Health and Safety Issues

Employability & Your Personal Development Portfolio (PDP)

Career Opportunities and Future Study

Academic Regulations

Additional Information specific to your course



Section 2: School Specific Information


School Charter for Students

Where to get help with your course


Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

Learning, Teaching & Assessment

Academic Mi
sconduct




2


3


Section 1: Course Specific Information


About this guide


This Course Guide will help you plan your particular Biosciences Postgraduate Masters

course. It tells
you which modules you must study and pass. The Guide also offers you brief des
criptions of each
module, including general information about assessment tasks, and an overview of how the Course
can be used for future career choices.


You should read this Course Guide in conjunction with the:


Postgraduate Regulations:


http://www.wlv.ac.uk/PDF/aca
-
pg
-
regs
-
07.pdf


The University’s Principles and Regulations:


http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=6932



Together th
ese documents should provide you with all the basic information that we think you will need
for your period of study here.


You are encouraged to read this Guide through now. It will be a considerable advantage to you to be
familiar from the outset with
the various aspects of your studies that are described. It may be that the
relevance of some of the sections will not be immediately obvious. Keep it somewhere accessible, so
that you can refer to it as needed. The answers to many of the questions that
you will want to ask are
contained in it.



Obviously even in a document like this we have not covered every query and problem that you might
have about the course. If you find that there is something you need to know, please do not hesitate to
approach t
he School of Applied Sciences Student Support Office, in MA104. You can also consult the
University’s Student Support and Guidance Services as appropriate. We are pleased to hear your
views and welcome suggestions for ways of improving the operation of the

Course.


Please enter the contact details for
your Personal Tutor for your future
reference:


The Student Support Office in MA104
is open 9am
-

5pm, Monday
-

Friday.
For general enquiries please contact:


Mrs Jan Turner, Student Support Receptionist

Tel:



01902 322129


E
-
mail:
janturner@wlv.ac.uk


For contacting academic staff, we operate an electronic booking system, ‘SAMS’, you will be fully
introduced to this during Welcome Week, and it can be accessed at t
he following address:


http://134.220.18.206/staffbooking/index.php


Please note that in order to develop and improve the Course, it may be necessary on occasions to
amend or revise the details
given in this Course Guide.


4


Welcome


On behalf of the Course Management Team I should like to extend to you a very warm welcome and
we would like to take this opportunity to wish you every success in your studies at the University of
Wolverhampton, an
d trust that your time at the University of Wolverhampton will prove to be enjoyable,
stimulating and rewarding.


The Biosciences Masters courses are

some of many run by the School of Applied Sciences, which has
itself established an excellent reputation f
or the quality of its courses, for an innovative approach to
teaching and learning, and for the friendliness of its staff.


We believe it is important that you are encouraged to make your own contribution to the effective
operation and development of you
r chosen course. We are, therefore, keen to hear your views and
would welcome any suggestions that you may have about ways of improving any aspect of your
course and/or the student experience here at the University. In practice, you will have the opportu
nity
to do this through our student voice processes.


Remember that the outcome of your studies could affect the whole of your future career and therefore
study should certainly be your first priority. In resolving to work hard however, do not forget to ha
ve
time for recreation and social activities. Do take full advantage of the University facilities at your
disposal.


Dr. D. A. Fincham

Course Leader


5


About the Course



Masters programmes have the generic aims to:



allow students with differing academic

backgrounds, experiences and abilities to enter at an appropriate
level and achieve to the maximum of their ability;


provide progressive, coherent and challenging learning opportunities underpinned by research, scholarly
activity and appropriate staff d
evelopment;


enable students to achieve clearly defined subject specific and generic academic outcomes and to
develop a range of key skills to fit them for subsequent employment and/or further study,


encourage students to take responsibility for their o
wn learning, foster a spirit of enquiry, and develop
attitudes and skills to underpin independent, life
-
long learning;


to inspire a professional approach, and to develop awareness of the ethical, socio
-
economic, political
and commercial contexts of their

studies;


integrate employer and professional body requirements, maximise vocational relevance and provide
opportunities for learning in the workplace.


Bioscience represents a corpus of knowledge, largely derived from observation, experiment, analysis a
nd
thought. The intention of our programmes is not only to fulfil these aims and objectives for the purposes of
completing a degree or diploma course but to prepare you so that you too will contribute to this corpus of
knowledge and engage in the resoluti
on of problems in the biosciences. To achieve this, we undertake in
partnership, exercises in teaching and learning, with an emphasis on what you know and what you can do as
a result of your learning. As Biosciences staff, we have attempted to make clear

statements on what
learning is about by defining the outcomes that we wish to see you achieve. Our learning programmes are
delivered in the form of modules, individual modules have outcomes related to their individual subject
content but no one module ca
n include the full range of practical skills and personal transferable skills
required. So the programme of study of the course defines the modules to ensure that there is coherence
within the subject and you achieve the complete range of learning outcome
s.


A programme of study is therefore composed of modules, the content of which is shown in a module guide.
The module guide will show the subject specific outcomes particular to that module, and the generic
academic outcomes and the personal transferable

skills that will be achieved in that module. This will
indicate how the outcomes of the module contribute to the overall aims and objectives of your programme.


When you arrive at university will you be enrolled onto an MSc programme. Your programme wil
l be defined
further by a specific course title. Your specific programme will be made up of a single route. Students
completing certain stages of the programme will be entitled to interim awards of PG Cert after 60 credits of
level four study and PG Dip
following 120 credits of study at level four. Students studying the MSc Molecular
Biology with Bioinformatics will not be able to claim the PG Cert due to the prescriptive nature of this route.


To obtain an MSc you must pass 180 credits (4 x 15 credit mo
dules in semester 1 and 4 x 15 credit
modules in semester 2 as well as a 60 credit module taken over the Summer Vacation).





6

Course Structure


M.Sc. Agricultural Biotechnology (Full Time Route)


Semester 1 Modules


Module
Code

Module name

Block

Credits

AB4
014


Agricultural Biotechnology


15

AB4006


Food and People


15

AB4409


Gene Technology


15

AB4420


Environmental Biotechnology


15


Semester 2 Modules


Module
Code

Module name

Block

Credits

AB3016


Biosciences in Society: Biotechnology


15

AB3029


Plant Biotechnology


15

AB4012


Masters Laboratory Techniques


15

AB4013


Research Methods


15



Note
:

Students who have not passed Research Methods will not be allowed into the laboratory to begin a
project.



Summer Vacation Module


Module
Code

Mod
ule name

Block

Credits

AB4426


Masters Project


60



7


M.Sc. Agricultural Biotechnology (Part
-

Time Route)


Semester 1 Modules


Module
Code

Module name

Block

Credits

AB4
014


Agricultural Biotechnology


15

AB4409


Gene Technology


15

AB4420


Environmen
tal Biotechnology


15

AB4425


Masters Dissertation


15


Semester 2 Modules


Module
Code

Module name

Block

Credits

AB3016


Biosciences in Society: Biotechnology


15

AB3029


Plant Biotechnology


15

AB4004


Industrial Studies


15

AB4013


Research Method
s


15



Note
:

Students who have not passed Research Methods will not be allowed into the laboratory to begin a
project.



Summer Vacation Module


Module
Code

Module name

Block

Credits

AB4426


Masters Project


60



8



M.Sc. Applied Microbiology & Biotech
nology

Semester 1 Modules


Module
Code

Module name

Block

Credits

AB4010

Genes and Genomes


15

AB4409

Gene Technology


15

AB4420

Environmental Biotechnology


15

AB4009

Food Borne Disease and Pathogen Analysis


15


Semester 2 Modules


Module
Code

Module

name

Block

Credits

AB4408

Fermentation Biotechnology


15

AB4011

DNA Data Mining


15

AB4012

Masters Laboratory Techniques


15

AB4013

Research Methods


15



Note
:

Students who fail Research Methods will not be allowed into the laboratory to begin a p
roject and a
Post Graduate Diploma will be awarded.



Summer Vacation Module


Module
Code

Module name

Block

Credits

AB4426

Masters Project


60




9



M.Sc. Molecular Biology with Bioinformatics

Semester 1 Modules


Module
Code

Module name

Block

Credits

AB4
409

Gene Technology


15

AB4010

Genes and Genomes


15

CP4011

Databases Concepts and Techniques


15

CP4012

Programming Concepts and Techniques


15


Semester 2 Modules


Module
Code

Module name

Block

Credits

AB4011

DNA Data Mining


15

AB4012

Masters Labo
ratory Techniques


15

AB4013

Research Methods


15

CP4014

Internet and Communications Technology


15



Note
:

Students who fail Research Methods will not be allowed into the laboratory to begin a project and a
Post Graduate Diploma will be awarded.



Sum
mer Vacation (SV)


Module
Code

Module name

Block

Credits

AB4426

Masters Project


60



10

Module Descriptions


List of Modules


Semester One Modules



AB4xxx

Agricultural Biotechnology

AB4006

Food and People

AB4009

Food Borne Disease and Pathogen Analys
is

AB4010

Genes and Genomes

AB4409

Gene Technology

AB4420

Environmental Biotechnology

CP4011

Databases Concepts and Techniques

CP4012

Programming Concepts and Techniques



Semester Two Modules



AB3016

Biosciences in Society: Biotechnology

AB3029

Plant Biotechnology

AB4011

DNA Data Mining

AB4012

Masters Laboratory Techniques

AB4013

Research Methods

AB4408

Fermentation Biotechnology

CP4014

Internet and Communications Technology





Summer Vacation



AB4426

Masters Project

AB4425

Masters
Dissertation*

AB4004

Industrial Studies*

* part time
mode







11


Module:
Agricultural Biotechnology


Module Code:
AB 4xxx


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Prof. Trevor Hocking


The module aims to:


T
HIS MODULE IS DESIGN
ED TO INTRODUCE THE
TOPIC O
F AGRICULTURAL BIOTE
CHNOLOGY AT LEVEL
4

AND AIMS TO
ACHIEVE A BROAD UNDE
RSTANDING OF THE IMP
ORTANCE OF BIOTECHNO
LOGY IN THE FUTURE D
EVELOPMENT OF
AGRICULTURAL AT A GL
OBAL SCALE
.

I
T REVIEWS THE MOLECU
LAR TECHNIQUES BEING

DEVELOPED AND APPLIE
D IN
AGRICULTURE

AND ADOPTS AN INTERN
ATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
IN CONSIDERING HOW T
HE APPLICATION OF
BIOTECHNOLOGY IS CHA
NGING AND WILL CONTI
NUE TO CHANGE AGRICU
LTURE IN THE FUTURE
.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Understand of the importa
nce of biotechnology in the development of agriculture.


2.

Critically evaluate case studies where biotechnology has been applied to agriculture.



Assessment


Component 1: Essay (25%)


Component 2: Case Study (75%)



12


Module:
Food and People


Module Code:
AB

4006


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Tim Baldwin


The module aims to:


The food industry is in a highly dynamic state with ever
-
changing demands from the retail sector. New and
existing technologies make it possible to exploit previously unused
food sources and to synthesise new
materials. Obscure food sources are taken into mainstream agriculture, often on a different continent from
their place of origin. New uses are found for old crops and even for crop wastes. ‘Functional foods’ offer
health
benefits in addition to nutrition. Plant secondary products affect (and often determine) food quality.
The role of crop diversification in maintaining sustainability, both of agricultural systems and of human
nutrition, is discussed.


On completion of the
module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Have a deep understanding of a specific topic relevant to the interaction between people and their
foods.


2.

Have a broad understanding of the diversity of potential food resources.


Assessment


Component 1: E
ssay (80%) Oral Presentation (20%)




13


Module:
Gene Technology


Module Code:
AB 4409


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Alan Burns


The module aims to:


Develop an understanding of the principles of gene manipulation and analysis, and their releva
nce to an
understanding of inherited diseases and their diagnosis. To contribute to the development of
communication, organisational and scientific skills. (Lectures/tutorials are designed only to provide a
framework and students will be expected to obtai
n a deeper knowledge and understanding of the topics
derived largely from independent learning, and to demonstrate this in the End Test and the group Case
History formats.)


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Explain the p
rinciples of the techniques used in the manipulation and analysis of genes.


2.

Describe the construction and introduction into genetic systems of novel genetic material and the
difficulties associated with these techniques.


Assessment


Component 1: Examinat
ion (50%)


Component 2: Case History (50%)




14


Module:
Environmental Biotechnology


Module Code:
AB 4420


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr David Hill


The module aims to:


This advanced module provides an appreciation of the role of biotechnology i
n environmental management
and the theory and practice of the application of biotechnology to solve environmental problems.


Specific topics include the biotechnology of sewage and solid waste processing, biotreatment of xenobiotic
compounds, mechanisms an
d application of bioremediation, and an examination of the molecular biology of
hydrocarbon
-

degrading microorganisms.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Describe and explain the principles of, and processes for, microbi
ological treatment of
environmental waste materials and pollution problems.


2.

Critically evaluate the scientific approaches used in the investigation of the microbial
biodegradation of environmental pollutants.


Assessment


Component 1: Open Book Examinatio
n (30%)



Component 2: Assignment, Case Study, Oral Presentation (70%)



15

Module:
Food Borne Disease and Pathogen Analysis


Module Code:
AB4009


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Roy Protheroe


The module aims to:


Reviews recent food poisoning outbr
eaks attributed to a variety of bacterial pathogens, in relation to the
causative agents, sources of contamination and methods of control. Describes sampling procedures and the
principles and applications of modern techniques for microbial food analysis, i
ncluding "rapid" assays, used
in the food industry.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Demonstrate the epidemiological relationship between pathogens and the chemical properties of
the food environment, in relation to tra
nsmission and pathogenesis.


2.

Understand the principles of modern rapid methods of analysis and discuss the potential and
actual advantages of these analyses in comparison with traditional cultural methodologies.


Assessment


Component 1: Assignment (50%)


Component 2: Assignment (50%)





16

Module:
Genes and Genomes


Module Code:
AB4010


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Michael Whitehead


The module aims to:


The module aims to: Introduce the student to the topics of genomics and proteomics which are
currently at
the forefront of research in biological sciences. The module will explain gene structure and genome
organisation in the main prokaryotic and eukaryotic model systems and demonstrate the usefulness of this
information in a comparative genomics
approach. Global expression profiling and the Proteome will be
elucidated. The application of genome analysis and genomics will be introduced, with a particular emphasis
on pharmacogenomics. The module concludes with the analysis of a genome project of the

students choice.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

To understand the organisation of genes and genomes. To appreciate the integration of gene
expression into a proteomics approach.


2.

To appreciate the role of genome proj
ects in contributing to our present understanding of how whole
organisms function and how this information can be applied to various specialisms.


Assessment


Component 1: Case Study (100%)



17


Module:
Database Concepts and Techniques


Module Code:
CP4011


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Mary Garvey


The module aims to:


Equip students with the skills necessary to design a relational database; understand the theory of the
relational model; implement and use a relational database and have an apprecia
tion of alternative data
models.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Deasign, implement and use a relational database.


2.

Evaluate the fundamental features of the relational approach to database management.


3.

Develo
p an independent learning ability.


Assessment


Component 1: Seen examination (50%)


Component 2: Practical work designing and implementing a relational database (50%)


18

Module:
Programming Concepts and Techniques


Module Code:
CP4012


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Rupert Simpson


The module aims to:


Introduce fundamental object oriented programming concepts which can be the basis for solving complex
problems and develop a high


level understanding of the processes involved in program developmen
t.
Students will cover the fundamentals of program design, documentation, coding and testing through lectures
and more importantly practical workshops.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Design and implement a progra
mming solution.


2.

Critically analyse the design and implementation of a programming solution.


1.

Evaluate the potential use of current techniques.


2.

Develop independent learning ability.


Assessment


Component 1: Examination (40%)


Component 2: Produce repo
rt based on process and product implementation (60%)


19


Module:
Biosciences in Society : Biotechnology


Module Code:
AB 3016


Level:
3


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Alan Burns


The module aims to:


To provide a positive, enjoyable learning experience usin
g scientific debate, tutorials and keynote lectures to
investigate all of the ramifications occurring in the rapidly developing science of Biotechnology by
consideration of social, legal, political and ethical issues. To develop an appreciation of the be
nefits and
positive application of many biotechnological processes. To enable students to synthesise varied view
points into a rational synopsis in controversial areas like genetic screening of employees, foetal detection of
abberant genes and ownership o
f information derived from sequencing human genomes. To contribute to
developing a wider appreciation of science in the community.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to
:


1.

Develop an appreciation of the social consequences of
the application of biotechnology.


2.

Appreciate the dangers and safeguards connected with recombinant DNA experiments and the use
or release of genetically modified organisms and their products.


Assessment


Component 1: Examination (50%)


Component 2: Cour
sework (50%)


20

Module:
Plant Biotechnology


Module Code:
AB 3029


Level:
3


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Tim Baldwin


The module aims to:


The objective of the module is to introduce the student to current and future applications of plant
biotechnology in

basic and applied plant sciences/agriculture. Topics covered will include plant cell and
tissue culture, plant transformation and regeneration, use of Arabidopsis as a model system and the use of
bioinformatics in the characterisation of plant genes and g
ene products.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to
:


3.

Understand the importance of model systems in the field of plant breeding.


4.

Understand how to access and use data in plant genomic DNA databases.


Assessment


Component 1:
Examination (40%)


Component 2: Assignment (60%)





21

Module:
Masters Laboratory Techniques


Module Code:
AB 4012


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Paul Hooley


The module aims to:


The skill based laboratory module aims to provide a series of pract
icals in an intensive or semi
-
intensive
mode designed to provide students from a variety of backgrounds with the appropriate technical skills for
subsequent workplace employment in recombinant DNA areas. Students can take a full diet of molecular
biology b
ased practicals or alternatively in the latter part of the course some specialised practicals suitable
for students hoping to gain employment in advanced microbiology areas will also be offered by microbiology
specialists.

To contribute to the development
of communication, organisational and scientific skills.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Explain the principles of the techniques used in the manipulation and analysis of genes.


2.

Explain the principles of some advanced

techniques used in modern microbiology laboratories and
describe the construction and introduction into genetic systems of novel genetic material and the
difficulties associated with these techniques.


Assessment


Component 1: Practical notebook (40%)


Co
mponent 2: Problem solving exercises/data analysis (60%)




22

Module:
Research Methods


Module Code:
AB 4013


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Michael Whitehead


Prerequisite:
This module must be passed before attempting AB 4426


The module aims to:


A module for postgraduate students that aims to introduce the necessary tools required for advanced
research study. This includes statistics, PowerPoint presentation, information retrieval and report writing,
project planning and choice and selection of m
ethods. This module is designed such that the student builds
up a portfolio of expertise, which prepares them for the project*. This module is designed such that the
student can undertake this module in a self
-
study mode.


On completion of the module, the
student is expected to be able to:


1.

To be able to use effectively the sources of scientific information and be capable of reviewing and
summarising relevant topics.


2.

To be confident in the use of appropriate statistical methods for analysing and evaluatin
g biological
scientific data.


3.

To

be confident in the design of biological experiments and the use of basic calculation techniques.


4.

To be proficient in the preparation of presentations.


Assessment


Component 1:

Portfolio of completed element tasks (100%)



*Note: Students who fail this module will not be allowed to undertake AB 4426


23

Module:
DNA Data Mining


Module Code:
AB4011


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Paul Hooley


The module aims to:


Introduce students to the analysis of DNA sequences a
nd the deduction of gene structure and function by
the use of public databases and genome projects accessed via the internet. Following introductory lectures
and tutorials to the theoretical aspects of this branch of bioinformatics, teaching will focus lar
gely upon
student directed practical workshops and an individual assignment. Each student will be assigned an
individual DNA sequence to analyse and may choose a particular gene of interest for their investigation
following negotiation with staff


On compl
etion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Understand the significance of DNA sequence data for the prediction of gene function.


2.

Use computer databases and programs to analyse a DNA sequence.


Assessment


Component 1: Report (100%)



24

Mod
ule:
Fermentation Biotechnology


Module Code:
AB4408


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Iza Radecka


The module aims to:


The theme of this module is well summarised by the following quotation from Hamer (1983):


"The process microbiologist or biote
chnologist, in addition to having an in
-
depth knowledge and wide
experience of the physiological problems pertinent to various microbiological processes, must also have the
appropriate knowledge and skill to communicate and interact effectively with chemic
al engineers. Effective
interaction between the biological scientist and the chemical engineering practitioner will provide the key for
both technological innovation and commercial success of the microbiological process industries in future
decades."


T
hus the module will explain how to carry out large scale industrial fermentations to make microbial products.
You will learn about the theory and practice of fermenter design and operation for industrial
-
scale cultivation
of microbial, plant and animal ce
lls in batch and continuous systems. This will include instrumentation and
control of the fermenter environment, the use of biosensors and computer
-
linked fermentations. Enzyme
technology, and downstream processing are also considered.


On completion of
the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Describe and explain the design and operation of industrial
-
scale bioreactors for cultivation of
microbial cells under controlled conditions to provide desirable products, with reference to cell
growth, p
roduct formation and environmental control.


2.

Understand the principles of product recovery and purification in relation to downstream processing
technology.


Assessment


Component 1: Examination (50%)


Component 2: Assignment, Case Study, Oral Presentation

(50%)



25

Module:
Internet and Communications Technology


Module Code:
CP4014


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Brendan Riordan


The module aims to:


Introduce fundamental data communications concepts. To develop an understanding of the methods and
techniques that underpin the practical use of computer networks, using the Internet as a prime example.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Describe the major components of computer networks and understand associated t
echnologies.


2.

Choose an appropriate network technology to solve a given problem.



3.

Evaluate the impact of networking technologies or evaluate the various options for the construction
of computer networks.


Assessment


Component 1: Portfolio (70%)


Com
ponent 2: Seminar presentation (30%)


26

Summer Vacation


Module:
Masters Project


Module Code:
AB 4426


Level:
4


Credits:
60


Module Leader:
Dr Daron Fincham


Prerequisite:
A pass in Research Methods is required before attempting AB4426.


The module aims to
:


This is a research
-
based experimental project related to your overall programme of study and provides you
with the experience of carrying out by independent study a detailed practical scientific investigation of a
currently active research area. Projec
ts will be related to staff research interests and/or may be initiated
through industrial links.


On completion of the project, you will have reviewed the literature in the chosen area, will have carried out
an extended programme of practical work, will ha
ve defended your work during a viva and will have prepared
and presented a report on the work.


On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


Show conceptual understanding that enables formulation of a strategy to test a hypothesis

at, or
informed by, the forefront of the discipline through a comprehensive command of the knowledge and
techniques applicable to the research.


Demonstrate the ability to autonomously plan, conduct and present practical experimental work in a
cooperativ
e, safety aware laboratory environment.


Assessment


Component 1: Viva voce examination (20%)


Component 2: Practical work and word processed report (80%)


27

Module:
Masters Dissertation


Module Code:
AB4425


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr Daron Fi
ncham


The module aims to:


The module is designed to provide you with the experience of carrying out a comprehensive and detailed
review in a currently active research area, or in response to School/Industrial links. It affords an opportunity
of reading w
idely and studying papers from leading journals in the field prior to presenting a critical review.
On completion you will have used extensive on
-
line search facilities, amassed a reference collection from
which you have critically selected a proportion fo
r use in preparing an authoritative dissertation, on a topic
not otherwise taught as part of the modules offered for the Award. You will be expected to deliver an oral
presentation on your findings to a peer group and possibly representatives from industry
, in addition to
interested academic staff. Titles selected for the dissertation may be suggested by you, your allocated
supervisor or perhaps jointly, from a fairly wide field as long as the topic is not incompatible with your overall
study programme.


On

completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


1.

Discuss, critically evaluate and produce a valid, defensible literature survey, report and summary on
a currently active research area.


2.

Give an oral presentation to an assembled peer group
.


Assessment


Component 1: Word processed dissertation (80%)


Component 2: Oral presentation (20%)


28

Module:
Industrial Studies


Module Code:
AB4004


Level:
4


Credits:
15


Module Leader:
Dr David Hill


The module aims to:


T
HE AIM OF THIS MODUL
E IS TO REA
LISE AN INDUSTRY
-
RELATED LEARNING EXP
ERIENCE
.

S
TUDENTS WILL DEVELOP

THEIR CLOSE WORKING
RELATIONSHIP WITH A
COMPANY TO HELP DEVE
LOP
/
SOLVE A PARTICULAR
OBJECTIVE
/
PROBLEM
.

I
N DOING SO THE STUDE
NT WILL EXPECT TO AL
SO GAIN AN INSIGHT I
NTO A RANGE OF ASPEC
TS
OF

THE INDUSTRIAL WORKI
NG ENVIRONMENT OF TH
E COMPANY
(
FACTORY DESIGN
,

PRODUCTION SYSTEM
TECHNOLOGY
,

QUALITY CONTROL
,

MARKETING STRATEGIES
,

MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE

ETC
.)

I
NDUSTRIAL PROJECT
MANAGEMENT AND COMMU
NICATION SKILLS WILL

BE DEVELOPED AS A CO
NSEQUENCE O
F THE IMPLEMENTATION

OF
THE INDUSTRY
-
BASED INVESTIGATION
.



On completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to:


3.

Solve an industry
-
related problem.


4.

Demonstrate an understanding of company structure and function.



Assessment


Component 1:

Assignment (70%)


Component 2: Assignment (30%)




29

Course Management


Student Counselling


The Course Tutor will act as a counselling co
-
ordinator for a small team of personal tutors for all students in
a particular cohort, and will normally be responsib
le for the same cohort from the time of admission to
graduation. You will be allocated your own personal year tutor who will be available for pastoral and
academic counselling as required, but will meet with you formally on at least three occasions in the

year, to
review progress on the course.


Group Counselling Sessions


At the start of the MSc Courses, group counselling sessions will be arranged to provide information and
practical advice about specific topics. These will include:




䱥慲ai湧⁃敮瑲攠e湤瑨tr l敡r湩湧⁲敳o畲u敳



T桥⁤ velo灭敮琠tf⁳瑵ty skills



A渠i湴牯摵c瑩潮⁴漠o攠啮iv敲eity⁃潵湳敬lin朠g湤⁇uid慮c攠e敲eice


Scheduled counselling sess
ions


Your tutor will be available for pastoral and academic counselling as required, but will meet with you:


In the Induction Week




瑯t扥c潭攠ec煵ai湴敤 睩瑨 you



瑯t敮s畲u⁴ a琠yo甠慲a

s整eli湧
扡ck)⁩湴n lif攠e琠啮Uv敲sity



瑯t慮s睥w⁡ yⁱ略s瑩潮s yo甠uav攠慢o畴ut桥 条nis慴a潮 ⁴ e⁳瑵ty⁰牯杲慭me


At the beginning of semesters 2 and 3




瑯tr敶ie眠yo畲⁰uo杲敳s



瑯t潦f敲ey潵⁧畩摡湣e 慮y⁳瑵ty 摩ffic畬瑩敳 yo甠ui杨琠tav攠灡r瑩cul慲ay i渠牥l慴io渠n漠慳si杮m敮瑳
潲⁰o慣瑩cal w潲o



瑯tr敧is瑥爠yo畲⁰uo杲慭me m潤畬攠e潩c敳⁦潲⁴桥of潬lowi湧⁳敭e
s瑥t


These counselling sessions are an important component of your Award Programme and are designed to
help you get the most from your time with us.
You will be expected to keep your appointment at the
times indicated by your tutor. As counselling on th
e Award is a formal event, any non
-
appearance
has to be recorded on file and tutors may not be in a position to offer an alternate time. To get the
maximum benefit from your counselling session, you need to prepare yourself adequately, and bring
with you
any relevant documents.


At other times

Clearly there may be occasions when you need advice outside of the scheduled counselling sessions. You
should feel free to approach your tutor at any time. Unless you need to see your tutor urgently, you will be
ex
pected to arrange an appointment at a mutually convenient time. If your tutor is not available when you try
to make contact, leave a message to explain your difficulty and suggest times when you could meet. If your
tutor is unable to help you directly wi
th a particular problem she/he will advise you on alternative sources of
advice.
It is best to send

a message via e
-
mail
, giving times when you are available. Your tutor can then
reply confirming the appointment time.


Specific Academic Problems

Remember t
hat if you have an academic problem relating to a particular module, you should discuss it in the
first instance with a member of the module team or the Module Leader.


The Course Tutor

The Course Tutor is responsible for the day
-
to
-
day administration of t
he Course and for all facets of its
operation. You must make an appointment if you wish to see the Course Tutor.


For Agricultural Biotechnology and Molecular Biology with Bioinformatics see Dr. D. Fincham.

For Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology see Dr.

R. Protheroe and Dr. C. Tobin.


30


The Dean of School

Prof. P. Robotham, Dean of School and the Associate Deans, Prof. T. Hocking and Dr. A. Bridges are
available for consultation provided sufficient notice is given and an appointment made via the Deanery
Se
cretary. If your problem or query is extremely urgent, they will make every effort to accommodate you at
their earliest convenience.


Course Committee

All members of the Course Team are also members of the Course Committee, which also includes an
elected
student representative of the course and representatives from the supporting subject groups and
relevant service sections within the University. The Course Committee meets whenever necessary, but on at
least one occasion per semester. The committee is ch
aired by the Course Tutor. The main function of the
Committee is to discuss issues and to identify and resolve problems which affect the operation of the course.
It is at the same time another line of communication between the students and the staff. Th
e role of the
student representative is a vital one. The work is interesting, not too onerous and gives you a useful insight
into how things work. The role involves attendance at the Course Committee to which the representative
relays the views of the st
udents. At the end of the year a report is produced for inclusion in the Annual
Report, written by the Course Tutor. In addition the same representatives attend informal meetings of the
Course Team which are held monthly to ensure a smoother day to day r
unning of the course.
Do give
careful consideration to the possibility of standing for election as a student representative.


Course Team Meetings

In addition to the formal Course Committee meetings, a series of informal course team meetings will be held
throughout the year which serve to resolve issues as swiftly as possible. These meetings are attended by
the student representatives and the Course Tutor and course team members. They are not intended to be
lengthy sessions and should be completed in 30
-

40 minutes. As these are informal meetings no minutes
are recorded and a free exchange of views is encouraged. Matters for action are referred back to the
Course Tutor who will undertake to resolve issues that arise and report back to interested partie
s the results
of any action taken.



31


Staff Involved with the Programme



Name

Role and interests

Room

Tel

e
-
mail

@wlv.ac.uk

Dr. T. Baldwin


Plant Molecular Biology

MA 144a

2142

T.Baldwin

Dr. T. Bartlett


Bioinformatics

MG 003

2693

T.J.Bartlett2

Dr. A.

Burns


Genetics, Biotechnology,
Recombinant DNA
Technology

MA 106

2154

A.Burns

Dr. D. Fincham


Membrane Transport
Physiology

Course Leader

MA 146

2130

D.Fincham

Dr. M. Garvey

Databases and JAVA

MI 112

1483

M.Garvey

Dr. H. Gibson


Food Microbiology and
Safety

MA 106a

2771

H.Gibson

Mrs. J. Granger


Academic Resource
Librarian

MD 210

2316

J.Granger

Dr. D. Hill


Food Microbiology, Anti


Micobial Agents and
Probiotics

MA 107a

2161

D.Hill

Prof. T. Hocking


Associate Dean

Plant Biotechnology

MA 118

2375

T.
J.Hocking

Dr. P. Hooley


Molecular Genetics, Control
of Gene Expression

MA 146

2130

P.Hooley

Dr. M. Kenward


Medical Microbiology,
Biotechnology

MA 106

2154

M.Kenward

Dr. R. Protheroe


Food Microbiology,
Biotechnology

Course Tutor

MA 144a

2142

R.Prother
oe

Dr. I. Radecka


Food Microbiology,
Biotechnology

MA 106a

2771

I.Radecka

Dr. B. Riordan

Internet Communications

MI 308

1487

B.Riordan

Dr. R. Simpson

Programming

MI 136

8526

Rupert.Simpso
n

Dr. C. Tobin

Ecology

Course Tutor

MA 204b

2160

C.M.Tobin

Dr.
M. Whitehead


Mycology, Fungal Genetics

MA 106a

2771

M.Whitehead



32



Career opportunities and Future Study


Career paths vary from technical to managerial in the industrial, educational, health and research
sectors in the areas of general microbiology, en
vironmental science, medical science and
biotechnology (including pharmaceuticals).


Many students progress to postgraduate research at academic or private sector institutions or embark
on science teaching careers. Graduate destinations therefore consist
of universities, colleges and
schools as well as companies in the pharmaceutical, agricultural and bioscience industries, hospitals in
the health service or government biological and medical research centres.


Further study to Ph.D. level is a frequent cho
ice made by Bioscience Masters graduates.


33



Academic Regulations


This course adheres to the University’s academic regulations for students undertaking a Postgraduate
degree, commencing after October 2002. A

full version of these regulations can be found

on the
University web site:



http//:www.wlv.ac.uk/PDF/aca
-
pg
-
regs
-
07.pdf


These regulations govern your course and will be binding on you. It is, therefore, important that you
read and become
familiar with them.



34


Section 2: School Specific Information


SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCES

STUDENT CHARTER


The University is a community of learning; each and every member, be they staff or students, have
responsibilities to that community as well as to t
hemselves. All students of the university have the right to
study in an environment that promotes success. This means that no one should be distracted by the
inconsiderate behaviour of others; for example by people who arrive late, or talk in lectures or t
he learning
centre.

In order to help you achieve your objectives with us, we will strive to provide:




Effective impartial advice and guidance



An effective introduction to the University, the School of Applied Sciences and your chosen course



A welcoming env
ironment with quiet places to study



Appropriate resources including books and computing resources



Qualified and professional tutors and staff



Stimulating and well planned learning opportunities



Well
-
defined and appropriate programmes of study



Opportunitie
s to plan and review progress with tutors and student support workers



Access to learning support



Access to confidential counselling and careers advice


We will aim to ensure that




Timely and appropriate feedback will be provided on assessments



You have a p
ersonal tutor



You can book an appointment with your tutor using the on
-
line booking system



You will have access to the information you need to progress on your course e.g. each module you
study will be accompanied by a module guide, similarly your award/pa
thway will have a guide or
handbook


The University expects and needs you to:




Make regular use of the electronic systems provided for your use e.g. E
-
Mail, E
-
Vision, Wolf and the
student appointments system If you do not make use of these resources you c
annot perform well.



Attend regularly and punctually, this means for example, that you should not enter a teaching room
after the session has started or miss appointments you have made to see staff.



Given in all your assessments on time (or they will not be

marked)



Show courtesy and respect to staff and other students, this means for example, that cell phones
should be turned off in all teaching sessions.



Ensure that you understand the requirements of your award/pathway



Ensure that you are aware of the requ
irements of each module you are studying and are aware
which sessions to attend and what the assessment procedures are



Respect and abide by University Regulations, e.g. Equal Opportunities Policy, ID Cards, quiet areas



Bring all the personal equipment that

you require to classes/workshops



Show consideration to others by listening attentively and participating in class activities



Keep your tutor informed if you have personal problems that affect your work; if these problems
make it necessary to seek extensio
ns, to do so before the deadline



Identify for yourself what constitutes academic misconduct such as plagiarism and make every effort
to avoid it. (See
http://asp.wlv.ac.uk/Level7.asp?U
serType=6&Level7=1152

for definitions and help)



Use the student support office (Room MA104) to get quick answers to your queries without hunting
for a lecturer.



Seek approval for and confirm any change of programme within the deadlines



Inform the Universi
ty when your address or other contact details change



Follow Health and Safety guidelines in laboratory and fieldwork settings.



Behave appropriately as an ambassador for the University when working off campus



35


Where to get help with your course



Student

Support

If you encounter any issues (personal or academic) the following diagram directs you to the
appropriate department or staff member.








36



Learning, Teaching & Assessment: What Can You Expect?


Learning & Teaching Resources

There is a wide r
ange of resources available for your learning, including on
-
line materials for each
module (on WOLF), web
-
based information and, importantly, the online resources provided by the
Learning Centres. Module information will direct you to specific information

sources, but there is an
expectation, particularly at Level 2, that you will research your own sources in order to enhance your
achievement of the learning outcomes for the programme.


Assessment

Types of assessment

The tutor, as part of the introduction

to the module, will outline the assessment tasks. A more
detailed briefing for each assignment will be available via the WOLF topic that supports the
module. There is a wide range of assessment (further details can be found in the
Undergraduate Student
Guide), including:




Written assignments



Laboratory reports



Reports



Time Constrained Assignments



Examinations (open book or closed book)


Marking of Assessments

The marking and grading of your work, be it for example an assignment or an exam is a
comprehe
nsive exercise involving first
-
marking by tutors, moderation by the tutors in the module
team and the submission of assessments to independent external examiners who monitor and
advise, thereby ensuring quality and standards.

The normal return period for f
eedback on your marked (summative) work is three weeks after
the date of submission. You will receive a grade achieved and comments on whether and how
you have achieved the learning outcomes.


The processing of grades is outlined in the
Undergraduate Stud
ent Guide.
Assessment grades
follow the ‘Grade Point Scale’ format outlined in the Guide. Grades range from A16
(outstanding) to F0 (fail, no resit permitted). For the majority of modules the average
achievement level will be in the C category which is ‘
average
-
good’; grades above this are
‘above average
-
very good to outstanding’, and grades below are from ‘satisfactory’ down to
‘uncompensatable fail’. Thus, an ‘upper’ C grade (e.g. C10) is comfortably a ‘good’ grade within
the A to F distribution.


What

Should You Avoid? What Should You Seek to Achieve?



Remember that you are writing for another reader or readers. Do not assume that the
reader will fill the gaps in your work.



Use the introduction to establish what you are doing in your assignment.



Use ex
amples to support your analysis.



Be objective and aim for reasoned argument. Phrases such as ‘in my opinion’ or ‘in my
view’ are of little value because they are subjective. Do not use them. You should aim
to support your points with evidence and reason
ed analysis.



Always acknowledge the use of someone else’s work, using the appropriate system of
referencing. Also, it is a very serious offence to use someone else’s work, especially
word
-
for
-
word or paraphrased contents of other’s work. Please see the s
ection below
on Academic Misconduct



Always keep copies of the sources or keep a note of each source as you use it, so that
you can reference it in your bibliography at the end of your assignment.



Plan your work in advance so as to meet the hand
-
in (submiss
ion) date. Writing up your
research is often more time
-
consuming than you expect.



Get help from tutors and mentors if you are unsure.



Above all, do not ‘suffer in silence’; the Course Leader, Student Advisor and tutors will
be able to provide guidance so
please use them.



37

Why are ethical considerations important when researching for assignments?

Research is an essential and vital part of teaching and learning. Much is literature
-
based, using
books, journals, periodicals and web
-
based material. However, s
ome research may involve
interaction with organisations and people. You should ensure that you do
NOT
conduct
research that could be intrusive or sensitive or could cause psychological harm or suffering to
others.


For all modules that bring you into con
tact with organisations and people you will be required to
follow appropriate ethical approval procedures. These will be explained to you by relevant
module leaders. Where individuals or organisations have agreed to provide information to you,
you may be r
equired to produce evidence that permission has been given for access or contact.


What Feedback Can You Expect?


What can you expect from your tutors whilst you are preparing your work?



Normally tutors will advise you, as a group, on the assessment at or
near the start of the
module.



Thereafter, you may consult your tutors by having a quick chat after a teaching session
or arranging an appointment through SAMS;
http://134.220.18.206/staffbooking/
index.php



What should you not expect from your tutors?



It is not the role of a tutor to read drafts of your work and correct them with a view to
your obtaining a ‘good mark’. An assignment should reflect your effort and input, and
the role of the tutor

is to guide and advise. It is then your responsibility to assess this
advice and guidance and use it accordingly. Tutors provide this in good faith, but its use
-

or lack of it
-

by you is not an automatic route to a good or a poor grade. Other factors
,
particularly those pertaining to your skills and efforts, will play a vital role in your
achievement.



You will not normally receive written feedback on formal University exams. However,
should you wish to discuss your performance, you can make an appoint
ment with the
relevant module leader.


After completion of the assignment



The main feedback is through a copy (to you) of the assessment feedback sheet by
email from tutors/administrative support staff.



In some modules, additional feedback may be available

through distribution of an
“outline answer”, highlighting key points for guidance.


How You Can Comment on Learning & Teaching And Assessment


We greatly value your feedback; students’ views are collectively influential in how we deliver L&T
and are gath
ered through staff
-
student meetings and via questionnaires, particularly the Course

Evaluation Questionnaire that you will be asked to complete towards the end of the academic
year. Such feedback is analysed for annual monitoring of modules, subjects and
courses.


Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

If you consider that you have undertaken prior learning that could be credited towards your course,
contact the Student Support Office in the first instance.



38

ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT


This can be defined as any
of the following:
-


Cheating

is defined as any attempt to gain unfair advantage in an assessment by dishonest means, and
includes e.g
.

all breaches of examination room rules, impersonating another candidate, falsifying data,
and obtaining an examination p
aper in advance of its authorised release.


Plagiarism

is the act of taking someone else’s work and passing it off as your own. This includes
incorporating either unattributed direct quotation(s) or substantial paraphrasing from the work of
another/others
. It is important to cite all sources whose work has been drawn on and reference them fully
in accordance with the referencing standard used in each academic school.


Collusion

is when two or more people combine to produce a piece of work for assessment t
hat is
passed off as the work of one student alone. The work may be so alike in content, wording and structure
that the similarity goes beyond what might have been coincidence. For example
-

where one student
has copied the work of another, or where a jo
int effort has taken place in producing what should have
been an individual effort.


Penalties


Where an offence is admitted, or a panel decides that cheating, plagiarism or collusion has occurred,
a penalty will be imposed. The severity of the penalty w
ill vary according to the nature of the offence
and the level of study. Penalties will range from failure of the assignment under investigation to a
restriction of the award a student may ultimately achieve or a requirement to leave the University.
Furthe
r information can be found on
-
line on the University web pages or from the Students’ Union.


http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Docs/aca_acad_misc.doc