July 2001 ABSTINENCE EDUCATION AND RELATED SERVICES (AERS ...

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July 2001
ABSTINENCE EDUCATION AND RELATED SERVICES
(AERS)
ProgramApplication
in response to
the Abstinence Education Provision
of the 1996 Welfare Law P.L.104-193
Section 510 of Title V of the Social Security Act
TomRidge
Governor
Robert S.Zimmerman,Jr.
Secretary of Health
Table of Contents
Application Face Sheet
Budget Information Forms
Assurances
Certifications
Project Narrative
Section 4.1 Project Abstract…………………………………….…...pages 1-2
Section 4.2.1 Priority Needs…………………………………………pages 1-3
Section 4.2.2 Legislative Priorities…………………………………..pages 3-5
Section 4.2.3 ProgramPlan………………………………………….pages 5-13
Section 4.2.4 Consumer Involvement……………………………….pages 13-15
Section 4.2.5 Budget Justification…………………………………...pages 15-18
Section 4.2.6 Coordination…………………………………………..page 18-19
Appendices
Appendix A:Biographical Sketches
Appendix B:AERS Assurance Materials
Appendix C:Reporting Forms
Appendix D:Performance Measures
Appendix E:Letter of Agreement with AERS Projects and
List of 28 Funded Projects
Appendix F:Sample RFA for AERS Continuation Funding
Appendix G:State Abstinence Funding Profile
Appendix H:FY 2000 Annual Report
Appendix I:AERS Quarterly Report
Appendix J:AERS Evaluation Progress Report
PROJECT ABSTRACT
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Project Title:Pennsylvania Abstinence Education &Related Services
(AERS)
Project Number:
Project Director:Milo Y.Woodward,Director,Maternal &Infant Health
Contact Person:Phyllis Y.Welborn,Adolescent Health Coordinator
Grantee:Pennsylvania Department of Health
Address:725,Health and Welfare Bldg,Harrisburg,Pennsylvania
17108
Phone Number:(717) 772-2762
Fax Number:(717) 772-0323
E-mail address:pwelborn@state.pa.us
World Wide Web address:http://www.health.state.pa.us/AERS/
Project Period:10/1/97-9/30/02
PROBLEM:Although the Pennsylvania rate for teens 15-17 years of age,per its 1999
Vital Statistics Report,is 30.0 per 1000 and well below the Healthy People 2010
objective of 46 per 1000,the social and economic costs of these teen pregnancies
annually are unacceptable.In 1999,there were a total of 7,638 pregnancies for teens 17
and younger.Measures that prove effective in curtailing teen pregnancy will be cost
effective in light of the short/long range,societal costs of children bearing children.
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES:The goal of this project is to reduce premature sexual
activity,the rates of STDs,teen pregnancy and out-of wedlock births to youth,9 to14
without a commensurate increase in its induced abortion rate.Objectives include:1.The
central role of communities and grassroots organizations in crafting,
implementing/managing these services.2.The role of parents,peers and others with
fiduciary relationships to children/adolescents,in teaching the skills to empower youth to
abstain fromsexual activity.3.The role of health care providers in providing regular/
periodic counseling and guidance to teens and their parents/guardians.4.The role of our
network of state heath districts and city/county health departments in assuring programs
adhere to state/federal standards.5.The role of the media in raising public awareness to
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the benefits of abstinence,the negative consequences of premature sexual activity,and
the central role of parents/significant others as the prime educators of their children.
METHODOLOGY:Activities include:the strengthening of existing teen pregnancy
prevention coalitions to provide strategic guidance and technical assistance to
communities,the provision of targeted grant programs and technical assistance to support
and/or expand community-based AERS projects,the design of a statewide media
campaign,the formation of linkages with other programs serving youth to reduce
fragmentation/duplication of services and increase efficiencies,and the use of existing
collaborative boards within communities as a prime vehicle for programimplementation.
COORDINATION:The AERS initiative comprises the teen pregnancy prevention
component of the Governor’s Project for Community Building and is administered by the
Department in partnership with public/private subcontractors who have demonstrated
expertise in the respective project area.
EVALUATION:The Department will address the 4 national performance measures
through a comprehensive statewide evaluation process.
ANNOTATION:The overall goal is to reduce pregnancies among teens,ages 15-17,
without a corresponding increase in the abortion rate.Activities include community-
based abstinence education,mentoring,counseling,and parental components.Other
efforts include a statewide media campaign,professional,peer and parent training/
technical assistance,etc.
KEYWORDS:Teen Pregnancy Prevention,Adolescent Risk Behavior Prevention,
counseling.
PROJECT NARRATIVE
1
SECTION 4.2.1:PRIORITY NEEDS
Pennsylvania’s Vital Statistics indicate that the 15-17-age cohort experiences higher than
acceptable numbers and rates of teen pregnancy,out of wedlock births and sexually transmitted
diseases.This finding is particularly prevalent among Pennsylvania’s Black and Hispanic
populations.
In 1995,there were a total of 8,708 pregnancies reported among all Pennsylvania youth,
aged 15-17.This included 5,130 pregnancies among White teens (pregnancy rate of 24.9 per
1000),3,484 pregnancies among Black teens (pregnancy rate of 132.6 per 1000),and 843
pregnancies among Hispanic teens (pregnancy rate of 114.7 per 1000).
In 1999,there were a total of 7,071 pregnancies (pregnancy rate of 30 per 1000) reported
among all Pennsylvania youth aged 15-17.This included 4,237 pregnancies among White teens
(pregnancy rate of 20.7 per 1000),2,763 pregnancies among Black teens,(pregnancy rate of
101.6 per 1000),and 731 pregnancies among Hispanic teens (pregnancy rate of 83.4 per 1000).
In 1995,there were a total of 6,104 births reported among all Pennsylvania youth,aged
15-17 (birth rate of 25.8 per 1000).This included 3,774 births among White teens (birth rate of
18.4 per 1000),2,274 births among Black teens (birth rate of 86.6 per 1000) and 779 births
among Hispanic teens (birth rate of 100.8 per 1000).
In 1999,there were a total of 5,003 births reported among all Pennsylvania youth aged
15-17 (birth rate of 21.2 per 1000).This included 3,171 births among White teens (birth rate of
15.5 per 1000),1,729 births among Black teens (birth rate of 63.8 per 1000),and 713 births
among Hispanic teens (birth rate of 81.3 per 1000).
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While Pennsylvania’s statistics demonstrate improvements for the respective cohorts,
they are unacceptably high and evidence significant disparities among Black and Hispanic teens.
In all cases,Pennsylvania’s statistics signal that its youth are engaged in high-risk sexual
behaviors for which additional primary prevention efforts are merited (i.e.abstinence-only
education,mentoring,counseling,and adult supervisory programs).
Moreover,Pennsylvania’s 1998 Vital Statistics indicated there was 1,633,383 youth,aged
10-19,in its total population.Pennsylvania’s Title V AERS projects are serving only 26,000 or
1.6%of these youth via 28 local community-based programs in 30 counties.Since the
implementation of Pennsylvania’s abstinence-only community-based programs,the Department
has received more than 700 unduplicated requests for funding fromcommunity-based entities
across the state.All this indicates the need to expand local,willing participation among
Pennsylvania’s youth and communities.
PERFORMANCE MEASURES FOR ABSTINENCE ONLY EDUCATION PROGRAMS
1.Lower the pregnancy rate among teenagers aged 15-17 to 25 per 1000 by 2002.
2.Reduce the proportion of adolescents 17 years and younger who have engaged in sexual
intercourse.
3.Reduce the incidence of sexually transmitted disease (STDs),among adolescents,15-19
to 1039 per 100,000 by the year 2002.STDs include gonorrhea,syphilis,and chlamydia.
4.Lower the birth rate among teenagers aged 15-17 to 31.6 per 1000 by the year 2002.
(Pennsylvania has achieved this rate,but will continue to emphasize the need to stay
vigilant).
5.Lower the number of pregnancies to all females,aged ≤ 14 years to 500 by the year 2002.
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6.Increase the percent of young people enrolled in abstinence education and related
services who acquire and use refusal skills to remain abstinent fromsexual activity and
other high risk behaviors to 85%of programparticipants by year 2002.
SECTION 4.2.2:LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES
The Department of Health is fully supportive of the legislative intent of the Section 510
language defining the scope and limitations of abstinence education relating to this grant
program.In its programplan,the Department has incorporated a number of actions and
activities to ensure the legislative priorities as described in the application guidance are fully
followed by the Department,its agents and subcontractors,including entities providing
community designed and driven abstinence education services.These actions include:
• Soliciting input frompartnering agencies to assess their level of participation in data
collection and analysis.Based on the availability of data,map out distribution of
abstinence education and related services.The survey instrument will incorporate the
specific language found in Section 510.
• Continuing to include Section 510 requirements in the subcontract with the Center for
Schools and Communities (CSC) for conducting the competitive award processes for
community-based abstinence and related service programs.(See programplan objectives
and action steps.)
• Continuing to include Section 510 language/requirements in contractual agreements with
each of the 28-exisitng AERS community-based projects and contractual agreements
expected to be entered into in FY 2002.Compliance with federal Section 510 abstinence
definitions and exclusion of contradictory programming will be clearly identified as an
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essential requirement in the Request for Application (RFA) materials and guidance.All
new bidders and community providers will continue to be required to sign an “Assurance
Page” (Appendix B) to confirmtheir understanding of the provisions of Section 510.
• Continuing to include Section 510 abstinence language in the design/methodology of the
statewide evaluation of abstinence education programs funded by the Department.
• Continuing to include compliance with federal abstinence education criteria outlined in
Section 510 as an indicator to be monitored by the Department’s contracted university
affiliated evaluator via the Department’s Community Health Districts.
• Continuing to review and approve abstinence curricula for medical accuracy,age
appropriateness and compliance with the provisions of Section 510.
• Continuing to promote separation of church and state for all funded programs.
• Continuing to provide education and training.
List of Priority Needs:
1.Pennsylvania lacks the information to create a comprehensive profile of adolescent health
needs to facilitate the targeting of high need populations and the allocation of resources
for abstinence education and related programs.While some data are available,they have
not been closely examined to first identify and,subsequently,contrast the geographic
distribution of high need adolescent populations with the geographic distribution of
abstinence education and related service providers.
2.Abstinence education and related services in Pennsylvania are fragmented and may lack
the capacity to conduct the additional services needed to comply with PL 104-93.
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3.At present,information is needed that describes model abstinence education programs
that can be used to provide technical assistance for the design and evaluation of
community driven abstinence education and related services.
4.At present,parents,professionals,peers,and other interested persons that interact with
children and adolescents are in need of training and materials to facilitate the effective
delivery of abstinence and related programming and services.
5.To combat media,peer and other societal pressures on adolescents to become sexually
active,there is a need to create statewide awareness that abstinence is a viable,
appropriate,and fashionable option for adolescents.At the same time,there is need to
promote and equip parents as the primary educators of their youth.
6.To assess the effectiveness of interventions,carefully designed measures and data
collection plans must be defined.
SECTION 4.2.3:FY 2002 PROGRAMPLAN
The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania,Bureau of Family Health,has developed a plan and
defined strategies for the implementation of Section 510,Title V of the Social Security Act (42
U.S.C.701 et
seq
.) to include abstinence education,mentoring,counseling,and adult supervision
to promote abstinence fromsexual activity.The plan is included in the teen pregnancy
prevention component of the Governor’s Project for Community Building and primarily targets
youth,males and females,ages 9-14.Multi-faceted and comprised of six objectives,the
Commonwealth’s AERS work plan defines interventions and strategies pertinent to the
following:1) the central role of communities and grassroots organizations in crafting,
implementing,and managing these services;2) the role of school districts in curricula building;
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3) the role of parents,peers and others with fiduciary relationships to children and adolescents,in
teaching the skills necessary to empower their youth to abstain fromsexual activity;4) the role
of health care providers in providing regular and periodic counseling and guidance to teens and
their parents/guardians;5) the role of the Department’s community health districts and
county/municipal health departments in assuring programs adhere to standards set forth by state
and federal governments;6) the role of the media in raising public awareness of the benefits of
abstinence,the negative consequences of teen pregnancies outside the context of marriage,and
the central role of parents and significant others as the prime educators of their youth on sexual
matters.
Decisions on past and future geographic targeting are based on the needs assessment
conducted annually.Recognizing Pennsylvania’s cultural,ethnic and social-economic diversity,
the plan tailors services to meet these diverse and unique needs where present.The need for
culturally sensitive services is evidenced by statistics.Pennsylvania vital statistics indicate that
the 15-17-age cohort experiences higher than acceptable numbers and rates of teen pregnancy,
out-of-wedlock births and sexually transmitted diseases.This finding is particularly prevalent
among Pennsylvania’s Black and Hispanic populations.In 1995,there were a total of 8,708
pregnancies reported among all Pennsylvania youth,aged 15-17.This included 5,130
pregnancies among White teens (pregnancy rate of 24.9 per 1000),3,484 pregnancies among
Black teens (pregnancy rate of 132.6 per 1000),and 843 pregnancies among Hispanic teens
(pregnancy rate of 114.7 per 1000).
In 1999,there were a total of 7,071 pregnancies (pregnancy rate of 30 per 1000) reported
among all Pennsylvania youth,aged 15-17.This included 4,237 pregnancies among White teens
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(pregnancy rate of 20.7 per 1000),2,763 pregnancies among Black teens,(pregnancy rate of
101.6 per 1000),and 731 pregnancies among Hispanic teens (pregnancy rate of 83.4 per 1000).
Pennsylvania programplans addresses the needs of all Pennsylvania’s youth,however,specific
activities were developed to target Hispanic youth and their families.These activities include:
broadcasting an abstinence message on Hispanic radio stations,distributing the Spanish version of
the booklet,“10 Tips on Talking to Your Kids About Sex,” which is designed to assist Hispanics
parents as the primary educators of their children about sexual matters,and finalizing an
abstinence curriculumthat is culturally and linguistically sensitive to the needs of Hispanic youth
and their families.
Traditional teen pregnancy prevention programs often focus primarily on females.
Pennsylvania recognizes the need to address male responsibility in its prevention efforts
and will continue to promote abstinence education activities targeting males as well as females.
Another factor is the education of parents and other adults with fiduciary relationships to youth.
The plan includes provider,peer,and parental education,technical assistance and training.The
Department will continue its contractual agreement with the Central Susquehanna Intermediate
Unit (CSIU),Center for Schools and Communities (CSC).The contract contains requirements
and funds for CSC to assist the Department to establish and fund local community-based AERS
projects,to provide training and technical assistance.As the Department’s agent,CSC entered
into formal “Letters of Agreement” with each of the 28 AERS projects funded in FFY 2001
(Appendix E).
OVERARCHING GOAL:To reduce premature sexual activity,the rates of STDs,teen
pregnancy and out of wedlock births to teens (9-14) in Pennsylvania,without a commensurate
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increase in its induced abortion rate.This will be accomplished via a five-year comprehensive
abstinence plan that includes abstinence-only education,mentoring,counseling and adult
supervisory programs,in accordance with PL 104-193,Personal Responsibility and Work
Opportunities Reconciliation Act,1996.Newly funded AERS programs will utilize the existing
infrastructure established with Title V abstinence education funding.
NEED STATEMENT#1:Pennsylvania continues to lack the information to create a
comprehensive profile of adolescent health care needs to facilitate the targeting of high-need
population and the allocation of resources for abstinence education programs.While most of the
data are available,they have not been closely examined to first identify and,subsequently,
contrast the geographic distribution of high-need adolescent populations with the geographic
distribution of AERS providers.
PRIORITY OBJECTIVE#1:Continue to annually,assess the availability,access,capacity,
and effectiveness of existing community–based abstinence education and related services within
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
ACTION STEPS:
1.1 In FFY 2002,continue to solicit input frompartnering agencies to assess their level of
participation in data collection,analysis and programdesign.
1.2 In FFY 2002,based on the availability of data as outlined in 1.1,map the distribution of
AERS programs in relation to areas with teens at high risk for teen pregnancy.
NEED STATEMENT#2:Abstinence education and related services in Pennsylvania are
fragmented and may lack the capacity to conduct the additional services needed to comply with
P.L.104-193.
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PRIORITY OBJECTIVE#2:Strengthen the capacity of state and local government and private
sector agencies and systems to collaborate and improve the delivery of abstinence education and
related services to children,adolescents and their parents.
ACTION STEPS:
2.1 In FFY 2002,continue to maintain and periodically update the list of over 800 key state and
local stakeholders,including public and private entities (i.e.consumers,business,religious
and other community leaders,educators,provider agencies,parent,youth and civic
organizations,local and state teen pregnancy coalitions),seeking funding to implement new
community-based abstinence services in Pennsylvania.
2.2 In FFY 2002,continue to actively participate in monthly interdepartmental meetings of the
Governor’s Project for Community Building (GPCB).AERS is the teen pregnancy
component of GPCB,other agencies represented in the meetings include:Department of
Education,Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency,Department of Labor and
Industry,Department of Community and Economic Development,Department of Health,and
The Governor’s Fatherhood Initiative.Continue to participate in regional forums conducted
throughout the state to solicit additional participants/key players and,the provision of AERS
training to interested parties.
2.3 In FFY 2002,continue to facilitate the establishment of an organization entity with strategic
oversight over the activities of this action plan.Recommendations resulting froma research
study of presently established models nationwide should be reflected in its organizational
structure and purpose.Recommendations will consider the specific needs of the
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Commonwealth.Research methodology will include:literature search,discussions with staff
fromestablished models,and site visits.
2.4 In FFY 2001-02,the Department in collaboration with its contractor,CSC,will issue a
“Request for Application (RFA) for Continued Funding for Abstinence Education and
Related Services” to the 28 community-designed and driven AERS projects in 30 counties
across the state (Appendix F).Approximately 26,000 youth who participated in these
programs in FY 2001 will continue to be involved in wholesome,school based instruction,
after school activities,job/career planning,summer camps,and other mentoring activities that
provide positive rewarding life experiences.
NEED STATEMENT#3:At present,information is needed that describes model abstinence
education programs that can be used to provide technical assistance for the design and evaluation
of community-based abstinence education.
PRIORITY OBJECTIVE#3:Disseminate information regarding abstinence education and
related services curricula,programs,and providers to stakeholders across Pennsylvania.
ACTION STEPS:
3.1 In FFY 2002,continue to expand,update and distribute the AERS Curricula Directory
(formerly Abstinence ProgramDirectory) developed in FY 1998,to assist communities in
identifying,implementing and evaluating abstinence resource materials that comply with Title
V,Section 510.
NEED STATEMENT#4:At present,parents,professionals,peers,and other interested
persons that interact with children and adolescents are in need of training and resource
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materials to facilitate the effective delivery of abstinence and related programming and
services.
PRIORITY OBJECTIVES#4:Ensure that parents,peers,professionals and other interested
persons that interact or work with children and adolescents (i.e.teachers,child care providers,
primary care physicians,school nurses etc.) have access to high quality training in the
delivery of abstinence education and related services.
ACTION STEPS:
4.1 In FFY 2002,continue to identify active professional,parent and peer support groups within
the communities that provide abstinence education and related services.
Continue to support and promote the establishment of new parent groups and peer support
groups in areas that demonstrate a lack of and need for abstinence education and related
services.
Continue to support parents/guardians in carrying out their role as the primary educators of
their children on matters of sexuality and to increase their understanding of child
development by providing training and materials to increase their knowledge of normal
childhood development,including normal sexual development and to thereby,engender
functional,open communication with their children.
4.2 In FFY 2001-2002,continue to promote the adoption of abstinence education and related
services into provider protocols for primary health care to adolescents (i.e.AMA’s Guide for
Adolescent Preventive Services,GAPS,and HRSABright Futures).This will ensure the
abstinence message is integrated into the regular schedule of primary prevention/health care
and counseling services for adolescents/and their parents or guardians.
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4.3 In FFY 2002,develop and submit SPRANS application to expand community-based
abstinence education programs to provide services to youth 12-18,support various
enhancements to current services and widen its scope to include child development
education and training to parents,and services tailored to and inclusive of youth with
disabilities and other special needs.
NEED STATEMENT#5:To combat media,peer,and other societal pressures on
adolescents to become sexually active,there is a need to create statewide awareness that
abstinence is a viable,appropriate,and fashionable option for adolescents.At the same
time,there is a need to promote and equip parents as the prime educators of their youth.
PRIORITY OBJECTIVE#5:Utilize outreach and media based strategies to promote
abstinence education and related services to target child and adolescent populations.
ACTION STEPS:
5.1 In FFY 2002,further expand the statewide abstinence media campaign.Continue to work in
conjunction with the media contractor to develop a strategic platform,creative concept and
media plan that:a) Is based on careful and focused primary and secondary market research
of the affected market segment/population and carefully examines and addresses the needs
of males and females in urban,suburban and rural areas,fromfunctional and dysfunctional
family settings,and varied racial,ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds;b) Promotes an
abstinence message consistent with PL 104- 93,“sells” the benefits of abstinence;
demonstrates the negative consequences of bearing children out-of-wedlock;teaches how
alcohol and drug use increases the vulnerability to sexual advances,promotes mutually,
faithful,monogamous relationships within the context of marriage,promotes abstinence as
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the expected standard for school age children;and c) educates parents and responsible adults
to their responsibility of talking to youth about abstinence and includes a call to action.
5.2 In FFY 2002,launch the campaign as outlined in step 5.1 utilizing existing marketing
distribution systems to promote the efficient distribution of literature and the timely on-line
response to callers utilizing the Department’s toll free number 1-877-PA-HEALTH,local
Community Health District Offices and the efficient distribution of literature,as appropriate.
5.3 In FFY 2002,community-based AERS programs will develop help aids for parents,
promoting abstinence/delay of premature sexual activity.
NEED STATEMENT#6:There is a need to assess the effectiveness of interventions,and to
develop carefully designed measures and data collection plans that must be defined.
PRIORITY OBJECTIVE#6:Design and implement an effective process and outcome-based
evaluation for the assessment of AERS community-based projects.
In FFY 2002,in conjunction with the university-affiliated evaluator,the Bureau of
Family Health will continue to design,modify and conduct a statewide evaluation study
of the statewide AERS initiative.The evaluation findings will be issued in October 2002.
a.In FFY 2002,in conjunction with the Department’s contractor,CSC,the Bureau
of Family Health and the Bureau of Community Health will continue to monitor
local AERS programs and provide technical assistance and training,as deemed
appropriate.
SECTION 4.2.4:PROCESS FOR CONSUMERINVOLVEMENT
As part of the annual Request for Application (RFA) process,28 AERS projects funded by the
Department are required to provide information on Community Support/Involvement.This
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section should explain the collaborative efforts underway in the community that will assure long-
termsupport for programcontinuation and may also include efforts to coordinate with other
abstinence education programs in the state.Every effort should be made to document
collaborative work accomplished by multiple agencies or groups.Applicants should specify any
connections with the specific initiatives including under the Governor’s Project for Community
Building (GPCB).Commonwealth agencies participating in the GPCB intend to give priority to
applications submitted that have the following characteristics:
♦ Awritten agreement that describes the role of all parties involved and signed by all parties.
This need not be a binding legal document per se,but should be quite specific.
♦ Roles played by the involved parties should include early planning of the local project.Early
involvement usually indicates a greater level of commitment to implementation.
♦ Roles of the parties involved should be substantial.This goes beyond just being a referral
source for programclients;for example,roles should involve collaboration not just
coordination.Each participating agency should bring resources that add to the value of the
services or activities being undertaken.These resources should be concrete and tangible - -
not just cooperation.Tangible resources are staff time,money,and equipment contributed on
an ongoing basis or at key points in implementation.
1.In addition to the GPCB,there are many community collaborative initiatives in Pennsylvania.
The applicant must describe how members of the community,including but not limited to
parents,teens,local health officials,local/regional Pregnancy Prevention Coalitions,Family
Centers,Family Services SystemReform(FSSR),Collaborative Boards,and Communities
That Care (CTC) were involved in the proposal process.
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2.Applicants should explain howthese community-based organizations and initiatives would
be involved in the ongoing development and operation of programservices and activities.
Applicants must also discuss how duplication of services will be avoided.
3.Special consideration will be given to programs serving communities in Keystone
Opportunity Zones (KOZ),ACT 47 Communities or Enterprise Zones.
4.Applicants should specify any connections with the State Health Improvement Planning
(SHIP).This initiative of the Department of Health establishes a statewide health planning
process that focuses on improving community health status through community health
improvement partnerships.The main goal is to create a coordinated approach to achieve
measurable improvements to local health status.The aimis to give communities a greater
voice in health issues that affect them.A further goal is to coordinate Department programs
and resources at the local level to increase programresponsiveness and efficiency
The information described in the items above also outline mechanisms to coordinate
Pennsylvania’s AERS project with other abstinence education projects in the state.
SECTION 4.2.5:BUDGET JUSTICATION
Pennsylvania’s AERS initiative proposes a budget for the period 10/1/2001 through 9/30/2002
comprised of a combination of federal funds,state and local/community matching funds to
support the total budget of $3,185,123.The Department is requesting $1.820 million in federal
funds to be combined with $1.365 million in state funds.As a condition of their grants and to
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demonstrate community ownership,projects funded starting in FFY 1998 were required to
provide cash or in-kind match of 5%of their project award.The match requirement was
increased to 10%for FFY 1999 and each year thereafter.Since Pennsylvania has met the
required 3 to 4 (state and federal) dollar match,the 5%and 10%local match will provide
additional local resources for the project.Budgeted funds support comprehensive,community-
based programs for young adolescents (ages 9 to 14),and outreach,abstinence education and
related services to reduce pregnancies in the 15-19 age group,wherein most teen pregnancies
occur.In grant year five,approximately 75%totaled budgeted funds will be awarded to
communities to strengthen their capacity to deliver strong,and coordinated abstinence education
and related services appropriately designed for high risk children,teens,their parents,guardians
and significant others.
Personnel:Key personnel include Project Director,Milo Woodward,currently employed in the
Division of Maternal and Child (DMCH) and the Project Coordinator,Phyllis Welborn,the State
Adolescent Health Coordinator.This team,whose positions are funded by the Maternal and
Child Health Services Block Grant,prepared the abstinence federal application and Work Plan,
and will continue to provide leadership and administrative direction congruent with the roles and
responsibilities outlined in the Biographical Sketches contained in Appendix Aof this
application.Milo Woodward,Project Director and Section Chief,Maternal and Infant Health
will oversee DMCH staff performance of programand administrative functions that include:
administering and monitoring the contract with the CSC,serving as staff liaison for the
Department’s media contract,serving as liaison between CSC,the evaluation team,community
health district staff,and participating in training and technical assistance activities,etc.
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Travel:Will include the abstinence programactivities of the central teamincluding the Project
Director and Project Coordinator.It will support transportation to state and regional training
sessions,meetings,site visits to community programs and occasional national forums on
abstinence education convened by federal agencies.
Subcontract/Other:
A.Training/Technical Assistance (TA) and Community Support Contract:For this grant
period,$2.8 million is budgeted for a contract with a state affiliated,partnering agency,
CSIU-16-Center for Schools and Communities (CSC).It includes funds to be awarded to
communities and schools,and provides administrative,and training/TAsupport for
various functions including but not limited to:
1.Conducting a targeted selection and award process that will culminate in fifth year
continuation funding for 28 AERS projects serving communities and/or school
districts for community-based abstinence education,mentoring,counseling,adult
supervision,and/or curriculumdevelopment programs.
2.Continuing to operate a center that provides training/TAservices programfor
professionals (i.e.educators,community agency staff,school teachers &
administrative staff,parents,etc),to assist these groups in the effective delivery of
abstinence education and related services to the target population.
3.Continuing to develop,execute and oversee agreements to provide grant funds to
sub-grantee providers (schools &community agencies) that are directly
responsible for implementing community–based abstinence education and related
services.
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4.Administering a subcontract to conduct an evaluation study to determine the
effectiveness of abstinence education and related services.
Of the total budgeted to the partnering agency contract in FFY 2001,$2.398 m
(85%of CSC’s budget) is for direct grants to community agencies and school
districts for abstinence education and related services.
B.Media Campaign:Approximately $300,000 is budgeted for the period 10-1-01 to
6-30- 02 and is included in a Department of Health contract with the Neiman Group.
The Neiman Group is a professional media/advertising agency with demonstrated
statewide capacity to conduct a statewide media outreach campaign that started on
7-1-98.This campaign will continue to support and enhance the community-based
abstinence education and related services and other portions of the Work Plan.The
campaign will target youth ages 9-14,be research-based,identify the needs and attitudes
of the diverse,rural and urban population of Pennsylvania,educate parents in the delivery
of messages on sexual matters,and establish a marketing distribution systemto
disseminate literature and other resources in response to on-line inquiries.Acopy of the
contracts with CSC and the Neiman Group were provided as Appendices in the Year 02
Application.
SECTION 4.2.6:COORDINATION EFFORTS WITH OTHER PROGRAMS
Coordination efforts were outlined in Sections 4.2.3 and 4 above.Additionally,as part of the
annual RFAprocess,the 28 AERS projects funded by the Department must provide information
on Community Support/Involvement.This information should explain the collaborative efforts
underway in the community that will assure long-termabstinence education programs in the
19
state.Every effort should be made to document collaborative efforts accomplished by multiple
agencies or groups.Proposals showing strong collaborative efforts are weighed more heavily
than those that do not.Applicants must also specify any connections with the State Health
Improvement Plan (SHIP).This initiative of the Department of Health establishes a statewide
health planning process that focuses on improving community health status through community
health improvement partnerships.The main goal is to create a coordinated approach to achieve
measurable improvements to local health status.The aimis to give communities a greater voice
in health issues that affect them.Afurther goal is to coordinate Department programs and
resources at the local level to increase programresponsiveness and efficiency.The
aforementioned activities provide an overview of Pennsylvania’s efforts to coordinate abstinence
with other programs,and local and state agencies.
APPENDIX A
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES
Biographical Sketch
Give the following information for all professional personnel contributing to the project beginning
with the Project Director.(DO NOT EXCEED 2 PAGES ON ANY INDIVIDUAL)
Name (Last,first,middle initial) Title Birth Date
Woodward,Milo Y.Director,Maternal and Infant Health
Section
06-04-48
Education (begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education and include postdoctoral
training)
Institution and Location Degree Year
Completed
Field of Study
Carnegie-Mellon University
Pittsburgh,PA 15213
BA 1973 Cognitive
Psychology
HONORS
None
MAJOR PROFESSIONAL INTEREST (S)
RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:
1980 - present:Maternal and Infant Health ProgramStaff,Pennsylvania Department of Health,
Division of Maternal and Child Health.Responsible for implementing and assessing Maternal and
Child Health programming,and assisting the Department of Public Welfare in its Healthy
Beginnings Plus Medical Assistance programdesigned to provide obstetrical and ancillary care for
low income high risk pregnant women.Responsible for the Title V Family Planning Program
which targets teens seventeen and younger for reproductive health care.Directs the State’s
County and Municipal Health Departments to implement appropriate and needed maternal and
child health services at the Community level.Collaborates with the six Healthy Start Projects that
are funded in Pennsylvania,to enhance perinatal systems.Provides direction and protocols to
Bureau of Community Health Systems staff for bereavement and support to families who have
experienced a SIDS death.
1974-1980:Worked as a planning analyst;participated in the writing of the first State Health
Plan in Pennsylvania.Worked with the Legal Counsel of the Department of Health to certify the
first Hospice in Pennsylvania through the Certificate of Need program.
1973-1974:Worked as a public health researcher at a private research firm,Pennsylvania Health
Research Institute,Camp Hill,PA.This research involved a feasibility study to determine the use
of a building whose original purpose had changed.The point of the research was to find an
alternate use for the building based upon the community’s needs and its ability to support and
implement the chosen use of the building.
Biographical Sketch
Give the following information for all professional personnel contributing to the project beginning
with the Project Director.(DO NOT EXCEED 2 PAGES ON ANY INDIVIDUAL)
Name (Last,first,middle initial) Title Birth Date
(Mo.Day Yr)
Welborn,Phyllis Y.Adolescent Health Coordinator
Education (begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education and include postdoctoral
training)
Institution and Location Degree Year
Completed
Field of Study
Antioch University MA 1984
Organizational
Development
Temple University BS 1982
Therapeutic
Recreation
Temple University General Certificate
ProgramGerontology
1982
Gerontology
HONORS
Deans List Sophomore through Senior Years (Temple University)
MAJOR PROFESSIONAL INTEREST (S)
Institute for Cultural Partnerships - Board Member;Harrisburg Area Leadership Program-
Alumni,past Officer/Board Member;Girls Club Inc.-past/Officer/Board Member
RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:
1998 - present:Adolescent Health Coordinator,Pennsylvania Department of Health,Child and
Adolescent Health (CAH) section,in the Division of Maternal and Child Health (DMCH).
Responsible for promoting the health of children and adolescent through facilitating the
development,implementation,expansion and evaluation of a variety of preventive health service
systems and special initiatives targeted at improving access to care through family-centered
community or school-based,and culturally competent health services.
Serves as the Coordinator for the Abstinence Education and Related Services Initiative (AERS)
for the MCH target population and for adolescent health within the DMCH.
1993 - 1998:Section Director,Targeted Service Management (TSM) Unit,Pennsylvania
Department of Public Welfare,in the Office of Mental Retardation.Responsible to design,
develop,administer and monitor the statewide implementation of the TSMinitiative.Direct staff
in providing training and technical assistance to county and contracted providers to promote the
provision of appropriate health care and human services for persons with mental retardation.
Formulate policy issues and new initiatives.
1985 - 1993:Mental Retardation ProgramSpecialist,Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare,
in the Office of Mental Retardation.Responsible for policy development,review and evaluation.
Developed and monitored contracts,prepared Request for Proposals,prepared federal grants
applications and other funding requests,providing technical assistance to state and regional
providers.Implemented new programinitiatives and models of service delivery.
1984 - 1985:Pennsylvania Management Intern Program,Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
Completed a one year salaried competitive management training programdesigned to provide a
comprehensive overview of state government.Participated in rotational assignments in core areas
of government including but not limited to:budgeting,policy,personnel,comptroller,labor
relations and selected programareas (mental retardation,health,aging).
IvonneC.Bucher
Director
BureauofFamilyHealth
IvonneC.Bucher
ActingDirector
DivisionofMaternalandChildHealth
MiloY.Woodward
Director
DivisionofMaternalandChildHealth
MaternalandInfantHealthSection
PhyllisY.Welborn
StateAdolescentHealthCoordinator
DivisionofMaternalandChildHealth
CenterForSchoolsand
Communities
PSU
StatewideEvaluation
28Community-Based
Projects
APPENDIX B
AERS ASSURANCE
APPENDIX C
REPORTINGFORMS
Table1UNDUPLICATED
COUNTOFCLIENTSSERVED
FiscalYear2000:10/1/99through9/30/00
PennsylvaniaAbstinenceEducationandRelatedServices(AERS)Initiative
AgeinYears/Grades
<10
K–3
rd
10-14
4th–8th
15-17
9th–11
th
18-19
12th
20-24>24
TOTAL
MALES
Non-HispanicWhite
1627634518565350010363
Black1591118276101001654
Hispanic1342497500539
Others3751400092
FEMALES
Non-HispanicWhite
2308688620585500011802
Black1891183357101001830
Hispanic1942385500532
Others58522000112
TOTAL
4323165394765129726924
Page1of2
Table2TOTALENCOUNTERS
BYCLIENTSSERVED
FiscalYear2000:10/1/99through9/30/00
PennsylvaniaAbstinenceEducationandRelatedServices(AERS)Initiative
AgeinYears/Grades
<10
K–3
rd
10-14
4th–8th
15-17
9th–11
th
18-19
12th
20-24>24
TOTAL
MALES
Non-HispanicWhite
98374342462396670060167
Black14331153815572220014750
Hispanic15927177655003646
Others32700174000906
FEMALES
Non-HispanicWhite
137734852483644110071072
Black41581938524152940026252
Hispanic1863355145715005013
Others408656620001567
TOTAL
29618130508216331614183373
Page2of2
APPENDIX D
PERFORMANCE MEASURES
APPENDIX E
LETTER OF AGREEMENT
WITHAERS PROJECT/LIST OF 28 FUNDED
PROJECTS
LETTER OF AGREEMENT
Abstinence Education and Related Services (AERS) Initiative
Continuation Funding:10/01/00-9/30/01
The Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit (CSIU),fiscal agent for Center for Schools
and Communities (CSC),intends to contract with,Provider Name.
(hereafter referred to as the
subcontractor) for the provision of services related to the Abstinence nc
Education and Related
Services grant.The total amount of the sub-contract is $ xxxxxx.Those services are provided
for in the attached proposal and in conjunction with services developed and implemented by the
CSC.The contract budget is to be rendered during the planning period fromOctober 1,2000
through September 30,2001.
Payment for services rendered will be made following receipt of the funding and upon
receipt of a signed Letter of Agreement fromthe subcontractor.The subcontractor must submit
an invoice for actual expenditures by the fifth day of the month for the previous month’s
expenditures,using the attached invoice.A final expenditure cash/reconciliation report is due by
October 15,2001.
I.Given availability of funding,the CSIU may make working capital payments to a
subcontractor.For the purposes of this Agreement,“working capital” is defined as
estimated cash needs to cover expenditures during a pre-determined period of the
subcontractor’s grant:
A.Asubcontractor may submit a working capital payment request to the CSIU for approval.
The CSIU shall only approve working capital payment requests when it has been determined
by the CSIUthat the subcontractor does not possess sufficient capital to performthe work
and the CSIU has adequate funding on hand to make such payments.The payment method
selected will be in effect for the entire grant year of October 1,2000 through September
30,2001.It cannot be changed during the grant year.
To request a working capital payment,the subcontractor shall submit an initial working
capital payment request,which shall not exceed forty-five (45) days of anticipated
expenditures.Each month thereafter,the subcontractor may submit a monthly working
capital payment request for a thirty-day period of cash needs.
1.The subcontractor shall include in each working capital payment request
submitted,with the exception of the initial request,a report (attached invoice) of
its actual expenditures for the previous month as directed above.The requests
shall include,at a minimum,the following information:Actual Cash Received to
Date,Actual Expenditures to Date,Cash on Hand and the Amount of Working
Capital Requested.
2.The CSIU shall be responsible for monitoring all working capital payments
paid to the subcontractor to ensure that the subcontractor’s funding on hand does
not exceed a forty-five (45) day requirement.
B.The subcontractor shall reconcile all working capital payments made with actual
expenditures according to a plan to be released by the CSIU upon termination of
the grant period.The subcontractor shall return any unspent funds within ten (10)
days of receiving such a request fromthe CSIU.
II.This Letter of Agreement and contract budget may be revised as is deemed necessary to
reflect ongoing operations by memo signed by the subcontractor’s chief executive officer and
the Executive Director of the CSIU.Abudget revision is required to be filed with the CSIU
in advance if there is a 20 percent or greater change in a major category.
III.By signing this Letter of Agreement,the subcontractor agrees:
1.that the subcontractor will send appropriate staff to all Department of Health sponsored
training between October 1,2000 and September 30,2001;
2.that the subcontractor must participate in all aspects of the Department of Health sponsored
evaluation of the AERS Initiative;
3.that the subcontractor will provide detailed fiscal information upon request by the CSIU;
4.that the subcontractor must provide detailed quarterly reports—format will be provided to the
subcontractor;
5.that projects cannot violate the standard of separation of church and state (see Attachment H
of the 2000-2001 Request for Continued Funding);
6.that materials purchased,produced or distributed do not contradict or conflict with any of the
eight elements of abstinence education as defined by federal guidelines in Section II,Point D
of the 2000-2001 Request for Continued Funding.If the subcontractor chooses to use a
different curriculum,the new or revised curriculummust be submitted for approval by the
Center for Schools and Communities and the Department of Health prior to use.In addition,
all videos used,any copyrightable and/or copyrighted material (e.g.,audiovisuals,software,
publications,curricula and training materials,etc.) developed or purchased for use in the
AERS programmust be approved by the Center for Schools and Communities and the
Department of Health prior to use;and
7.that the subcontractor’s failure to meet any of the requirements listed in this agreement
in a timely manner will result in revocation or reduction of grant funds.
IV.The subcontractor understands that the funds paid under this contract are state funds (43
percent) and federal funds (57 percent--under CFDA number 93.235) and that the
subcontractor must comply with all regulatory aspects of that legislation and its ongoing
interpretations,as well as any other applicable law and regulations.Any final audit
disallowance imposed on the CSIUresulting fromits reimbursements to the
subcontractor for expenditures under the contract shall be the responsibility of the
subcontractor,and the subcontractor hereby agrees to reimburse the CSIUon a timely
basis if any such costs are disallowed.The CSIU agrees to contest any disallowed costs
to the extent possible,and the subcontractor agrees to cooperate and assist in such
defense.
V.The CSIU agrees to cooperate with the subcontractor in resolving any proposed
disallowance the auditors of the subcontractor recommends as a result of audits,or any
final audit disallowance imposed by the appropriate authorities,but the CSIU shall not be
held liable by the subcontractor for such disallowed costs.
Agreed by Subcontractor:
Signature Date Date
Executive Director,CSIU
Print Name and Title Above
1
Revised11-2-00
AERSGrantees
Agency
County
ProgramSummary
CatholicSocialServices
TheBridgeSouthServices
33EastNorthamptonStreet
Wilkes-Barre,PA18701
RonEvans,Phone:570-824-8756
LuzerneTheSmartChoicesprogramsusestheSEXCANWAITandFACTScurriculumsfor
afterschoolandcampabstinenceonlyeducation.Theprogramservesstudents7-18
yearsofagethroughhomeworkclubs,tutoring,mentoring,computeractivities,field
trips,andspecialevents.Parentingprogramsarealsooffered.
ChesterCountyHealthDepartment
ChesterCountyGovernmentServicesCenter
601WesttownRoad,Suite175
WestChester,PA19382
BillWiseman,Phone:610-344-6685
ChesterOxfordSchoolDistrictwillbenefitfromanabstinence-onlycurriculumsupplemented
byvideopresentationsandguestspeakers.Supportserviceswillincludementoring,
discussiongroups,andpeerpresentation.`
CityofChester
DepartmentofPublicSafety
BureauofHealth
SaberProject
36EastFifthStreet,2
nd
Floor
Chester,PA19013
PhyllisNails&MarreaWalker
Phone:610-447-7770/7832
DelawareTheSABERprogramusesthreecurriculums:CHOOSINGTHEBESTisthemain
curriculum,whileSEXCANWAITandME,MYWORLD,MYFUTUREarealso
usedforspecificagesandactivities.Theagencyhasdesignedsummercamp
programming,whichconsistsofdiscussion,role-play,creativeactivitiesandcareer
development.Homevisitsareincludedintheprogram.Tutoringandcounselingare
alsoavailable.
CommunitiesinSchools-Philadelphia,Inc.
JohnF.KennedyCenter
Room450,734SchuylkillAvenue
Philadelphia,PA19146
TreenaReid,Phone:215-875-3171
PhiladelphiaHealthEducatorsprovidemultipleservicestostudentsinGillespieandFitzsimons
MiddleSchools.ThecurriculumusedforabstinenceonlyeducationisETR:
CONTEMPORARYHEALTHSERIES.Servicesincludecasemanagement,
mentoring,tutoring,andfieldtripsthroughschoolyearandSummerprogramming.
Servicesarecoordinatedwithintheschoolandcommunity.
2
AERSGrantees
GeorgeWashingtonCarverCommunityCenter
349EastJacobyStreet
POBox971
Norristown,PA19401
GilbertKinsey,Phone:610-272-4699
MontgomeryProjectACEusestheSEXCANWAITcurriculumforabstinenceonlyeducationfor
afterschoolandsummerprogramming.Studentsare9-14years.Sports,recreation,
mentoring,guestspeakers,andfieldtripsareincluded.
KeystoneCentralSchoolDistrict
CentralMountainMiddleSchoolDistrict
301WestChurchStreet
LockHaven,PA17745
JayneArnone,Phone:570-893-4956
ClintonThecurriculum,FAMILYLIFEEDUCATION,ispresentedusingabstinenceonly
educationfor4
th
through10
th
gradersintheschooldistrict.Highschoolstudentswrite
andperformabstinenceonlyskitstocoincidewithcompletionofthecurriculum.The
componentsincludeaparentprogramming,familyevents,camping,andtheater
presentations.
KeystoneEconomicDevelopmentCorporation
1954MaryGraceLane
Johnstown,PA15901
AllenAndrews,Phone:814-535-6556
CambriaTheSEXCANWAITcurriculumisusedforabstinenceonlyinstructionto6
th
through
9th
graders.Programmingincludescareerdevelopment,usingtheEnterHereSeries,
fieldtrips,andasummercamp.
LackawannaTrailSchoolDistrict
POBOX85
Factoryville,PA18419
NancyHlavaty,Phone:570-945-5153
Lacawanna/Wyoming
T
hisafterschoolprogramusesSEXCANWAITasitscurriculum.Theprogramserve
studentsin4
th
through12
th
grades.Theprogramincludes,inadditiontoabstinenceonl
education,tutoring,socialskills,anti-violenceeducation,careerexploration,andfield
trips.
CommunityMinistriesoftheLutheronHomeat
Topton
LatinoSocialServices
CallowhillBuilding
10North5
th
Street,Suite800
Reading,PA19602
MinervaCruz,Phone:610-372-5392
BerksUsingSEXCANWAITasthecurriculum,4
th
and5
th
gradersintheschooldistricts
elementaryschoolslearnaboutabstinenceuntilmarriage.Emphasisonselfesteem,
alongwithdevelopingsocialskills,anti-violenceeducation,careerexploration,andfie
trips.
LaSalleUniversitySchoolofNursing
POBox808
1900WestOineyAvenue
NortheastPhiladelphia,PA19141
MaryEllenMiller,Phone:215-951-1489
PhiladelphiaTheReachfortheSTARSprogramusestheSEXCANWAITcurriculum
.
Abstinence
educationisofferedto9-14yearinavarietyofsettings:publicschool,recreation
centers,communitycenters,andapublichousingproject.Componentsinclude
education,mentoring,counseling,andreunions.Parentprogramsarealsooffered.
3
AERSGrantees
LehighValleyCoalitiontoPreventPregnancy
St.Luke’sHealthNetwork
801OstromStreet
Bethlehem,PA18015
WilmaAlvarez,Phone:610-954-6202
Lehigh/NorthamptonYouthinAllentown,Bethlehem,andEastonwillreceiveabstinenceonlyeducationand
s
upportservicesthroughfamilycentersandothercommunityorganizations.Asumme
programisoffered.TheSEXCANWAITcurriculumisusedforthisprogram.
AbstinenceAlliance-Manito
7564BrownsMillRoad
Chambersburg,PA17201
JuliaWest,Phone:717-375-4834
Franklin
T
heAbstinenceAllianceisusingManitoclassroomsandcommunitycollaborationsto
p
rovideabstinenceprogramminginanumberofcommunityandschoolsettings.SEX
CANWAITandFOUNDATIONSOFFATHERHOODarecurriculapresentlyused.
Schoolyearandsummerprogrammingareoffered.
MercyHospitalofPittsburgh
1515LocustStreet
3MercyHealthCenter,Room322
Pittsburgh,PA15219
MichelleRupert,Phone:412-323-7312
AlleghenyThisabstinenceonlyprogram,throughamulti-agencycollaborativeoffersBOYSTO
MEN,PHENOMENALFEMALES,andMANAGINGPRESSURSBEFORE
MARRIAGEascurricula.Theprogramisofferedthroughclassesinschools,
communitycenters,andsummercamps.
NeighborhoodUnitedAgainstDrugs
5629ChesterAvenue,2
nd
Floor
SouthwestPhiladelphia,PA19143
JosephE.Purnell,Phone:215-724-7430
Philadelphia
U
singtheSEXCANWAITcurriculumforabstinenceonlyeducation,thisprogramuse
trainedyoungadultambassadorstoprovideinstruction.Tenambassadorseachruna
teamof10youthofthesamesexandagegroup(9-11or12-14).Activitiesruninthis
mannerincludehomeworkassistance,tutoringandfieldtrips.
NewBringhtonSchoolDistrict
322543
rd
Street
NewBrighton,PA15066
MaryBucci,Phone:724-843-1795
Beaver
T
hecurriculumME,MYWORLD,MYFUTUREisusedforabstinenceonlyclassesin
healtheducationin7
th
grade.Othercomponentsusedinthemiddleschoolsetting
includeaMISHslidepresentation.Saltworksproduction,andChicCliqusocialclub.
Parentingprogram,PASS,isofferedonascheduledbasis.
NeuvaEsperenza,Inc.
LatinoInstituteofBehavioralHealth
4261N.5
th
Street
NorthPhiladelphia,PA19140
DanCortez,Phone:215-324-0746
PhiladelphiaThisprogramusestheUrbanFamilyCouncilabstinencecurriculum,forschool
presentationsfor9-12yearolds.Theyalsoofferabstinencefairs,counseling,andpeer
supportgroups.CampEsperanza,aoneweekovernightcamp,isofferedduringthe
summer.Homevisitsareincludedwiththepeersupportcomponent.
4
AERSGrantees
SchoolDistrictofLancaster
ProjectImpact
McCaskeyEastHighSchool
1051LehighAvenue
Lancaster,PA17602
PatriciaKinsey,Phone:717-396-6810ext.4236
LancasterProjectIMPACT,IndividualsMotivatedtoPromoteAlternativeChoicesforTeens,ist
curriculumusedfor8
th
through12
th
grades.Thiscurriculumwasdevelopedbythe
granteeforabstinenceonlyeducation.Someout-of–schoolprogrammingandsummer
programmingisofferedforyouth.
RealCommitment
TenderCarePregnancyCenters
755AOldHarrisburgRoad
Gettysburg,PA17325
DanKriel,Phone:717-338-9500
Adams
W
AITING,THESMARTCHOICE,thecurriculumusedforabstinenceonlyeducation
ispresentedto9
th
graders.Stude
n
tsforREALCOMMITMENT,apeersupportgroup
doespresentationsandworkswith5
th
–10
th
graders.Parentcomponenthasworkshops
ToOurChildren’sFuturewithHealth,Inc.
1914North63
rd
Street
WestPhiladelphia,PA19151
RobinFoster-Drain,Phone:215-879-7740
PhiladelphiaYouth,ages10to14,intheHaddingtonareaofPhiladelphia,arereceivingabstinence
onlyeducationthroughthecurriculum,POSTPONINGSEXUALINVOLVEMENT.
Thecomponentsincludehealtheducation,peerleadership,afterschooltutorials,and
communityservice/publicawareness.
TresslerLutheranServices
901North6
th
Street
Harrisburg,PA17102
NathanielGadsden,Phone:717-233-1448
DauphinTheprogramsubcontractswithavarietyofcommunityorganizationstoprovide
abst
i
nenceonlyeducationincommunitysettings.OfferingsincludeLifeEsteem,mari
arts,creativeactivities,Africandrumming,andgroupgathering.
TuscaroraIU
2527USHWY522South
McVeytown,PA17051
DonnaWaleski,Phone:717-899-7143
Fulton/HuntingtonUsingthecurriculaMANAGINGPRESSURESBEFOREMARRIAGEfor7
th
and8
th
g
radeabstinenceonlyeducation,BABES(BeginningAlcohol/BasiceducationStudies)
forgradesK-3,andGETREALABOUTTOBACCOforgrades4-6.ConductaYouth
ConferenceDay,afterschoolactivities,tutoringandhomeworkclubs.Incoming7
th
gradersattendaonedaycampandsummerprogrammingisofferedfor5
th
–8
th
graders
VenangoCountyAreaVocational
VenangoTechnicalSchool
OneVoTechDrive
OilCity,PA16301
ToniStevenson,Phone:814-677-3097
Venango
APPENDIX F
RFA FOR AERS GRANT FY 2000
APPENDIX G
STATE ABSTINENCE FUNDINGPROFILE
GRANTYEAR5:ABSTINENCEEDUCATION&RELATEDSERVICES
Personnel:Intern
POSITION
Hours/week
Durationof
Employment
Wage/Rate
SubtotalWage
Fringe@11%
Total
Intern37.520weeks$8.30$6,225.00$684.75$6,909.75
Travel:
Activity
ProjectDirector
Project
Coordinator
Comments
TOTAL
MajorConference$806.00$806.00Includestransport(240mi.@.345)perperson
HotelAccommodations@$282.00perperson
Subsistence@$96.00perperson
Miscellaneous@$45.00perperson
RegistrationFee@$300.00perperson
$1,612.00
TenSiteVisits
Fiveperperson
$694.00$694.00Includesparking,andtravel,to&fromprojectsites.$1,388.00
TOTALS
$1,500.00
$1,500.00
$3,000.00
Supplies:
Activity
EstimatedDollar
AmountforActivity
TOTAL
GeneralOfficeSupplies$2,000.00$2,000.00
Newspaperinserts,brochures,educationalandoutreachmaterialsforstatewidedistribution.$75,330.00$75,330.00
TOTALS
$77,330.00
$77,330.00
OMBApprovalNo.0348-0044
BUDGETINFORMATION—Non-ConstructionPrograms
SECTIONA–BUDGETSUMMARY
EstimatedUnobligatedFundsNeworRevisedBudget
GrantProgram
Functionor
Activity
(a)
CategoryofFederal
DomesticAssistance
Number
(b)
Federal
(c)
Non-Federal
(d)
Federal
(e)
Non-Federal
(f)
Total
(g)
1.Abstinence
Education
93.235
$0$0$1,820,070$1,365,053$3,185,123
2.
3.
4.
5.TOTALS
$0$0$1,820,070$1,365,053$3,185,123
SECTIONB–BUDGETCATEGORIES
GRANTPROGRAM,FUNCTIONORACTIVITY
6.ObjectClassCategories
(1)FederalDollars(2)Non-FederalDollars(3)(4)
Total
(5)
a.Personnel$6,225$0$0$0$6,225
b.FringeBenefits685685
c.Travel3,0003,000
d.Equipment00
e.Supplies77,33077,330
f.Contractual1,312,8531,365,0532,677,906
g.Construction0
h.Other400,000400,000
I.TotalDirectCharges(sumof6a-6h)1,800,0931,365,053003,165,146
j.IndirectCharges@4.1%19,97719,977
k.TOTALS(sumof6i-6j)$1,820,070$1,365,053$0$0$3,185,123
7.ProgramIncome$0$0$0$0$0
StandardForm424A(4-
SECTIONC–NON-FEDERALRESOURCES
(a)GrantProgram(b)Applicant(c)State(d)OtherSources(e)TOTALS
8.AbstinenceEducation$0$1,365,053$0$1,365,053
9.
10.
11.
12.TOTALS(sumoflines8-11)$0$1,365,053$0$1,365,053
SECTIOND–FORECASTEDCASHNEEDS
13.Federal
$1,820,070$455,018$455,017$455,018$455,017
14.Non-Federal1,365,053341,263341,263341,263341,264
15.TOTAL(sumoflines13and14)$3,185,123$796,281$796,280$796,281$796,281
SECTIONE–BUDGETESTIMATESOFFEDERALFUNDSNEEDEDFORBALANCEOFTHEPROJECT
FUTUREFUNDINGPERIODS(Years)
(a)GrantProgram
(b)(c)(d)(e)
16.AbstinenceEducation
17.
18.
19.
20.TOTALS(sumoflines16-19)
SECTIONF–OTHERBUDGETINFORMATION
(Attachadditionalsheetsifnecessary)
21.DirectCharges:22.IndirectCharges:FixedRateof4.1%
DirectCharges=$487,240IndirectCharges=$19,977
23.Remarks
SF424A(4-88)Pag
PrescribedbyOMBCircularA-
APPENDIX H
FY 2000 ANNUAL REPORT
1
5.1 FY 2000-ANNUAL REPORT
Pennsylvania’s Annual Report to the Maternal and Child Health Bureau includes a project
narrative that addresses how abstinence education projects meet priority needs in the State,the
legislative priorities,and the programplan,including the State Abstinence Funding Profile in
Appendix G.The process for consumer involvement and coordination of this project with other
abstinence education (including abstinence only) programs in the State are also described.
PROJECT NARRATIVE:PRIORITYNEEDS INTHE STATE
In response to and in accordance with P.L.104-103,Personal Responsibility and Work
Opportunities Reconciliation Act,1996,Pennsylvania is in its fourth year of funding community-
based,designed and driven abstinence-only education programs in geographic areas across the
state with disproportionate numbers of youth at high risk for out-of-wedlock births,teen
pregnancy and the early onset of sexual activity.Programs are youth developmental in nature
and are supported by a five-year strategic plan to promote abstinence as a positive lifestyle
choice for adolescents,9-14 years of age,statewide.Truly community-owned and driven
projects,each is designed and tailored by the sub-recipient community to respond to the unique
and pressing needs encountered in their own backyard.Projects are supported by statewide,
strategic infrastructure to ensure their ongoing success,accountability and adherence to
abstinence-only tenets,and the successful progression towards desired goals and outcomes,
subject to a statewide evaluation.Each programreceives regular on-site visits to provide tailored
technical assistance,participates in required semiannual trainings and other networking
opportunities to share best practices and lessons learned.The messages espoused by Abstinence
Education and Related Services (AERS) programs at the local level are under-girded by a
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statewide media campaign that targets teens,parents and other individuals with fiduciary
relationships with Pennsylvania’s youth.Overall AERS is aimed at increasing the number of
young adolescents,9-14 years of age,who decide to abstain fromsexual activity before
marriage.This state administered model preserves local design and ownership,ensures
statewide programintegrity and,reduces fragmentation and duplication of services.
LIST OF PRIORITYNEEDS/PENNSYLVANIA’S RESPONSE
PRIORITY NEED 1:Pennsylvania lacks the information to create a comprehensive profile of
adolescent health care needs to facilitate targeting of high need populations and the allocation of
resources for abstinence education and related programs.While some data is available they have
not been closely examined to first identify and subsequently contrast the geographic distribution
of high need population with the geographic distribution of AERS providers.
• DATACOLLECTION-PENNSYLVANIAVITAL STATISTICS COMPONENT
The Bureau of Family Health (BFH) requested Pennsylvania FY 2000 vital statistics to
assess the current status of teen pregnancy and births for the under 15,and 15-19,age
cohorts.The Department of Health’s reporting systemimpeded our data collection
efforts.FY 2000 vital statistics were not available for the target populations identified
above.In fact,at the time of the request,the most current teen pregnancy data available
were Pennsylvania’s FY 1998 statistics.Therefore,we utilized this data in our analysis
of the number of pregnancies and births and the pregnancy and birth rates for the target
populations.We identified areas of the State with populations at high risk for teen
pregnancy as well as racial and ethnic disparities to better target abstinence education
programs and services.
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Pennsylvania is currently updating its vital statistics and selected FY 1999 teen
pregnancy data is now available.It is included in this section of the Annual Report.In
accordance with Pennsylvania’s FY 1999 Vital Statistics,the 15-17 age cohort
experiences higher than acceptable numbers and rates of teen pregnancy,out of wedlock
births and sexually transmitted diseases.This finding is particularly prevalent among
Pennsylvania’s Black and Hispanic populations.In 1999,there were a total of 7,071
pregnancies (pregnancy rate of 30 per 1000) reported among all Pennsylvania youth aged
15-17.This included 4,237 pregnancies among White teens (pregnancy rate of 20.7 per
1000),2,763 pregnancies among Black teens,(pregnancy rate of 101.6 per 1000),and
731 pregnancies among Hispanic teens (pregnancy rate of 83.4 per 1000).
In FY 1999,there were a total of 5,003 births reported among all Pennsylvania youth
aged 15-17 (birth rate of 21.2 per 1000).This included 3,171 births among White teens
(birth rate of 15.5 per 1000),1,729 births among Black teens (birth rate of 63.8 per 1000),
and 713 births among Hispanic teens (birth rate of 81.3 per 1000).
While Pennsylvania’s statistics demonstrate improvements for the respective cohorts,
they are unacceptably high and evidence significant disparities among Black and
Hispanic teens.In all cases,Pennsylvania’s statistics signal that its youth are engaged in
high-risk sexual behaviors for which additional primary prevention efforts are merited
(i.e.abstinence-only education,mentoring,counseling,and adult supervisory programs).
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• DATACOLLECTION – QUARTERLY REPORTING MECHISMS
• In FY 2000-2001,the Department implemented numerous reporting mechanisms to
facilitate data collection fromits subcontractors and 28 Department funded AERS
projects currently providing services in 30 Pennsylvania communities.For example,the
Center for Schools and Communities (CSC),the Department’s contractor,is required to
submit a quarterly “Abstinence Education and Related Services Status Report” for
Department of Health review and approval.The report provides a brief description of the
current status of each AERS project,rates each project as a performer,performer with
some need for improvement or as an under-performer which is supported by the
program’s demonstrated ability for consistency in both fiscal accountability and program
performance.In this report,CSC also identifies their actions and responses to these
issues.The information provided in the status reports assists the Department and its
contractor to monitor project performance on an on-going basis,identify technical
assistance needs,develop plans to address identified needs and facilitates future policy
and funding decisions.Note,the “Abstinence Education and Related Services Status
Report” is an internal document and is not included with this Annual Report.
Each AERS project is required to submit an “ AERS Quarterly Report” (Appendix I).
This information is summarized and submitted to the Title V Director in the Bureau of
Family Health.The data collected is also routinely shared with local Maternal and Child
Health Consultants who assist the Department to conduct site reviews of 28 community-
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based AERS projects.The “AERS Quarterly Reports” contains information that
identifies the approved abstinence education curriculumutilized by the project,breaks-
out the number of participants (males,females),number of parents,dropouts,new
enrollees,identifies peer-support activities,parenting and parental involvement,
mentoring,male responsibility and counseling activities.AERS projects are also
encouraged to use the quarterly report to highlight project successes and best practices.
Information highlighting the accomplishments of Pennsylvania’s AERS projects will be
collected and published for distribution.
• DATACOLLECTION- STATEWIDE EVALUATION COMPONENT
The Pennsylvania Department of Health is conducting a statewide evaluation of the
AERS Initiative.AUniversity affiliated evaluator is implementing the evaluation of 28
Department funded community-based AERS programs located in 30 Pennsylvania
counties.Survey data collection began in October 1999 immediately following approval
by the Pennsylvania Department of Health’s Internal Review Board and is still
continuing.Focus group data collection began in March 2000 and also continues to be
collected.After much investigation and discussion,it was determined that an elementary
survey should not be created and administered.
The “AERS Evaluation Progress Report” is included with this report as Appendix J.The
report provides a synopsis of data collection efforts as related to the AERS evaluation.
Work conducted by the Penn State AERS Evaluation Project during funding year three,
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1999-2000,is discussed in this report.Aseparate report will present the preliminary
analysis of data collected.The report describes the data collection methodology,target
audience,and discusses issues/concerns as well as progress through August 2000.The
subcontractor is preparing a separate report that will present the preliminary analysis of
data collected through August 2000.
PRIORITY NEED 2:Abstinence Education and Related Services in Pennsylvania are
fragmented and may lack the capacity to conduct the additional services needed to comply with
PL 104-193.
• In FY 2000,the Department continues to maintain and update a database of over 800 key
state and local stakeholders including:public and private entities (i.e.consumers,
business,religious and other community leaders,representatives fromproviders,parent,
youth and civic organizations,local and state teen pregnancy coalitions,etc.) These
individuals/organizational entities continue to request funding to implement new
community-based abstinence education programs.They are advised that currently
funding is not available to implement new AERS projects.However,if the Department of
Health receives notification of additional state and/or federal dollars to expand the
number of AERS project statewide (e.g.SPRANS grant award) this information will be
publicly announced and a new Request for Application process will be implemented.
• In FY 2000,in collaboration with a partnering agency,the Department of Health
continues to facilitate and fund regional and community partnerships and expand
curriculum-based services in schools.Pennsylvania is in its fourth year of funding 28
community-based,designed and driven abstinence-only education programs in
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geographic areas across the state with disproportionate numbers of youth at high risk for
out-of wedlock births,teen pregnancy and the early onset of sexual activity.AERS
programs are youth developmental in nature and are supported by a five-year strategic
plan to promote abstinence as a positive lifestyle choice for adolescents,9-14 years of
age,statewide.Pennsylvania’s 1998 Vital Statistics indicated there were 1,633,383,
youth,10-19 years of age,in its total population.Pennsylvania’s AERS projects are
serving only 26,000 or 1.6%of these youth via 28 local community programs in 30
counties.As previously stated in Section 2 above,the Department maintains and updates
a database of over 800 persons/organizations who have requested funding to implement
abstinence education programs locally and funding is not currently available to address
this issue.
• In February 2000,Pennsylvania submitted an application for “Special Projects of
Regional and National Significance (SPRANS) for Community-Based Abstinence
Education” to request new grant funds to implement up to 12 new abstinence-only
education programs in Pennsylvania.This new grant funding will build on the
experience and well-established infrastructure of 28 community-based projects currently
serving 26,000 Pennsylvania youth,aged 9-14.New grant funds will allow more
communities the opportunity to design and implement local programs and expand its
audience to youth 12-18 years of age.Moreover,the new grant will support various
enhancements to current services and widen its scope to include local child development
education and training to parents,and services tailored to and inclusive of youth with
disabilities and other special needs.
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• In FY 2000,the Bureau of Family Health issued the FY 2000-2001,“Request for
Application (RFA) for Continued Funding for the Abstinence Education and Related
Services Initiative.” The RFAprocess provided the opportunity for the 28 community-
based AERS projects funded by the Department of Health in previous fiscal years to
request funding awards for their local abstinence education efforts.Grant awards are
performance based and contingent on the continued availability of state and federal
funds.In addition to the criteria established to rate the applications,the following criteria
are considered in making final funding decisions:the AERS projects must assure
geographic representation of awards (e.g.urban,rural,suburban),assure that services are
available to populations at highest risk of teen pregnancy,proposals that demonstrate
community-based support and significant,viable community partnerships,including
other State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) groups and the Governor’s Project for
Community Building.In FY 2000,27 of 28 AERS projects were funded immediately.
Grant awards ranged from$45,000 to $135,000.The project not funded failed to
adequately demonstrate howthe local abstinence education programserved the target
population of youth,9-14 years of age.The Department and its contractor,the Center for
Schools and Communities,conducted site visits and interviews with key staff at the local
AERS projects,completed comprehensive programmatic and fiscal record reviews,
observed the AERS programin operation during unannounced visits and ultimately
discovered that appropriate services were being provided to the target population,
however,these services were inappropriately documented by staff.The Department of
Health established criteria for provisional funding to this AERS project,provides
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technical assistance to improve record keeping/attendance data and conducts periodic
monitoring visits.Additionally,the AERS project is monitored through its submission of
project reports as described in,Priority Need 1-Data Collection – AERS Quarterly
Reporting Mechanisms.
PRIORITY NEED 3:At present,information is needed that describes model abstinence
education programs that can be used to provide technical assistance for the design and evaluation
of community-driven abstinence education and related services.
• In FY 2000,the Pennsylvania Department of Health continued the process of distributing,
expanding and updating the AERS Curricula Directory to assist communities to
implement and evaluate community-based abstinence education resources in compliance
with the provisions of PL 104-193.The directory was updated and distributed to the 28
AERS projects funded by the Department and is also available upon request to interested
parties.
• In FY 2000,the Department continued the requirement that each funded AERS program
funded by the Department to submit their abstinence education curricula and related
materials for review and approval prior to implementation.All curricula/materials are
reviewed using the Department’s approved review criteria which ensures that the
information meets the requirements of Section 510,the definition of abstinence
education/does not contradict any of the eight elements,promotes the separation of
church and state and,are medically accurate and age appropriate for the target audience.
The Department’s contractor,the Center for Schools and Communities,maintains an
onsite Resource Library that contains approved materials (i.e.curricula,brochures,
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books,videos etc).These resources are available to the 28 community-based abstinence
education programs through a short-termloan programand to other interested
professionals,as deemed appropriate.The community-based programs utilize a variety
of resource materials to present their abstinence–only message,address other risk
behaviors and to equip youth with the refusal skills necessary to combat the pressures and
pre-cursors to teen pregnancy etc.Twenty-four different curricula are used,with some
sites using several curricula to fit different age groups.Based on reports fromthe 28
projects,the most popular curricula are “Sex Can Wait” utilized at eight sites,“W.A.I.T.”
used at four sites,and “Managing Pressures Before Marriage” used at four sites.Some
sites with the professional expertise have created their own curricula/materials for
presentation.As stated earlier,these materials are also subject to review and approval in
accordance with the Department’s established criteria.
• While male responsibility is an important issue when dealing with abstinence-only
curriculum,many community-based AERS projects are still struggling with incorporating
this concept into their program.Some of the programs use curricula such as the “Male
Responsibility ProgramTraining Module,” (the Department of Health sponsored regional
training on this module),“R.S.V.P.” and “Boys to Men,” but they would still like further
guidance on how to involve more males in the program.Even when sites have a large
number of young men involved as participants,they have difficulty getting adult males
and fathers involved in the program.Some sites have requested technical assistance in
regards to male involvement;therefore it will be included as a topic at regional training.
Additionally,to enhance male involvement,community-based AERS projects are
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encouraged to collaborate with the local fatherhood programs established under the
Governor’s Fatherhood Initiative,seek-out organizations such as the YMCAand Big
Brothers to identify male mentors.These organizations are often good resources for
trainers who may conduct training or discussion groups for males.The Department of
Health will continue to monitor male involvement in the AERS programs and assist them
to identify methods to increase male involvement in abstinence education.
PRIORITY OBJECTIVE 4:At present,parents,professionals,peers and other interested persons
that interact or work with children and adolescents (e.g.teachers,child care providers,primary
care physicians,school nurses etc.) are in need of training and materials to facilitate the effective
delivery of abstinence and related programming and services.
• In FY 2000,the Bureau of Family Health (BFH) invited the Director,Division of
Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs),to participate in the proposal review process for
the “Request for Application (RFA) for Continued Funding for Abstinence Education and
Related Services (AERS).” The State Adolescent Health Coordinator (SAHC),whose
staff position is located in BFH,oversees the RFAreview and selection process.As a
member of the review teamthe STD Division Director assisted BFH in assessing the
proposals submitted by 28 community-based AERS projects requesting continuation
funding to implement community-designed and driven abstinence and related
programming and services.This process provided an environment for key STD staff to
gain a better understanding of the positive impact of abstinence programming in teen
pregnancy prevention and in preventing the spread of STDs among the target population
of youth,9-14 years of age.It is important to note that while the STD Division Director
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enthusiastically accepted the invitation to participate in the RFAreview process,there are
professionals in the STD field that hesitate to support abstinence-only education as a
means of preventing teen pregnancy and the spread of STDs and other high risk
behaviors.This hesitation is often based on a lack of understanding of the scope of
abstinence education programs and services offered by Pennsylvania’s community-based
AERS projects and its basis in the youth developmental model.Under the Direction of
the State’s Title V Director,BFH is reaching out to state and local public health agencies
and dialoguing with their key administrators regarding the need to better coordinate
policy decisions and service delivery to Pennsylvania’s youth.We also identify and
include in our coordination efforts parents,consumers,and health professionals
(physicians,nurses,health professionals affiliated with universities,health districts etc)
and,other local and State entities serving youth (e.g.Pennsylvania Coalition to Prevent
Teen Pregnancy,Department of Welfare,Department of Education etc.).This is
particularly important because many of Pennsylvania’s youth receive services from
multiple agencies.
• In FY 2000,as a direct result of the successful collaboration referenced above another
opportunity for coordination between the two agencies was presented.The SAHC was
invited to participate in the STD Stakeholders Planning Committee.The STDDivision
Director was instrumental in convening the committee and identifying state and local
stakeholders fromthe public health arena (e.g.parents,counselors,physicians,school
health nurses,university personnel,other health care professionals,etc),including the
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SAHC to participate.The overarching goals of the STDStakeholders Planning
Committee is to initiate open discussions about STDs,involve representation at a state
and local level,identify issues/concerns,share data across systems,develop a profile of
STDs in Pennsylvania,identify the adolescent population (s) at high risk for infection,
identify population(s) diagnosed with high infection rates,coordinate service delivery,
identify training needs,develop long and short-termstrategies to address identified issues
and reduce the incidence of STDs in all Pennsylvania populations.
• During four regional meetings,planned and implemented by the STD Stakeholders
Planning Committee,the SAHC presented information on the Pennsylvania AERS
initiative.She also discussed abstinence as the only 100 %effective method of
preventing STDs and teen pregnancy.She also provided statistics regarding
Pennsylvania’s teen pregnancy rates for youth 15-17 years of age.There was also a
discussion of other risk behaviors that youth engage in,the importance of educating
youth about abstinence,instilling good decision making skills and refusal skills in youth
as a means of combating STDs.Following the presentations participants assembled in
small groups to further discuss these issues.Future STDStakeholder meetings will be
implemented and BFH will continue to participate in this very important discussion.
• In FY 2000-2001,the Pennsylvania Department of Health was notified that funding is
included in the Governor’s Budget to facilitate planning training for physicians and their
staff to provide age appropriate counseling to parents and their children regarding pre-
adolescent and adolescent sexuality issues,drug and alcohol and other high risk activities.
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The primary target population is youth,males and females,9 to 14 years of age.For
young teens counseling will also address the merits of abstinence fromsexual activity
until marriage.This component will also promote open and honest communication
between health professionals,parents and youth in the areas of pre-adolescent and sexual
health,HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections,drugs and alcohol and other health
concerns.The overall goal of the training is to promote abstinence fromsexual activity
for pre-adolescent and adolescent youth.The Department of Partners involved in
planning and implementing health training for physicians include:the Bureau of Family
Health,American Health Education Center,American Academy of Pediatrics,Society for
Adolescent Medicine,Pennsylvania Academy of Family Physicians,and the Children’s
Hospital of Pittsburgh.
• In FY 2000-2001,the Department of Health continued to support and promote the
establishment of new parent groups and peer support groups in areas that demonstrate a
lack of and need for abstinence education.Department funded community–based AERS
projects included parental components in their local programs.However,efforts to
involve parents vary fromsite to site.Many AERS sites involve parents as chaperones at
special events,but only a few sites hold regular meetings for parents.The Y.E.S.
abstinence-education programimplemented by the Chester County Health Department
encourages parent participation by having family dinners.To Our Children’s Future with
Health,Inc.,has a parent group that meets monthly.Attendance at these meetings has
continually grown,and the parents have even facilitated two workshops at their meetings.
Some sites have found that home visits have helped in getting parents more involved.
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However,parental involvement is also an area in which AERS sites have requested
technical assistance,and as with male responsibility,may be a topic at a regional training.
The Department of Health and it’s contractor,the Center for Schools and Communities
(CSC),will continue to assist AERS projects to identify and implement strategies to
increase parental involvement in local projects while also continuing to assist in the
ongoing maintenance and establishment of new parent and peer support groups.
PRIORITY NEED 5:To combat media,peer and other societal pressures on adolescents to
become sexually active,there is a need to create a statewide awareness that abstinence is a
viable,appropriate,and fashionable option for adolescents.At the same time,there is a need to
promote and equip parents as the prime educators of their youth.
• In FY 2000-2001,the Department of Health continued its efforts to promote abstinence
education as a viable life style decision for youth,males and females,aged 9-14.The
Department continued to distribute the booklet entitled:“10 Steps on Talking To Your
Kids About Sex” to parents and other interested parties.The booklet is provided as a
resource for parents,who are viewed as the primary educators of their children,to discuss
topics such as love,sex and relationships.Parents have responded very favorably to the
10 Tips…booklet.The booklet is available in both English and Spanish languages to
meet the needs of Pennsylvania’s diverse populations.
• In FY 2000,the Abstinence programparticipated in a television media buy for their
parent-focused TV advertisements during the Olympics in September.The Department
of Health also conducted a pilot programfor four teen abstinence television
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advertisements.The advertisements were developed by the Campaign for Our Children
based in Baltimore Maryland,and were brought to our attention by U.S.Congressman
James Greenwood and his coalition comprised of pro-life and pro-choice advocates.The
four advertisements are youth focused,allowing us to reach our prime target—males and
females,ages 9-14.Our goal is to motivate Pennsylvania’s youth not only to abstain
fromsex but also to help themdevelop and improve their decision-making skills,with the
end result of making positive,wise choices when confronted with peer pressure.We
believe the four messages go beyond telling young men and women to say “No,” by
encouraging kids to choose to refrain fromsex for personal and individual reasons.We
want teens to make wise choices when confronted with peer pressure.These ads were
meant for teens (and parents) to think and talk about abstinence and the consequences
associated with early sexual behavior.They also are meant to empower teens,
reinforcing the message that they do have a choice.The four television advertisements
aired in the Harrisburg area and region of Bucks County for nine weeks.At the end of
the pilot program,the Department will conduct an evaluation on the advertisements and
decide what the next steps are – whether to request to air the same advertisements
statewide or whether to develop our own teen abstinence ads.In making the decision,the
Department will take into consideration comments received on the ads through mail,our