Web Literacy for Reading and

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Nov 5, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Web Literacy for Reading and
Writing




TESOL 99

March 11, 1999

Kathleen Eilers crandall

NTID English Department

Rochester Institute of Technology

Thesis


Students with web literate teachers are able to
make good use of the web’s resources for
developing reading and writing literacy.

Web technology enhances
teaching effectiveness


Students have a more active role in learning.


Students get faster feedback.


Better
-
looking materials are more interesting.


Modifications can be made immediately or
shortly after teaching.

Preparing

for class


Don’t let technology consume teaching time.


Allocate sufficient time.


Practice set up before class and keep notes.


Have a short activity for students while you set up.


Make friends with the technology staff.


Have alternate plans when technology fails.

Readability issues



Essentially the same for high and low
technology materials.


Text complexity


Follow good visual design principles for
displaying materials to be read.

Visual design for class displays


Limit the text on the screen to the point you are
making.


Display conceptually related information.


Allocate sufficient time to look at the display.


Do not display more than 6 to 8 lines of text at once.


Do not show more than 2 graphics at once.

Display

principles


Use large enough type size


Use color schemes to maximize clarity.


Know techniques for changing print size.

Print

size


MS Word
-

Use
Ctrl A

and
change font size
.

Demo


open a word document


Netscape Communicator. Use
Ctrl ]

and
Ctrl [
.
Demo


open a web site


MS Explorer
-

Change default type size.


PowerPoint
-

Set type size in development stage.


Others
-
Use the magnifier utility in Windows 98.

Special needs


Students with visual
-
motor needs


special easy
-
to
-
manipulate mouse


shortcut keys to manipulate programs


Students with limited sight


may not see graphics on classroom display


individual screen with a magnifier utility

Cautions



Don’t let technology hamper communication.


Use technology for a specific purpose.


Technology doesn’t improve poor teaching.


Overuse of technology doesn’t promote
interest in learning.

Communication

issues


Equipment can reduce visibility.


It is often a challenge to regain students’
attention.


Establish a procedure to get students’ attention.


Plan your class time so there are not too many
switches back and forth between teacher display
and student displays.


Deaf

students

and

technology


Variation in experience


Prevent technology anxiety


Teach needed new skills

Develop skills for intelligent use
of

technology


Teach students how to:


select the right information


evaluate materials for


relevancy to assignments


readability


credibility

Added

teacher

responsibilities


Select and review before directing students to
outside web sites.


Be aware of the changing nature of web sites.


Teachers who prepare their own web sites
need to develop new skills.

end

Student

skills


E-mail
Discussion
Groups
Information
Pages
Chat
Rooms
World Wide Web
E
-
mail

Communicating
with
Teachers
Communicating
with
Class Members
Communicating
with
Friends & Family
Communicating
with
Outsiders
E-mail
E
-
mail:

Common

Skills

Common to all uses of e
-
mail:


computer


e
-
mail utility procedures


e
-
mail etiquette

E
-
mail:

Family

&

Friends

Communicating with family and friends


common interest area


common content knowledge

E
-
mail:

Class

Communicating with teachers or class
members


common topic knowledge


course relevancy

E
-
mail: Others

Communicating with outsiders


ability to establish objectives


skill in determining usefulness

Discussion

Groups

Participating in Limited
Membership Groups
Participating in Open
Membership Groups
Discussion
Groups
Discussion: Common

Skills common to all discussion groups:


computer


newsgroup or message board utility


discussion etiquette

Discussion: Limited

Participating in limited membership groups


common purposes


common interest and content areas


ability to make meaningful contributions

Discussion: Open

Participating in open membership groups


all of the above


ability to judge validity of contributions

Information Pages

Selecting
Specified
Information
Conducting
Independent
Inquiry
Using
Databases
Contributing
Information
Information
Pages
Information: Selecting

Selecting specified information


vocabulary and reading


browsing skill

Information: Inquiry

Conducting independent inquiry


vocabulary and content knowledge


search strategies and protocol

Information: Research

Using databases


knowledge of subject


research design


collection and analyhsis of data

Information: Contributing

Contributing information


subject content area


web design and presentation

Chat

Rooms

Closed
Membership
Open
Membership
Joining Topic Specifc Rooms
Closed
Membership
Open
Membership
Joining General Rooms
Chat
Rooms
Chat Rooms: Common

Skills common to all chat rooms:


computer


chat utility


knowledge of how to locate rooms


chat language conventions


chat etiquette

Chat Rooms: Specific

Joining topic specific rooms


skill in establishing objectives


common knowledge and interests


willingness and ability to contribute


ability to judge merit and relevancy

Chat

Rooms:

General

Joining general rooms

--

all of the above plus ..


skill in determining usefulness


Have

your

students

...

developed skills critical for the 21st century?

Producer

-

Presenter

Kathleen Eilers crandall


NTID English Department

Rochester Institute of Technology

Rochester, NY 14623

Phone: (716) 475
-
5111

Fax: (716) 475
-
6500

Email:
kecncp@rit.edu

Web:
http://www.rit.edu/~kecncp