The art of strategic

obnoxiouspotpieManagement

Nov 8, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

79 views

The art of strategic
planning


Strategy


management tool


Disciplined effort to


produce fundamental decisions and
actions


shape and guide what an organization
is, does, and why


Future orientation


Understanding of uncertainty and
risk as inherent in the process


Three key requirements


Purpose


What are we doing?


Are we doing the right thing?


Understanding of environment and
context


Particularly factors such as
regulation, competition, technology,
client groups


Creativity and preparedness to
change


Responsive dynamic organizational
structure

Ideal outcomes


Leads to action


Builds shared vision/common purpose


Is inclusive and participatory


Is accountable and transparent


Is externally focused


Has quality assurance processes


Is reflexive


Enhances management and practice


A Typical Strategic

Planning Model


Get ready


Identify issues


Clarify roles


Planning committee


Organizational profile


audit/inventory


Outcome
: Work plan


A Typical Strategic

Planning Model


Articulate statement of purpose,
mission and vision


“As the capital city of Tasmania,
Hobart will be a vibrant, progressive,
prosperous, efficiently managed,
human
-
scale city that provides for the
best possible lifestyle opportunities…
Our mission is to ensure good
governance of our City.”


A Typical Strategic

Planning Model


Assess the situation


Current strengths and weaknesses


Niche


Performance


Funding


Opportunities and constraints


Core and optional status


Outcome
: Data and information base


A Typical Strategic

Planning Model


Develop strategies (broad
objectives), and goals and
objectives (general and specific
results sought)


Consultation


Leadership


Outcome
: outline of strategic
directions



A Typical Strategic

Planning Model


Complete written plan


Circulate


Review


Link to operational plan


Detailed action plans to accomplish goals and
objectives proposed


Link to budget


Outcome
: strategic plan

Strategic planning should ...


recognize and reconcile various
environmental, social and economic
interests


provide clear statements of values,
policy, and priorities with respect to
urban development


provide direction for land release
and staging of urban development
within a 5
-
10 year time frame

and should also ...


Prioritize actions


Be directive enough that
operational plan is coordinated


Provide the context for the
development of statutory policy


Enable effective community input
into policy making

Community


What is together as one [the body politic]


The sense of being bound, obligated or indebted
together [the social contract]

Communities of interest

Communities of place

The idea of community

Sustainability

Governance
and
citizenship

Social

well
-
being


Ecological
integrity

Economic
security

Communities of place and communities of interest

Sustainability and community

Sustainability

Empowerment
and

responsibility

Social

well
-
being


Ecological
integrity

Economic
security

Communities of place and communities of interest

Natural, human, social, physical and financial assets

Integrated model for

sustainable communities

Physical



buildings &


infrastructure



communications



energy systems



transportation

Financial



savings



credit



pensions and remittances



welfare payments



grants and subsidies

Human



health, skills and
nutrition



education and
knowledge



access to services

Social capital



relations of trust and
reciprocity



common rules and
norms



networks and groups

Natural



natural resources
-
food,water, wood/fibre



ecosystems services
-
soil,
fisheries, water, biological
processes, wildlife habitat,
waste assimilation



beauty of nature
-
recreation/leisure, aesthetic
value

Capital Assets

Capital assets & strategic planning


Huon Valley Council


Community consultations and Council
research


Sustainable Communities Research Group


Issues and Options Paper


Capital assets model


60 issues


Assets inventory


State of the Valley report


Scenario planning


Institutional change


Strategic Plan


Implementation

Asset issues in the huon

Catchment
management

Water quality

Environmental
management

Land and
landscape
values

Forestry

Agriculture

World heritage
and other
parks

Confidence

Capacity to act

Educational
opportunities

Employment
opportunities

Health and
well
-
being

Welfare

Trust, reciprocity
and networks

Reconciliation

Children and youth

Aging and the
elderly

Protection of
heritage and history

Government

Structures and
methods of
governance

Urban
development

Industrial
development

Roads,
bridges and
transport
services

Streetscapes

Sewerage

Waste
services

Water
services

Low rate
base

Limited
resources

Higher than
desired
dependence
on grants

Lack of
capacity to
be innovate

Leadership
issues

Statutory planning


Planning not in original
constitution, but enacted by all
tiers of government


Policy always has an institutional
context
-

the expression of the
political will of a government or
governments


Understanding the policy and
institutional context is essential
for planners as policy makers

The RMPS


Tasmania’s
planning policy context


Tasmania’s land use planning embedded
in the Resource Management and
Planning System, introduced 1994


RMPS a system of laws, policies and
procedures to ensure integrated
approach to resource and land use


Whole of government


Predicated on principles of ecologically
sustainable development


Principles of ESD


These principles (LUPAA, Schedule 1)
are:


to promote sustainable development and to
maintain genetic diversity


to provide for the fair, orderly and
sustainable use and development of air, land
and water


to encourage public involvement in resource
management and planning


to facilitate economic development in
accordance with these objectives


to promote the sharing of responsibility for
resource management and planning between
the different spheres of government, the
community and industry in the state


Policy instruments


Methods to achieve these
objectives


Planning schemes


basic rules for proposed new developments


managed by local governments


statutory
-

that is, legally binding


Sustainable Development Policies
(State Policies)


statutory


managed by State but binding of local
governments and other instrumentalities


Enforcement and Appeals system


Resource Management and Planning Appeal
Tribunal


Suite of Legislation



Primary legislation


Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993
(LUPAA)



Regulates land use and development in Tasmania
through Planning Schemes and a permit system



Environmental Management and Pollution
Control Act 1993 (EMPCA)


Manages and regulates pollution and other
environmental problems through various management
tools and prescribed offences


State Policies and Projects Act 1993


Deals with the creation and enforcement of
Tasmanian Sustainable Development Polices. Also
defines how Projects of State Significance are
approved and regulated


Resource Management and Planning Appeal
Tribunal Act 1993


Establishes the Tribunal, which hears objections to
land use and planning proposals and has power to
enforce the Acts




Linked legislation


Public Land (Administration and Forest) Act 1991
-

RPDC


Threatened Species Protection Act 1995
-

flora
and fauna



Wellington Park Act 1993
-

Mt Wellington Range


Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995
-

heritage


Living Marine Resources Management Act 1995
-

fisheries


Marine Farming Planning Act 1995
-

marine farming,
leases


Regional Forest Agreement and Land Classification
Act 1998
-

RFA


Water Management Act 1999
-

sustainable water
use

LUPAA Schedule 1(2)


Objectives of the planning process


sound strategic planning and coordinated
action by State and local governments


planning instruments by which to set
objectives, policies and controls for the use,
development and protection of land


methods to consider and provide for explicit
consideration of social and economic effects
flowing from the development and use of land


planning and policy that is easily integrated
with environmental, social, economic,
conservation and resource management
policies at State, regional and municipal
levels

LUPAA Schedule 1 (2)


Objectives of the planning process


coordination of planning and related
approvals an


creation of pleasant, efficient and safe
environmental for Tasmanians and visitors


conservation of sites, areas and places of
scientific, aesthetic, architectural or
historical interest, or otherwise of special
cultural value


protection of public infrastructure and
assets, and orderly provision of public
utilities, facilities and infrastructure


provision of a planning framework that fully
considers land capability