MA3001 Engineering Mathematics III

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ADVANCED DIPLOMA STAGE I SYLLABI


MA3001 Engineering Mathematics III


Subject

Code

MA3001

Subject
Title

Engineering Mathematics III

Credits

4.0

Total
Hours

Lectures

60hrs

Pre
-
Requisites

Engineering
Mathematics I
& II

GPA/NGPA

GPA

MCQ

1 hr

Aims:

To

provide t he st udent s wit h higher mat hemat ical concept s and t ools t o analyse and solve a
range of engineering problems and t o recognize some physical concept s.

Le arning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this subject, the learner will be able to :

1.

Perf
orm differentiation under integration.

2.

Work with functions of many variables to evaluate value of functions, to obtain optimal
points and values specifically under constrains.

3.

Be able to select and apply multiple integration methods.

4.

Use theoretical founda
tions of Laplace transform & inverse including the convolution
theorem to solve single or multiple ordinary linear differential equations arising in
engineering applications.

5.

Apply software for Laplace Transforms to solve engineering problems.

6.

Expand
functions describing periodic signals using Fourier coefficients. Use half range
methods.

7.

Obtain Fourier series for periodic signals measured at discrete points. Use relevant
software tools.

8.

Be able to handle vector functions in 2D and in 3D and use grad,
divergence & curl
operators and the related equations with ease.

9.

Evaluate line and surface integrals and use Divergence, Stokes’ and Green’s theorems.

10.

Apply laws of vector calculus to derive some physical laws.

11.

Use concepts linear independent, orthogonal v
ectors to solve different types of linear
systems of equations.

12.

Use different methods of solutions of linear systems including applications of software.

13.

Use principles of engine value in engineering calculations.

14.

Apply series solution methods to solve non
-
linear ordinary differential equations.

15.

Use special functions to solve differential equations.

Syllabus:

Calculus

Brief introduction to improper integrals, differentiation of integral. Function of two or three
variables, multiple integrals, Taylor

series applications. Constrained maxima and minima,
Lagrange multipliers.

10 hrs



Laplace transform

Basic theorem on Laplace transforms of elementary functions. Application of Laplace
transform to solution of differential equation and systems. Use of
convolution theorem.
Transfer function, concepts of stability and controllability.


10 hrs


Fourier Series Approximation

Periodic functions and signals. Fourier coefficients, Dirichlet’s

condition, odd and even
function, half range series, Trigonometric approximation to discrete data.


08 hrs


Vector Calculus

Vector functions in 2D
& 3D differentiation & differential operators. Laws of operators.
Evaluation of line integrals along space curves. Evaluation of surfaces integrals. Divergence
theorem, Stokes’ theorem. Green’s theorem in plane. Some basic applications including
derivation

of some physical laws.

14 hrs

Linear Algebra

Brief treatment of vectors in higher dimension ( linearly independent vectors, orthogonals
and normal vectors)


Schemes for solution of simultaneous linear equations ( Gauss
elimination scheme for tridiagonal
matrices, triangular decomposition.) Partitioned matrices.
Eigen value problem ( Algebraic determination of eigen values, properties of eigen values,
eigen values of symmetric matrix , similar matrices, quadratic form and their reduction).
Some basic appli
cations in boundary value problems.

10 hrs

Ordinary linear differential equations with variable coefficients

Series solution of non
-

linear ordinary differential equations. Singular points, Existence and
uniqueness of solution (elementary discussions with
out proof). Use of special function (eg:
Bessel, Legendre).


08 hrs

Assessment
:

Final exam : 100 %


References:

1. Schaum's Outline Books on


Matrices


Linear Algebra


Vector Analysis


Advanced Calculus


Differential Equations



2. Engineering Mathematics Vol. 2 by C.S. Sastry (2nd ed.), Prentice Hall of India


3. Advanced Engineering Mathematics by R.K. Jain & S.R.K. Eye
ngar, (2nd ed.),


Narosa Publishers



4. Advanced Engineering Mathematics by A.C. Bajpai, L.R. Mustoe & D. Walker



5. Advanced Engineering Mathematics by M.D. Greenberg, (2nd ed.), Pearson


Publishers



6. Advanced Engineering Mathematics by

E. Kreyszis, (2nd ed.) John Wiley & Sons.






MN3001 Management 1


Subject

Code

MN3001

Subject
Title

Management 1

Credits

4.0

Total
Hours

Lectures

65 hrs

Pre
-
Requisites

None

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Assignment


Aims:

To introduce to student a broad range of management issues and experiences faced by managers in
modern organizations and teach him the role of engineer in management of engineering organizations,
technical control and/or supervision


of



these


organiz
ations


including


aspects


related


to planning,
control, human aspects, and financial control and environment considerations in engineering decisions

Learning Outcomes:


General;




Demonstrate

an overview on engineering management theories and
principles that students have
learnt



Explain

the key concepts in engineering management functions, dimensions and roles of engineering
managers



Analyse

the factors affecting the operations and effectiveness of the engineering/manufacturing
organizations, a
s well to identify the problematic areas;



Formulate

solutions to engineering management problems using the range of techniques and
concepts introduced in the subject of Management for Engineers


Specific;


On successful completion of this module students will be able to...



Understand the role of management in industry and its relevance to engineers today;



Understand the importance of Human Resource Management and its important in managing
engineering firms.



Assess value of historical development in engineering and technology, its socio economic impacts and
management theories



Understand the importance of environmental management and engineering obligation to the society
in terms of the environmental requirements.



Analyse and report environmental impact in engineering practice and demonstrate sustainability in
the process of ma
king engineering decisions



Prepare, read and understand financial statements



Learn and practice health, safety and welfare management concepts at the work place



Learn basics of information systems in management businesses and learn the importance of MIS.

Syllabus

1.

Introduction: Scope and significance of the subject of management for engineers; the basis of
management theory, science and practice; Historical development of management thought.



[06 hrs]

2.

Basic Functions of management: planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling;
Interrelationship of each function to another [06 hrs]



3.

Organizational Behavior, Foundations of Individual
Behavior, Attitudes & Job Satisfaction,
Personality & Values, Perception & Individual Decision Making.


Motivation:

From Concepts to

Application, Emotions & Mood, Group

Behavior,
Understanding

Working

with Teams, Communication, Leadership traits and skills
, Manager and
Leader, Basic

Approaches to

Leadership, Contemporary Issues in Leadership, Power & Politics,
Conflict & Negotiation, Foundations of Organizational Structure, Organizational Culture, Human
Resource Policies & Practices, Organizational Change

a
nd Stress Management [12 hrs


4.

Human Resources Management (HRM): Human resources in an orgnaisation, Role of HRM, job
design, manpower planning, employee resourcing, interviewing, performance appraisal and
feedback, grievance handling, rewarding
, training, carrier and succession planning, trade
unions, discipline, motivation, incentive schemes, employer and employee relations,
determination of wages and other benefits, mediation and arbitration [08 hrs]


5.

Understanding busin
ess and economic environment: Business environment, business objectives
and functions, role of managers, types of business enterprises, business planning. [06 hrs]


6.

Difference between financial accounting and cost accounting, Primary entry book and cash b
ook,
double entry system, the ledger and the trail balance, preparations of financial statements, Profit
and loss account and balance sheet, cash and fund flow statements, accounting for depreciation,
book value and salvage value of assets, interpretation
of financial statements [12 hrs]


7.

Functioning of the natural system which makes life possible on Earth; relationship between
natural system and humankind; diverse influences of human activity on the natural system;
need for management and human
responsibility to keep the system in a healthy condition if life
as we know it is to continue; an understanding of sustainable development and management to
meet the needs of the present, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet
their

own needs; an understanding of how local environments contribute to the global
environment; a sensitivity to, and a sense of responsibility and concern for, the welfare of the
environment and all other life forms which share this planet; an awareness of t
heir own values
concerning environmental issues; an awareness of the values of others; personal development
and participation in local and global environmental concerns. [08 hrs]


8.

Safety and industrial Hazards: Accidents and prevention of accidents at workplace. Observing
safety with machines, tools and equipment. Housekeeping of the workplace. Safety requirement
of installations. Health, safety and welfare of the workforce. First a
id on the shop floor. [04 hrs]


9.

Business and Technology Trends: Management Information Systems, their strategic use and
importance in the business; e
-
commerce, e
-
business; B2B and B2C [02 hrs]


Assessment:


Tutor mark assignments


10 Assignments: Best 8 assignments are considered with 100
marks



Final Examination


3 hrs: 100 marks


Answer five of seven questions; If necessary, answer to

the first question can be made
compulsory



Final Mark = 0.3 x Tutor Mark Assignment + 0.7 x Final Examination Mark

References:

1.

Management by Harold Koontz, Cyril O’ Donnell, Heinz Weirich

2.

Management by
Ricky W Griffin

3.

Work and Organisational Behaviour by
John Bratton
,

Militza Callinan
,

Carolyn Forshaw

and
Peter
Sawchuk

4.

Accounting in Business by R.J.Bull






CE 3001 Basic Structural Design



Subject

Code

CE
3001

Subject

Title

Basic Structural Design

Credits

4.0

Total

Hours

Lectures

50 hrs

Pre
-
requisites

CC1003

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assign.

20 hrs

Aims


To impart knowledge and related skills to carryout structural design. Further ability
to
acquire different principles in design utilizing various materials. Overall selection
of materials and dimensions is the broad aim.

Learning outcomes


Ability to design a three
-
storeyed building.

Ability to familiarize with various codes of practice used

in design

Preparation of input data to computer software and interpretation of results

.

Syllabus


1.

What is design?

2.

Meaning of structural design

3.

Load paths and types of elements

4.

Properties of materials in relation to design

5.

Types of loading

6.

Different type
s of supports

7.

Geometrical forms

8.

Types of structural forms

9.

Introduction to code of practice EC2

10.

Design of various structural elements

11.

Design aspects relating to tension, compression and bending

12.

Design of connections between elements.

13.

Design of foundations

14.

Detailing

Assessment


10 tutorials of 2hr duration



End of stage examination of 3hr duration



Recommended Texts

Dias W.P.S. and Sivakumar K (2012) “Graded Examples in Reinforced Concrete
to Euro code 2”, 3
rd

Edition, Society of Structural Engineers
-

Sri Lanka



CE 3002


Analysis and Modeling of Structures


Subject

Code

CE
3002

Subject

Title

Analysis & Modeling of Structures

Credits

4.0

Total

Hours

Lectures

50 hrs

Pre
-
requisites

CC1003

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assign.

20 hrs

Aims


To teach the basic concepts of structural analysis in particular the analysis
techniques for statically indeterminate structures .Also to teach modeling concepts
related to structural analysis and computer software.


Learning
outcomes


1. Ability to understand equilibrium and compatibility in relation to structures

2. Ability to identify degree of statical and kinematical indeterminacy of structures

3. Ability to relate stresses and strains, Loads and deformations using
Hooke’s law

4K Ability to find internal for捥猬 獵pport rea捴ion猠and deformation猠in 捯ntinuou猠
beams frames, trusses and grids

5. Ability to idealize and model discontinuities in structural elements, joints,
supports, materials and loads.



Syllabus


St
ructural Analysis

1.

Energy Theorems

2.

Moment distribution

3.

Matrix force method of analysis

4.

Matrix displacement method of analysis

5.

Computer method of analysis


Structural Modeling

1.

Types of structures

2.

Load path

3.

Deflected shape

4.

Structure idealization

5.

Framed
Structures

6.

Non
-
framed / continuous structures

7.

Computer programs

8.

Connections and support conditions

9.

Loads and load idealization

10.

Stresses and deformations

11.

Comparison of structural forms

Assessment


5 tutorials of 2hr duration

3 laboratory assignments, ea
ch 3hr duration



GRASP



PROKON



SAP2000



End of stage examination of 3hr duration



Recommended Texts


Ghali A,. Neville, A.M. and Brown T.G. (2010) “Structural Analysis A Unified
Classical and Matrix Approach”, 4
th

Edition Chapman and Hall publishers




CE 3003 SOIL MECHANICS AND ENGINEERING GEOLOGY


Lectures = 80 Hours






Earth’s place in the space.

History of the earth








04hrs


Structure of the Earth. Geological processes of the Earth’s crust






04 hrs



Process of weathering, erosion transportation and deposition. Nature distribution and engineering
characteristics of sediments deposi
ted in different environments, deltaic, desert, flurial, glacial, periglacial,
residual soils.



06 hrs

Deformational
features of the earths crust and deformational features of rocks. (foliation, folds, faults,
lineations and joints). Intraformational shears. Nature and origin in relation to stress fields.

Formation and classification of sediments and sedimentary rocks






04 hrs






Metamorphism, metamorphic grades and classification of metamorphic rocks.




04 hrs




Igneous activity, formation of igneous rocks and classification of igneous rocks

04

hrs




Theory of plate tectonics and associated activities





02 hrs




Geological time scale. Principles of stratigraphy






02 hrs



Geological and geotechnical maps, their interpretation and mapping. Interpretation of aerial
photographs. Measurement of planer structures in the field. Rose diagrams and stereographic nets.



06 hours

The design and execution of site investigations; for dam sites and reservoirs, underground tunnels,
building sites and road projects. Dr
illing, coring trial pits and sampling. Logging bore holes.



04 hours

Geophysical investigation methods mainly used for

site investigations. Seismic prospecting methods and
electrical prospecting methods.




06 hours

Principles of hydrogeology. Rock
and soil permeability. Groundwater regimes, springs, aquifers and
aquicludes. The engineering significance of groundwater conditions. Influence of rocks and sediments
on groundwater. Groundwater pollution.



04 hours

Construction materials. Suitability of rock types and soils etc. for construction industry. Locating rock
quarries and borrow pits.


Introduction to Sri

Lankan geology.







02 hrs



SOIL MECHANICS


1.

Basic soil properties

Mass, Volume, void ratio, moisture content definitions. Specific gravity. Density relationships.


Particle size distribution (Sieve Analysis and Hydrometer Analysis)


Atterberg Limits









06 hrs




2.

Classification of Soils









03 hrs
.




Classification of Soils for engineering purposes, purpose of Classification, different systems,


Unified Classification System


3.

Compaction o
f Soils









04 hrs




Proctor compaction test, AASHO test, air voids ratio, Compaction in the field, Compaction


Control, Field
testing of density, Principles of soil stabilization.


4.

Permeability of Soils








06 hrs




Darcy’s law, Hydraulic gradient, Coefficient of permeability, Laboratory and field measurement


of permeability, Steady seepage.


5.

Flow nets













04 hrs


Flow nets for confined and unconfined flow , isotropic and anisotropic
conditions.

Critical hydraulic gradient and piping.




LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS


Soil Mechanics Laboratory Classes


5 Classes


15 Hrs.


Particle Size Distribution

Atterberg Limits

Compaction Properties

Insitu Density of Soils

Determination of Coefficient
of Permeability in the Laboratory
.


Engineering Geology


Geology Map 6 Classes


18 hrs.



Map 1

-

Drawing strike lines for foliations and calculation of true dip.


Map 2
-

Drawing geological cross sections perpendicular and parallel to the strike direction


of the foliation.


Map 3
-

Completing a geological map with given geological data.


Map 4
-

Use of under
ground geology (3 bore holes) to prepare a surface geological map



Map 5

-

Work on a map with repeated foldings.


Map 6 Work on a map with a fault and unconformity



RECOMMENDED BOOKS


Soil Mechanics


Principles of Geotechnical Engineering by Borja M Das, PWS
-
KENT Publishing Company.

Principles of Foundation Engineering Borja M Das, PWS
-
KENT Publishing Company.

Soil Mechanics for Civil and Mining Engineers by G N Smith, Granada Publication

Soil Mechanic
s


R F Graig, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Ltd


Engineering Geology


Geology of Sri Lanka by P G Cooray


Introduction to Physical Geology by P Zumberg, Elsevier Publication


Geology and Engineering by R Bower, Elservier Publication


Fundamentals of Engi
neering Geology by F G Bell, Butter and Tanner Publications


Engineering Geology and Geotechnics by F G Bell, Newnes Butterworths Publication



CE3004 Fluid Mechanics and Environmental Engineering

Subject Code

CE3004

Subject
Title

Fluid Mechanics and
Environmental Engineering

Credits

4.0

Total
Hours

Lectures

55 hrs

Pre
-
requisites

CE2001 or
equivalent

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assignments

10 hr

Aims

To provide students with an understanding of the concepts and principles of Fluid Mechanics,
Hydraulics, and

Environmental Engineering as applied to problem solving and applications in
engineering practice.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this subject, the student will be able to;



Identify important fluid properties, flow characteristics and
recognize their significance in the
applications in engineering practice.



Determine hydrostatic forces and use them to assess the equilibrium and stability conditions of
submerged and floating bodies.



Apply concepts of Boundary Layers, Pipe Systems and Net
works, Transient Flows in Pipes,
Dimensional and Hydraulic Model Analysis, Hydraulic Machinery, and Uniform Flow in
Open Channels in solving problems and developing applications in engineering practice.



Recognize the need for conservation of resources and
environments when a project is
undertaken and to identify the causes of environmental problems related to human activities,
assess the magnitude of environmental consequences and predict consequences.



Analyze a given scenario based on key environmental con
cepts and to develop solutions to
environmental
-
related problems
such as water, air and soil pollution and propose mitigatory
actions
.



Syllabus

Fluid Mechanics

[45 hrs]



Introduction: Historical development and applications of Fluid Mechanics in engineering
practice.



Fluids and Fluid
Properties: Characteristics of fluids, Continuum concept, Density, Specific
weight, Relative density, Viscosity, Bulk modulus, Vapour pressure, Surface tension,
Significance of fluid properties in engineering applications.



Hydrostatic Pressure: Variation o
f hydrostatic pressure, Pressure and Piezometric head,
Absolute and Gauge pressure, Centre of pressure, Measurement of pressure.



Buoyancy: Upthrust

on submerged bodies, Archimedes principle, Centre of buoyancy,
Equilibrium and stability of fully submerged and floating bodies, Concept of metacentre.



Boundary Layers: Viscosity of fluids, Definition of boundary layer, Displacement thickness
and Momentum

thickness, Distribution of sheer stress and velocity and Computation of drag
force in Laminar/Turbulent boundary layers, Drag coefficient, Dynamic pressure, Form drag
and Skin friction drag, Wakes, Streamlining of shapes/bodies, Lift and Drag of aerofoils
.



Pipe Systems and Networks: Equations for frictional loss, Darcy/Manning’s/Hazen William’s
formulae, Relationships between the coefficients, Moody diagram, Iterative methods for pipe
network analysis (Hardy Cross Method).



Transient Flow in Pipes: Incompre
ssible water column theory, Elastic theory of water
hammer, Sudden/gradual closure & valve opening, Strain energy water hammer theory,
Fundamental differential equation of water hammer, Velocity of propagation, End conditions,
Reflection at a reservoir, Su
rge tanks (Purpose, Type, Frictional effect, Theory of mass),
Oscillation (Simple finite difference methods of solution, Solutions using scale models).



Dimensional and hydraulic model Analysis: Dimensionless numbers, Buckingham’s theorem,
Hydraulic simila
rity, Hydraulic models of different types of structures, Distorted models.



Hydraulic Machinery: Introduction, Types of Pumps and Turbines, Total head, Reciprocating
pumps (Components and mechanisms, SHM of piston, Single/Double acting pumps, Slip,
Inertia
pressure, Friction in Suction/Delivery pipes, Cavitation, Practical applications and
limitations), Centrifugal pumps (General equation for head generated, Velocity triangles,
Efficiencies, Specific speed, Performance at Constant/Variable speed, Guide vanes
, Volute
casing, Priming/Self priming, Deep
-
well pumps, Components and installation), Turbines
(Impulse/Reaction types, General equation for power generated, Velocity triangles, Pelton
turbine and Velocity ratio/speed regulation, Francis turbines, Specific

speed, Efficiencies,
Characteristic curves, Guide vanes, Volute casing, Draft tubes, Selection of turbines,
Introduction to hydropower installations in Sri Lanka).



Uniform Flow in Open Channels: Equations, Normal depth and Economic/optimum section

Enviro
nmental Engineering [10 hrs]



Introduction to Environmental Engineering



Principles of Ecology, Resource constraints and threats to Earth’s life support system



Sustainability a
nd development, Risk assessment, Global environmental issues



Environmental Quality, Water Quality (Concepts, Need of water quality studies and standards,
Physical/Chemical/Biological characteristics of water, Water related diseases)



Treatment of Water Supp
lies: Introduction to water treatment processes



Wastewater Treatment: Introduction to wastewater treatment processes



Water and Wastewater Systems/Wastewater Systems: Introduction, Sources/
Collection/Treatment/Distribution/Related structures, Application
s & Problem solving



Pollution in Surface and Groundwater and its control: Types and sources of pollution, Effects
of water pollution and control measures



Solid and Hazardous Waste Management



Air Pollution and Noise Control



Environmental Impact Assessment

Assessment

Six laboratory assignments, each 2 hour duration: 30%

i).

Determination of Friction coefficient for commercial pipes

ii).

Surge tank experiment

iii).

Testing of reciprocating and centrifugal pumps

iv).

Testing of turbines

v).

Determination of bed roughness
coefficients in channels using uniform flow

vi).

Determination of quality of water and wastewater

End of stage examination of 3 hour duration: 70%

Recommended Texts

1).

Webber, N. B. (1990). Fluid Mechanics for Civil Engineers, Taylor & Francis.

2).

Hamill, L. (2011)


Understanding Hydraulics


Palgrave Macmillan Limited.

3).

Subramanya, K. (1993). Theory and Applications of Fluid Mechanics (Tata McGraw
-
Hill)

4).

Pickford, J. (1969). Analysis of Water Surge, Macmillan.

5).

Douglas, J. F. (1961). Solution of Pro
blems in Fluid Mechanics
-
Part I & II, Pitman.

6).

Miller G. Tyler Jr. & Scott Spoolman (2012). Living in the Environment: Principles,
Connections, and Solutions, 17th Edition, ISBN
-
10: 0538735341 ISBN
-
13: 9780538735346.

7).

Fair, G.M. & Okun
, D. A. (1968). Water and Wastewater Engineering, JohnWiley & Sons.


CE 3005



Construction Technology



Subject

Code

CE
3005

Subject

Title


Construction Technology

Credits

4.0

Total

Hours

Lectures

50 hrs

Pre
-
requisites

None

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assign.

20 hrs


Aims:





This module aims to develop the students’ abilities on construction processes of all
types of civil engineering projects.



Learning outcomes:


At the completion of this module, students should be able to:



Perform practical application of engineering knowledge on construction techniques fro
the civil engineering projects.



Apply health and safety culture in all civil engineering projects.



Perform efficient planning with respect to equipment usage and planning

in civil
engineering projects



Develop quality controlling techniques for the all construction processes.
.




Syllabus:




Planning and Setting out

(5 hrs)



Techniques of setting out of buildings and major civil engineering work




Land clearing and Earthworks


(5 hrs)










Equipment used for Land clearing and earthworks : Bulldozer, Back
-
Hoe, Grab, Scraper, Grader, Wheel
Loader, Dredger, Dump Truck; Land clearing techniques; Large excavations, dredging, Trench excav
ation,
Pipe

laying,

Sheet piling and Shoring Systems.




Compaction of Earth with necessary equipment


(5 hrs)























Deep excavations including dewatering and method of ground water control


Concrete Technology



(12 hrs)











Properties of Concrete; concrete materials, Mix design, quality control, reinforcement , construction joints,
plasters and mortars, precast concrete and tolerances, pre
-
stressed concrete.


Concret
ing Material handling on sites and access scaffolds









Material handling equipment on site:
Hoists, Forklifts, Tower cranes
; other cranes, Dumpers, site layout of
materia
l handling equipment;

concreting equipment and methods, Erection of scaffolds.


Temporary works for the concreting; formwork, false work and scaffolding (This should include conventional
and advanced new system formwork).


Tunneling Rock Blasting and Aggregate Production


(5 hrs)








Tun
neling equipment and methods, b
lasting of rock and use of explosives, quarrying and production of
aggregates.

This should include conventional and new techniques used in Sri Lanka and in other countries.



Road and Bridge construction




( 7 hrs)










Road Construction techniqu
es; e
arthmoving plant selection
; Bridge construction methods;

cofferdams and
work over water
; Pile driving and Caisson sinking.


Quality assurance process

(3 hrs)


Application of quality assurance processes and ISO 9000 for heavy construction work


Construction Safety


(3 hrs)











Safe construction practices and checklists.


Sus
tainable construction techniques (5 hrs)


Implementation of sustainable design concept into construction

How to incorporate sustainable concepts in construction projects



Assessments:





1.

A visit t o an equipment center maint ained by ICTAD
-

15%


2.

Assignment based on a high
-
rise building const ruction or a bridge project including concrete
t echnology, t emporary works, planning act ivit ies et c.
-

25%

3.

An assignment based on
safet y at const ruction sit es


10 %



4.

Final exam
-

50%



Recommended Texts:



1.

Peurifoy, R L “Const ruct ion Planning, Equipment and Met hods”, McGraw Hill 1985

2.

Harris, F, “Modern const ruction equipment and met hods “’ Longman Scientific & Technical
copulbished in t he USA wit h John Willy and sons Inc, New York, 1989.

3.

Murphy, R W , “Sit e St ruct ural Analysis (a unified classical & mat rix approach), A Ghali, AM Neville,
Chapman & Hall, London

4.

Shapiro, Howard I, “Cranes and Derricks”, McGraw Hill Inc. 199
1.

5.

Harris, Frank. “Ground Engineering Equipment and methods”. Granada Publishing , 1983.

6.

Russel, James E. “Const ruct ion Equipment” Rest on Publishing Co. , Inc, USA, 1985.

7.

Sadgrove, B.M. “Set ting


out procedures”, But terworths, CIRIA, 1988.



ME3001
Fluid Dynamics


Module
Code

ME3001

Module Title

Fluid Dynamics

Credits

4.0

Hours/Week

Lectures

55hr
s

Pre


requisites

GE1003

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assignments

10hr
s

Aims


The aim of this subject is to provide thorough understanding about the fundamentals of fluid dynamics
and related engineering applications


Learning Outcomes


At the end of the module sessions students should be able to



Understand the concepts of fluid
dynamics and identify associated engineering problems



Describe two dimensional ideal fluid flow analysis and solve related problems



Describe the viscous effects in real fluid flow and solve problems of flow through bounded
systems



Analyze

simple problems associated with boundary layers



Investigate engineering problems associated with particle mechanics



Explain the techniques of dimensional analysis and similarity theory and solve typical problems
in mechanical engineering applications


Sy
llabus




Introduction [04 hours]

Classification of fluids and flows. Behaviour of real fluids: Defining Laminar and Turbulent flow,
Reynolds Number, Basic flow analysis techniques and associated engineering problems.




Governing Equations in Fluid
Mechanics

[10 hours]

The concept of continuum approach for fluids, Fundamental descriptions of fluid motion:
Eularian and Lagrangian, Conservation of mass and momentum: continuity and Euler equations.
Basic understand of flow lines: stream line, path line

and streak line, Kinematics of fluid: fluid
rotation and rate of deformation, angular velocity, circulation and vorticity. Bernoulli equation,
constitutive relation, conservation of energy, Navier
-
Stokes equation. Boundary conditions.



Two dimensional idea
l flow

[10 hours]

Stream function and velocity potential function in steady, two dimensional flows. Introduction of
basic flow singularities: point vortices, sources, sinks and doublets. Derivation of flow patterns by
combining free stream, sources, sinks
, doublets and point vortices and case studies: flow
modeling of ideal flow around a circular cylinder with circulation.



Viscous Flow [10 hours]


Characteristics of viscous flow, laminar flow, transition to turbulent, flow separation and
formation of
wake. Characteristics of turbulent flow.

Qualitative analysis of viscous flow through channels
-

entry region, fully developed laminar and
turbulent flow.

Quantitative analysis of viscous flow through channels


analysis o映steady 晵lly developed
laminar
flow in bounded systems for Newtonian and non
-
Newtonian fluids: velocity and shear
stress distributions, energy losses due to friction, Darcy formula.





Boundary Layer Theory


[08 hours]

An overview on boundary layer development, Transition of flow from La
minar to turbulent
regimes, flow over a flat plate
-

Laminar and turbulent, Evaluation of boundary layer thickness,
Von
-
karman momentum integral, Boundary layer control, Turbulent flow.




Particle Mechanics

[08 hours]


Characteristics of flow around a pa
rticle
-

Pattern of flow, pressure distribution and force
coefficients at different Reynolds number regimes, Motion of a particle in a gravitational field


trajectory, Flow through packed bed of solid particles
-

Karman
-
Kozeny equation for fixed bed,
Flui
dization, Industrial applications.




Dimensional Analysis and Similarity Theory

[05 hours]

Concept of dimensional homogeneity. Basic methods in dimensional analysis
-

Rayleigh's
method, Buckingham's Pi
-

theorem. Practical importance of non
-
dimensional
groups. Theory of
physical similarity and model testing. Application
-

Flow through free surfaces and bounded
regimes, flow around submerged bodies including distorted models.


Assessment


Four practices of each 2.5 hr duration (16%)

1.

Analysis of fluid
flow through pipe systems

2.

Drag on a circular cylinder

3.

Pressure drop in a packed bed and a fluidised bed

4.

Dimensional analysis and model testing in building aerodynamics


Quiz(s) (10%)

Attendance or any other (4%)

Final written exam (70%)


Recommended book


John F. Douglas, Janusz M. Gasiorek, John A. Swaffield, Lynne B. Jack ,
Fluid Mechanics
, fifth edition




ME 3002 AUTOMOBILE TECHNOLOGY

Subject

Code

ME 3002

Subject
Title

Automobile Technology

Credits

4.0

Total
Hours

Lectures

55 hours


Pre
-
Requisites

None

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assignt

10 hours

Aims:


The aim of this subject is to provide a thorough understanding about the basic technical aspects
related to a motor vehicle.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing this module, the students
should be able to:


• recognize the basic sub
-
systems of an automobile

• describe basic principles behind automotive system operations

• identify different parts of each sub
-
system and their operation

• understand possible failures of each of sub
-
system c
omponents

Syllabus:


1.

Internal Combustion Engine (15 hours)

Engine Construction (Combustion Chamber Design, Piston, Valves, Cam & Crank Shaft,
Flywheel etc), Engine operation (two & four strokes), Otto & Diesel engine operation, Aspect
of timing, Aspect of

balancing, Emission control, Engine Performance Parameters,
understanding possible failures

2.

Engine Systems (10 hours)

Fuel systems (petrol & diesel), Injectors & injector pumps, Cooling system, Lubrication system,
Advance fuel injection systems, understan
ding possible failures

3.

Automotive Electronic and Electrical system (10 hours)

Electrical circuit and its interface with all components, Starting system, Electricity generation &
charging system including the battery, Electronic system including ignition &
distribution
system, understanding possible failures

4.

Automotive Drive Trains (10 hours)

Clutches (operation of mechanical clutches and fluid coupling), Transmission system, Gearbox
(operation of manual & automatic gearboxes), Torque converters, Differentia
l mechanism and
related locks, Four wheel drives, Power transmission to wheels, understanding possible failures

5.

Automotive chassis system and Miscellaneous (10 hours)

Suspension system (springs &

dampers), Brake systems


hydraulic, air, boosting, servo
assisting, ABS etc, Steering system (Worm & wheel, Rack & pinion etc, Camber/Castor, CV


ME3003 Electrical Distribution and Machines


Subject
Code

ME3003

Subject
Title

Electrical distribution and Machines

Credits

4.0

Total
Hours

Lectures

55
hrs

Pre
-
requisites

Completion of
certificate
levels

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assign.

10 hrs

Aim:
Provide electrical engineering knowhow required to understand information
communicated by the means of specifications, reports drawings for those who are
following the non
-
electrical discipline

Learning outcomes

The student will be able to:


1.

Explain methods of electrical power distribution

1.1.

Describe how electrical power is received by the users and the role of distribution system

1.2.

Explain role of sub stations

1.3.

Describe different types of distribution systems, area of use and merits and demerits

of each

1.4.

Calculate voltage at loads , power loss of systems of DC distribution systems

1.5.

Calculate voltage at loads, voltage regulation of simple distribution networks

1.6.

Explain methods of voltage improvement


2.

Describe Basics of wiring regulations and fundamen
tals of electrical safety

2.1

Identify a regulation in terms of the all number identification system

2.2

State the possible sequence of steps that may be implemented in the design of an
installation

2.3

State the scope of IEE wiring regulation

2.4

State briefly the
regulation relating to the fundamental requirement for safety

2.5

Describe term electric shock as per regulation

2.6

Explain the graph of time
-
current characteristic on a human body and describe shock
security of each zone

2.7

Explain the methods of protection agains
t direct and indirect contacts

2.8

Describe methods of earthing systems and their use


joint), Wheel alignment, Tires & wheels, understanding possible failures


Assessment:


Laboratory Work:

Hands on work on identifying basic systems/parts, their functionality and basic trouble shooting

3.

Explain principle operation of transformer

3.1.

Explain the role of transformer in electrical systems

3.2.

Describe operating principle of ideal transformer

3.3.

Calculate voltage, curren
t of primary and secondary sides of transformer

3.4.

Determine efficiency of transformer

3.5.

Explain different applications of transformer

3.6.

Explain construction features of transformer

3.7.

Explain operation of auto transformers and instrumental transformers

3.8.

Identify the

group connection of three
-
phase transformer


4.

Describe operation and common application of electrical machines

4.1.

Explain operating principle of DC and AC machines

4.2.

Explain classification of three phase induction motors

4.3.

Explain classification of single phase
motors

4.4.

Explain classification dc motors and generators

4.5.

Describe types of enclosures of electrical machines

4.6.

Describe the methods of cooling

4.7.

Describe the methods of insulation

5.

Select suitable ac or dc industrial drives

5.1.

Select industrial drives based on di
fferent running conditions

5.2.

Select industrial drives based on starting conditions

5.3.

Select industrial drives based on speed controlling facilities

5.4.


Syllabus

1.

Power distribution [10 hrs]

Radial, ring, ring main systems, advantages disadvantages, area of use,

types of sub stations, voltage
current calculation of radial and ring systems (both AC and DC), power loss and voltage regulation,
power factor improvement, use of taps in transformers


2.

Wiring regulations and safety [6 hrs]

IEE wiring regulations, body
resistance, safety voltage and current for the human, ventricular
fibrillation, IEC international document of time


current zones, direct contact, indirect contact, TT, IT,
TN systems, RCCB, ELCB operations, fuses, MCB


3.

Transformers [14 hrs]

Primary and

secondary emf, turns ratio, referred impedance, impedance matching, losses of
transformers, efficiency, voltage regulation , shell and core types, sandwich and concentric windings,
use of auto transformers, taps of transformers, standard three
-
phase wi
nding connections, cooling
methods of transformer


4.

Electrical machines [20 hrs]

Operating principle of electrical machines, slip rings, commutator
, three
-
phase generator, three
-
phase
induction motors, equivalent circuits, torque

speed characteristics, rotating magnetic fields, slip,

DC motors: series, shunt, compound DC machines, equivalent circuits, basic DC machine equations,
field of use of D
C machines, wound rotor and squirrel cage motors, salient pole and cylindrical rotor
synchronous motors, methods of starting of single

phase motor, universal motor, standard types of
enclosures, protection against harmful ingress of water. Different type
s of insulating material used in
electrical applications (glass, paper, porcelain etc)


5.

Industrial drives [6 hrs]

Impact of running and starting condition on selection of industrial drives, methods of breaking
(mechanical friction, eddy current, counter c
urrent, dynamic breaking, impact of environmental
conditions

Assessment

5 laboratory assignments, each of 2hr duration

End of stage written examination of 3hr duration


ME3004 Industrial Electronics


Subject

Code

ME3004

Subject
Title

Industrial
Electronics

Credits

4.0

Total
Hours

Lectures

55 hrs

Pre
-
Requisites

GE1002

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assignment

20 hrs

Aim:

The aim of the course unit is to introduce principles of analog and digital electronic circuits and
motors for mechanical engineering
students who will be employed in the industry. This unit
builds upon the theories and experimental practices in electrical circuits taught in the pre
-
requisite course, GE1002, to develop a basic understanding of the operation of circuits
containing amplifi
ers, power electronic devices, transistors and diodes. Further, it deals with
motors, basic digital circuits and simple microprocessors. The experimental skills will be
developed during the laboratory component of the course unit enabling the student to pe
rform
basic designs, constructions, and measurements involving simple analog and digital electronic
circuits and motors.

Learning Outcomes:


On the completion of the course, the student should be capable to:

1.

Determine electrical relationships and
calculate electrical parameters

2.

Handle power distribution equipment and specify such equipment

3.

Analyze the steady state and small signal AC response of simple electronic circuits
containing diodes, transistors, power electronic devices and operational ampl
ifiers

4.

Apply performance criteria in the design of basic amplifier circuits and verify that the
criteria were met by circuit simulations and experimental measurements

5.

Design, analyze, construct, and test circuits containing digital components and
microproc
essors

6.

Determine the voltages and currents in AC and DC motors and design, construct, and
test motor control circuitry

7.

Troubleshoot problems in electronic/electrical modules/circuits; handle electronic
instrumentation and measuring instruments

8.

Identify an
d consider proper electrical safety in equipment and electrical safety
procedures

Syllabus:


Preliminary consideration in power electronics:

Application of Industrial Electronics, Power
Semiconductor Devices, Control Characteristics of Power Devices, Characteristics and
Specifications of Switches, Types of Industrial Electronic Circuits. [4 hours]

Power Distribution:

Electrical Safety, Direct Current Electrical Circuit Theory and
Components, Alternating Current Electrical Circuit Theory and Components, Single phase and
three phase circuits (wyes and deltas), Power factor, capacitive and inductive loads, Electrical
Tes
t Equipment, Power Distribution ( transformers, raceways, boxes, fittings, installations,
wiring, etc.,) Grounding, circuit breakers, fuses, National Electric Code, Conduit, Hazardous
Locations

[6 hours]

Electro Magnetic Fields and Waves:
Vector analysis, Faraday’s law, Coulombs law and
electric field intensity, Gauss’s law, flux density and divergence, energy and potential,
conductor die
lectric and capacitance, Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations, steady
-
state magnetic
field, magnetic forces, materials and inductance, time
-
varying fields and Maxwell’s equations,
uniform plane waves.

[6 hours]

Power Semiconductor Diodes and Circuits:

Semiconductor basics, Diode Characteristics,
Reverse Recovery Characteristics, Spice Diode Model, Diodes with RC and RL Loads, Diodes
with LC and RLC Loads, Free
wheeling diodes, Recovery of Trapped energy with a Diode.

[4 hours]

Diode Rectifiers:
Single
-
Phase Half
-
Wave Rectifiers, Performance Parameters, Single
-
Phase
Full
-
Wave Rectifiers, Single
-
Phase Full
-
Wave Rectifier with RL Load, Multiphase Star
Rectifiers, T
hree
-

Phase Bridge Rectifiers, Three
-

Phase Bridge Rectifier with RL Load.



[4 hours]

Power Transistors:

Bipolar Junct
ion Transistors, Power MOSFETS, COOLMOS, SITs,
IGBTs, Series and Parallel Operation, di/dt and dv/dt Limitations, Comparisons of Transistors.



[2 hours]

DC
-
DC Converters:

Principle of Step
-
Down Operation, Step
-
Down Converter, with RL Load,
Principle of Step
-
Up Operation, Step
-
Up Converter with a Resistive Load, Performance
Parameters, Converter Classification, Switching
-
Mod
e Regulators. [4 hours]

Pulse
-
Width
-
Modulated Inverters:

Introduction, Principle of Operation, Performance
Parameters, Single
-
Phase Bridge Inverters, Three
-
Phase Inverters, Voltage Control of Single
-
Phase Inverters, Voltage Contr
ol of Three
-
Phase Inverters, Harmonic Reductions, Current
-
Source Inverters, Variable DC
-
Link Inverter. [6 hours]

Thyristors:

Introduction, Thyristor Characteristics, Two
-
Transistor Model of Thy
ristor,
Thyristor Turn
-
On, Thyristor Turn
-
Off, Thyristor Types, di/dt Protection. dv/dt Protection.



[4 hours]

Controlled R
ectifiers:

Introduction, Principle of Phase Controlled Converter Operation,
Single
-
Phase Full Converters, Single
-
Phase Dual Converters, Principle of Three
-
Phase Half
-
Wave Converters, Three
-
Phase Full
-
Wave Converters, Three
-
Phase Dual Converters.[4 hours]


AC Voltage Controllers:

Principle of On
-
Off Control, Principle of Phase Control, Single
-
Phase
Bidirectional Controllers with Resistive Loads, Single
-
Phase Controllers with Inductive Loads.



[6 hours]

DC Drives:

Basic Characteristics of DC Motors, Operating Modes, Single
-
Phase Drives, Three
-
Phase Drives, DC
-
DC Converter Drives, Closed
-
Loop Control of DC Drives. [4 hours]

AC Drives:

Induction Motor Drives, Closed
-
Loop Control of Induction Motors, Vector
Controls, Synchronous Motor Drives, Stepper Motor Control.
[6 hours]

Microcontrollers and Processors
: Introduction to microcontrollers and microprocessors and
their applications (Algorithms, flow charts, Input Output interfacing circuits, etc.). [2 hours]



Assessment:


Tutorial (in the class): 5 sessions e
ach lasts for one and half hour duration


Take home assignments: 4 assignments covering all above topics


Final Examination: Question paper with 3 hours


Final Mark = 75% x Final Examination mark + 25% Take home assignment marks




List of Experiments:

1.

Study of V
-
I characteristics of SCR, DIAC, TRIAC.

2.

Study of V
-
I characteristics of power semiconductor devices: GTO, MOSFET, IGBT.

3.

Study of R and R
-
C firing circuit (verify the input(R,V,I)
-
output(firing angle)
characteristics).

4.

To plot firing angle vs. out
put voltage of three phase half/full converter with R and R
-
L
load,

5.

Study operation of chopper driver circuit ( CLC, TRC techniques ).

6.

Study of torque
-
speed characteristics of Thyristor based LMdrive with V/F constant.

7.

Microprocessor/Microcontroller based

speed control DC motor.

8.

Speed control Stepper motor.

9.

Study of Series and Parallel Inverters.

10.

Study of various parameters of UPS/SMPS.

References:


1

S.K. Battacharya, S. Chatterjee, “Industrial Electronics”, Tata McGraw Hill Publication.

2

P.C. Sen, S Chand,

“Modern Power Electronics”.

3

P.C. Sen, ”Power Electronics”, Tata McGraw Hill Publication, New Delhi.

4

R.P. Jain, “Modern Digital Electronics”, Tata McGraw Hill Publication.

5

M. Ramamoorthy, “An Introduction to Thyristors & Their Applications:. East
-
West Pres
s.

6

V.R. Moorthy, ”Power Electronics”, Oxford University Press

7

Dr. Bimbra, ”Power Electronics”, Khanna Pub., N. Delhi.

8

Jaganathan, ”Power Electronics”, PHI.

9

M.D. Singh, K.B. Kenchandani, ”Power Electronics”, TMH.

10

Vedam Subramanyam, “Electric Drives”, TM
H.

11

Subrahmany, A.M. Vedam, “Electrical Drives”, Concepts & Applications”, TMH

12

Gaonkar, “Introduction to 8085 Microprocessor”, Wiley Eastern.


ME3005 Design of Machine Elements


Subject

Code

ME3005

Subject
Title

Design of Machine Elements

Credits

4.0

Total
Hours

Lectures

65 hrs

Pre
-
Requisites

GE1001

ME2001

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Assignments

---

Aims:

To synergize forces, moments, torques, stress and strength information to develop ability to
analyze, design and/or select machine elements
-

with attention to

safety, reliability, and
societal and fiscal aspects.

Students will learn the fundamentals of the design process, and
the design of some common machine elements will be the main focus. The students will apply
the concepts in the design and those theories
and concepts learnt in other engineering
subjects as well to design simple machines.

Learning Outcomes:

16.

The student will be able to use the knowledge in Statics and Strength of Materials and in
several other engineering subjects for design of machine
elements.

17.

The student will apply the concepts of failure theories, and apply them in machine design
exercises.

18.

The student will be able to design shafts and machine elements for power transmission
and design and/or select other power drives and mechanical
elements associated with
these drives such as belts, gears, etc.

19.

The student will be able to design or/and select mechanical components used in
mechanical systems that require functioning the respective machines for their intended
purposes.


Syllabus:

1.

Philosophy of engineering design, basic design procedure, application of computer and
computer software in the design process; traditional design materials, design synthesis,
aesthetic consideration in design, ergonomic consideration in design, use of stan
dards in
design, selection of preferred sizes, design for manufacture, limits and fits and tolerances,
surface finishes, engineering materials and mechanical properties of materials and
desirability of mechanical properties for mechanical elements, and tra
its of a Good
Designer.
5 hours

2.

Free
-
body diagrams, understanding on stresses due to normal, shear, and torsional loads,
understanding of Mohr’s circle stre
ss analysis and static failure criteria; fundamentals of
stress and strain analysis
2 hours

3.

Design against static loads and fluctuating loads: understanding Design for Safety with

safety factor, design factor, service factor; modes of failure, theories of failures, and
stresses in various beams. Fatigue failure, stress concentration factors and stress
concentration effects, fatigue design under combined stresses.

4 hours


4.

Power screws: Application of power screws in power transmission, forms of threads, force
analysis with different threads, collar friction, self locking of screws, transmission
efficiency, differential and combined screws, recirculating ball
screws, stresses in screws.


3 hours



5.

Threaded joints and welded joints; flexible joints, permanent joints, keyed joints: Joints
under the

categories of permanent and flexible joints. Welded joints, riveted joints, bolted
joints.
5 hours

6.

Shafts and couplings: Transmission shaftings, desig
n against static and fatigue loads,
lateral and axial loads combined with torsional loads, effects of stress raisers on shafts,
whirling of shafts and avoiding failure of shafts due to whirling, rigidity of shafts; flexible
couplings, rigid couplings; cot
ter joints, pin joints; joints under loads and stresses
developed; various types of keyed joints and stresses in keys and keyways under
torsional and other loads; design or/and selection of a key for a given application.
6 hours

7.

Mechanical springs: Mechanic
al springs, helical springs, stress equation and deflection
equation, spring materials, styles of ends, design against static loads and fluctuating
loads, optimum designs of helical springs, helical torsion springs, leaf springs and multi
leaf springs, nip
ping of leaf springs and shot peeing.
4 hours


8.

Friction clutches: Torque transmitting capacity of friction clutches, multi
-
disk clutches,
friction materials, cone clutches, centrifugal clutches,
2 hours

9.

Brakes: Energy equations, block brake with short shoe, pivot
ed block brake with long
shoe, internal expanding brakes, band brakes, disc brakes, thermal considerations.


2 hours

10.

Belt, Chain and rope
drives: Flat and V belt drives, other types belts normally used in the
industry, flat pulleys and V
-
pulleys, belt constructions, geometrical relationships, analysis
of belt transmission, condition for maximum power, adjustment of belt tension, selection
of

belts from manufacture’s catalogue; chain drives, roller chains, geometric relationship,
polygonal effect, power rating of roller chains, sprocket wheels, silent chains; rope drives



6 hours

11.

Rolling contact bearings: types of rolling contact bearings, selection of bearing type, static
and dynamic load capacity, equivalent bearing load, load
-
life relationship, selection of
bearing life,
load factor, use of manufacturer’s catalogue in bearing selection, design for
cyclic loads and speeds, bearings with a probability survival other than 90%, lubrications
of rolling element bearings, mounting of bearings.

4 hours

12.

Sliding contact bearings: Basic modes of lubrication, viscosity and measurement of
viscosity, effect of temperature on viscosity, hydrostatic step bearing and energy losses,
Reynold’s equation, Raymond and Boyd method; temperature rise, be
aring design with
selection of parameters, constructional details of bearings; lubrication oils, additives for
mineral oils, selection of lubricants.
4 hours

13.

Gears: Spur, helical gears, bevel

gears and worm gears: Classification of gears, selection
of type of gears, law of gearing, terminology of gears, standard system of gear tooth,
force analysis, gear material, gear tooth failures, constructional details, number of teeth,
and gear parameter
s, estimation of module based on beam strength, wear strength and
dynamic loading; design of a pair of gears for a given application
10 hours

14.

Fly wheel: Torques analysis, solid disk fly wheel, rimmed flywheel, stresses develop in
flywh
eel and design of flywheels in relation to fluctuation of energy.
2 hours

15.

Cylinders and Pressure Vessels: Thin cylinders and thin spherical pressure vessels, thick
cylinders with internal and external pressures; Lame’s equation and Clavari
no’s and
Birnie’s equation, compound cylinders, autofrettage, gasket joints
4 hours


16.

Introduction

to computer aided designs, components of cad systems, I/O devices,
graphics display terminals,
introduction

to Finite Element Analysis (FE
A), use of FEA
software in design analysis.
2 hours

Notes:



Machine element should be considered from the point different modes of failures with
static and dynamic loading condition
s wherever appropriate.



Wherever possible selection of material and standard components from catalogues and
manuals should be encouraged along with the analytical designs.



Use of computer should be made to appreciate by the students wherever possible.

Assessment
:



Design projects are assigned in conjunction with the regular homework assignments.
Student should work six take home assignments with each assignment carrying 20 marks
and the marks of best five assignments will be considered for the final mark

(5 x 20)
totalling to a score of X. X>=40%



Final Examination is with a Question paper of four hour (04 hour) duration. The paper has
two parts, Part A with one hour duration and Part B with three hour duration. Student
should answer four (04) out of five
(05) questions in Part A, each carrying 25 marks (a
total of 4 x 25=100) and the question in Part B carrying 100 marks with a total score of Y.



Y = 0.4 x marks of Part A + 0.6 x marks of Part B.



Final mark, Z=0.3X + 0.7Y, and Z>=40% for a pass.



(Both Desi
gn project and question papers are compulsory components)


References:


1.

Design of Machine Elements by V.B.Bhandari

2.

Design of Machine Elements by C.S.Sharma, Kamalesh Purohit

3.

Advanced Machine Design by A. Mubeen

4.

Machine Design by J.E.Shiegly

5.

SKF Bearing
catalogue

6.

Mechanical Engineering Design Hand Books, manufacturers’ catalogues, design charts
and information.


EC3005


Computer Architecture

Subject

Code

EC3005

Subject
Title

Computer

Architecture

Credits

4.0

Total Hours

Lectures

55 hrs

Pre
-
Requisites

GE2003,
EC2001

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assignt

10 hrs

Aims:

This course puts the emphasis on computer hardware and provides with necessary knowledge to
analyse and organise computer systems

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this subject,
students are expected to:



Explain different classifications of computer systems.



Assess performance of computer systems.



Describe internal organisation of a processor.



Describe memory organisation and I/O systems.



Examine performance enhancing techniques i
n computer systems.



Demonstrate the ability to interconnect external devices/ circuits with computers and develop
drivers/ programs for them.

Syllabus:



Classification of computer systems

[2 hr
]

Multiplicity of Instruction
-
data streams, Flynn’s
classification, serial vs. parallel
processing, parallelism vs. pipelining



Performance

[5 hr
]

Performance metrics, clock rate, MIPS, Cycles per instruction, benchmarks; Averaging
metrics, arithmetic, geometric and harmonic; Amdahl’s law



Processor
architecture

[18 hr
]

Instruction Set Architectures, stack, accumulator, register; RISC & CISC architectures
(reg.
-

memory & load store); Memory addressing modes; categories of instructions;
types & size of operands; Fixed and floating point system, Non nu
meric data and
information; components of a processor and their functionalities, Control unit,
Hardwired and Microprogrammed controls



Memory Organisation

[10 hr
]

Main memory, virtual memory; memory hierarchy; memory management; interleaved
memory, caches,
Associative memory; Design of memory hierarchy.



I/O Systems

[10 hr
]

Storage systems, storage devices, RAID; Buses, interfacing I/O devices; Programmed
I/O, DMA, interrupts; IO processors. serial vs., parallel, synchronous vs. asynchronous
data transfer.



Ap
proaches for performance enhancement

[10 hr
]

Pipelining, classification of pipeline processing, performance issues; static/dynamic
pipelines; Hazards: structural, data, control. Instruction
-
level parallelism, branch
penalties; superscalar, VLIW processors,

Multithreading, multiprocessors, multicore
architectures

Assessment:

Assignments:

2

(20%)

Labs
:

(20%)



writing programmes in X86 assembler to handle interrupts



connecting and controlling external devices through serial and parallel ports, and ISA bus

Final examination:

3 hrs

(60%)



EC3001 Electronics II

Subject

Code

EC3001

Subject
Title

Electronics II

Credits

4.0

Total
Hours

Lectures

55 hrs

Pre
-
Requisites

EC2001

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assignt

10 hrs

Aims:

This subject aims at developing the skills
to analyse and design electronic circuits and
systems.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:



Examine the behaviour of different semiconductor devices



Analyse the circuit behaviour of the electronic
circuits.



Design and construct analogue circuits and systems.



Design and construct logic circuits and systems.



Use HDL for design and simulate digital circuits.

Syllabus:



Diodes circuits

[4 hrs]

Piecewise linear diode model, Nonlinear model, Circuit
applications, Special types



Transi stor circuits

[10 hrs]

h parameter model, Ebers Moll model, Field effect transistor Models, low frequency and
high frequency equivalent circuits of BJT/FET circuits



Amplifiers with feedbacks

[16 hrs]

Amplifier types, Feedb
ack types, Use of the feedbacks



Analogue filters

[4 hrs]

Passive and active filter design, Low pass, High pass, Band pass filter design



Oscillators

[4 hrs]

Conditions for oscillation, Phase shift oscillator, Wien bridge oscillator, Colpitts and
Hartly osci
llators



Digital to Analogue and Analogue to Digital convertors

[4 hrs]

Different types of A/D and D/A conversion techniques, successive approximation,
common chips available and applications



Digital circuits

[10 hrs]

Combinational and sequential logic circ
uit design, PLDs, Memory cells & chips, ICs
available and applications



Hardware Description Languages

[3 hrs]

Circuit design using hardware description languages, use of HDL packages and FPGAs
for digital circuit design and implementations

Assessment:

Assignments:

2

(20%)

Labs
:

(20%)



Designing a Wien Bridge oscillator



Designing active filters



Designing and simulating digital circuits using HDL

Final examination:

3 hrs

(60%)



EC 3002
-

Communication Engineering 1


Subject

Code

EC 3002

Subject Title

Communication Engineering 1

Credits

4.0

Total Hours

Lectures

55hrs





GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assignt

10hrs

Pre
-
Requisites : Knowledge on Certificate level mathematics and Electronics

Aims:

To provide students with a

introductory knowledge of the principles of modern communication
systems including fixed, mobile and multi
-
media network.



Learning Outcomes:

Fundamental theories and concepts of communication. Overview of the communication systems and
networks.


Syllabus:

Outcome 1 : Understanding of the existing communication and computer networks.

Introduction

An overview of the history of telecommunication. A brief simplified introduction to PSTN
System. Mobile Communication System, Computer LANs, WANs and
Internet.

Main components of a communication system including source, media and receiver.

Overview of circuit switching, packet switching and transmission medias.


Outcome 2: Understanding the fundamental concepts of communication



Analog signals, Digital
signals, Analog to Digital Conversion.



Overview of Multiplexing


FDM, TDM, OFDM



Overview of SDH and SONET



Overview of Analog Modulation


AM, FM



Overview of Digital Modulation


ASK, FSK, BPSK, QPSK



Quadrature Amplitude Modulation



Overview of Noise



Overvi
ew of Transmission Medias and their characteristics



(Copper, Fibre and radio)



Optical Networks, Wave length Division Multiplexing



TDM networks and Packet Networks



Radio Multiple Access Technologies


FDMA, TDMA, CDMM,



Overview of Access Network Technolog
ies


ADSL, FTTX, WiMAX



Overview of Core Network Technologies


SDN, MPLS



Components of an end to end leased data circuit



Dedicated networks and share networks



Outcome 3:Describe the signals in Frequency, Time and Statistical domains and evaluate effect

through
a linear system



recognize and distinguish between periodic and non
-
periodic signals



recognize and distinguish between deterministic and random signals



recognize and distinguish between transient and non
-
transient signals



use analytical formulas to

represent common periodic and transient signals in
time and



frequency domains



use probability distributions and statistics to describe random signals



translate simple signals between time and frequency domains using the fourier
series and



fourier transfor
m



translate signals between time and frequency domains using tables of Fourier
series, Fourier



transforms and Fourier transform theorems



calculate the power spectra and autocorrelation functions of signals



relate power spectra and autocorrelation functions

using the Wiener
-
Kintchine
theorem



explain what is meant by cross
-
correlation function and correlation coefficient
and calculate



these for simple signals and random variables



describe the effect of a linear system using frequency response and/or impulse
r
esponse,



especially in the context of pulse transmission



relate the frequency response and impulse response of a linear system



describe the origin, effects and mitigating techniques for the following types of
distortion

(a)


loss

(b)


amplitude distortion


(c) phase and group delay


Outcome 4: Understanding noise



explain what is meant by additive noise, white noise and Gaussian noise



explain why thermal noise can normally be assumed to be additive, white and
Gaussian



explain origin and characteristi
cs of shot noise



distinguish between internal and external receiver noise



define noise temperature and noise figure and convert freely between the two



calculate the overall noise temperature and noise figure of a system comprising
multiple



subsystems conne
cted in cascade



explain what is meant by antenna noise temperature



sketch the typical noise temperature of a narrow beam antenna as a function of
frequency



for low and high elevation angles



explain the origin of the dominant antenna noise at different freq
uencies




Outcome 5 : Understanding the characteristics of Transmission medias.

Characteristics of Copper, Fibre and Radio transmission medias and link budgets




Assessment:

Assignments : 1. Characteristics of Transmission medias


2. Applications of above theories (two assignments)


Lab classes : Recommended the lab classes followed in Part II


Communication Engineering (old
syllabus)



References:

Digital Coomunications : Ian A Glover, Peter M Grant

Communication Systems : Bruce carlson

Data Communications and Networking : Behrouz Forouzan








EC 3003

Computer Networks 1


Subject

Code

EC 3003

Subject Title

Computer Networks 1

Credits

4.0

Total Hours

Lectures

55hrs





GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assignt

10hrs

Pre
-
Requisites : Knowledge on Certificate level mathematics & IT

Aims:

To provide students with a introductory knowledge of the principles of Computer Networks



Learning Outcomes:

Fundamental theories and concepts of Computer Networks


Syllabus:

Outcome 1 : Understanding the Standards and brief idea about protocols

Protocols and standards, standards organizations. Introduction to Internet Standards,
internet Administration. A brief history of Internet. Introduction to ISO
-
OSI model a
nd
brief description of function of each layer.

IEEE, ITU
-
T, ETSI and other standard bodies and forums.


Outcome 2: Understanding the fundamental concepts of data communication



Data transmission
-

Concepts and terminology, analog and Digital Data
Transmission, Transmission Impairments, Transmission Media



Data Encoding

Digital Data, Digital Signals

Digital Data, Analog Signals

Analog Data, Digital Signals

Analog Data, Analog Si
gnals



Digital Data Communication Techniques

Asynchronous and Synchronous Transmission



Packet switching and circuit switching



Virtual circuits




Outcome 3:Understand the complete operation of physical layer



Detailed study of physical layer operation, standards, protocols.



Detailed physical layer characteristics and interfacing.









Outcome 4: Understanding the error correction and
complete operation of data link layer




Forward error correction, backward error correction



Block coding, Linear block codes, cyclic codes, checksum



Data link control


Flow and error control, ARQ,



Layer2 protocols

HDLC, PPP





Outcome 5: Understanding the
operation of Local area Networks




O
verview of LAN and LAN protocols



IEEE 802 model



Hub, Switch, Spanning tree algorithm




Outcome 6: Understanding the function of
network devices



Hub, Switch, Router, DHCPserver, DNS server etc., Firewall and other network
devices




Assessment:

Design and implement a network for a corporate company.


Lab classes : Will be included in the subject outline.


References:

Data and Computer Communications


William staling

Computer Communication


Fred Halsal

TCP/ IP protocol suit
-

Behrouz Forouzan

Data Communications and Networking : Behrouz Forouzan





EC3004


Data Structures and Algorithms

Subject

Code

EC3004

Subject
Title

Data Structures and Algorithms

Credits

4.0

Total Hours

Lectures

56 hrs

Pre
-
Requisites

GE2003

GPA/NGPA

GPA

Lab/Assignt

12/12 hrs

Aims:

This subject aims to introduce students to the concepts used in defining data structures in computer
programs, and the algorithms used to solve problems using computer programs.


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this
subject, students should be able to:



implement and use common data structures



analyse the complexity of basic algorithms



select appropriate data structures and algorithms for a given situation or a problem



apply basic algorithm design techniques for a
given situation or a problem


Syllabus:



Introduction to data structures

[4

hrs]

Student should be able to describe basic data structures such as arrays, records, lists, stacks,
queues and dictionary




Introduction to algorithms

[4

hrs]

Student should be
able to describe what is an algorithm, write pseudo code for an algorithm and
revi ew sample al gorithms




Insertion Sort and Bubble Sort

[4

hrs]

Student should be able to describe Insertion Sort algorithms, Basic Bubble Sort algorithms,
Optimised Bubble Sort

algorithms, and use sample program segments to carry out an analysis
on Insertion Sort and Bubble Sort




Implementing Arrays and Linked Lists

[5

hrs]

Student should be able to implement arrays, carry out operations such as additions,
multiplications, vecto
r operations and matrix operations on arrays, should be able to design
Single Linked Lists, Double Linked Lists, and carry out insertion and deletion operations on
linked lists. Finally the student should be able to develop a simple application program tha
t uses
arrays and linked lists




Implementing Stacks and Queues

[5

hrs]

Student should be able to build stacks and queues, carry out stack and queue operations,
demonstrate example uses of stacks and queues in compilers and operating systems, and
develop
simple application programs using stacks and queues



Implementing a Dictionary

[3

hrs]

Student should be able to describe different methods of implementing a dictionary, carry out
searching, insertion and deletion operations on a dictionary, and analyse sam
ple code segments
of dictionary implementations



Introduction to Merge Sort, Recursion and Divide & Conquer approaches

[5

hrs]

Student should be able to demonstrate the use of Merge sorting techniques, identify design
techniques used in recursion and divide

& conquer approaches, and review sample programs on
Merge Sort,Recursion, and Di vi de & Conquer




Complexity Analysi s

[7 hrs]

Student should be able to describe what analysing algorithms means, should know how to use
the asymptotic notations such as Ω, o a
nd ω, should be able to describe the major factors
considered in analysing algorithms, growth of functions, concept of time complexity, time
complexity analysis of algorithms, best case and worst case scenarios, and identify the
problems with recursion




Bi
nary Search Trees

[4 hrs]

Students should be able to represent tree data structures, describe tree traversals, implement
simple trees, carry out tree operations such as minimum, maximum, successor and predecessor



Heap Data Structures and Heap Sort

[3 hrs]

Student should be able to describe Heap data structure and its operations, heap sort and its
operations, running time of heap sort



Hash tables and Hash Functions

[3 hrs]

Student should be able to describe hash tables, hash functions, collisions in hashing
, and design
hash functions



Graphs

[4 hrs]

Student should be able to identify different types of graphs, describe graph traversal, searching,
spanning trees, and shortest path



NP
-
Completeness

[5 hrs]

Student should be able to describe what NP
-
Completeness

means, show the difference
between NP, NP
-
complete and NP
-
hard problems, identify real life NP
-
Complete problems, and
illustrate how to approach problems when they are NP
-
complete


Assessment:

Assignments:


(20%)



writing a pseudo code,



analysing the tim
e complexity of an algorithm,



representing a problem using graphs


Labs
:

(20%)



implementing a linked list,



implementing Bubble Sort algorithm



implementing Merge Sort with recursion


Final examination:

3 hrs

(60%)



References:



Thomas H. Cormen
, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest and Clifford Stein, Introduction to
Algorithms, 3rd Ed. Cambridge, MA, MIT Press, 2009.



Sara Baase and Allen Van Gelder, Computer Algorithms: Introduction to Design and Analysis, 3rd Ed.
Delhi, India, Pearson Educat
ion, 2000.



Supplementary reference: Alfred V. Aho, Jeffrey D. Ullman, John E. Hopcroft, Data Structures and
Algorithms, Addison Wesley


EE3001 Advanced Measurements


Subject

Code

EE3001

Subject
Title

Advanced Measurements

Credits

4.0

Total
Hours

Lectures

55hrs

Pre
-
Requisites

None

GPA/NGPA

GPA

MCQ

10hrs

Aims:

To develop capacity to select and implement an appropriate measurement system for a
simple application.

Learning Outcomes:

The student will be able to :

1.

Understand the concept of
transformation and its applications.

1.1.

Understand Fourier transform, transformation algorithms and how to apply them for practical
applications

1.2.

Understand Z
-
transform and its applications

1.3.

Understand Laplace transform and its applications

2.

Analyse measured d
ata using statistical analysis methods

2.1.

Understand concepts of accuracy and repeatability

2.2.

Use signal analysis methods to analyse measured data

2.3.

Identify sources of errors and ways to minimize them

3.

Understand the techniques of generating digital signals, the
ir coding, transmission methods and
encoding

4.

Understand the working principles of different digital to analogue and analogue to digital converters

5.

Understand the need for Shielding, isolating and proper grounding

5.1.

Familiarize with methods for shielding, iso
lation and grounding.

6.

Understand the concept of digital filters and their applications

6.1.

Understand the different filter types and their uses

6.2.

Design digital filters

7.

Understand the Kalman filter

7.1.

Explain the Kalman filter and its applications

Syllabus:

1.

The
Fourier transform and the Laplace transform (9hrs)

The Fourier transform, the discrete Fourier transform, the fast Fourier transform, the Z
-
operator, difference equations and the Z
-
transform

The general complex exponential excitation function, use of Lapla
ce transform, the s
-
plane, pole zero patterns, network functions, energy functions

2.

Statistical basis of measurements (12hrs)

Accuracy, Precision and repeatability, review of probability and statistics, signal analysis
-

convolution, correlation, power dens
ity spectra, sources and minimisation of errors,
sampling theory

3.

Digital data transmission (9hrs)

Sampling, quantizing and coding, Analogue versus digital data transmission, pulse code
modulation, encoding

4.

DAC and ADC (6 hrs)

Summing amp DAC, R
-
2R Ladder
DAC, Hold Circuit, Flash ADC, Delta ramp DAC,
successive approximation ADC, Integrator, Single slop ADC, Delta sigma ADC.

5.

Interference, Shielding and filters, Grounding(6 hrs)

Shielding, Isolating transformers, EMI filters


6.

Digital filters (6 hrs)

Recursiv
e and non
-

recursive filters, filter characteristics, Moving average filters, Design
of digital filters

7.

Kalman filters ( 6 hrs)

Introduction to Kalman filters


Assessment
:

5 take home assignments/in class tests (20%)

End stage examination of 3hr duration
(80%)



EE3003 Electrical Machines I


Subject

Code

EE3003

Subject
Title

Electrical Machines I

Credits

4.0

Total
Hours

Lectures

55 hrs

Pre
-
Requisites

None

GPA/NGPA

GPA

MCQ

10 hrs

Aims:

The aim of the unit is to impart knowledge of electrical
machines and to develop familiarity
with their operation, application and basic designs.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing this module the student should be able to

1.

Demonstrate the knowledge of electromechanical energy conversion principles

2.

Identify
applications that need DC motors and DC generators, solve operational problems and
perform calculations in DC motors and generators.

3.

Do basic design of a single phase transformers and identify applications.

4.

Compare performance of different types of three p
hase transformers and perform calculations of
steady state behaviour and apply three phase transformers.

5.

Choose the most suitable starting, braking and speed control equipment for a three
-
phase induction
motor and select the most suitable motor type for a
given application.

6.

Compare performance of different types of single phase AC motors and select the most suitable
motor type for a given application.

7.

Operate a large generator and vary its output power within safe limits

8.

Bring in a generator parallel with a
nother

9.

Perform calculations of steady state behaviour of AC generators


Syllabus:

1.

Electromechanical energy conversion

Energy balance equation, principles and production of force/ torque in linear and
rotary coupled circuits, Stationary and rotating
magnetic fields, Overall relationship
between

machine dimensions and power, specific electric and magnetic loading.

2.

DC machines

Construction and operating principle, separate, shunt, series and compound excited
motors, steady state equivalent circuit and characteristic, dynamic behaviour, speed
control, starting, braking, applications, operation in generating mode protection.

3.

Sing
le
-

phase transformers

Construction, equivalent circuit, testing, characteristic, parallel operation,
autotransformers, pulse transformers, high frequency equivalent circuit.

4.

Three
-

phase transformers

Construction of different types, two winding and thre
e winding types, vector group,
per
-

unit equivalent circuit, characteristic, losses and efficiency, magnetization
phenomena, unbalanced loading, parallel operation, tap changing, inrush current,
protection.

5.

Three
-

phase induction motors

Squirrel cage rotor

and wound rotor types, equivalent circuits, torque
-

speed
characteristics, losses and efficiency, NEMA classes, testing, starting, braking,
principles of speed control, operation as a generator, motor applications, and
protection.

6.

Single
-

phase motors

Ind
uction motors of different types, equivalent circuits, torque
-
speed characteristic,
methods os speed control, applications, AC commutator motor ( universal motor)

7.

Synchronous generators for bulk power generation

Cylindrical rotor and salient pole rotor ty
pes, constructional features, windings,
cooling, excitation, equivalent circuit, phasor diagram, power
-

angel characteristic,
safe operation, turbine
-

governor characteristic, real power control, reactive power
control, AVR, parallel operation, synchronizi
ng, earthing.


1.


Assessment
:

5 laboratory assignments, each of 2 hour duration (20%)

End of stage examination of 3 hour duration (80%)