Disability Pedagogy Workshop

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Nov 17, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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1



Friday, October 29, 2010

11:30
-
1:30p

Lawrence Street Center 1150



Amy Vidali, PhD

Assistant Professor, English Department

Chair, Disabilities Committee

University of
Colorado Denver

amy.vidali@ucdenver.edu


This packet contains supporting material for the workshop, including
print copies of the
PowerPoint presentation.
Also available in large
print.
Please contact me quest
ions or with access issues.


Disability Pedagogy Workshop


Teaching Strategies for Including All Students



2


Disability Pedagogy Mini
-
Bibliography


Bowe, Frank G.
Universal Design in Education: Teaching Non
-
traditional
Students.

Westport,
CT
: Bergin and Garvey, 2000.


Brueggemann, Brenda Jo.
“Coming Out Pedagogy: Risking Identity in
Language and Literature Classrooms.”
The Teacher’s Body:
Embodiment, Authority, and Identity in the Academy.

Eds. Diane P.

Freedman and Martha Stoddard Holmes. New York:
SUNY
Press, 2003.
209
-
33.


---

and Cynthia L
ewiecki
-
Wilson, eds.
Disability/Teaching/Writing: A
Critical Sourcebook.

Bedford/St. Martin, 2007.


“Disability Matters: Pedagogy, Media and Affect,” Special Issue.
Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education

31.4 (2010). (TOC:
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=g92704219
9
)


Dolmage, Jay. “Disability Studies Pedagogy, Usability and Universal
Design.
Disability Studies Quarterly

25.4
(Fall 2005).
http://www.dsq
-
sds.org/article/view/627/804
.


Dunn, Patricia A.

Talking Sketching Moving: Multiple Literacies in the
Teaching of Writing.

Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook & Heinemann,
20
01.


---

and Kathleen Dunn DeMers. “Reversing Notions of Disability and
Accommodation: Embracing Universal Design in Writing Pedagogy and
Web Space.”
Kairos

7.1 (Spring 2002).
http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/7.1/binder2.html?coverweb/dunn_de
mers/index.html
. (also see related special issue:
http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/7.1/coverweb.html
).

3



E
revelles, Nirmala. “Educating Unruly Bodies: Critical Pedagogy,
Disability Studies, and the Politics of Schooling.”
Educational Theory

50.1 (
Winter

2000
)
: 25
-
47
. (abstract:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741
-
5446.2000.00025.x/abstract
)


Knoll, Kristina. “Feminist Disability Studies Pedagogy.”
Feminist Teacher

19.1 (2008)
: 122
-
133
. (abstract:
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/feminist_teacher/v019/19.1.knoll.html
)


Nocella, Anthony J. “Emergence of Disability Pedagogy.”
Journal for
Critical Education Policy Studies
6.2 (
December

2008): 77
-
94. (abstract:
http://eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_
&ERICExtSearch_SearchValu
e_0=EJ837424&ERICExtSearch_SearchType
_0=no&accno=EJ837424
)


Roman, Leslie G. “Disability Arts and Culture as Public Pedagogy.”
International Journal of Inclusive Education

13.7 (2009)
: 661
-
675
.
(abstract:
http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/13603110903041912
)



**On a disability
pedagogy

approach to accessible conference
presentations
:

http://www.disabilityrhetori
c.com/index.php?p=1_8_Access
.

4


Workshop Prompts

(also in PowerPoint presentation)


1. Re
-
craft your syllabus.



What does your syllabus say about disability?



How do you talk about disability on the first day?



2. Work in multiple modes.



What is your
preferred mode?



Consider an assignment or project in your class (as a teacher or
student).



What do you hope students will learn?



What steps do you usually take to get there?



How might you take advantage of different modes to reach
your learning goal?



3
. Encourage Interdependence



What are the typical roles students assume when working with each
other in groups or teams?



What sorts of
new
roles and tasks can we suggest or model in order
to include all students?



(How might students learn from each other as

they work
interdependently?)



4. Make Physical and Online Spaces Accessible

5




What access challenges exist in your classroom?



5. Build in Feedback



What sorts of access features can we ask students to provide
feedback on?



Please help me build the cursory

list I’ve begun in your packet.



6. Account for your own embodiment as a teacher.



How does your embodiment impact your classroom?



(Please don’t feel you must disclose illness or disability.)




6


Disability on the Syllabus


You may also have inform
ation
required by your college. What is below
is just one suggestion.


DISABILITY INCLUSION STATEMENT

If you have a disability, or think you may have a disability, I encourage
you to contact me so we can work together to develop strategies for
your success. Also
, the office of Disability Resources and Services (DRS)
provides support for students with disabilities, and you can find them at
their website (
http://hschealth.uchsc.edu/disabilityresources/
) or by
calling
(303) 556
-
3450/
TTY

(303) 556
-
4766
. To access their services,
you will need to provide documentation of disability.


Other language you might include:



Disabilities can be visible and invisible, and I am dedicated to
ensuring that all
students succeed in my course.



I look forward to conversations about your learning styles and
needs.



Please contact me or DRS early in the semester, before exams and
papers are due.



You may contact DRS without notifying me if you would prefer to
keep your
disability confidential.



It is the policy of the University of Colorado Denver to create
inclusive learning environments.



The University of Colorado Denver and I are dedicated to
honoring the rights ensured by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation
Act and the
Americans with Disability Act.



Other Syllabus and First
-
Day Ideas



Move beyond disability as only a “policy issue.”



If you have a diversity statement, include
disability
there.

7





Think about where disability appears on your syllabus.



Is it always dead last
? Why?




Plan your class so that all can plan ahead.



Avoid assignments given one class and due the next.




Bring your syllabus in large print.



This announces, right
-
off, that you are interested in access.




Go over the syllabus in class.



Many aren’t textual
learners, and would benefit from your
discussion.




Talk about the kind of learner that you are, and recognize that
there are other types of learners.





8


Different Disabilities that Can Affect Web Accessibility

(lightly adapted from:
http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/PWD
-
Use
-
Web/#diff
)


Blindness

To access the Web, many individuals who are blind rely on
screen
readers

--

software that reads text on the screen (monitor) and outputs
this information to a
speech synthesizer

and/or
refreshable
Braille

display
. Some people who are blind use
text
-
based browsers

such as
Lynx, or
voice browsers
, instead of a graphical user interface browser
plus screen reader. They may use rapid navigation strategies such as
tabbing
through the headings or links

on Web pages rather than
reading every word on the page in sequence. Examples of barriers that
people with blindness may encounter on the Web can include:



images that do not have alternative text



complex images (e.g., graphs

or charts) that are not adequately
described



video that is not described in text or audio



tables that do not make sense when read serially (in a cell
-
by
-
cell
or "linearized" mode)



frames that do not have "NOFRAME" alternatives, or that do not
have mean
ingful names



forms that cannot be tabbed through in a logical sequence or that
are poorly
labeled




browsers and authoring tools that lack keyboard support for all
commands



browsers and authoring tools that do not use standard
applications programmer interfaces for the operating system they
are based in



non
-
standard document formats that may be difficult for their
screen reader to interpret

9



Low vision

To use the Web, some

people with low vision use extra
-
large monitors,
and increase the size of system fonts and images. Others use screen
magnifiers or screen enhancement software. Some individuals use
specific combinations of text and background colors, such as a 24
-
point
br
ight yellow font on a black background, or choose certain typefaces
that are especially legible for their particular vision requirements.
Barriers that people with low vision may encounter on the Web can
include:



Web pages with absolute font sizes that do

not change (enlarge or
reduce) easily



Web pages that, because of inconsistent layout, are difficult to
navigate when enlarged, due to loss of surrounding context



Web pages, or images on Web pages, that have poor contrast,
and whose contrast cannot be ea
sily changed through user
override of author style sheets



text presented as images, which prevents wrapping to the next
line when enlarged



also many of the barriers listed for blindness, above, depending
on the type and extent of visual limitation


Color

blindness

To use the Web, some people with color blindness use their own style
sheets to override the font and backgroun
d color choices of the author.
Barriers that people with color blindness may encounter on the Web
can include:



color that is used as
a unique marker to emphasize text on a Web
site



text that inadequately contrasts with background color or
patterns



browsers that do not support user override of authors' style
sheets

10


Deafness

To use the Web, many people who are deaf rely on captions fo
r audio
content. They may need to turn on the captions on an audio file as they
browse a page; concentrate harder to read what is on a page; or rely on
supplemental images to highlight context.

Barriers that people who are
deaf may encounter on the Web can

include:



lack of captions or transcripts of audio on the Web, including
webcasts



lack of content
-
related images in pages full of text, which can slow
comprehension for people whose first language may be a sign
language instead of a written/spoken
language



lack of clear and simple language



requirements for voice input on Web sites


Hard of hearing

To use the Web, people who are hard of hearing may rely on captions
for audio content and/or amplification of audio. They may need to
toggle the captio
ns on an audio file on or off, or adju
st the volume of an
audio file.
Barriers encountered on the Web can include:



lack of captions or transcripts for audio on the Web, including
webcasts


Motor disabilities

To use the Web, people with motor disabilities

affecting the hands or
arms may use a specialized mouse; a keyboard with a layout of keys
that matches their range of hand motion; a pointing device such as a
head
-
mouse, head
-
pointer or mouth
-
stick; voice
-
recognition software;
an eye
-
gaze system; or othe
r assistive technologies to access and
interact with the information on Web sites. They may activate
commands by typing single keystrokes in sequence with a head pointer
rather than typing simultaneous keystrokes ("chording") to activate
commands. They may

need more time when filling out interactive
forms on Web sites if they have to concentrate or maneuver carefully
11


to select each keystroke.

Barriers that people with motor disabilities
affecting the hands or arms may encounter include:



time
-
limited respon
se options on Web pages



browsers and authoring tools that do not support keyboard
alternatives for mouse commands



forms that cannot be tabbed through in a logical order



Speech disabilities


To use parts of the Web that rely on voice recognition,
someone with a
speech disability needs to be able to use an alternate input mode such
as text entered via a keyboard.

Barriers that people with speech
disabilities encounter on the Web can include:



Web sites that require voice
-
based interaction and have n
o
alternative input mode


Visual and Auditory Perception

To use the Web, people with visual and auditory perceptual disabilities
may rely on getting information through several modalities at the same
time. For instance, someone who has difficulty reading

may use a
screen reader plus synthesized speech to facilitate comprehension,
while someone with an auditory processing disability may use captions
to help understand an audio track.


Barriers that people with visual and auditory perceptual disabilities m
ay
encounter on the Web can include:



lack of alternative modalities for information on Web sites, for
instance lack of alternative text that can be converted to audio to
supplement visuals, or the lack of captions for audio


Attention deficit disorder

To use the Web, an individual with an attention deficit disorder may
need to turn off animations on a site in order to be able to focus on the
12


site's content. Barriers that people with attention deficit disorder may
encounter on the Web can include:



distr
acting visual or audio elements that cannot easily be turned
off



lack of clear and consistent organization of Web sites


Intellectual disabilities

To use the Web, people with intellectual disabilities may take more
time on a Web site, may rely more on g
raphics to enhance
understanding of a site, and may benefit from the level of language on
a site not being unnecessarily complex for the site's intended purpose.

Barriers can include:



use of unnecessarily complex language on Web sites



lack of graphics on

Web sites



lack of clear or consistent organization of Web sites


Memory impairments

To use the Web, people with memory impairments may rely on a
consistent navigational structure throughout the site.

Barriers can
include:



lack of clear or consistent or
ganization of Web sites


Mental health disabilities

To use the Web, people with mental health disabilities may need to
turn off distracting visual or audio elements, or to use screen
magnifiers.

Barriers can include:



distracting visual or audio elements that cannot easily be turned
off



Web pages with absolute font sizes that do not enlarge easily


Seizure disorders

To use the Web, people with seizure disorders may need to turn off
animations, blinking text, or certa
in frequencies of audio. Avoidance of
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these visual or audio frequencies in Web sites helps prevent triggering
of seizures. Barriers can include:



use of visual or audio frequencies that can trigger seizures


Multiple Disabilities

For instance, while some
one who is blind can benefit from hearing an
audio description of a Web
-
based video, and someone who is deaf can
benefit from seeing the captions accompanying audio, someone who is
both deaf and blind needs access to a text transcript of the description
of

the audio and video, which they could access on a refreshable
Braille

display. Similarly, someone who is deaf and has low vision might
benefit from the captions on audio files, but only if the captions could
be enlarged and the color contrast adjusted.

14


Feedback on Course Accessibility (Work in Progress)


I need your help! This is the beginning of a list of questions you might
ask your students to assess access.


You probably wouldn’t want to ask all the questions below, but can pick
and choose to gear to
ward your class. Open
-
ended questions will work
in some cases, but for some questions, you might provide multiple
choice answers. If you are using surveymonkey.com, be sure students
are able to skip answers (rather than being required to respond).


Areas o
f Response


classroom access



lighting



arrangement and suitability of tables and chairs



ability to see/read the board and images on screen



any problems with sound, scent or other environmental factors


timing



course pacing in homework



course pacing in
class


course materials



access to websites, BlackBoard, .pdf files, etc.



usefulness of course materials (handouts, lectures, PowerPoints,
etc.)


cultural and curricular issues

15




diversity of classroom activities



treatment of disability issues (if relevant)



i
nvitation to express concerns or bias among students



16


Problem
-
Solving Scenarios



large lecture


1.

You’re teaching a course that requires the transmission of
a lot
of
information,
and you usually lecture. But you have a student with a
traumatic brain injury

who has memory problems


and a lot of
sleepy students
. What do you do?




“technical/visual course”

2.

You
are teaching a course that involves visual learning, such as
teaching equations or painting.
You have a student with a visual
impairment. How do you
make this situa
tion accessible to this
student, preferably in a way that benefits all students?




“non
-
writing
, content
-
based course”

3.

You are teaching a course where you need to assess if the students
are absorbing the material.
How can you assess student

learning
outside of a traditional paper or an exam? (For example, you might
not be able to grade the amount of student writing, and/or want to
avoid an in
-
class exam that
disabled

students will need to take
elsewhere.)




“writing course”

4.

You are teaching

a writing course (argument, creative, or other), and
you have a student with a disability that

makes it difficult for her

to
17


write. You’ll still expect the student to submit the final product, but
what strategies can you use to get them to writing, other
than
writing itself?




“course with workshops or group work”

5.

You are teaching a course that requires a good deal of
workshopping
or
group work. You have a student who struggles with social
interaction (due to autism, anxiety, or something else), and this
student has shared that group work is difficult for
him
. What do you
do to
include the student?




“film
-
oriented class”

6.

You are teaching a
course
that uses film for much of its subject
matter. You have a Deaf student who needs to take your class, and
many

of the films you chose are not captioned. What do you do to
make this class accessible to the student in a non
-
stigmatizing way?



18


Further Resources on Presentation
-
Related Topics


UC Denver Disability Resources



Disability Resources and Services:
http://www.ucdenver.edu/student
-
services/resources/disability
-
resources
-
services/Pages/disability
-
resources
-
services.asp
x
.



Accommodation Request for Faculty and Staff:
http://www.ucdenver.edu/about/departments/HR/FormsTemplates
Processes/Documents/adaRequest.pdf



Disa
bilities Committee:
http://www.ucdenver.edu/faculty_staff/faculty/assembly/downtow
n/committees/diversity/Pages/Disabilities.aspx


Disability Statistics



U.S. Census Bureau:
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/disability/disability.html




National Council of Education Statistics, Post
-
Secondary Profile:
http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=1999187




UCSF Disability Statistics Center:
http://dsc.ucsf.edu/main.php



Learning Styles Inventories

Stu
dents are interested in under
standing their learning styles (
even if
some of the
quizzes
are
a little
silly
)
. It’s important

to validate each of
the styles, as some carry more stigma than others (“visual” often looks
like a “typical” student, “physical” or

“kinesthetic” does not).



Learning Styles Links, Ohio State University:
http://www.oucom.ohiou.edu/fd/learning_style_inventories.htm
.



Quick and easy online quiz:
http://ttc.coe.uga.edu/surveys/LearningStyleInv.html
.

19




Barsch inventory (provides some explanation of styles):
http://ww2.nscc.ed
u/gerth_d/AAA0000000/barsch_inventory.htm
.



Less mysterious, but printable for in
-
class use:
http://www.wright.edu/~carole.endres/learnstyles.htm
.



Simplified Kolb inventory with explanat
ion:
http://casa.colorado.edu/~dduncan/teachingseminar/KolbLearningS
tyleInventoryInfo.pdf
.



Easily printable, .pdf learning styles quiz:
http://www.njea.org/pdfs/LearningStyleInventory.pdf


About Disability Studies

(DS)



DS
syllabi:
http://
www.disstudies.org/content/syllabi

(humanities &
social sciences)



Disability Studies Quarterly
:
http://www.dsq
-
sds.org
/

(peer
-
reviewed, open
-
access)



DS
bibliographies:

o

http://
www.lib.umd.edu/guides/disability.html
(U of M
D)


o

http
://
disabilitystudies.syr.edu/resources/bibliography.aspx

(Syracuse U)



DS
in the Humanities listserv:
https://listserv.umd.edu/archives
/ds
-
hum.html

(open archives)



DS and Rhetoric website:
http://www.disabilityrhetoric.com

(maintained by Amy Vidali)