Chapter 1: A Leisurely Look at Worthy Performance

nostrilswelderElectronics - Devices

Oct 10, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Human Competence: Engineering Worthy Performance

1

Thomas F. Gilbert, Chapter 1


A Leisurely Look at Worthy Performance

(pgs 13
-
15)



1.

When we make judgments bout the competence of human conduct, we often look
at performance from the wrong vantage point.

2.

Main problem of investigating human competence

a.

We confuse behavior with performance
.



Leisurely Theorems



Leisure is a synonym for human capital=product of time and opportunity



Worthy Performance

(pgs 15
-
17)




Example: Actions of a hunter, need to observe the whole transaction



P = B

C

o

Behavior is a means

o

Co
nsequence is the end



Need to engineer
valuable performance

o

P = B

A

o

Consequence as a valuable accomplishment



But the behavior may cost us too much, so what we really need is
worthy
performance
=value of the accomplishment exceeds the cost of the
behavior

o

Worth is greater as value increases and cost decreases

o

Worth =
Value


Cost



Competent

people are those who can create valuable results without using
excessively costly behavior


The First Leisurely Theorem

(pgs 18

-
19)




Human competence = function of wort
hy performance
, which is a function of
the ration of valuable accomplishments to cost behavior

o

W =
A


B



The way to achieve human competence is to increase the value of our
accomplishments while reducing the energy we put into the effort.

Sale



Seller

Behavior



Performance

Human Competence: Engineering Worthy Performance

2

Thomas F. Gilbert, Chapter 1




Great quantitie
s of work, knowledge, and motivation, in the absence of at least
equal accomplishments are unworthy performance.



Great accomplishments are not worthy if the cost in human behavior is also
very great.

o

Example: Egyptian pyramids = worthless achievement

o

Ar
abs alphabet = incalculable worth



Money, energy, or time invested in reducing the behavior required of
performance can pay off splendidly.



A system that rewards people for their behavior (work, motivation or
knowledge) encourages incompetence. And a sys
tem that rewards people
only for their accomplishments, and not for the net worth of their
performance, is an incomplete system that fails to appreciate human
competence.



Human capital can best be achieved through worthy performance only if we
measure and
respond directly to human competence. And human competence
is found in overt performance, not in hidden behavior.


Distinguishing Behavior and Accomplishment (pgs 19
-
22)





A test score rates people low on the assumed correlatives of the job or school
requ
irements, but it does not identify precisely what must be developed in them
for us to make good their potential



Tests are usually too indirect



Psychological testing has prevented us from testing direct performance



People are very much alike in their behavi
or repertories, but there are great
individual differences in what they accomplish.


Corollaries of the First Leisurely Theorem (pgs 22
-
25)




Corollary of the distinction between measures of accomplishment and measures
of behaviors



Number 1: If we know wh
at we are doing, education must be highly economical.

o

Accomplishments alone have direct value to us. Behavior changes are
simply things that cost us money.

o

W =
A

=
V


B C



Number 2: We have not need to measure behavior until we have measured
a
ccomplishment.

o

Example: Tests scores are usually misleading



Number 3: Quantitative expression of behavior, except for special purposes, are
often misleading indices of performance. It is frequently useful to quantify
measures of accomplishment, and the
se measures should have economic
correlatives.

o

Example: plumber