Making an Impact

nostrilshumorousInternet and Web Development

Nov 18, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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Making an Impact:

Building Transportable and
Sustainable Projects

(
formerly

Dissemination)


Webinar 4 of the

Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science, Technology,
Engineering and Mathematics Series











Handout 1

1

Don Millard

dmillard@nsf.gov

&
John
Yu
zyu@nsf.gov


April
17,
2012

Louis Everett
leverett@nsf.gov

& Susan Finger
sfinger@nsf.gov


April
18,
2012




Before you leave, please complete the assessment
survey:






http://
www.nsflsu.com


2


Most of the information presented in this workshop represents
the presenters’ opinions and not an official NSF position.



Local facilitators will provide the link to the workshop slides at
the completion of the webinar.



Participants may ask questions by
“raising their virtual hand”
during a question session. We will call on selected sites and
enable their microphone so that the question can be asked.



Responses will be collected from a few sites at the end of each
Exercise. At the start of the Exercise, we will identify these
sites in the
Chat Box
and then call on them one at a time to
provide their responses.





3


Learning must build on
prior knowledge


Some knowledge correct


Some knowledge incorrect


Misconceptions



Learning is


Connecting new knowledge to prior knowledge


Correcting misconceptions



Learning requires
engagement


Actively recalling prior knowledge


Sharing new knowledge


Forming a new understanding

4


Effective learning activities


Recall prior knowledge
--

actively, explicitly


Connect new concepts to existing ones


Challenge and alter misconceptions



Active & collaborative processes


Think

individually


Share
with partner


Report

to local and virtual groups


Learn

from program directors’ responses

5


Coordinate the local activities



Watch the time


Allow for think, share, and report phases


Reconvene on time
--

1 min warning


With one minute warning, refer to Chat Box to see if you will be
asked for a response



Ensure the individual think phase is devoted to
thinking quietly and not talking



Coordinate the asking of questions by local
participants and reporting local responses to
exercises

6

The session will enable you to design
transportable and sustainable engineering
and computer science education projects,
based on an understanding of how faculty
make decisions about their teaching.

7

After the session, participants should be able to:


Discuss the importance of project transportability


Transfer or transmission model


Readiness Change model


Rational Faculty Model



Discuss key components of institutionalization at home
institution


Structural and cultural considerations



Discuss types of transportability and sustainability
approaches


Enabling, Facilitating, Encouraging, Collaborating


Greater emphasis on designing for transportability than in the past

8



Reflect on a specific change you have made in your teaching (e.g.,
active learning, concept inventory, online modules, or any other
changes)



How did you first find out about it?


What convinced you to try it?


What aspects of the innovation (would have) made it easy to adopt?


What support from others (would have) made it easy to implement?



Exercise
----

6 min


Think individually
--------

~2 min


Share with a partner
-----

~2 min




Report in local group
----

~2 min


Watch time and reconvene after 6 min


Use THINK time to think


no discussion, Selected local facilitators report to virtual group



With one minute warning, look at Chat Box to see if you will be asked for a response


9


Usually you have a specific problem to solve


You want to adapt or experiment with the
change


It shouldn’t be too rigid or complicated


It should be compatible with your students,
department, academic term, IT systems


You need different information at different
times


Evidence of student learning, assessment data


Advice on how to implement


Help processing “failures” and negative student reactions

10

Handout 2


Reflect on your own experience to understand
your audience and design a plan to ensure
others will use your materials



What motivates you to change can


Inspire the need for a project


Inspire the project transportability and institutionalization


Also inspires others to use your materials and approach


11


Develop and disseminate model


Transfer or transmission model


Developer (change agent)


Creates instructional materials and strategies


Significant effort


Research
-
based


Tries to convince other faculty to use them


Postings, presentations, publications


Short, one
-
time workshops




12


Faculty may need more than one exposure to
materials/ideas


Importance of local factors may be overlooked


Faculty are likely to need ongoing support when
adopting materials of others




13


Sequential change models


Pre
-
awareness


Willing to read a one
-
pager


Awareness


Willing to read longer summaries


Interest


Willing to read journal or conference
publication


Search


Willing to attend a 2
-
4 hr workshop


Decision


Willing to attend a 1
-
2 day workshop


Action


Willing to implement


Trial period


Decision to continue or discard


Rogers, Diffusion of Innovations, 1995

Froyd
, FIE, 2001

14



Faculty cannot be moved from Pre
-
awareness to Action with a single
workshop



Change is not an event


it is a process


Froyd, FIE, 2001

15


Matched to how faculty members actually change


Dancy

and Henderson’s Rational Faculty Model


Provide easily modifiable material


Users will customize


Provide research ideas with material


Users understand the rationale


If not, risk inappropriate adaptation, e.g., clickers for
attendance


Make it clear what aspects will transfer under what
conditions


Identify critical elements


Recommend modification for different situations


Dancy

and Henderson, NRC Workshop Report, 2008

16


Can’t transform undergraduate education if TUES
projects are not sustained at the home institution
after NSF funding ends



This process is called
institutionalization

“when an innovation or program is fully integrated into an
organization’s structure”


17

Curry, ASHE Report, 1992

What are some common reasons an education
project fails to be institutionalized after NSF
funding ends?



Exercise
----

6 min


Think individually
--------

~2 min


Share with a partner
-----

~2 min




Report in local group
----

~2 min


Watch time and reconvene after 6 min


Use THINK time to think


no discussion, Selected local
facilitators report to virtual group



With one minute warning, look at Chat Box to see if you will be
asked for a response



18


Enthusiasm wanes after grant ends


Money unavailable for personnel, supplies, travel, training, etc.


PI moves on


Other teaching assignments


Administrative responsibilities


Moves to another institution


Multiple/new instructors less comfortable with format


Specially trained TAs graduate


Technology changes (equipment outdated, new computers/software)


Budget cuts reduce offerings of elective courses


Changes to curriculum impact student demand


Administrators unaware or not convinced of value, may move to other
positions or change priorities



19


Not just about money



Two aspects


Structural


policies, curriculum, teaching load/assignments


Cultural


becomes part of normal expectations of how we educate
students (in topic X)



The most successful efforts address both
structural and cultural



20

For an idea you are considering for a TUES
proposal, what institutionalization strategies
can you pursue that address structural and
cultural aspects?



Exercise
----

6 min


Think individually
--------

~2 min


Share with a partner
-----

~2 min




Report in local group
----

~2 min


Watch time and reconvene after 6 min


Use THINK time to think


no discussion, Selected local
facilitators report to virtual group



With one minute warning, look at Chat Box to see if you will be
asked for a response



21


State learning outcomes and align to curricula and values


Collect and distribute convincing evaluation data


Publicize successes to deans, chairs, faculty and teaching
assistants


Discuss at faculty and curriculum committee meetings


Adapt it to work for all students, faculty, departments (as
appropriate)


Recruit other faculty to learn about it and use it in their classes


Provide data, advice, incentives and moral support


Work to secure resources as needed: lab space, staff support


Work to integrate it into curricula (as appropriate)


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Handout 3


Questions


“Hold
-
up your virtual hand” and you will
be called upon after we unmute your
mike.


BREAK

15 min



BREAK

1 min warning


Most NSF education programs require project
transportability (broader impact, dissemination)


Example

Review criteria for TUES Program include:


Projects should produce exemplary materials, processes,
or models that can be adopted by other sites


Projects should involve a significant effort aimed at
facilitating adaptation at other sites


Projects should have the potential to contribute to a
paradigm shift in undergraduate STEM education


In this section we discuss how to address
these criteria in a proposal or project

26

As you work on your project (or develop your
proposal) from the very beginning throughout the
entire project think about:



Encouraging others


Make others aware of and interested in your materials or approach


Facilitating others


Help others use your materials or approach


Enabling others


Designing your
materials
so that others can use
them


Collaborating with others


Engage others in improving your materials or approach

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The next activities will help you
understand what each of these means

How do you make others aware of and interested in
your materials?



Exercise
----

6 min


Think individually
--------

~2 min


Share with a partner
-----

~2 min




Report in local group
----

~2 min


Watch time and reconvene after 6 min


Use THINK time to think


no discussion, Selected local
facilitators report to virtual group



With one minute warning, look at Chat Box to see if you will be
asked for a response


28


Use a variety of strategies


Post, present, and publish it


Present workshops at your institution or at national meetings


Make personal connections to others’ needs


Post it on more widely accessed sites


Connexions

site (cnx.org)


National Instruments (ni.com)


NSF’s
NSDL

(nsdl.org)


Search engine optimization


Use technology


Videos


Social media (YouTube, Face Book, Google+)


Provide a Information package (a “sales brochure”)


Statement of need and importance, learning objectives


Summary of approach


Evaluation data, assessment evidence


Stories, scenarios, advice for use and troubleshooting


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Handout 5

How do you help others use your materials?



Exercise
----

6 min


Think individually
--------

~2 min


Share with a partner
-----

~2 min




Report in local group
----

~2 min


Watch time and reconvene after 6 min


Use THINK time to think


no discussion, Selected local
facilitators report to virtual group



With one minute warning, look at Chat Box to see if you will be
asked for a response


30


Continued support


Organize a support group (a community of practice)


Virtual workshops and support group


Wikis


Series of workshops


Share evaluation instruments and processes


Formative as well as summative


Prepare a user’s guide


Pitfalls


Alternate approaches


Video demonstrations


Use “open source” approach


31

Handout 6

What should you think about when developing
your
materials
so that
the final product can be
used by others?


Exercise
----

6 min


Think individually
--------

~2 min


Share with a partner
-----

~2 min




Report in local group
----

~2 min


Watch time and reconvene after 6 min


Use THINK time to think


no discussion, Selected local
facilitators report to virtual group



With one minute warning, look at Chat Box to see if you will be
asked for a response



32


Build in flexibility, e.g. software platforms


Consider how the approach could be used:


In other curricular models, other courses, or other disciplines


With other teaching styles


State clearly the expected learning outcomes and link to needs


Minimize special equipment needs and implementation cost,
consider virtual approaches


Collect convincing evaluation data


Summarize the approach’s rationale (the research
-
base, false
starts, etc.) in a simple story


Provide options for gradual scale up


Recruit a few faculty at other sites that teach the course (potential
future users)

and ask them periodically to consider


How well the approach fits their course and their style


How could it be made more compatible


What data would convince them

33

Handout 4

How do you engage others in designing and
developing your materials?



Exercise
----

6 min


Think individually
--------

~2 min


Share with a partner
-----

~2 min




Report in local group
----

~2 min


Watch time and reconvene after 6 min


Use THINK time to think


no discussion, Selected local
facilitators report to virtual group



With one minute warning, look at Chat Box to see if you will be
asked for a response


34


Share control


Allow others to develop pieces of the material


Enable partners to contribute to the posted material


Identify new partners at conferences and workshops


Give credit to collaborators


Develop a common evaluation process and data
base


Build in review and improvements at key points


Develop group approaches for engaging and
facilitating others


Include collaborators as Co
-
PIs, advisory board, etc.

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Handout 7


Does your proposal or your project have a strong
(sustainable, transportable) dissemination plan?


How can you improve it?



Take
----

4 min


Think individually
--------

~2 min


Report in local group
----

~2 min



Watch time and reconvene after 4 min



Use THINK time to think


no discussion, Selected local facilitators
report to virtual group


36



Curry, B.K., (1992).
Instituting Enduring Innovations: Achieving
Continuity of Change in Higher Education
. ASHE
-
ERIC Higher
Education Report No. 7


Dancy
, M.H. and Henderson, J.C. (2008). Barriers and Promises in
STEM Reform. Commissioned paper presented at NRC workshop on
Evidence on Selected Promising Practices in Undergraduate Science,
Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education,
Washington, DC. Retrieved from
http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/Dancy_Henderson_Commiss
ionedPaper.pdf
.


Froyd, J.E., “Developing a Dissemination Plan,”
Proceedings, 2001
ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference.


Rogers, E. (1995).
Diffusion of Innovations.



37



Question
s


Hold up your “virtual hand” to ask a
question.


Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappguide/nsf11001/


38



To download a copy of the presentation
-

go to:




http://www.nsflsu.com



Please complete the assessment survey
-
go to:




http://www.nsflsu.com

39