Crisis Management/ Business Continuity - Diocese of Pittsburgh

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Nov 20, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Crisis Management

Diocese of Pittsburgh

John Krauland

Loss Control/ Safety Coordinator


Crisis Management


Crisis Management is the
process

by
which an organization deals with a major
event that threatens it’s operation.


It involves dealing with the threats:


Before


During, and


After


Consideration should be given to both
perception and reality.

Examples of Crises

Natural disasters (flood, tornado, earthquake)

Severe weather

Fires

Hazardous material spills

Bus crashes

School shootings

Bomb threats

Medical emergencies

Student or staff deaths

Outbreaks of disease or infections


Process of Crisis Management

Prevention


addresses what can be done to eliminate
or reduce the risk to life, property, and efficacy.


Preparedness



focuses on planning for the worst
-
case scenario.


Response



is the steps taken during a crisis


Recovery



returning back to “normal”

Establish a Committee

A “Safe n’ Secure” committee should be
established to identify roles and
responsibilities within the crisis management
cycle.


“If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.”


Crisis Planning should…

Begin at the top.

Not be done in a vacuum.

Open lines of communication.

Include police, firemen, and EMS.

Establish a common vocabulary.

Include all facilities.

Provide direction.


Mitigation and Prevention

Phase 1

Keys to Preventing a Crisis


Facility location/ layout


Property maintenance


Security procedures


Life safety compliance


Community involvement


Timely response to incidents


Facility Location/ Layout

Keep in mind:


Geography


Building uses


Parking lots


Playgrounds


Occupants



Property Maintenance


Buildings


Grounds


Systems


Vehicles


Security Procedures


Access controls


Entry


Alarms


Visitor protocol


Early dismissals


Discipline/ Prosecution Policies


Life Safety Compliance


Means of egress


Paths or isles


Doors/ exits


Locks


Emergency lighting


Contents/ storage


Protective systems

Community Involvement


Use the resources available to you:


Parishioners


Fire, Police, and EMS


Community leaders


Local emergency management directors


Consider a “suggestion box”


Social development programs

Timely Response

Every incident is not a crisis.

Don’t let it become one.

Preparedness

Phase 2

The following elements should be
considered:



Site security


Emergency action plan


Business continuity plan

Security Measures

Outside Recommendations:


Clearly define property


Clearly label facilities


Maintain adequate lighting


Limit blind spots


Remove items to scale buildings


Routinely inspect the premises





Security Measures

Inside Recommendations:


Limit the use of entrances


Institute strict procedures for key control


Secure access points of joint
-
use facilities


Routinely inspect doors and windows


Keep unoccupied areas locked


Keep door latches in the locked position






Security Measures

Considerations specifically for schools:


Install a panic alarm in main office area


Ensure all classrooms have 2
-
way communication


Use caller ID


Ensure radio frequency communication is possible


Restrict access to all mechanical/ utility rooms


Implement student release procedures






Develop an

Emergency Action Plan

(EAP)

EAP

An EAP is a proactive plan to deal with potential threats, so
that everyone knows what is expected of them when
something happens. The major elements are:


Hazard assessment


Resource assessment


Responsibility assessment


Communication assessment


Policy and Procedures


Training and education


Record keeping


Hazard Assessment

Identify hazards, assess risks. Determine:


the types of hazards (fire, flooding, tornado,
etc.).


the probability of their occurrence.


the extent of damage if hazards occur.


Resource Assessment

Assess capabilities and resources.


What do we have?


What will we need?


Identify personnel and equipment.


Review existing plans if they exist.



Responsibility Assessment

For each hazard or threat, determine who is
responsible for necessary actions.


Keep in mind, one person can not be
everywhere at the same time all the time.


Be detailed and precise when assigning
responsibilities to personnel.

Communication Assessment

Who do you need to communicate with?


Administration


Families


Authorities


Utility providers


Mutual
-
aid providers


Media

What ways do you communicate?



Phones, Email, Radios, PA Systems


When is communication necessary?



Develop Procedures

Using the information you’ve gathered
through the multiple assessments, develop
the procedures to be followed for each
threat.


Include drawings with evacuation plans,
utility shut
-
offs, safety equipment, etc.



Write It!


Put the plan in writing. The easiest way to
get everyone on the same page is to give
them the same book.



Implement & Practice the Plan

Give all employees a copy of the plan and
train them on their responsibilities within the
plan.


Invite local authorities to review your plan.


Practice the plan. Identify weaknesses.


Types of Drills


Evacuation


Lock
-
down


Table top scenarios


Bus evacuation



Update the Plan

No matter how specific your plan, it is likely
that once practiced, changes will need to be
made. Make the changes in the written plan
and communicate the changes with
everyone they affect.

Develop a

Business Continuity Plan

(BCP)

Business Continuity Plan (BCP)

Business continuity planning focuses on
sustaining the delivery of services essential
to the organization’s survival.


Personnel


Bank accounts


Vendors


Property

What should be included
in a BCP?

A BCP should identify:


What services you deliver,


To whom these services are delivered,


Who will deliver the services, and


Alternate locations the services will be
offered


The more detailed you are now, the easier
the recovery process will be later.

Response

Phase 3

Assess the Situation

Does a crisis exist? If so, determine:


The type of crisis


The location


The magnitude



Notify Emergency Responders


Don’t delay!


It is never too early.


Give as much information as possible


Alert key personnel for your facility.


React


Respond within seconds


Evacuate or lock down facility


Triage injuries if necessary


Trust the leadership


Communicate appropriate information


Document, Document, Document


Record all actions taken


Record damages


Record financial transactions


Keep all original notes and records

Recovery

Phase 4

Return to “Normal”


Take as much time as needed


Focus on people and buildings


Continue communication


Provide for families, staff, and responders

Evaluate Response Activity

Evaluation of the response can help guide
the prevention and planning processes for
the future.



What worked and what didn’t?



What additional training is necessary?



What additional resources are necessary?

Questions

Helpful Links and References


John Krauland


Loss Control/ Safety Coordinator



Office: 412
-
456
-
3150

Email:jkrauland@diopitt.org


Catholic School Safety and Security Manual


Parish Emergency Action Plan Guide

http://www.diopitt.org/pdfs/parish
-
emergency
-
action
-
plan
-
guide


Practical Information on Crisis Planning

http://www2.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/emergencyplan/crisisplanning.pdf


Department of Homeland Security


School Safety

http://www.dhs.gov/school
-
safety


Mitigating Hazards in School Facilities

http://www.ncef.org/pubs/pubs_html.cfm?abstract=mitigating2


Department of Homeland Security


Active Shooter Booklet

http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/active_shooter_booklet.pdf


Church Mutual


Self
-
Inspection Safety Checklist

http://www.churchmutual.com/admin/store/downloads/Self_Inspection_Checklist.pdf


Church Mutual


Free Safety Resources

http://www.churchmutual.com/index.php/choice/risk/page/intro/id/21