Electronic Commerce Strategies

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Oct 29, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


1


Electronic Commerce

Strategies

MGMT S
-
105

Harvard Summer

School


Summer

2009

Final Syllabus

Instructor:

Professor Dennis Galletta

University of Pittsburgh

Email:
galletta@katz.pitt.edu


Teaching Fellow:

John
-
Paul Messina

Email:
messinajp@gmail.com



When this course started

back in 1995
, there was tremendous magic in the air. People dreamt
about millions of dollars that could be cashed in on wild ideas. And some
indeed earned those millions.
Some earned millions on selling a shaky idea only to see the buyer turn around and make tens of
millions

on the same idea. The course had standing
-
room only crowds and large waiting lists.

Fast
-
forward to 2009.
E
-
Commerce is n
o
w

totally
in the
mainstream.
You probably find yourself
using the internet so many times during a typical day that you cannot remember what it was like before.
As enrollments shrank during the “burst bubble” of 2000, e
-
commerce just kept growing. Many fir
ms
perished but many thrived. Many brick
-
and
-
mortar firms became “brick
-
and
-
click” firms.

In the
mid
90's, a course in E
-
Commerce would have spent
a few weeks
teaching students about
HTML
,
JavaScript
,

and
other low
-
level tools for
building web
-
pages. Just
fifteen

years later, the
list of
technologies
is longer than
ever

and
changing const
antly.

Powerful packages are now available that
avoid the need for developers to see the HTML language very often. One popular
and powerful
example
is Adobe’s Dreamweaver
.
And
you might have received a very easy
-
to
-
use web development package as
part of
Microsoft
Office
(
possibly
free with your university plan

long ago
):
Front Page. More recently,
Publisher

is included
.

Even Word (since XP) allows you to develop pages and save them as HTML
documents. There are fewer barriers than ever before to publish any of your materials to the world.

The trouble is that m
any tools
require

expert knowledge of how to change server oper
ating
system settings (especially to open security gates to only the right parties)

and link to databases
.

The
technology has developed so much that
a
n entire

series

of courses can, and must be taken to do the
building

of an on
-
line business
. Meanwhile,
th
e philosophy in this course is that
it is more important to
have the creative idea, the gem, the golden moment that can either provide or squander a lifetime
’s
worth

of income.

F
ifteen
years later
, where we are now
,
there are many new business models that
did not exist at
the beginning. The new tools and ease of producing complicated applications have pushed the envelope
to such an extent that those who are familiar with the old tools are simply amazed. One example is
Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


2


Google’s use of the Ajax language, whic
h allows you to scroll a map around without having to reload the
page for each movement of the map (as you’ve undoubtedly noticed is required in less sophisticated
sites).

The development of new businesses has admittedly slowed. Most of the effort is now a
imed at
helping
an existing business looking at n
ew ways to leverage e
-
commerce
, rather than starting new
enterprises. Of course, some new businesses begin and end, but that is natural even in mature
businesses like stores, restaurants, and service enterpr
ises.

All in all, t
here is good news and bad news. The good news is that much intellectual content is
now available for studying e
-
commerce. There are interesting strategic models and a plethora of cases
involving those in your day
-
to
-
day experience like
m
usic downloading

and those that you probably will
never use, such as
N
eopets.

The bad news is that the area is still developing so your knowledge will be time
-
sensitive. You
will find that new developments will
seem to

make some of this material obsolete.
Fortunately, the
approach we take here will focus on frameworks that should not change as rapidly as the technology. If
you become accustomed to applying the strategic frameworks to these real situations, you will see how
new technologies do not change
eve
rything

all at once. There are still timeless issues of competitive
forces, competitive advantage, value chain, and sustainability that will organize the material, and
hopefully will organize your thoughts about the new technologies for many years to come.

Course Approach

My approach in this course is to combine my own extensive teaching and research materials
with that of the only surviving and up
-
to
-
date textbook in the area
, and with a range of
case studies
from
Harvard other
universities
.

The result is perhaps a

heavy reading load, but our seven
-
week format
allows you to become immersed in the material. The text will serve to supplement the class materials,
perhaps providing deeper explanations of any items that I might gloss over.
For cas
es, I will provide
specific questions to avoid your having to guess what I’m looking for, and
I will alternate your
case
requirements between group cases and individual cases. Finally, the sequence of the material has been
set to accommodate the very limit
ed schedules of our guest speakers.

The usual class plan is to cover a case for about an hour, then to cover material that you will
want to cover
for the next case.

If we get behind, please fill in with reading; the need to cover the
material will be modest at best.
We will also from time to time discuss research projects that have been
completed, as well as some that are under way. For instance,
you completed a
short

instrument
and
we
discuss
ed

the results in

a subsequent class
:
http://katz.qualtrics.com/SE?SID=SV_cUv6gypZPlCQigs&SVID=Prod


Cases

Most of t
he cases are available on
Harvard’s
e
-
commerce site and the link to buy them

is
http://harvardbusinessonline.hbsp.harvard.edu/relay.jhtml?name=cp&c=c52443

.
Please note that the
site will be down

from

June 24,

2009,
at 6 AM until June 25 at 9 AM, so please make your purchases
before or after that interval. I’ve designed the first two cases around this problem, so don’t panic.


Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


3


Some of the case
s

are quite new and others are quite old. Harvard cases are a
bout management
approaches, not about the latest
trends or
developments
. Also, the older cases tend to be the best
-
sellers most often, and not all of the newer ones are worthwhile. The cases for this course have been
chosen carefully to cover particular is
sues that they cover extremely well.

In the order in which they are covered, the cases are as follows:




Online Groceries (in your text, pp. 63
-
65)



Lands’ End (available at the following link:
http://cais.isworld.org/articles/11
-
3/article.pdf
. If
this link disappears, please let me know).



Netflix (Rachleff & Coates), 6/11/08: #9
-
E23
-
8

(Buy from the Harvard
link above
)



Paypal (Mendelson),
9/01: #EC7 (free from the author, available on this site
)



NeoPets (Eisenmann & Kind),
5/12/03: #9
-
802
-
100

(Buy from the Harvard
link above
)



eBay (A) The Customer Marketplace (Frei & Rodriguez
-
Farrar), 9/15/05: #602071

(Buy from
the Harvard
link above
)



RealNetworks Rhapsody

(Eisenmann &

Carpenter), 9/13/05: #9
-
804
-
142

(Buy from the
Harvard
link above
)



Amazon.com: Exploiting the Value of Digital Business Infrastructure (Applegate & Collura),
9/5/2000: #9
-
800
-
330

(Buy from the Harvard
link above
)



Baxter Healthcare Corp: ASAP Express (Vital
e & Konsynski), 2/11/91: #188080

(Buy from the
Harvard
link above
)



iPremiere Co. (A) Denial of Service Attack (Austin, Lei
brock, & Murray) 7/26/07: #601114
(Buy from the Harvard
link above
)



Threadless: The Business of Community (Lakhani & Kanji), 6/30/08:
#608707 (Buy from the
Harvard
link above
)

it is a CDROM so it must be mailed.

Administrative Matters


Harvard has a well
-
defined process for many administrative matters. There are specific
procedures for students with disabilities (please contact Academic
Services at 617
-
495
-
0977 or
disabilities@dcemail.harvard.edu
)
, religious conflicts, and makeups (we can’t do it)
. Also, taking
attendance is required of me during the early classes to allow waitlisted

students to take the place of
non
-
attending registered students.
Given that you are
taking the course for
graduate
credit

and have
obviously not only survived, but flourished, suffice it to say that your submitted work must be yours and
yours alone unless

the assignment is clearly labeled to be from your group. As you know by now, there
are severe penalties for academic dishonesty, which includes copying nearly any amount of text from a
web site without attribution

as well as the traditional forms of copyi
ng from others. If you cite

a source,
simply use quotation marks and an author name and year in parentheses, as well as a list of complete
references, and as the only modestly funny joke goes, “cheating” becomes “research.” Because you are
all held closely

to it, you should be familiar with the academic policy explained in
http://www.summer.harvard.edu/2009/policy
, and in particular, page 87 as it applies to dishonesty
.

Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


4



Generally in analyzing my ca
ses I do not expect your writing to be dramatic or artistic. So you
can dispense with the “It was a dark and stormy night” beginnings

or clever plot development
. However,
the bullets or sentences you hand in should be clear.

So if writing is an issue, or y
ou just want some help,
the writing center is located in cyberspace at
http://www.summer.harvard.edu/~wricntr
.


If you need to get ahold of me, email is best.
While in Boston, I will promise quick rep
lies (within
a few hours). Often I will reply within 5 minutes.
Note: I do not have email access on my phone, so
please be patient while I am at dinner or visiting friends in Boston!
I will conduct office hours on short
notice

(a day

or less
)
.
However, stu
dents seldom need extensive help due to the non
-
technical nature of
this material.
I have only had one request for office time, so please feel free to
contact me to meet!


New Grading System


Five main vehicles will be used for grading, shown below.

1.

Six
individual cases (7 points each)

................................
................................
.......

42

2.

Five group cases (4 points each)

................................
................................
...........

20

3.

Final project
................................
................................
................................
........

22

4.

“Failures” presentation

................................
................................
.......................

6

5.

Class, group participation (quality plus quantity) (peer evaluations included)

.........

10

Total

................................
................................
................................
...................
100

Previous

Grading
System

1.

Six individua
l cases

(7 points each)
................................
..........................

42

2.

Five group cases

(4 points each)
................................
...............................

20

3.

Final exam

................................
................................
................................
.......

20

4.

“Successes” and “failures” presentations

................................
..............

8

5.

Class participation (quality plus quantity)
................................
..............

10

Total
................................
................................
................................
..................
100

The University rules preclude students from handing in extra work
or resubmissions to improve
assigned grades. Grade changes are only permitted if there is a “clearly documented clerical or
computational error” (
Summer
School
Faculty Handbook

2009
,

p. 32)
. Further, while students may ask
for explanations about their grad
es and to review their papers, but student harassment of faculty
(repeated calls, pleas, or complaints) is not tolerated by Harvard.

A Quasi
-
Paperless Course


I strive to make this course as “paperless” as possible. Of course, having a textbook violates
that
policy right away. However, if you recycle or resell your text at the end, it will get closer to that goal.

The syllabus is now final
. Additional readings
were
added, corrections
were
made,
and
the
schedule change
d a small amount

due to unforeseen cir
cumstances. Further, the cases and readings can
all be downloaded and
, hopefully,

comfortably read from your screen. I strive to never hand out any
paper.

Given that there are limitations in the Harvard downloads (only readable on your computer), you
might

want to print them if you wish to keep them forever.

Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


5


Final Project


The goal of the final (group) project is to integrate the material in this course into an
entrepreneurial endeavor of some kind. Each group should develop

one

of the following
:

1.

Create

and develop

an

idea for
a new Internet
-
based business


2.

Create
and develop
an

idea for
a new Internet
-
related hardware or software product

3.

Create
and develop
an

idea for a new Internet
-
based opportunity

for an existing business

The plan should be created
as a PowerPoint presentation,
not a written document,
and
should
contain the following elements
. Cover this in a 15
-

to 20
-
minute presentation and the parts you do
not cover due to time should be placed in appendices. Time will be called abruptly at 20 min
utes
and the next group will need to begin.

Make use of Chapter 9 in the textbook to get a pretty useful
glimpse of various industries.

If you have chosen option 3, please
only

present
incremental

costs.

1.

C
ontext

(2 points)
:

a.

If you are focusing on an exist
ing business, describe it in enough detail for us to
understand the context.

b.

Whether it is an existing business or
a new business or product, describe the problem
you intend to solve for
customers or trading partners.

2.

The Idea

(3 points)

a.

Describe your ide
a

b.

Describe the technological solution. If a web site, a mock
-
up of the site would be
helpful. Just draw it and insert text boxes with links, buttons, titles, etc. Insert photos
where desired. Just let us know what you’re thinking about as vividly and quick
ly as
possible.

3.

The Competitive Environment (5 points)

a.

Provide an overview of the industry that is represented most closely or related most
strongly to your innovation

b.

Describe the customer

base: How large is the market? Describe the market (i.e., what
are

the customers like?).

c.

Describe that industry with respect to Porter’s five competitive forces
.

d.

Which of the three competitive
strategies are intended? (cost, differentiation, focus)

4.

Marketing plan (3 points)

a.

Where will you advertise?

b.

How much will it
cost?

5.

The business model
and finances
(5 points)

a.

How will you monetize your efforts?
What is your pricing?

b.

Project the potential revenues

and/or cost reductions

for 5 years

c.

Project your likely costs for 5 years. Make up a spreadsheet that combines the
mark
eting costs from above with salaries, product costs, and the rest of the
likely costs
for 5 years. If you have problems trying to estimate

the technologies
, use
any
of the
following

that
you find

useful
. Your own estimates can override any of these numbers

of
Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


6


mine (for example, if you have
volunteer developers or will pay only in stock options or
something).

i.

Outsource at $.75 per transaction
, OR

ii.

Start with

two servers plus

a
n additional

server for every 500 transactions a day.
Each server can be estimated a
t $
5
,000, overhead (
operating system, database
server,
labor,
space,
power, etc.) at $1,000 per server per year
. Add labor of a
full
-
time person at $50,000 the first year then $120,000 annually after that, plus
another full
-
time person at $120,000 annually

for every five servers.

6.

Sustaining the
Competitive Advantage (4 points)

a.

Review the barriers you intend to construct
(from the sustainability framework).

b.

Point out critical success factors

for this endeavor

c.

Point out the
likely risks
in light of 6a and 6b.

Successes Assignment

Note:
The Successes assignment

was replaced by the final project.



Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


7


Course Outline



1

June 23

Introduction

Group Formation

Strategic Models

Chaps 1
-
2

Galletta
1

2

June 25

Online Groceries

mini
-
case analysis due
(individual)
(pp.
63
-
65)

Technologies of e
-
commerce

Chap 3

3

June 30

Lands End

case analysis due (group)

Online Content and Media

Chap 10

4

July 2

Guest Speaker: Scott Bradner (Harvard)

Netflix

(9
-
E23
-
8)
case analysis due (individual)

Online payment systems

Online
Security (part 1)

Chap 5

Wingfield
2

5

Jul y 7

PayPal

(Stanford)
case analysis due (group)

Online Security

(part 2)

Web 2.0

(JP)

Chap 11

6

July 9

Neopets

(802100)
case analysis due

(individual)
(JP)

Search Engine Optimization and E
-
Commerce Marketing
Communications

(JP)

Chap 7

7

July 14

Guest Speaker:
Dr. Eleanor Loiacono (WPI)

EBay

case analysis due
(group)

Loiacono
7

8

Jul y 16

Rhapsody

case analysis due

(individual)

Web Startup

F
ailures
assessment

group presentations


9

July 21

Amazon

case analysis due

(group)

Security (final segment)

Chap
5

10

July 23

Guest Speaker: Dr. John Halamka (Harvard)

B to B E
-
Commerce

Software in the “cloud”

Baxter

case analysis due

(individual)

Chap
12

Cummings
4

and

Kay
5

articles


11

July 28

i
-
Premiere

case analysis due

(group)

Crowdsourcing

The Long Tail

Marketing; marketing communications

Chap 6,
7

Elberse
3

Bonabeau
6


12

July 30

Threadless

case analysis due (individual)

Ethical, Social, Political Issues

Designing and b
uilding an e
-
commerce web site

Chap
4
, 8


Aug 4

Final

Presentations



Note: All case analyses are due by the minute class begins. For each 5 minutes or fraction thereof, 2
points are deducted until the score becomes zero (this occurs if you are
16

minutes late).





Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


8


Other Readings

1.

Galletta, Dennis “
Thinking Strategically about E
-
Commerce to Achieve Competitive Advantage,”
Keynote presentation
for

the 17
th

Conference on EDI and E
-
Commerce, Rachna, Poland, June
2009.

Available at
http://www.pitt.edu/~galletta/research/GallettaKeynote.pdf


2.

Wingfield, Nick “
Netflix Boss Plots Life
after

the DVD
,” Wall Street Journal, June 23, 2009, Vol.
253, No. 145, pp. A1
-
A12
. (See detailed handout for retrieving this article)

3.

E
lberse, Anita, “Should you Invest in the Long Tail?”
Harvard Business Review,

July
-
Aug 2008
.

(See detailed handout for retrieving this article)

4.

Cummings, Joanne, “How SOA could change the way you buy electricity,” Network World,
October 22, 2007. Available

at
http://www.networkworld.com/supp/2007/ndc6/102207
-
pnnl
-
ibm
-
soa
-
case
-
study.html


5.

Kay, Russell, “Quickstudy: Cloud Computing,” Computerworld, August 4, 2008. Available at
http://www.computerworl d.com/acti on/arti cl e.do?command=vi ewArt
i cl eBasi c&arti cl eId=321699


6.

Bonabue, Eric, “Decisions 2.0: The Power of Collective Intelligence,”
Sloan Management Review,
vol. 50, no. 2, pp. 45
-
52.

Library instructions will be provided

later
.

7.

Loiacono, Eleanor, “Web Accessibility and Corporate America,”

Communications of the ACM,
Vol. 47, no. 12, pp. 83
-
87.
(See detailed handout for retrieving this article)

Web Startup Failures Assessment

A web site named "Te
ch Crunch" has taken over from the book
F'd Companies

and has
fortunately done so without as much

profanity (except in the blog postings)
as in the infamous book.
See the site at
http://www.techcrunch.com/tag/deadpool/

. While profane, the book was a very
quick and often hilarious read. It is ama
zing to see where people invested millions of dollars,
especially in retrospect.

You can also use the book as a source if you’d like.

Your group’s assignment is to pick one of the firms and become an "expert" about it. You will
have time in class on
or aft
er
June 30 to make your choice. No two groups should pick the same
firm
. Please do not email your choices.

Try to be as complete as possible and check out some of the blog entries and articles written
about the firm. Then develop a 10
-
minute presentation a
bout it. About 6
-
7 slides might be ideal but
you are not held to a specific number. Make a presentation to the class that explains the following:


1.

Concept (company name, what they tried to provide) (any screenshots you can dig up of
logo/website/etc. would

be helpful)

2.

Business model (how they tried to make money)

3.

Why did it not work? Bring out issues such as financial, market, staffing, etc., as
comprehensively as you can.

4.

What are the changes (at minimum) that you believe would have been necessary to make
it
survive?

No paper
-
type (narrative) submissions are necessary; just submit the PowerPoint decks. Make it
fun!

Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


9


Case Questions

O
NLINE
G
ROCERIES

(
INDIVIDUAL
)
:

1.

Describe briefly
the extent to which
Freshdirect and Webvan each addressed
(or did not
address)
each of Porter’s
three generic c
ompetitive

strategies
. Use just a few points in bullet
form for each company and force, and while you do not need to use complete sentences, please
make sure there is enough there to make a clear point.

Here is an example on

a totally different
subject: while you could say “service” as a bullet, it is meaningless. It would be better to say
“great customer service,” and better yet to say “great customer service because of proprietary
technology.”

2.

Do the same for each of Porter
’s
five competitive forces.

(Note: in all future cases, when asked
about the five competitive forces, use Porter’s framework).

3.

Do the same for Piccoli, Feeny, and Ives’ sustainability barriers.

Note: in all future cases, when
asked about sustainability, always use
Piccoli et al.’s
framework.

4.

Comment in a paragraph about what you think of Freshdirect’s
chances for survival.


L
ANDS


E
ND

(
GROUP
)

Even if
each
group member
focuses on answering one pa
rticular
question, put it all together and submit
it as one document.


1.

How much do you think
custo
m
-
tailored clothing should cost?

a.

Before reading the case, d
etermine how much each of your fellow group members
would expect custom
-
tailored clothing to cost,
as a percent of the cost of mass
-
produced ready
-
to
-
wear clothing
. That is, summarize
how much more
each
would pay
for custom
-
tailored clothing.

b.

Try to find prices of custom
-
tailored and ready
-
to
-
wear suits in any community (for
example, by comparing price
s of a tailor and prices at a store such as Macy's).

c.

After reading the case,
the group should
estimate the impact of custom
-
tailoring on the
following cost factors: equipment, labor, inventory, shipping, and advertising.
How does
that group estimate compar
e to the average of the individual estimates above?

2.

Visit the web site for Lands' End's custom tailoring program. Provide three positive and three
negative impressions about how it works.

3.

Adopt the position that the Lands' End program has sustainable compe
titive a
dvantage.
Support that position.

4.

Adopt t
he position that the Lands' End’s advantage is not sustainable (
can be copied easily by a
competitor
)
. Support that position.

5.

What advice would you provide to Lands' End's management (a) in early 2001, (b) in

2002, and
(c) in 2003




Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


10


N
ETFLIX
(
INDIVIDUAL
)

1.

Evaluate the five competitive forces for Netflix as of now. What is particularly worrisome for
Netflix?

2.

The case describes competitive advantage enjoyed by Netflix. Is that advantage sustainable?

3.

What advice
would you give to the management of Netflix as of today? In your answer, briefly
assess the viability of this troubled industry segment as of right now. Support your opinions with
logic and statistics.


P
AYPAL

(G
ROUP
)

1.

In your group, derive a count of how m
any have used Paypal, with what frequency, and also
disclose the largest transaction of the entire group (to the extent the individuals are willing to
disclose).

2.

Review Paypal according

to the five competitive forces and the sustainability framework.

3.

The case provides a comparison of Paypal with a few competitors.
By now you might already
know that the competitors have virtually been wiped out. Review each competitor and describe
briefly
why

you think
they
might have

disappeared
.

4.

Visit Paypal's
“sucks”

site
(
http://www.paypalsucks.com/
) and
determine what you believe are
true issues that are of concern.

5.

Do some research using an on l
ine news service such as
news.com or
news.google.com
(
Google's news search).
Please
ignore
IPO
issues
and focus on their product/service strategies.
What are the most important stories and what are th
e implications for Paypal?


6.

What should Paypal do next
, at the time of the case?



N
EOPETS

(I
NDIVIDUAL
)

1.

As of mid
-
2001, do you consi
der Neopets to be a successful company? Why or why not? Please
be specific about measures you use for this assessment.

2.

Evaluate the strategy of NeoPets using the five competitive forces. How, if at all, would you
change its strategy?
If you would

keep the
same strategy, why?

3.

As a consultant to Dohring, what international expansion strategy would you recommend? What
markets would you target, in what sequence, and how would you organize to serve these
markets?


EB
AY

(G
ROUP
)

1.

As of the date of the case, how suc
cessful is eBay? How does its performance compare to that of
traditional retailers such as Wal
-
Mart and Internet retailers such as Amazon.com?

2.

What service does eBay provide? What is the role of customers in providing this service?

3.

In considering the prici
ng and the services offered,
is e
Bay

(a) too expensive,
or (b
)
too
inexpensive?

4.

H
ow
is
eBay's competitive advantage
sustained over other auctions?

5.

Going forward, should eBay be concerned with growing corporate involvement?

“Buy it Now”
items?


Final

as

of July 23
, 2009


11


R
HAPSODY
(I
NDIVIDUAL
)

1.

What are the barriers to mass
-
market acceptance of online subscription music services?

2.

What are key factors for
online subscription music
success? Is Rhapsody positioned for success?

3.

What should Real do to
expand the number of Rhapsody
subscribers?


A
MAZON

(
G
ROUP
)

1.

Visit the Amazon.com (www.amazon.com), Barnes & Noble.com (www.bn.com), Borders.com
(www.borders.com), Walmart.com (www.walmart.com) and Kmart (www.bluelight.com) web
sites. Compare the product/service offerings and online cust
omer experience available on each
site. What are the strengths/weaknesses of each site?

2.

Evaluate Amazon’s positioning with respect to the five competitive forces.

3.

Evaluate the sustainability of Amazon’s competitive advantage as of the date of the case
,
es
pecially in light of Bezos’ analysis of the myths.
That is, use those myths to inform your
analysis of sustainability.

4.

What were the key
challenges
for Amazon back then
?

5.

What are some new key challenges for Amazon (from case material, more recent developme
nts,
and your own knowledge and experience)?
Support your assertions as best you can.


B
AXTER

(I
NDIVIDUAL
)

1.

Think about the hospital supplies industry and AHSC in 1985. What factors made the ASAP
system successful?

2.

What
competitive
forces caused Baxter to
develop ASAP Express?


3.

Would you proceed with the ASAP Express implementation? If so, how? If not, why not?


I
P
REMIERE

(G
ROUP
)

1.

What errors did iPremiere make that led to its troubles?

2.

Provide arguments to support a decision to do nothing and continue bu
siness as usual.

3.

Outline two other possible courses of action, plus a third “do nothing” plan, and evaluate all
three using from the standpoint of stockholders (owners), stakeholders (anyone associated with
iPremiere) and society.

4.

What course of action
would you recommend? Develop a presentation that your group will
present in class to argue for your course of action.

Part of your grade will be determined by the
strength
and uniqueness
of your arguments and ability to withstand questioning from the rest
of the class.

Given that there will be 8 groups presenting, uniqueness will be difficult. Therefore,
pull original material in from other sources to support your arguments.


T
HREADLESS

(
I
NDIVIDUAL
)

1.

What motivates community members to participate? What is T
hreadless offering its community
members?

2.

What are the barriers to entry for this kind of business?

3.

In what other areas might this model work? How might you leverage or exploit this model for
innovation and product development in a business with which you

are or have been associated?