Documentation, Collection and Appraisal of Records

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University of Maryland

College of Information Studies


LBSC 785

Documentation, Collection and Appraisal of Records

Course Syllabus

Fall 2012


Bruce Ambacher

4117J
Hornbake

Tel: 301
-
405
-
2043

E
-
mail: bambache@umd.edu


Class: Tuesday, 12:30
-
3:15 pm, HBK
2119

Office Hours: Tuesday,
3:30
-
4:30 pm

and by appointment


Course Objectives

Students will understand the theory and practice surrounding the selection and appraisal
of records
(in all forms)

with enduring value. Arch
ival repositories can retain only a
small fraction of the available documentation. This makes appraisal a core function for
the profession. The decisions made determine what survives as society’s documentary
and cultural heritage. Through readings, lectur
e, discussion, and visits to archives,
students will understand how appraisal is carried out in different institutional contexts
and how archivists apply appraisal concepts to build collections in various formats.


Readings

The following books or manuals

are available from the University Book Center.
Members of the Society of American Archivists can order these books from SAA at the
member (discount) price.
Other required readings are available on
the class elms
blackboard site under Course Documents, as

e
-
reserve
, or through the McKeldin Library
reserve system
. Additional readings and other materials may be distributed during the
semester. Most of the reserve readings w
ill be available electronically through the course
elms blackboard site.



Boles, Fran
k.
Selecting and Appraising Archives and Manuscripts
, Chicago: SAA, 2005.


Cox, Richard J.
No Innocent Deposits: Forming Archives by Rethinking Appraisal.
Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2004



Course Structure

Each week the class will consist of lecture/discussion, led by the instructor or a guest
lecturer. There will be no formal student presentations on the readings, but students are
expected to have done the reading and to participate in the discussions in cl
ass or on

elms (blackboard)
. In addition, there will be visits to area repositories, all scheduled
during class time



Course Requirements


1.
Class Participation (
1
0%):


Students are expected to attend class, having

read the assigned readings and
par
ticipate in the discussions. Student presence and punctuality are also expected
at the off campus repository visits, out of respect for our hosts.


2.
Appraisal Project

(30%)


:
Students will conduct an appraisal project on
the
. Specific details on that
assignment will be provided on September

11
.
Due: October
9


3.
Acquisition Policy Report

(30%)


Each student will select a repository and evaluate its acquisition and/or appraisal
policies. While it is probably simpler to select a local repository

from

the
list of
Cooperating Archives Practicum Institutions at
http://www.ischool.umd.edu/pdf/programs/fieldstudy.pdf
, any archive
s

(except
those covered by guest lectures in class

and/or class site visits
) is acceptable. As
usual, it is best to avoid one’s p
lace of
previous or current
employment.
The
report should be

5
-
7 page
s
, double
-
spaced
, and

should:


a. Describe the institution’s
collecting
policy (or practice if it lacks a formal
policy).

b. Place the collecting policy within the context of the instit
ution.

c. Evaluate the institution’s policy/practice based on appropriate archival and
records management standards.

d. Examine a sample of the institution’s collection and series descriptions and
determine if they conform with the stated collection poli
cy or practice.

e
. Refer
ence

the literature on collecting policies as appropriate.

f
. Propose ways that the policy and practice could be strengthened.

g
. Propose ways t
hat the “success” of the policy
and practice could be
measured or evaluated.
Du
e: Nov
e
mber 6
.


4.
Research Report

(30%)


Each student will write a research paper of 10
-
15
pages,
double
-
spaced
,

on a topic
of his/her choosing. Since students are already conducting analyses of
the
acquisition and appraisal policies of
specific
repositories, this paper should focus
on a specific archival topic, type of material, or theme in the archival literature,

relating to the documentation, selection, or appraisal of records,

rather than a
specific repository. Repository examples can, howeve
r, be used to illustrate points
in the paper, which should also utilize archival literature beyond what we read in
class.
Topic Abstract due
(via email)
by Octobe
r 2
.
Paper D
ue: December 11





Grade

The course grade will be assigned in accordance with University and
iSchool

guidelines:

A=Outstanding; B=Satisfactory; C=Barely Adequate; D/F=Failure; I=Incomplete. The
grade will be computed as follows: Class participation=20%; Appraisal project=25%;
Rep
ository report=25%; Research paper=30%.


Requirements for Written Work

Quality of Writing

Excellent written communication skills are essential to the provision of information in
professional contexts. Written work will therefore be graded on the quality
of writing as
well as on the content and evidence of critical analysis. Grades for work that is not well
written, clearly organized, and grammatically correct will be reduced accordingly.

Formatting:


Double space, in Times New Roman 12 point type with on
e inch margins


Include a list of sources consulted


Cite sources, both in the text or as footnotes/endnotes, and in the list of sources
consulted in conformity with the most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style, or
the Publication Manual of the A
merican Psychological Association. Be sure to include
page numbers for all citations.

Number the pages and staple the pages together. Do not place in a folder or
binder

Classroom Environment
: The classroom environment should be professional and
respectf
ul. Punctual arrival for class, especially when we visit other sites or have a guest
lecturer, contributes to the smooth operation of the class and the quality of the learning
experience. Late arrivals, early departures, and unavoidable breaks are disrup
tive and
distracting. If you know you be late or have to leave early, please let the instructor know
in advance. Please turn off or mute all cell phones and other communication devices
during each class. You also should limit computer usage to course
-
re
lated work (i.e.
taking notes).

Academic Integrity
:
The University of Maryland, College Park has a nationally
recognized Code of Academic Integrity, administered by the Student Honor Council.
This Code sets standards for academic integrity at Maryland for

all undergraduate and
graduate students. As a student you are responsible for upholding these standards for this
course. It is very important for you to be aware of the consequences of cheating,
fabrication, facilitation, and plagiarism. For more informat
ion on the Code of Academic
Integrity or the Student Honor Council, pleas
e visit http://www.shc.umd.edu.

The Code of Academic Integrity strictly prohibits students from cheating on exams,
plagiarizing, submitting the same paper for credit in two courses wi
thout authorization,
buying papers, submitting fraudulent documents, and forging signatures. Plagiarism is of
particular concern in the networked digital environment. Students must write their own
essays and assignments in their own words. Whenever stud
ents take an idea or a passage
of text from another author, they must acknowledge their debt both by using quotation
marks where appropriate and by proper referencing using footnotes or in
-
text citations.

Instances of any suspected academic dishonesty will

be reported and handled according
to University policy and procedures. For a more detailed description of the University’s
definition of academic dishonesty, visit http://faculty.umd.edu/teach/integrity.html.

To further exhibit your commitment to academi
c integrity, remember to
include and sign

the Honor Pledge on all examinations and assignments: "I pledge on my honor that I have
not given or received any unauthorized assistance on
this examination (assignment).”

Website:
shc.umd.edu

This course follows all University policies and procedures, including adherence to the
Honor Code, accommodation for students with disabilities, and consideration for
religious holidays.


CourseEvalUM Fall 2012



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LBSC 785 Fall

2012

Schedule





4 Sept

Introduction to Course/Introduction to Basic Appraisal
Concepts


11 Sept

Historical Development of Appraisal Theory

Vin Novara

Introduction to
appraisal project.

18 Sept

Appraisal Methods and Practices I: Records
Management/Functional Analysis


25 Sept

Appraisal Methods and Practices II: Collection Development
and Collecting Policies



2 Oct

Appraisal Methods & Practices III: Documentation Strategies
and other Cooperative Approaches

Research Paper
Abstract due


9 Oct

Appraisal Methods & Practices IV: Sampling, “Black Box,”
and Case Files

Appraisal project
report due

16 Oct

Appr
aisal Contexts I:
Records of Science and Technology

Host: Joe Anderson

Class at AIP

23 Oct

Appraisal Contexts


I
I: College and
University Archives

Guest: Anne Turkos


30 Oct

Appraisal Contexts III: Government Archives

Host: Karen Paul

Class at U.S. Senate
Historical Office


6 Nov

Appraisal Contexts IV: Records of Business

Acquisition Policy

Report due

13 Nov

Special Formats I:

Non
-
print media

Guest: Chuck Howell


20 Nov

Special Formats II: Electronic Records

Guest: Mark Conrad


27 Nov

Special Formats III:
Websites



4 Dec

Social Context, Activism, the Post
-
Custodial Era, and
Postmodernism


11 Dec

Reappraisal,
Deaccessioning, and Ethics

Research Paper due







Schedule of Classes, Readings and Topics


4 September

Unit 1: Introduction to Course/Introduction to Basic Appraisal Concepts

Readings:

Boles, Frank.
Selecting and Appraising Archives and Manuscripts
, Chicago: SAA, 2005,
Chapters 1
-
3, pp. 1
-
73.


Cox, Richard J.
No Innocent Deposits: Forming Archives by Rethinking Appraisal
,
Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2004, Chapters 1
-
2, pp.1
-
46.



11
September

Unit 2:
Historical Development of Appraisal Theory

I
nt
roduction to appraisal project.


Vin Novara

Readings:

Schellenberg, T.R. “The Appraisal of Modern Public Records,”
Available at:

http://www.arch
ives.gov/research/alic/reference/archives
-
resources/appraisal
-
of
-
records.html

or (Course Documents).


Jenkinson, Hilary.
A Manual of Archival Administration
, London: Percy Lund,
Humphries & Co., 1966, pp. 1
-
16, 136
-
155.
(e
-
reserve)


Duranti, Luciana. “The
Concept of Appraisal and Archival Theory,”
American Archivist
57

(Spring 1994): 328
-
344.

Available at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/pu548273j5j1p816/fulltext.
pdf


Boles, Frank and Mark A. Greene. “Et Tu Schellenberg? Thoughts on the Dagger of
American Appraisal Theory,”
American Archivist
59

(Summer 1996): 298
-
310.

Available
at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/k3x81g0852825l31/fulltext.pdf




18
September

Unit 3: Appr
aisal Methods and Practices I:
Records Management/Functional
Analysis

Readings:

Cox, Richard J.
No Innocent Deposits
, Chapter 4, 6, pp. 87
-
113, 147
-
163.


Robinson, Catherine, “Records Control and Disposal Using Functional Analysis,”
Archives and Manuscripts
25

(November 1997): 288
-
303.

Available at
:

http://www.records.nsw.gov.au/recordkeeping/keyword
-
products/records
-
control
-
and
-
disposal
-
using
-
functional/


Cook, Terry. “Macro
-
appraisal and Functional Analysis: Documenting Governance
Rather than Government,”
Journal of the

Society of Archivists
, 25

(2004): 5
-
18.
(e
-
reserve)


Roberts, John. “One Size Fits All? The Portability of Macro
-
Appraisal by a Comparative
Analysis of Canada, South Africa, and New Zealand,”
Archivaria
52

(Fall 2001): 47
-
68.

Available at:
http://journals.sfu.ca/archivar/index.php/archivaria/article/view/12814/14021


Marcus C. Robyn
s

and
Jason Woolman
,

Institutional Functional Analysis at
Northern
Michigan University: A New Process of Appraisal and Arrangement of Archival
Records
,


American Archivist
, 74:1 (Spring/Summer 2011) p. 241
-
256.

(e
-
reserve)


Juan Ilerbai
g
,

Specimens as Records: Scientific Practice and Recordkeeping in Natural
History Research
,


American Archivist
, 73:2 (Fall
/Winter 2010) p. 4
63
-
482 (e
-
reserve).



25 September

Unit 4:
Appr
aisal Methods and Practices II:
Collection Development and Collecting
Policies

Readings:

Endelman, Judith E. “Looking Backward to Plan for the Future: Collection Analysis for
Manuscript Repositories,”
Ameri
can Archivist
50

(Summer 1987): 340
-
355.
Available at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/m24760mh124r6u3w/fulltext.pdf


Ericson, Timothy L. “At the ‘Rim of Creative Dissatisfaction’: Archivists and
Acquisition Development,”
Archivaria
33

(Winter 1991
-
1992): 66
-
77.

Available at:
ht
tp://journals.sfu.ca/archivar/index.php/archivaria/article/view/11799/12750


Max, D.T. “Final Destination,”
The New Yorker
,
June 11 & 18, 2007, pp. 54
-
71,
available at:
http://
www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/06/11/070611fa_fact_max


Boles, Frank.
Selecting and Appraising Archives and Manuscripts
, Chapter 5, pp. 97
-
120.


Cox, Richard J.
No Innocent Deposits
, Chapter 5, pp. 115
-
145.


Faundeen
, John L., “Appraising U.S. Geological Survey Science Records,”
Archival
Issues
, 32:1 (2010): 7
-
22, available at:
http://vnweb.hwwilsonweb.com.proxy
-
um.researchport.umd.edu/hww/results/external_link_maincontentframe.jhtml?_DARGS=
/hww/results/results_common.jhtml.44

(use research port) or Course Documents.


Sullivan, Tim. “An Artifact or a Pay
day?” New York Times, July 21, 2012. Available at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/22/sports/baseball/donors
-
seeking
-
to
-
mone
tize
-
memorabilia
-
put
-
museums
-
on
-
guard.html
?_r=2&pagewanted=all



2 October

Unit 5
: Appraisal Methods & Practices III: Documentation Strategies and other
Cooperative Approaches

[Paper topic
abstract
due

by e
-
mail

Readings:

Hackman
, Larry J. “The Documentation Strategy Process: A Model,”
American Archivist
50

(Winter 1987): 12
-
29.
Available at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/uxr67661210337
66/fulltext.pdf


Ericson, Timothy L. “’To Approximate June Pasture’: The Documentation Strategy in the
Real World,”
Archival Issues
22

(1997): 5
-
20.
(e
-
reserve)


Marshall, Jennifer A. “Documentation Strategies in the Twenty
-
First Century?:
Rethinking Insti
tutional Priorities and Professional Limitations,”
Archival Issues
23

(1998): 59
-
74.
(e
-
reserve)


Johnson, Elizabeth S. “Our Archives, Our Selves: Documentation Strategy and the Re
-
Appraisal of Professional Identity,”
American Archivist

71:1 (Spring/Summer 2008) 190
-
202. (Course Documents) Available at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/81386n13w71j15v3/fulltext.pdf


Malkmus, Doris J., “Document
ation Strategy: Mastodon or Retro
-
Success?”
American
Archivis
t, 71:2 (Fall/Winter 2008): 384
-
409. (Course Documents) Available at:

https://archi
vists.metapress.com/content/v63t471576057107/resource
-
secured/?target=fulltext.pdf


Hackman, Larry. “The Origins of Documentation Strategies in Context: Recollections
and Reflections,”
American Archivist

72:2 (Fall/Winter 2009) 436
-
459.
(e
-
reserve)

Availab
le for current SAA members at
https://archivists.metapress.com/content/g401052h82h12pm3/resource
-
secured/?target=fulltext.pdf




9 October

Unit

6: Appraisal Methods & Practices
IV: Sampling, “Black Box,”

and Case Files

Readings:

Cook, Terry. “’Many are Called, but Few are Chosen’: Appraisal Guidelines for
Sampling and Selecting Case Files,”
Archivaria
32

(Summer 1991): 25
-
50.
Available at:
http://journals.sfu.ca/archivar/index.php/archivaria/article/view/11759/12709


Klaassen
, David. “The Provenance of Social Work Case Records: Implications for
Archival Appraisal and Access,”
Provenance
1

(Spring 1983): 5
-
30.
(e
-
reserve)


Boles, Frank.
Selecting and Appraising Archives and Manuscripts
, Chapter 4 and
Appendix 2, pp. 75
-
96 and 1
49
-
157.


James Gregory Bradsher and Bruce I. Ambacher
,
Archival Sampling: A Method of
Appraisal
, MARAC Technical

Leaflet No. 8, 1992
. (Course
Documents
)



16
October

Unit 7:
Appraisal Contexts II: Records of Science and Technology

Visit to American Institute of Physics

Host: Joe Anderson

Readings:

R. Joseph Anderson and Orville R. Butler, M.Juris, Ph.D.
,
History of Physicists in
Industry Final Report
,
September 2008
. (Course Documents)


Hotz, Robert Lee
. “
A Data Deluge Swamps Scie
nce Historians
:

As Paper Trails Fade,
Digital Material Grows in Size and Complexity; How to Decipher Those 80
-
Column
Punch Cards
,”
Wall Street Journal
, August 28, 2009. (Course Documents)



2
3

October

Unit 8
: Appraisal Contexts I: College and University Archives

Guest lecturer: Anne Turkos, University Archivist, University of Maryland

[Appraisal assignment due
]

Readings:

Boles, Frank and Young, Julia Marks.

“Exploring the Black Box: The Appraisal of
University Administrative Records,”
American Archivist
48

(Spring 1985): 121
-
140.

Available at:
http://archivists.metapress.co
m/content/1414g624328868vw/fulltext.pdf


Sarah Buchanan, Sarah and Richardson, Katie. “Representation through Documentation:
Acquiring Student and Campus Life Records through the Bruin Archives
Project.”
American Ar
chivist
,
Vol
.

75, 1 (Spring/Summer 2012): 205
-
224.
(e
-
reserves)
Available

for SAA members
at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/e61061ul8701076u/fulltext.pdf



30 October

Unit
9: Appraisal Contexts III:
Government Archives

Visit to U.S. Senate Historical Office


Site visit in
Hart

Senate Office Building

Host: Karen

Paul, Senate Historical Office

Readings:

Vogt
,
Sheryl B.“Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and
Studies: An
Evolutionary Mode;.
In
Karen D
awley Paul , Glenn R Gray , and
L. Rebecca Johnson
Melvin

(ed.) ,
An American Political Archives Reader
, S
carecrow Press, 2009. (e
-
reserves)

or Course Documents.

.

Butler , Elizabeth and Karen Paul, “
Electronic Record Systems on Capitol Hill: Finding
and
Obtaining

What You Want to Collect
.”
In
Karen D
awley Paul , Glenn R Gray , and
L. Rebecca Johnson Melvin

(ed.) ,
An American Political Archives Reader
, Scarecrow
Press, 2009. (e
-
reserves)

or Course Doc
uments.


Aronsson, Patricia. “Appraisal of Twentieth
-
Century Congressional Collections,” in
Archival Choices: Managing the Historical Record in an Age of Abundance
, Nancy E.
Peace, ed., Heath

&

Co., 1984, Chapter 4, pp. 81
-
104.
(e
-
reserve)


Brown, Lauren R. “Present at the Tenth Hour: Appraising and Accessioning the Papers of
Congresswoman Marjorie S. Holt,”
Rare Books and Manuscripts Librarianship
(1987
):
95
-
102.
(e
-
reserve)




6

November

Unit 10: Appraisal Contexts IV:
Records of Business

Readings:

2012:
[Institutional report due]

Lutzker, Michael A. “Max Weber and the Analysis of Modern Bureaucratic
Organization: Notes Toward a Theory of Appraisal,”
American Archivist
45

(Spring
1982): 119
-
130.
Available at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/n05v8735408776qh/fulltext.pdf


Yates, JoAnne. “Internal Communication Systems in American Business Structures: A
Framework to Aid Appraisal,”
American Archivist

48

(Spring 1985): 141
-
158.
Available
at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/h45p4g1416243154/fulltext.pdf


Bruemmer, Bruce. “Avoiding Accidents of Evidence: Functio
nal Analysis in the
Appraisal of Business Records,” in
The Records of American Business
, James O’Toole,
ed., Chicago: SAA, 1997, Chapter 6, pp. 137
-
160.

(e
-
reserve)


Greene, Mark A. and Daniels
-
Howell, Todd J. “Documentation with an Attitude: A
Pragmatist
’s Guide to the Selection and Acquisition of Modern Business Records,” in
The Records of American Business
, Chapter 7, pp. 161
-
229.
(e
-
reserve)



1
3
November

Unit 11: Special Formats
I: Non
-
print media

Guest lecturer:
Chuck Howell
, National Public Broadcasting Archives

Readings:

Connors, Thomas. “Appraising Public Television Programs: Toward an Interpretive and
Comparative Evaluation Model,”
American Archivist
63

(Spring/Summer 2000): 152
-
174.

Available at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/242683617n40849g/fulltext.pdf


Ide, Mary and Weisse, Leah. “Developing Appraisal Criteria for a Public Broadcasting
Station,”
Moving Image
3

(Spring 20
03): 146
-
157.
(e
-
reserve)


Ritzenthaler, Mary Lynn and Diane Vogt
-
O’Connor.
Photographs: Archival Care and
Management,
(Chicago:SAA, 2006), Chapter 4, pp. 78
-
133.
(e
-
reserve)


Boles, Frank.
Selecting and Appraising Archives and Manuscripts
, Chapter 6, pp. 121
-
135.


2
0
November

Unit 12
: Special Formats II: Electronic Records

Guest lecturer
: Mark Conr
ad,
Center for Advanced Systems and Technologies,
NARA

Readings:

Cook, Terry. “Electronic Records, Paper Minds: The Revolution in Information
Management and Archives in the Post
-
Custodial and Post
-
Modernist Era,”
Archives and
Manuscripts
22

(November 1994): 300
-
329.
(e
-
reserve)


Davis, Lidija “
Who will Preserve Your Dig
ital Data?

December 13, 2008

(Course
D
ocuments).


Fowler, Geoffrey A. “
Buyer's E
-
Morse: 'Owning' Digital Books
Purchasing Electronic
Tomes Online Gives Readers Fewer Legal Rights to Share and Resell Than Hard
-
Copy
Customers Enjoy
.”
Wall Street Journal
, Ju
ly 23, 2009
. (Course Documents)



Paquet, Lucie. “Appraisal, Acquisition and Control of Personal Electronic Records: From
Myth to Reality,”
Archives and Manuscripts
28

(November 2000): 71
-
91.
(e
-
reserve)


The National Archives (UK
), Appraisal Policy, Version 1, August 2004. Available at:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/appraisal_policy.pdf



2
7

November

Unit 13:
Special Formats II: Elect
ronic Records
Websites

Readings

W
W
illiam G. LeFurgy
, “
Records and Archival Management of World Wide Web Sites,”

Government Record News
,

the newsletter of the Government Records Section of the
Society of American Archivists, 2000
-
2001, Issue 2, April 2001. Available at:
http://www.mybestdocs.com/lefurgy
-
w
-
grn0104.htm

Gordon Paynter
,
Susanna Joe
,
Vanita Lala
,
Gillian Lee
, “
A Year of Selective Web
Archiving with the Web Curator at the National Library of New Zealand,”
D
-
Lib
Magazine

May/June 2008, (Volume 14 Number 5/6). Available at:
http://www.dlib.org/dlib/may08/paynter/05paynter.html


Prom, Christopher J. and Ellen Swain. “From the College Democrats to the Fa
lling Illini:
Identifying, Appraising, and Capturing Student Organization Websites,”
American
Archivist

70:2 (Fall/Winter 2007): 344
-
363. Available at:
http://archivists
.metapress.com/content/c8121767x9075210/fulltext.pdf


NARA
,

Guidance on Managing Web Records
,

January 2005
. Available at:

http://www.archives.gov/records
-
mgmt/policy/ma
naging
-
web
-
records.html

Mike Ashenfelder
. “
The First Decade of Web Archiving at the Library of Congress
,


The
Signal: Digital Preservation

(Course
Documents).



4

December

Unit 14:
Social Context, Activism, the Post
-
Custodial Era, and Postmodernism

Readings:

Brown, Richard Harvey and Davis
-
Brown, Beth.

“The Making of Memory: the Politics
of Archives, Libraries and Museums in the Construction of National Consciousness,”
History of the Human Sciences
, 11
(1998): 17
-
32.
(e
-
reserve)


Cox, Richard J.
No Innocent Deposits
, Chapter 9, pp. 231
-
258.


Nesmith, T
om. “Seeing Archives: Postmodernism and the Changing Intellectual Place of
Archives,”
American Archivist
65
:1
(Spring/Summer 2002): 24
-
41.
Available at:
http://archivists
.metapress.com/content/rr48450509r0712u/fulltext.pdf


Schwartz, Joan M. and Cook, Terry. “Archives, Records, and Power: The Making of
Modern Memory,”
Archival Science
2

(2002): 1
-
19.
(e
-
reserve)


Wexler, Geoff and Long, Linda, “Lifetimes and Legacies: Mortality, Immortality, and the
Needs of Aging and Dying Donors,”
American Archivist
, 72:2 (Fall/Winter 2009): 478
-
493. (e
-
reserves). Available at SAA website for current members.


1
1

December

Unit
15:
Reappraisal, Deaccessioning, and Ethics

[
Research
Paper due]

Readings:

Rapport, Leonard. “No Grandfather Clause: Reappraising Accessioned Records,”
American Archivist
, 44

(Spring 1981): 143
-
150;
Available at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/b274w3126t430h52/fulltext.pdf


Benedict, Karen. “Invitation to a Bonfire: Reappraisal and Deaccessioning of Records as
Collection Management Tools in an Archives


A Reply

to Leonard Rapport,”
American
Archivist,
47

(Winter 1984): 43
-
49.
Available at:
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/gt26318774q20241/fulltext.pdf


Cox, Richard P.
No

Innocent Deposits
, Chapter 10, pp. 259
-
293.


Greene, Mark, “I’ve Deaccessioned and Lived to Tell about it: Confessions of an
Unrepentant reappraiser,”
Archival Issues
, 30:1 (2006), p.7
-
22.


Laura Uglean Jackson

and
D. Claudia Thompson
, “
But You Promised: A Case Study of
Deaccessioning at the American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming
,”
American Archivist

73:2 (Fall/Winter 2010), p. 669
-
685.

(e
-
reserve)


American Heritage Center, “
Deaccessioning Notice
.” (Course Documents)


SAA Code of Ethics. Available at:
http://www.archivists.org/governance/handbook/app_ethics.asp


Examine: Gu
ideline for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning, SAA Standards Portal


Look at: Protocols for Native American Materials.

http://www2.nau.edu/libnap
-
p/protocols.html