English IV ADV Research Project - Writing the Outline

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English IV

Research Project:

Writing the Rough Draft

Greene ‘11
-
’12

OUTLINE


To
outline
is to organize a set of facts or ideas
by listing main points and subpoints. A good
outline shows at a glance how topics or ideas
fit together or relate to one another.


You will need to organize your note cards into
their most logical order and use them to
construct a working outline.

Topic Outline



In a topic outline, each new idea is stated as a
word or phrase rather than a complete
sentence.

I.
The technology of genetic engineering


A
. Gene manipulation


B.

Gene copying and transferring


C.
Gene recombining and cloning

II.

The uses of genetic engineering


A.
Unpredictable in past


B.
More predictable now


C.
More potential in future

III.
The fears about genetic engineering


A.

Release of dangerous organisms


B.

Lack of trust in scientists

Outlining Guidelines


Choose one of the two types of outlines and
follow it consistently.
You cannot mix the two
types together!!


Topic outlines must remain parallel.


Follow proper numbering



I. A. 1. a. i. (1) (a) (i) etc.



You must have at least two points per level.


If you have I, you must have II. If you have an A,
you must have a B. If you have a 1, you must have
a 2, etc.

Your Organization

I.
Author and Time Period


A.
Historical Period




B.
Author Bio Info & Influences


C.

Overall Style



D.

Overall Themes



Transition to Poem Analysis

II.
Title, speaker, setting

III.
Paraphrase

IV.
Theme

V.
Figures of Speech/Figurative Language

VI.
Form and Meter

VII.
Diction and Tone


In the first draft,
you must quote the
poem
OFTEN

and
explain

(develop) why
you quoted it.


You should include
a variety of notes
(documented) in
each

section.


You must use notes from a variety of
sources or else you have a book report.


First Draft

4 Types of Sentences in a Research Paper


Structural



topic sentences


These sentences give your paragraphs direction.


Notes



from your note cards


must include
citation


These are paraphrases of information from your
sources that support your sections.

4 Types of Sentences in a Research Paper


Quotes from primary source
(the poem)


These quotes from your poem support what
critics

or
you

say about your poem by providing
the
exact

line/s from which you make your claim.




4 Types of Sentences in a Research Paper


Development


Your

ideas and interpretations
from the notes


the information from your
poem analysis that was
truly yours

before
research.


These sentences are what you think about the
poem


the claims
you

make based on
your

reading of the poem.


Organization

INTRODUCTION


Introduce the time period. Then discuss what
influenced him and his overall style and
themes.


Use
parenthetically documented

notes

You
can write developing sentences and then go
back and insert notes, OR record notes and
then develop those notes, OR do both at the
same time.


INTRODUCTION

The following information in your outline will translate
into paragraphs in your paper.

Points A
-
D should be developed into separate
paragraphs. The introduction will consist of 4
paragraphs.


I.

Author and time period


A.

Historical Time Period
(5 characteristics about time period/
3 important historical events)


B.

Author Info & Influences


C.

Author’s Style


D.
Author’s Themes


TRANSITION to Poem Analysis


Introduce your poem while connecting it back
to your introduction.


Written around 1859, “Success is Counted
Sweetest” epitomizes Dickinson’s style of
writing with strong images and metaphors
and creating speakers who remain in states of
want.


POEM ANALYSIS

II
.
Title, Speaker, Setting


The information in this portion of your outline
will correlate to 1
-
3 paragraphs in your paper.


You need to include notes, quotes from your
poem, and your own development.

POEM ANALYSIS

III. Paraphrase



The information in this section of your outline,
including the paraphrase of your poem and
discussion of the poem’s main idea, will
correlate to 1
-
3 paragraphs in your paper.


You need to include notes, quotes from your
poem, and your own development.


POEM ANALYSIS

IV. Theme


The information in this section of your outline,
will correlate to 1
-
3 paragraphs in your paper.


You need to include notes, quotes from your
poem, and your own development.

POEM ANALYSIS

V.

Figures of Speech



The information in this section of your outline,
will correlate to 2
-
5 paragraphs in your paper.


You need to include notes, quotes from your
poem, and your own development.

POEM ANALYSIS

VI.

Form

and

Meter


The information in this section of your outline
will correlate to 1
-
3 paragraphs in your paper.


You need to include notes, quotes from your
poem, and your own development.

POEM ANALYSIS

VII. Diction and Tone


The information in this section of your outline
will correlate to 1
-
3 paragraphs in your paper.


You need to include notes, quotes from your
poem, and your own development.

Sample Paragraphs

Incorporating quotations


Incorporating quotations


Incorporating quotations


Incorporating quotations


PAPER FORMAT

Information on the following slides was taken from The Owl at Purdue


http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/


Documentation

Style


MLA
: Modern Language Association


Used in literature, arts, humanities


APA
: American Psychological Association


Used in psychology, education, other social
sciences


AMA
: American Medical Association


Used in medicine, health, and biological sciences


General Guidelines


Type your paper on a computer and print it out on standard, white 8.5 x 11
-
inch paper.


Double
-
space

the text of your paper, and
use a legible font (e.g. Times New Roman).
Whatever font you choose, MLA recommends that the regular and italics type styles
contrast enough that they are recognizable one from another. The font size should be
12 pt.


Leave only one space after periods or other punctuation marks (unless otherwise
instructed by your instructor).


Set the
margins

of your document to
1 inch on all sides
.


Indent the first line of paragraphs one half
-
inch
from the left margin. MLA
recommends that you use the
Tab key
as opposed to pushing the Space Bar five times.


Create
a header that numbers all pages consecutively in the upper right
-
hand corner
,
one
-
half inch from the top and flush with the right margin. (Note: Your instructor may
ask that you omit the number on your first page. Always follow your instructor's
guidelines.)


Use italics
throughout your essay for
the titles of longer works
and, only when
absolutely necessary, providing emphasis.




Formatting the First Page


In the
upper left
-
hand corner
of the first page, list
your name, your instructor's name
,
the
course
, and the
date
. Again, be sure to use double
-
spaced text.


Example: Jo Jones, Ms. Greene, English IV ADV, 5 January 2010


Double space again and
center the title
. Do not underline, italicize, or place your title in
quotation marks; write the title in Title Case (standard capitalization), not in all capital
letters.


Use quotation marks and/or italics when referring to other works in your title, just as
you would in your text:
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

as Morality Play; Human
Weariness in "After Apple Picking"


Double space between the title and the first line of the text.


Create a
header

in the
upper right
-
hand corner
that
includes your last name
, followed
by a
space

with
a page number
; number all pages consecutively with Arabic numerals
(1, 2, 3, 4, etc.), one
-
half inch from the top and flush with the right margin. (Note: Your
instructor or other readers may ask that you omit last name/page number header on
your first page. Always follow instructor guidelines.)


To insert a consecutive page number


either double click over header space to activate
header and then choose to insert a page number (Word 2007) OR Click View and choose
Header/ Footer and then Insert, Page number.


If you manually type in a number 1, a number 1 will appear on every page of your paper.


Works Cited
: General Guidelines


Begin your Works Cited page on a separate page at the end of your
research paper. It should have the same
one
-
inch margins and last
name, page number header as the rest of your paper
.


Label the page
Works Cited
(do
not

italicize

the words Works Cited
or

put them in
quotation

marks or type e them larger than 12 pt
font
) and
center

the words Works Cited at the
top

of the page.


Double

space

all citations, but
do

not

skip

spaces

between

entries.


Indent

the
second

and
subsequent

lines

of citations five spaces so
that you create a hanging indent.


List page numbers of sources efficiently, when needed. If you refer
to a journal article that appeared on pages 225 through 250, list the
page numbers on your Works Cited page as 225
-
50.


Works Cited:
Capitalization and
Punctuation


Capitalize

each

word

in the
titles

of
articles
,
books
,
etc, but do not capitalize articles, short prepositions,
or conjunctions unless one is the first word of the
title or subtitle:
Gone with the Wind, The Art of War,
There Is Nothing Left to Lose
.


Use
italics

(instead of underlining) for titles of larger
works (
books
,
magazines
) and
quotation

marks

for
titles of shorter works (
poems
,
articles
)


Works Cited:
Listing Author Names


Entries are listed by author name (or, for entire edited collections,
editor names). Author names are written last name first; middle
names or middle initials follow the first name:


Burke, Kenneth



Levy, David M.



Wallace, David Foster


Do not

list titles (Dr., Sir, Saint, etc.) or degrees (PhD, MA, DDS, etc.)
with names. A book listing an author named "John Bigbrain, PhD"
appears simply as "Bigbrain, John"; do, however, include suffixes
like "Jr." or "II." Putting it all together, a work by Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. would be cited as "King, Martin Luther, Jr.," with the suffix
following the first or middle name and a comma.


Works Cited:
More than One Work
by an Author


If you have cited more than one work by a particular author,
order the entries alphabetically by title, and use three
hyphens in place of the author's name for every entry after
the first:

Burke, Kenneth. A Grammar of Motives. [...]

---
. A Rhetoric of Motives. [...]


Works Cited:
Work with No Known
Author


Alphabetize

works

with

no

known

author

by

their

title
; use a
shortened version of the title in the parenthetical citations in
your paper. In this case, “Boring Postcards USA” has no
known author:

Baudrillard, Jean. Simulacra and Simulations. [...]


“Boring Postcards USA.” [...]

Burke, Kenneth. A Rhetoric of Motives. [...]



If you want another example of proper format,
Write for College,
pp. 363


371, provides a
sample research paper. The sample in this
book also includes format for a title page and
outline.

For the outline (p.363), you do NOT need to
include the “Introduction” or “Conclusion”
portions.

CITATION

CITATION:
Single Work from an Anthology
(with an author)


Works Cited:

Green, Mark. “The Pro
-
PAC Backlash: When Money Talks, Is it
Democracy?”
Points of View
. Ed. Robert E. Diclerico and
Allan S. Hammock. 3
rd

ed. New York: Random House, 1986.
154
-
55. Print.


In
-
text Parenthetical Citation:


He became the only poet to use metaphor in contrast to
simile
(Green 154).


Green describes his style as “reflective of the metaphysical
poets who developed conceits”
(154).


If you include the author’s name/s in the sentence introducing
the quote or paraphrase, you do not need to put it in
parenthetical citation as well.


CITATION:
Single Work from an Anthology
(without an author)


Works Cited:

“The Pro
-
PAC Backlash: When Money Talks, Is it Democracy?”
Points of View
. Ed. Robert E. Diclerico and Allan S.
Hammock. 3
rd

ed. New York: Random House, 1986. 154
-
55.
Print.


In
-
text Parenthetical Citation:


He became the only poet to use metaphor in contrast to
simile
(“The Pro
-
PAC Backlash” 154).


His style is “reflective of the metaphysical poets who
developed conceits”
(“The Pro
-
PAC Backlash” 154).


If an article title is very long, you only need to include enough
of it to differentiate it from your other articles.

CITATION:
Book with One Author


Works Cited:

Dickens, Charles
.
Hard Times
.
Mineola
,
NY
:
Dover Publications Inc
.,
2001
.

Print.


In
-
Text Parenthetical Citation


He became the only poet to use metaphor in
contrast to simile
(Dickens 34).



His style is “reflective of the metaphysical
poets who developed conceits”
(Dickens 34).


CITATION:
Book with Two or Three Authors

Works Cited:

McKenna
,

Michael C
.,

and Richard D. Robinson
.

Teaching through Text: Reading and Writing in
Content Areas
.

Boston
:

Allyn & Bacon
,
2002
.
Print.

In
-
text Parenthetical Citation


He became the only poet to use metaphor in
contrast to simile

(McKenna and Robinson 45).


His style is “reflective of the metaphysical poets
who developed conceits”
(McKenna and
Robinson 45).


CITATION:
Book with More than Three Authors

Works Cited:

Orlich
,

Donald C
.,

et al.

Teaching Strategies
.

New York
:

Houghton Mifflin Co
.,

2007
.
Print.

In
-
Text Parenthetical Citation:


He became the only poet to use metaphor in
contrast to simile
(Orlich et al. 66).


His style is “reflective of the metaphysical
poets who developed conceits”
(Orlich et al.
66).


CITATION:
Book with an Editor

Works Cited:

Lopate
,

Philip
, ed.

The Art of the Personal Essay: an
Anthology from the Classical Era to the

Present
.

New York: Doubleday
,

1994
.
Print.

In
-
text Parenthetical Citation:


He became the only poet to use metaphor in
contrast to simile
(Lopate, ed. 106
-
7).


His style is “reflective of the metaphysical poets
who developed conceits”
(Lopate, ed. 106
-
7).

CITATION: Online Article

(regular website)

Editor, author, or compiler name (if available). “Name of Article.”
Name of Site
.
Version number. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site
(sponsor or publisher), date of resource creation (if available). Medium of
publication. Date of access <URL>.

Works Cited:

“Emily Dickinson.”
Poets.org
. Academy of American Poets, 2009.
Web. 13 Nov. 2009 < http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/
155 >.

In
-
text Parenthetical Citation:


She became the only poet to use metaphor in contrast to simile
(“Emily Dickinson”).


Her style is “reflective of the metaphysical poets who developed
conceits”
(“Emily Dickinson”).






CITATION: Online Article

(website with article from book or journal)

Works Cited:

Mulvihill, John. “Why Dickinson Didn’t Title.”
The Emily
Dickinson Journal

V.1 (1996): n. pag. Web. 13 Nov.
2009 <http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/
a_f/ dickinson/ mulvihill.htm>.

In
-
text Parenthetical Citation:


She became the only poet to use metaphor in
contrast to simile
(Mulvihill).


Her style is “reflective of the metaphysical poets who
developed conceits”
(Mulvihill).


QUOTING POETRY

Quoting Poetry


If you block a quotation, it should be like a photograph of the
original passage.


Block any quotation of
4 or more lines.



Although your paper is double spaced, you should
single
space a blocked quotation
.



I hate and love.


And if you ask me why,


I have no answer, but I discern,


Can feel, my senses rooted in eternal torture. (11.1
-
4)


Quoting Poetry


If you quote fewer than 4 lines, you will not block the
lines.


He is more interested in the life of “senses” (l. 4) than in
the life of rational action. He is also interested in
involving the reader in his experience


“and if you ask
me why . . .” (l. 2)


in order to prevent him or her from
remaining emotionally distant from his “hate and love”
(l. 1).


Shakespeare’s speaker refuses to lay claim to his love
after he has departed from the world. He pleads with
her: “let your love even with my life decay: / Lest the
wise world … / … mock you with me after I am gone” (ll.
12
-
14).