Final Lesson Plans 1 Running Head: FINAL LESSON PLAN PROJECT: ART APPRECIATION & CRITICISM

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Final Lesson Plans
1


Running Head: FINAL LESSON PLAN PROJECT: ART APPRECIATION & CRITICISM







Final Lesson Plan Project

ARE 6195: Art Appreciation & Criticism

Stephanie Jordan

University of Central Florida



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Introduction

Overarching Goal / Topic


My overarching goal for these lesson plans is to introduce high school students to the
critical
analysis of imagery. I feel it is important to teach them to think critically about not only
works of contemporary art, but imagery from mass media and popular culture as well.
Furthermore, I want to introduce students to the post
-
modern concept of appro
priation. After
these lessons, it is my goal that students will become comfortable enough with critical thinking
about imagery that it becomes second nature. Students should be able to conduct an informal
version of these methods every time they encounte
r new works of art or images from everyday
life. Overall, the goal is to improve students’ abilities to make judgments on all kinds of images.

Statement of Origin

The idea for these lessons came primarily from class material from ARE 6195, Teaching
Art Ap
preciation and Criticism. After reading E. B. Feldman’s
Practical Art Criticism

(1994)
and using his method of art criticism, I knew I wanted to incorporate his methodology into
lessons. Many people are not comfortable with or prepared to judge works of
art. I feel that if
students were introduced to his critical process while still at a relatively young age, it would be
for the benefit of their encounters with art in the future. Additionally, after reading G. Green’s
Imagery as Ethical Inquiry

(2000) a
nd R. Goldson’s
The Show and Tell Machine

(1978) I felt
strongly that students should be taught to think critically about mass media and popular culture
imagery. Several issues of ArtNews from the Summer and Fall months of 2009 also served as
sources for
these lessons.


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Review of Literature

Why is there often reluctance to appreciate contemporary art? Villenueve and Erickson
(2008) state that this hesitancy is because most people are not prepared to negotiate it. Perhaps
this is because young students are

not often exposed to process of art criticism in school while
their minds are still open to many varieties and forms of art. However, as Gude (2007) explains,
“abilities to investigate, analyze, reflect and represent are critical skills for citizens of a

participatory democracy” (p.14). This unit plan attempts to teach students how to conduct a
critical analysis of images: both artworks and images from popular culture. The work of several
authors served as sources of inspiration. Most predominantly, th
is includes E. B. Feldman’s
Practical Art Criticism

(1994) and Gaye Green’s
Imagery as Ethical Inquiry

(2000).

Feldman’s critical process (1994) is a stellar example of a method of art criticism that can
be used by art journalists and students alike. His
step
-
by
-
step method demystifies the daunting
task of art criticism and is encouraging to everyone interested in participating in the art world. It
begins with the, “information gathering stage,” where the viewer makes a “neutral, unloaded,
value
-
free” lis
t of the things they see (Feldman, 1994, p.25). Analysis, “is an advanced type of
description” where one examines the combination of formal elements to discover relationships
(Feldman, 1994, p.28). This is also where one mentions technical processes. Th
en, when
interpreting, critics create a hypothesis that, “mak[es] sense” of the visual facts to determine
what the work means (Feldman, 1994, p.30). Finally, when one judges a work, the critic should
include a comparison and an appropriate ground for judg
ment (Feldman, 1994, p.36
-
41).

In addition to being able to negotiate a variety of artworks, students should also be
prepared to think critically about the numerous images in everyday life. Young people, “spend a
third of their waking hours in front of a
screen” (“Learning in Visual Age,” 2009, p.4). If one

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considers that imagery , “often surpass the capability of words to communicate,” (Green, 2000,
p.19) it becomes apparent that visual culture needs to be addressed in the classroom to prevent
young peop
le being, “seduced” by imagery (Duncum, 2008, p.p.132). For example, young
children develop seeing unrealistically thin models on every magazine, movie poster, and TV
show. Green (2000) states, “images that promote unrealistic ideals can be damaging both

psychologically and physically (p.21). To put this in to perspective, today, 42% of first to third
grade girls think they’d look better thinner (NEDA, 2005).

Visual culture can be more than just damaging to students’ self
-
image. The notoriously
cool c
artoon from the Joe Camel cigarette advertising campaign is probably responsible for t
he
increased rate of teens taking up smoking during the years he in ads (PR Newswire, 1998).

R.
K. Goldson in
The Show and Tell Machine

(1978) goes as far as to compare

television to a large
-
scale behavior modification procedure that has the power to desensitize viewers.

Gaye Green believes students would benefit from, “curricula that exposes questionable
media practice, illuminates the power of images, and teaches stu
dents to critically analyze the
visual culture that permeates their lives” (2000, p.24). She proposes a methodology in which
critics analyze image form and content, the image maker, and historical context.

Being prepared to negotiate artworks and visual cu
lture would be of great value to
students. This preparation could create critical thinkers who are more knowledgeable citizens,
more discerning consumers, and possibly long
-
term participants in the art world.

Lesson One:
Describe

the artist’s studio

Sunsh
ine State Standards

VA.A.1.4.1uses two
-
dimensional and three
-
dimensional media, techniques, tools, and processes
to communicate an idea or concept based on research, environment, personal experience, or

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observation, or imagination; VA.D.1.4.2. understands
critical and aesthetic statements in terms
of historical reference while researching works of art; VA.D.1.4.3. knows the difference between
the intentions of artists in the creation of original works and the intentions of those who
appropriate and parody t
hose works.

National Standards

Content Standard #2: Achievement Standard, Proficient: Students evaluate the effectiveness of
artworks in terms of organizational structures and functions; Content Standard #4:
Achievement
Standard, Advanced
:

Students analyze

and interpret artworks for relationships among form,
context, purposes, and critical models, showing understanding of the work of critics, historians,
aestheticians, and artists

Objectives


In this lesson, students will be introduced to the Feldman (1994)

critical process;
specifically, “Describing” in depth (p.25). After being shown contemporary artworks, students
will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of “describing”

by creating a neutral inventory of
visual facts. Students will use the informati
on they gleaned from this study to inform their own
artmaking when they design and plan their dream studio. In addition, students will also have
increased knowledge of appropriation, as well of some of the defining characteristics of the
artworks of famou
s artists from history such Matisse and Frida Kahlo.

Procedures

1.

In a lecture format, the students will be introduced to Feldman’s critical process (1994).
We will cover the “Describing” (Feldman, 1994, p.25) step in detail, emphasizing that it
is a neutra
l inventory of visual facts


no opinions.


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2.

Students will be shown
Frida Kahlo’s Studio (Coyoacan Mexico, 1941)

by Damian
Elwes (2002
-
06). As a class, we will discuss the concept of, “Appropriation” and view
examples of Kahlo’s paintings that are appropria
ted in Elwes’ painting.

3.

Briefly, the class would review the Art Elements. A poster of the Elements and
Principles will also be on display to assist students.

4.

Together, we will go through the
Describing
step of critiquing an artwork (Feldman,
1994). The

instructor will use guided questions to prompt the class as we fill out the
Describing Chart on an overhead (Appendix A).

5.

Students will be divided into groups of 2 or 3 and complete the chart on Elwes’
Matisse’s
Studio (Collioure, 1905), (2002
-
06)

or Joe
Fig’s
Mary Heilman: April 19, 2007 (2007)
.

6.

When completed, we will discuss it as a class. Students will be instructed to create their
own dream studio in their sketchbooks. It can be as realistic or imaginary as they wish.
Students will make sketchnotes

(ample notes on their sketch describing their image).
They will be shown an example of expectations for sketchnotes (Appendix B).

Assessment and Images

See appendixes B and C.


Lesson Two:
Analyze

Ron Hutt

Sunshine State Standards

VA.A.1.4.3. knows how

the elements of art and the principles of design can be used to solve
specific art problems; VA.B.1.4.3. understands some of the implications of intentions and
purposes in particular works of art; VA.D.1.4.2. understands critical and aesthetic statements
in
terms of historical reference while researching works of art; VA.D.1.4.3. knows the difference

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between the intentions of artists in the creation of original works and the intentions of those who
appropriate and parody those works.

National Standards

Con
tent Standard #1:
Achievement Standard, Advanced:
Students initiate, define, and solve
challenging visual arts problems independently using intellectual skills such as analysis,
synthesis, and evaluation; Content Standard #4:
Achievement Standard, Advanced
:
Students
analyze common characteristics of visual arts evident across time and among cultural/ethnic
groups to formulate analyses, evaluations, and interpretations of meaning

Objectives

Students will be introduced to “Analyzing
,”
the second step of the
critical process
(Feldman, 1994, p.28). Students will learn how to analyze an artwork and will apply this
knowledge to create a written analysis of an artwork. Additionally, students will also be
introduced to an historical art style and gain increased k
nowledge of appropriation.

Procedures

1.

Show students
Aphrodite

(2008) and
Muse_01

(2008) by Ron Hutt. A brief class
discussion will include review of, “Appropriation” and how Ron Hutt appropriates an
ancient Greek style. Show examples of authentic red fig
ure style for comparison.
Discussion will also include artist statements, and Hutt’s choice to combine classical
style and subject matter with contemporary content (cell phones, video games).

2.

The class will cooperatively complete the Describe chart (Appe
ndix A)

3.

Introduce the analyze step according to Feldman (1994) in detail.


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4.

After getting started on the analysis as a class to ensure comprehension, students will
then complete it in groups of 2 or three. Students can use either of the Hutt works. A
sho
rt paragraph and rough sketch of the work will be submitted for assessment.

Assessment and Images

See appendix D.


Lesson Three:
Interpret

Holly Andres

Sunshine State Standards

VA.A.1.4.1 uses two
-
dimensional and three
-
dimensional media, techniques, tools
and processes
to communicate an idea or concept based on research, environment, personal experiences,
observation or imagination; VA.B.1.4.2 understands that works of art can communicate an idea
and elicit a variety of responses through the use of selected

media, techniques and processes

National Standards

Content Standard #1:
Achievement Standard, Advanced:
Students initiate, define, and solve
challenging visual arts problems independently using intellectual skills such as analysis,
synthesis, and evaluati
on;
Content Standard #5:
Achievement Standard, Proficient:

Students
identify intentions of those creating artworks, explore the implications of various purposes, and
justify their analyses of purposes in particular works
Achievement Standard, Advanced:

Stu
dents
correlate responses to works of visual art with various techniques for communicating meanings,
ideas, attitudes, views, and intentions

Objectives

Students will be introduced to “Interpreting”

according to Feldman (1994, p.30).
Students will learn ho
w to interpret an artwork and will apply this knowledge to create a

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narrative of a contemporary photograph. Students will identify the visual evidence that supports
their narrative. Additionally, students will draw an image illustrating what they predict

will
occur next, utilizing notes to explain the story to the viewer.

Procedures

1.

Introduce “Interpreting” and explain that it is “making sense” of information gathered
earlier to form a hypothesis for meaning of a work (Feldman, 1994, p.30). Show
Behind
t
he Old Painting

(2008) and
The Secret Portal
(2008) by Holly Andres.

2.

Read from a review on the works; “Andres has the four fair
-
haired adolescent girls who
appear throughout the series in detailed, theatrical scenarios that speak of hidden truths of
treasu
res about to be discovered… Their curious antics, and Andres’ deft manipulation of
perspective leave enough mystery to lure the viewer in” (Chang, 2009, p.119).

3.

Students will create their own story of what is happening. Questions will be provided;
“Where
in the world, or out of the world, is this happening? Who lives here? What do
they do? Why do they do it?… What happened before we arrived? What will happen
afterward?” (Feldman, 2009, p.32
-
34) Students will include supporting visual evidence.

4.


S
tudents

will create sketchnotes of what they think will happen next.

Assessment and Images

See appendix E.


Lesson Four:
Judge

Happily Ever After?

Sunshine State Standards

VA.B.1.4.2 understands that works of art can communicate an idea and elicit a variety of
responses through the use of selected media, techniques and processes; VA.C.1.4.1 understands

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how social, cultural, ecological, economical, religious and political conditions influence the
function, meaning and execution of works of art

National Standards

Content Standard #1:
Achievement Standard, Advanced:
Students initiate, define, and solve
challenging visual arts problems independently using intellectual skills such as analysis,
synthesis, and evaluation; Content Standard #5:
Achievement Standard, Profi
cient:

Students
identify intentions of those creating artworks, explore the implications of various purposes, and
justify their analyses of purposes in particular works

Objectives


Students will be introduced to “Judging” artworks according to Feldman (
1994, p36).
Students will learn to evaluate works and support their judgments. Additionally, students will
learn three grounds for judgment: expressivist, instrumentalist, and formalist. They will utilize
this knowledge to create a written paragraph of
their judgment of a contemporary photograph.

Procedures

1.

Introduce, “Judging works of art”

(Feldman, 1994, p.36). Explain this is when one
evaluates a work. It should include comparison with an artwork similar in meaning or
purpose, and can be judged from

one of several grounds for judgment (expressivist,
formalist, or instrumentalist) (Feldman, 1994).

2.

Show
Cinder 2

(2008) and
Princess and the Pea

(2008) by Dina Goldstein.

3.

As a class, briefly complete the describe chart and analyze the work.

4.

Discuss art
ist statements and possible interpretations.


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5.

Instruct students to write a paragraph evaluating one of the two Goldstein works. It must
include at least one ground for judgment and use the other example for comparison.
Students will turn their paragraph i
n for assessment.

Assessment and Images

See Appendix F


Lesson Five: Critically Analyze Advertising Towards Children

Sunshine State Standards

VA.B.1.4.2 understands that works of art can communicate an idea and elicit a variety of
responses through the us
e of selected media, techniques and processes; VA.B.1.4.3 understands
some of the implications of intentions and purposes in particular works of art

National Standards

Content Standard #2:
Achievement Standard, Proficient:

Students demonstrate the ability
to form
and defend judgments about the characteristics and structures to accomplish commercial,
personal, communal, or other purposes of art; Content Standard #5:
Achievement Standard,
Proficient:

Students identify intentions of those creating artworks, ex
plore the implications of
various purposes, and justify their analyses of purposes in particular works

Objectives


Students will learn to critically analyze advertisements to discover questionable
marketing tactics. They will gain increased awareness of t
he power of imagery and how images
are meant to impact viewers. Students will utilize critical thinking skills to evaluate a popular
culture image and assess whether or not it is a cause for ethical concern.

Procedures


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1.

Ask students what they think the ph
rase, ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’ means.

2.

Briefly discuss the power of imagery as explained in
Imagery as Ethical Inquiry

(Green,
2000). Give examples of powerful images, such as, “a raw egg plopped into a sizzling hot
frying pan along with the
words, ‘This is your brain on drugs. Any questions?’” (Green,
2000, p.20). Ask students for other examples.

3.

Show the Pop
-
tarts commercial
(
“Flavorhood,” 2009
)
. Show the print counterparts from
Ladies Home Journal (June 2009, p.58) and Family Circle (Marc
h 2009, p.82).

4.

Pass out the Critical Analysis of Kellogg’s Pop Tarts Ad handout (Appendix H).

5.

Review the term
ethics:

moral principles governing a person’s conduct (“ethics,” n.d.)
.
Explain the handout’s
Questions for Analysis

and have students comple
te the sheet. The
ultimate goal is to have students think critically about the imagery and independently
reach a conclusion. Thus, for time reasons and to assist students with analysis, portions
of Green’s critical process have been completed. This will

be handed in for assessment.

Assessment and Images

See appendix G.


Lesson Six: Imposing an ideal?

Sunshine State Standards

VA.B.1.4.3 understands some of the implications of intentions and purposes in particular works
of art; VA.C.1.4.1 understands how s
ocial, cultural, ecological, economic, religious, and political
conditions influence the function, meaning and execution of works of art; VA.D.1.4.3 knows the
difference between the intentions of artists in the creation of original works and the intentions

of
those who appropriate and parody those works


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National Standards

Content Standard #2:
Achievement Standard, Proficient:

Students demonstrate the ability to form
and defend judgments about the characteristics and structures to accomplish commercial,
pers
onal, communal, or other purposes of art;
Content Standard #4:
Achievement Standard,
Advanced:
Students analyze common characteristics of visual arts evident across time and
among cultural/ethnic groups to formulate analyses, evaluations, and interpretatio
ns of meaning

Objectives


Students will examine how beauty is portrayed in the media and discover possible hidden
messages. They will compare and contrast a contemporary appropriation image with the
Renaissance original to determine the purpose and effect

of the appropriation. They will write a
paragraph explaining whether they judge the image to be positive or negative in terms of
promoting a healthy self
-
image.

Procedures

1.

Discuss how beauty is portrayed in the media. Read from
RethinkingBeauty

to illus
trate
the focus on appearance (Appendix I). Read recent headlines. Women’s magazines:
The
lazy woman’s guide to a better body, 18 Foods that fight cellulite, Hollywood hair,
Beauty for Dummies, 152 expert beauty tips, Models skin care secrets, 10 diet mi
stakes,
Get a better body
. Men’s magazine:
Lose your gut, New year new body, Six pack abs,
Your best body ever, Muscle secrets, 15 foods that fight fat, From fat to flat, trans
-
fat
truths
(Williams, 2009, Media Monopoly section).

2.

Ask what messages is th
is sending? What effect do you think this could have on young
viewers? Is this promoting a nearly impossible ideal?


Final Lesson Plans
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3.

Introduce the two advertisements appropriating Botticelli’s
Birth of Venus

(c.1485).
Show Botticelli’s for comparison and very briefly disc
uss some basic symbolism; Venus,
the goddess associated with beauty, just born from the sea is being blown to shore by the
Zephyrs, wind gods. She is welcomed with a flowered cloak by Horae (Oceansbridge,
n.d.). Discuss how the ads appropriate this meani
ng/imagery and to what aim.

4.

In a written paragraph, have students select one of the images and answer the following:
‘Is this an image that draws on gender stereotypes and promotes an unrealistic ideals or is
it an image of an empowered, strong woman? Inc
lude visual evidence to support your
conclusion.’ Tell students to address some questions adapted from Feldman (1994) in
their responses:
What is this trying to sell to me? How does it attempt to do this? What
does it want me to admire? Think? Feel?
Who

does it think I am? Does it address me by
age or gender?
Does it reference other artists/art history? For what purpose? Also, ask
students to reflect: What is your personal reaction to this piece? Explain.

Assessment and Images

See Appendix I.


Conclus
ion


Developing this unit plan involved learning the critical processes of Feldman (1994) and
Green (2000) sufficiently to be able to teach it to high school aged students. It entailed finding
artworks and popular culture images that were appropriate to t
eaching the specific aims of each
lesson, and developing procedures and assessments tailored to the objectives. One conclusion I
reached in the process was that time constraints considerably decrease what is possible in the
classroom. Feldman’s critical
process (1994) consists of four steps, each of which is dependant

Final Lesson Plans
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on the earlier ones. Thus, in order to interpret and judge, one must first describe and analyze. In
a class period that runs under an hour, it is nearly impossible to complete this task.
C
onsequently, an outcome of this study was my realization that lessons must focus on one or two
important objectives rather than try to cover the entire critical process in one class.

One of my limitations may be that not all lessons have a studio compon
ent. While I don’t
believe all lessons must have an artmaking segment, I would like to see students apply what they
learned in the creation of their own artwork whenever possible.


I feel very strongly that art appreciation, art criticism, and critical
analysis of all types of
imagery must be taught in the classroom. As a result of this project, I learned how complex it is
to create lessons that effectively do so. I feel my instruction will always benefit from reading
about new methods and techniques f
or instruction. In the future, I would like to do more
research. I hope to become familiar with more methodologies of analysis. Teaching various
methods would allow students to compare and contrast and select the one they feel most
comfortable with. Hop
efully, in the future I’d be able to develop my own methodologies as well.



Final Lesson Plans
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References

Andres, Holly. (artist). (2008).
Behind the Old Painting

[photograph, C
-
print]. Los Angeles,
California; DNJ. Retrieved October 18, 2009 from
http://www.robertmann.com/exhibitions/2008/andres/image_09.html
.

Andres, Holly. (artist). (2008).
The Secret Portal

[photograph, C
-
print]. Los Angeles, California;
DNJ. Retrieved October 18, 2009 from
http://www.robertmann.com/exhibitions/2008/andres/image_09.html
.

Chang, R. (2009). Holly Andres.
ARTnews,
108(8), 119.

Duncum, P. (2008). Holding aesthetics and ideology in tens
ion.
Studies in Art Education, 49
(2),
122
-
135.

Elwes, Damian. (artist). (2002
-
06).
Frida Kahlo’s Studio (Coyoacan, Mexico, 1941)

[painting].
USA. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from
http://www.damianelwes.com
.

Elwes,

Damian. (artist). (2002).
Matisse’s Studio (Collioure, 1905)

[painting]. USA. Retrieved
October 17, 2009 from
http://www.damianelwes.com
.

ethics. (n.d.).
The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language

(4th ed.). Retrieved
November 18, 2009, from:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ethics

Feldman, E. B. (1994).
Practical Art Criticism.

Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Fig, Joe. (artis
t). (2007).
Mary Heilmann: April 19, 2007

[model]. USA.
ARTnews
, 108(9), 90.

Florida Department of Education. (1996)
Sunshine State Standards
. Retrieved November 11,
2009, from http://artsedge.kennedy
-
center.org/teach/standards/standards_k4.c


fm#04

Genocc
hio, B. (2007). Humor, with a serious edge after all.
New York Times
, Retrieved from
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/09/nyregion/nyregionspecial2/09artsli.html
.


Final Lesson Plans
17

Green, G.L. (2000). Imagery as ethical inquiry
.

Art Education,
November, 19
-
24.

Goldson, R. K. (
1978).
The show and tell machine.
Concord, CA: Delta Books.

Goldstein, Gina. (2008).
Cinder 2 of the fallen princesses series

[photograph]. Retrieved October
17, 2009, from
http://www.jpgmag.com/stories/1
1918

Goldstein, Gina. (2008).
Princess and the pea of the fallen princesses series

[photograph].
Retrieved October 17, 2009, from
http://www.jpgmag.com/stories/11918

Gude, O. (2007). Principles of Possibi
lity: Considerations for a 21
st
-
Century Art & Culture
Curriculum.
Art Education, January,
6
-
17
.

Hutt, Ron (artist). (2008).
Aphrodite

[painting]. Islip, New York; Islip Art Museum. Retrieved
October 17, 2009, from http://www.ronhutt.org.

Hutt, Ron (artist
). (2008).
Muse_01

[painting]. Islip, New York; Islip Art Museum. Retrieved
October 17, 2009, from http://www.ronhutt.org.

Kellogg’s Pop
-
Tarts Advertisement (2009)
Ladies Home Journal
,
June
, 58
-
69.

Kellogg’s Pop
-
Tarts Advertisement (2009)
Family Circle
,
Ma
rch
, 82.

Kellogg’s.
Flavorhood Pop
-
Tarts Advertisement

(2009). Retrieved November 20, 2009 from
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZQHi551xdY.

Kennedy Center. (n.d.).
The National Standards for Arts Education.

Retrieved November 11,
2009 from http://artsedge.
kennedy
-
center.org/teach/standards/standards_k4.c


fm#04

Meddings, Derek. (artist). (n.d.).
Skydiver

[sketch]. Retrieved November 18, 2009 from
http://ufoseries.com/preProduction/index.html

National Art Education Association. (2009).
Learning in a visual
age: the critical importance of
visual arts education.

Reston, VA. Retrieved from
www.arteducators.org
.


Final Lesson Plans
18

NEDA. (2005).
Statistics: eating disorders and their precursors.
Retrieved October 22, 2009
from http://www
.sc.edu/healthycarolina/pdf/facstaffstu/eatingdisorders/E


atingdisorderstatistics.pfd

Oceansbridge. (n.d.).
Birth of venus by sandro botticelli.

Retrieved November 15, 2009, from
http://www.botticellibirthofvenus.com/.

Parsons, M. J. (1992).
How We Unders
tand Art: A Cognitive Developmental Account of
Aesthetic Experience.

New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

PR Newswire. (October 11, 1998).
Ohio groups say joe camel was to blame for increase in teen
smoking rates
. Retrieved November 4, 2009, from
http
://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G1
-
53074013.html.

Reebok Advertisement

[image] (2009). Retrieved October 16, 2009, from
http://www.trendhunter.com/trends/reeboks
-
birth
-
of
-
venus
.

Renaissan
ce Hotels Advertisement

[image] (2008). Retrieved October 16, 2009, from
http://eternallycool.net/2008/01/renaissance
-
revival/
.

Villenueve, P. & Erickson, M. (2008). The trouble with cont
emporary art is…
Art Education,
61
(2), 92
-
97.

Williams, L. (n.d.)
Media monopoly
. Retrieved November 10, 2009 from
http://www.rethinkingbeauty.com
.

Wolff, R. (2009). Art talk: He shrunk andy warhol.
ARTnews,

108(9), 33.



Final Lesson Plans
19

Appendix A


Describe Chart

Name: ______________________________________

Describe

Fill in the right side of the chart. For the Art Element, describe the artist’s use of the Art
Element in a sentence.

Name of the artist


Medium


Date of
the work


Title of the work


Name what you see

(people, places, objects)


Art Elements:

LINE
The edges of a form.
Are
the lines straight, curved, jagged,
etc?


SHAPE
The contours of the forms.

What shapes do you see? Are they
Soft
-
Edged, Hard
-
Edged,
Geometric, Natural? 2D or 3D?


COLOR
ROY G BIV

What colors do you see? Are they
bright, dull, warm, cool? Does one
color dominate? Do the colors used
create a mood


VALUE
The amount of light or
dark seen on an object or in a color.

Are t
he Values dark, light or
blended? Is there a lot of contrast


SPACE
The depth portrayed.

How does the artist achieve Space?
Is there a foreground, middle
ground, background? Is it shallow
or deep? Does the artist use
perspective?


PATTERN
Repetitio
n of lines,
shapes, colors, etc.

Are there any patterns? Does it
create Unity or Variety?


TEXTURE
The illusion of a
surface’s quality.

Are textures rough, smooth, soft,
bumpy?




Final Lesson Plans
20

Appendix B


Lesson One

Expectations for Sketchnotes:


Meddings, Derek. (
artist). (n.d.).
Skydiver

[sketch]. Retrieved November 18, 2009 from
http://ufoseries.com/preProduction/index.html


Rubric for Assessment:

Lesson One:
Describe
the Artist’s Studio

Assessment
:
Students will be assessed based using a rubric on the thoroughness of their describe
chart, as well as neutrality of their “inventory” of visual facts (Feldman, 1994, p.25). Students
will also be assessed on their design for a dream studio.









Score:

Teacher Comments:

Artist Name, Title of work, Medium and
date of work (1 point)


Sufficiently “Named what they saw” (3
灯pntsF


ja摥⁡ sentence 摥scri扩ng use 潦 at least 㔠
elementsW
Line, Shape, Color, Value,
Space, Pattern, Texture
(5 points
)


“Neutrality” of all of the above


aesigne搠 a 摲eam stu摩漠E㔠灯RntsF


ja摥⁷ritten n潴es 摥scri扩ng 摥tails 潦
their stu摩漠E㔠灯pntsF


q潴al

彟彟_㈰



Final Lesson Plans
21

Appendix C


Lesson One

Images:



L: Elwes, Damian. (artist). (2002).
Matisse’s Studio (Col
lioure, 1905)

[painting]. USA.
Retrieved October 17, 2009 from
http://www.damianelwes.com
.

R: Elwes, Damian. (artist). (2002
-
06).
Frida Kahlo’s Studio (Coyoacan, Mexico, 1941)

[painting]. USA. Retrieved October 1
7, 2009 from
http://www.damianelwes.com
.



Fig, Joe. (artist). (2007).
Mary Heilmann: April 19, 2007

[model]. USA.
ARTnews
, 108(9), 90.


Final Lesson Plans
22

Appendix D


Lesson Two

Rubric for Assessment:

Lesson Two:
Analyze

Ron Hutt

Assessment
: Students’ Analysis will be assessed based on a rubric. Rubrics will be shown to
students before the assignment. Score will be dependent on students’ participation in class
discussion (on Ron Hutt’s work and class completion of Describe chart
). Students will also get
points for having completed a rough sketch of the work being analyzed.









Score: Teacher Comments:

Participation in class discussion (4)


Analysis in Paragraph form (4)


Use of critical language: Form descriptors

(4)


Use of critical language: identification of
relationships among forms (4)


Rough sketch of the work being analyzed (4)


Total

____/20


Images:




R: Hutt, Ron (artist). (2008).
Muse_01

[painting]. Islip, New York; Islip Art Museum.
Retrieved October 17, 2009, from
h
ttp://www.ronhutt.org
.

“Here a Muse of Video Games is added to the original 9 Muses of art, music, poetry, drama and
sciencesⰠshe h潬摳 a⁎inten摯d tii c潮tr潬ler an搠is seen with her Avatar a⁳mall warri潲
archer” (Hutt, 2008, Greek Inspired Painting sec
ti潮F




L: Hutt,
Ron (artist). (2008).
Aphrodite

[painting]. Islip, New York;
Islip Art Museum. Retrieved October 17, 2009, from
http://www.ronhutt.org
.

“Aphrodite after her rendezvous with Ares calls her husband
ee灨aestus 潮 her ce
ll phone to say she will be late getting home.”

EeuttⰠ㈰〸ⰠOree欠fns灩re搠mainti湧 secti潮F




Final Lesson Plans
23

Appendix E


Lesson Three

Rubric for Assessment:

Lesson Three:
Interpret

Holly Andres

Assessmen
t
: Students’ narratives will be assessed based on a rubric. Rubrics will be shown to
students before the assignment. Score for their hypothesis of what is happening in the story will
be dependent on strength of students’ thesis, the clarity and thoroughn
ess of their story, and
effective use of visual evidence. Students will also get credit for their sketchnotes depicted what
will happen next in the story.








Score: Teacher Comments:

Student narrative: Strong Thesis (5)


Student narrative:

Clarity of story (4)


Student narrative: Thoroughness (3)


Good use of visual evidence (4)


Sketchnotes of the next event in the story (4)


Total

____/20


Images:



L: Andres, Holly. (artist). (2008).
The Secret Portal

[photograph, C
-
print]. Los An
geles,
California; DNJ. Retrieved October 18, 2009 from
http://www.robertmann.com/exhibitions/2008/andres/image_09.html
.

R: Andres, Holly. (artist). (2008).
Behind the Old Paint
ing

[photograph, C
-
print]. Los Angeles,
California; DNJ. Retrieved October 18, 2009 from
http://www.robertmann.com/exhibitions/2008/andres/image_09.html
.



Final Lesson Plans
24

Appendix F


Lesson Fo
ur

Rubric for Assessment:

Lesson Four:
Judge

Happily Ever After?

Assessment
: Students’ judgments will be assessed based on a rubric. Rubrics will be shown to
students before the assignment. Score will be partially based on their participation in class
di
scussion (class completion of describe chart, analysis, and possible interpretations).
Additionally, score for their completion of the
Judge
step according to Feldman (1994) will be
based on format, use of 1+ grounds for judgment, comparison with a simila
r artwork, and their
support for any judgments/opinions.








Score: Teacher Comments:

Participation in class discussion (4)


Judgment in paragraph form (3)


Proper use of at least 1 grounds for judgment:
expressivist, instrumentalist, form
alist (4)


Comparison with alternative artwork (4)


Support of judgments/opinions (5)


Total

____/20





L: Cinder 2, The Fallen Princesses Series

[image] (2008). Retrieved October 17, 2009, from
h
ttp://www.jpgmag.com/stories/11918

R: Princess and the Pea, The Fallen Princesses Series

[image] (2008). Retrieved October 17,
2009, from
http://www.jpgmag.com/stories/11918

Artist Statement: “These works place fairy tale characters in modern
day scenarios. In all of the images, the princess is placed in an
environment that articulates her conflict. The “happily ever after’ is
replaced with a realistic outcome and a
ddresses current issues… I
began to imagine Disney’s perfect princesses juxtaposed with real
issues that were affecting real women around me, such as illness,
addiction and self
-
image issues” (Goldstein, 2008, Fallen Princesses
section).



Final Lesson Plans
25

Appendix G


Lesson Five

Rubr
ic for Assessment:

Lesson Five: Critically Analyze Advertising Towards Children

Assessment
: Students’ critical analysis will be assessed based on a rubric. Rubrics will be
shown to students before the assignment. Score will be based on their completion o
f the
Critical
Analysis of Kellogg’s Pop Tarts Advertisement

Critique.



Completion of
Critical Analysis of

Kellogg’s Pop Tarts Advertisement

Critique:


Score: Teacher Comments:

Content (4)


Format (4)


Point of View (4)


Image Context

(4)


Evaluation/Conclusion/Implications (4)


Total

____/20


Images:











L: Kellogg’s Pop
-
Tarts Advertisement (2009)
Family Circle
,
March
, 82.

R: Kellogg’s Pop
-
Tarts Advertisement (2009)
Ladies Home Journal
,
June
, 58
-
69.



Final Lesson Plans
26

Appendix H


Lesson Fiv
e

Name
:______________________________________
Date
:__________________


Critical Analysis of Kellogg’s Pop Tarts Advertisement

Adapted from Green “Imagery as Ethical Inquiry” (2000) and Feldman
Practical Art Criticism

(1994)


Question(s) for Analysis
:

Does this advertisement appeal to young children’s interests and tastes to sell a product? Are advertisements that
appeal to children a cause for ethical concern?


Content:

What is depicted in this image? What is happening? Where is it happening? Who
lives here? What do they
do? Why do they do it? Are the represented events real?

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
___________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________


Format
: Analyze the art elements and principles of design to determin
e how they affect the meaning of the image
(Green, 2000, p.24). Similar to the Feldman (1994)
Describe

and
Analyze

steps, consider line, color, value, shape,
space, texture, dominance, variety, repetition, and balance (Green, 2000).

____________________
_________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
___
_________________________________________________________________________________


Your Point of View:

How do your personal beliefs, experiences, education, age, gender, occupation, family
background, etc. influence how you perceive the image? Consider

what you personally bring to the interpretation
process (Green, 2000).

I have included a sample of my own point of view as a reference.

My perspective is that of an art educator. Advertising that is geared towards children in this manner
concerns me.

In her analysis of Joe Camel ads, Green (2000) discussed, “children’s inability to separate reality from
what appears in advertisements” (p.23). Though Pop Tarts are considerably less dangerous than cigarettes, it is still
important to consider this lac
k of critical thinking ability. This image makes it obvious why it is essential to equip
students with the tools to analyze and interpret visual culture.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
___


Historical:

Consider historical info that relates to the image regarding its creation and perception.

Ever since the Kellogg’s corporation began in the early 1900’s
, they have experimented with new
marketing techniques such as free samples, children’s

contests, sponsoring children’s radio, and making convenient
individual serving packages for busy families (“Kellogg’s: A Historical Overview, 2007). While superficially, the
company talked of nutrition and wholesomeness, the cereals marketed towards chi
ldren with fun cartoon characters
have always been the ones with the highest sugar content.


Image Context:

Consider images that are similar in style or in content to this image. What does this image remind you of? Think of
at least one example (ads, tv
, movies, etc.) that comes to mind when you look at this image. Briefly explain how it
compares to this image.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
__________________________________________

Final Lesson Plans
27

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________


Image Maker:

Who created this image?
Research the creator and possible motivation for creating the image, how is it created
and/or marketed, and what the creator’s background.

As early as the 1910’s, Kellogg’s knew it was in their best interest to market to children. Over the years,
they’ve
held drawing contests, sponsoring children’s radio,
distributed children’s books, and held promotions to
mail
-
in box tops and receive a toy (“Kellogg’s: A Historical Overview, 2007). These marketing habits continued in
the 1950s when the company presented

many of the children’s cereals we still know today, including Frosted Flakes,
Honey Smacks, and Cocoa Krispies. These cereals almost all had cartoon icons, such as Tony the Tiger. It seems
this is when the trend to market sugary breakfast foods to child
ren with fun cartoon icons began.


Conceptual Context:

Consider general societal influences that affect the making and perception of this image. This includes scientific,
economic, religious, historical, political, philosophical, geographical, psychologic
al, artistic, and cultural influences.

Cultural: Concept



TV Bombards Children With Commercials For High
-
fat And High
-
sugar Foods,”


a
contributing factor to the growing problem of childhood obesity? (Bell, 2009, p.406). A recent article reports that
re
searchers from University of California
-
Davis examined advertisements played on children’s channels during
Saturday mornings and weekday afternoons, which they say are optimum viewing times for children (Bell, 2009).
The results showed that almost 20% of
commercials during these times were, “for a food or nutrition
-
related
product,” and that foods high in sugar and fat made up more than 70% of food commercials (Bell, 2009, p.406). A
study on the research suggests food advertisements targeting children migh
t be a big part of the childhood obesity
problem.


Evaluati on, Conclusions, and Implications:

What statements can you make about the image? Come to a personal
conclusion and evaluation. Consider the following:

What is the work trying to sell to the targe
t audience? How?

What does it want them to think and feel? What does it expect them to know or believe?

Does the work address viewers by age? Do visual clues suggest this? What are the implications of this? Is this
ethical?

________________________________
_____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_________
________________________________________________________________________



Final Lesson Plans
28

Appendix I


Lesson Six

Rubric for Assessment:


Lesson Six: Imposing an ideal?

Assessment
: Students’ judgments will be assessed based on a rubric. Rubrics will be shown to
students

before the assignment. Class participation is included in the scoring process. Score for
their evaluation will be dependent on strength of students’ conclusion about the nature of the
image, effective use of visual evidence, attention to some of the pro
mpt questions, as well as the
inclusion of their personal reaction to the image.








Score: Teacher Comments:

Participation in class discussion (4)


Conclusion about the nature of the image (4)


Good use of visual clues to support
conclusio
n (4)


Attention to prompt questions (4)


Reflection: Personal reaction (4)


Total

____/20

Images:



L: Reebok Advertisement

[image] (2009). Retrieved October 16, 2009, from
http:
//www.trendhunter.com/trends/reeboks
-
birth
-
of
-
venus
.

R: Renaissance Hotels Advertisement

[image] (2008). Retrieved October 16, 2009, from
http://eternallycool.net/2008/01/renaissance
-
revi
val/
.


R: Sample image from Rethinkingbeauty.com:

“A United Nations report on the status of women
named advertising as the worst offender to women’s
well
-
beings,” “The average American may view as
many as 40,000 television commercials every year,”
and, “
one out of every 11 commercials is about
appearance” (Williams, n.d., media monopoly
section).