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nebraskaboomOil and Offshore

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NEWSVIEWS

September 1, 2008

West Coast Publishing


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1



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Table of Contents


MCCAIN’S TAX PLAN IS

SUPERIOR TO OBAMA’S
TAX PLAN

................................
.........................

2

OBAMA’S TAX PLAN IS
SUPERIOR TO MCCAIN’S

TAX PLAN

................................
.........................

3


JOHN MCCAIN’S ENERGY

PLAN IS SUPERIOR TO
OBAMA’S
................................
...........................

4

OBAMA’S ENERGY PLAN
IS SUPERIOR TO MCCAI
N’S

................................
................................
......

5


SARAH PALIN WILL HEL
P MCCAIN WIN THE ELE
CTION

................................
................................
.

6

SARAH PALIN WILL NOT

HELP WIN MCCAIN THE
ELECTION

................................
........................

7


OBAMA’S SELECTION OF

JOE BIDEN AS VICE PR
ESIDENT WILL HELP
HIS PRESIDENTIAL
RUN

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............................

8

OBAMA’S SELECTION OF

JOE BIDEN AS VICE PR
ESIDENT WILL NOT HEL
P HIS
PRESIDENTIAL RUN

................................
................................
................................
................................
..

9


THE UNITED STATES SH
OULD NOT SUPPORT THE

FULL ACCEPTANCE OF G
EORGIA INTO
NATO

................................
................................
................................
................................
............................
10

THE UNITED STATES SH
OULD SUPPORT THE FUL
L ACCEPTANCE OF GEOR
GIA INTO NATO

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.......
11


SUCCESS OF SURGE IN
IRAQ SHOULD BE COPIE
D IN AFGHANISTAN

................................
.........
12

SUCCESS OF SURGE IN
IRAQ SHOULD NOT BE
COPIED IN AFGHANISTA
N

................................
13


POST
-
OLYMPICS CHINA WILL
BE MORE PROGRESSIVE

................................
................................
.
14

POST
-
OLYMPICS CHINA WILL
NOT BE MORE PROGRESS
IVE

................................
........................
15


MEXICO’S PRESIDENT F
ELIPE CALDERON’S STR
ATEGY TO STOP CRIME
IS WORKING

........
16

MEXICO PRESIDENT FEL
IPE CALDERON’S STRAT
EGY TO STOP CRIM
E IS NOT WORKING

...
17


THE WAR IN AFGHANIST
AN IS SUCCEEDING

................................
................................
....................
18

THE WAR IN AFGHANIST
AN IS NOT SUCCEEDING

................................
................................
...........
19

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McCain’s tax plan is superior to Obama’s tax plan

The 2008 presidential election, while an election of change versus experience, has taken a
dramatic shift into more policy
-
oriented discussion. The McCain advantage on policy was seemingly
limited to homeland security and the wars. Instigated by his admiss
ion that the economy wasn’t his strong
suit, many discounted McCain’s ability to add another major policy issue to McCain’s political core.
However, due to some help by senior economic advisers, McCain has developed a tax plan that has become
very popular
and almost single
-
handedly given him the advantage over Obama in recent polls.
1

Amidst
economic crisis, Americans are looking for a candidate that can bring relief to their own pocketbooks. John
McCain’s plan of slashing taxes across the board has endeared

him to the independent populous, while
Barack Obama’s plan of increasing tax rates for some and reducing rates for others has been lauded as
typical Democratic Party “tax and spend liberalism”. McCain has grabbed hold of this rhetoric and has
gone so far
as to say that “Obama’s tax plan is a recipe for economic disaster” in a recent ad.
2

John
McCain’s economic plan is pragmatic, thus it is appealing to voters. Of all the issues in this presidential
election, taxes are the most universally identifiable conc
ern. Therefore, the candidate that wins taxes will
likely be the one who wins presidency. Overwhelmingly, McCain has the most realistic plan. Thus,
McCain’s tax plan is superior to Obama’s tax plan.

McCain’s tax plan is superior to Obama’s tax plan becaus
e McCain’s plan allows corporations to
grow. The current state of the economy can only be revitalized if corporations have the ability to expand.
The stock market has to be fixed from the inside out, and the McCain corporate tax plan clearly accounts
for t
his. His corporate plan includes phasing out the two highest tax rate brackets, 35 percent and 34
percent, leaving only the 15 percent and 25 percent brackets. Obama would keep corporate tax rates and
would raise capital gains and dividends rates to 20 per
cent for the two highest income brackets.
3

Obama is
making a grave mistake by leaving the corporate tax rates as they are. Corporations need a tax break in
order to be able to cope with the current economic situation. Reasserting this business confidence w
ill
allow the economy to get back on track. Similarly, McCain’s decision to not increase capital gains and
dividends rates allows companies to flourish more freely. In fact, even Jason Furman, Obama’s director of
economic policy, admits that Obama “would l
ike to cut the corporate tax rate…first he must resolve
underlying problems…If you can fix a lot of these problems you can bring the tax rate on corporations
down.”
4

The Obama plan is simply delaying the inevitable
-

to expand the economy the corporate tax
rate
must come down. McCain guarantees it and Obama says it can happen at an unspecified time in the future.

McCain’s tax plan is superior to Obama’s tax plan because McCain’s plan develops economic
expansion. Obama’s high tax plan is more concerned with
cutting the federal budget deficit than
jumpstarting the economy. McCain’s plan to focus on the economy first is more in touch with the
American people. A recent Pew Research poll shows that only two percent of people even mention debt
-

far behind high ga
s prices, unemployment, mortgage problems and healthcare costs.
5

McCain’s tax plan
solves for these problems. The prioritization of the economy in McCain’s tax plan shows foresight.
Obama’s plan of taxation first misses the mark altogether. Richard W. Rahn

of the Institute for Global
Economic growth points out that “Budget deficits have averaged about three percent of GDP for the last 40
years, and the government debt as a percentage of GDP (approximately 37 percent) is close to its historical
average for t
he last half
-
century. As the numbers show, those who say disaster is upon us and we must
increase taxes are just plain wrong!”
6

Obama’s plan clearly harms growth. This is not what the American
people want; therefore McCain’s tax plan is clearly superior.

M
cCain’s tax plan is superior to Obama’s tax plan because McCain’s plan is pro working and
business class. Obama continues to claim that his plan is pro middle class, but many people fall through the
cracks with his plan. Michael Boskin, professor of econom
ics at Stanford University and senior fellow at
the Hoover Institute, points out that “There are people who are left out of Obama’s plan. Past the $250,000
mark, the state could end up taking away as much as 62.8 percent [of earnings] up from 44 percent”
7

This
includes small businesses and their owners. McCain gives tax cuts across the board, not just in certain
situations like Obama. Furthermore, Obama neglects the best way to expand growth in the middle class.
Chris Edwards of the Cato Institute explains,

“Obama’s $500 payroll tax credit called ‘making work pay.’
If Obama had wanted to spur employment, he should have proposed a cut in the payroll tax rate, which
would change the marginal incentive to work,

unlike the proposed credit.”
8

Once again, John McC
ain
shows the foresight to make tax cuts in the right places, instead of taking ineffective half measures.

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Obama’s tax plan is superior to McCain’s tax plan

Barack Obama and John McCain have sparred in many venues regarding foreign and social
policy. Whi
le all foreign and social issues are major concerns nothing weighs more heavily on the minds of
American citizens as the economy. Michael Dimock, associate director of research at the Pew Research
Center, claimed that despite other issues, “The economy is
the one issue that continues as the dominant
voter concern.”
9

Barack Obama is going on the offensive trying to establish economic clout to gain a major
edge on John McCain. All the while, Senator McCain has made ill
-
advised statements such as, “There’s
bee
n great progress economically,” and “We’ve had a pretty good prosperous time with low
unemployment.”
10

These words, in tandem with the flailing state of the economy, play very well to Senator
Obama’s message of change. The two candidates’ plans come in dire
ct juxtaposition with one another
-

McCain is in favor of slashing taxes and Obama is in favor of replacing taxes on the highest earning tax
brackets and cutting taxes for the lower and middle earning brackets. The candidates’ tax plans will very
likely be
the deciding factor in the November elections. While both candidates play very well to their own
base, Obama’s change in the status quo with regards to taxes give him the edge. Therefore, Obama’s tax
plan is superior to McCain’s tax plan.


Obama’s tax plan

is superior to McCain’s tax plan because Obama’s plan eases the burden on low
and middle earning tax brackets. The middle class has suffered tremendously from the poor state of the
economy. Barack Obama specifically addresses these individuals in his tax
plan. Obama will cut taxes for
95 percent of workers and families. He will cut taxes $500 for workers and $1000 for working couples,
whereas McCain will raise taxes on the middle class by $3.6 trillion over ten years to pay for his health care
plan.
11

The O
bama tax plan is thus better for the middle class. John McCain clearly does bring lower taxes
overall, but when it comes to the middle class there is no such policy. The continuation of the tax cuts on
the highest earners neglect the people who need their
economic load eased the most: the middle class. John
McCain’s tax policy is not in touch with workers struggling to make ends meet. In fact, a recent study
showed that Obama’s tax cuts on the middle class would be three times larger than John McCain’s.
12
The

end scenario pits low and middle earning tax cuts against overall tax cuts. The mortgage crisis and the
rising cost of gas are harmful to everyone, but the people that find it most difficult to cope with are not high
earners or corporations. The people wh
o have the most difficult time are the people in the working class.


Obama’s tax plan is superior to McCain’s tax plan because Obama’s plan has substance. While
Obama does commit to cutting taxes on the middle class, he retains an ability to bring in reve
nue to help
balance the budget. He is able to bring this balance about by increasing the high earning bracket’s income
tax from 35 percent to 39 percent and keeping the corporate tax at 35 percent
-

McCain plans to lower the
corporate tax to 25 percent.
13

Ob
ama’s plan puts him in a good position to balance the budget. McCain is
seemingly not headed in the right direction. This problem has been exposed because McCain has promised
to cut taxes and balance the budget by 2013. These two ideas cannot work in conju
nction with one another
because of the colossal budget deficit.
14

Simply put, the government needs more money to balance the
budget and McCain cannot deliver by slashing taxes. When it comes to substance, Obama is far ahead of
McCain. Despite these problems
, the McCain campaign has criticized Obama’s plan on high interest
earners, but says he will “not close off any options for social security payment.”
15

McCain criticizes Obama
but lacks a clear tax plan for social security payment himself. Showing once agai
n that Barack Obama’s
economic promises and tax plan has more substance than John McCain’s do.


Obama’s tax plan is superior to McCain’s tax plan because Obama will bring major changes to the
Bush tax policy. The past eight years have brought a tremendous
budget deficit and a miserable economy.
The tax policy hasn’t ultimately served the purpose of keeping the economy moving. Barack Obama’s plan
indicates an about face from the Bush Doctrine. In fact, Obama’s plan makes tremendous strides to cut
down on the

budget deficit. The independent Tax Policy Center estimated that Obama would reduce the
federal deficit by $700 billion over the next decade and McCain would add to the deficit by $3,400
billion.
16

The fiscal responsibility of Obama’s tax plan is far super
ior to McCain’s. Obama makes great
strides in turning around the financial problems brought about by George W. Bush. John McCain was
originally opposed to Bush tax cuts, but now he wants more of them. Even worse McCain reduces revenue
by 17.6 percent and O
bama’s plan increases revenues by 18.5 percent.
17

McCain is simply a continuation of
Bush when it comes to taxes. Obama brings change, and statistically it will be the change that the United
States needs to balance the budget and get away from the failed Bu
sh tax policy.


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John McCain’s energy plan is superior to Obama’s

George W. Bush’s legacy has made it very difficult for John McCain to counter Barack Obama’s
message of major change. Indeed, being associated with the Bush administration in any way seems t
o be
politically unwise. Thus, it is very clear why John McCain has been looking for major issues where real
world solutions will outweigh Obama’s change platform. Energy has been at the forefront of this McCain
strategy. Indeed, it comes as no surprise th
at McCain has gone on the offensive over Obama’s lack of
tangible solutions in the realm of energy.
18

Attacking the research and development oriented Obama plan is
a way for McCain to make up for America’s desire for change. His own plan is very independent

and
incorporates a major expansion of energy. Energy is particularly important for the McCain camp in order to
win the White House. The American people are experiencing a very difficult time with respect to high
energy costs. Even worse, the warming of th
e earth is happening at an alarming rate. Collectively the next
commander in chief must fully address these problems. From both a political and policy perspective
McCain’s guaranteed expansion of clean energy is much better than Obama’s research and develo
pment
plan. It is clear that John McCain’s energy plan is superior to Obama’s.

John McCain’s energy plan is superior to Obama’s because America needs more energy resources.
The Obama plan is oriented around research and development.
19

Ultimately, R&D alone
cannot address the
problems that face America today. The tremendous underutilization of existing clean technologies is
absolutely appalling. The next American president must expand major energy sources like nuclear and
wind power. It is clear that the chan
ge must be immediate. 72 percent of the American people believe that
developing alternative energy sources “could accomplish a great deal”
20

From a development perspective,
green technologies currently in existence have not yet been expanded to a significan
t level. Developing
energy by using wind, solar, and nuclear power can cost substantially less than “the most advanced natural
gas stations.”
21

The United States is amidst both a crisis of cost and of emissions. By expanding energy
resources America can acc
ount for both. Revamping the energy portfolio of the United States cannot
effectively happen unless the government itself seeks to expand existing technologies. More energy
resources are needed because of the high demand of American consumers. Luckily, by
expanding clean
technologies, getting more energy resources can be a very environmentally friendly process.


John McCain’s energy plan is superior to Obama’s because it provides more energy resources. On
the issue of energy, McCain has really broken ranks

from the typical republican agenda with his promises
to fund an expansion of energy resources. McCain favors expanded use of nuclear energy while Obama
remains guarded on nuclear expansion.
22

Nuclear energy is one of the cleanest forms of energy, and John
McCain allows for it to flourish under his program. He will add 45 new nuclear plants by 2030, which is a
sharp addition to America’s 103 nuclear plants.
23

While research and development is certainly important,
the United States must have a president that
will commit to expanding known clean energy methods. In this
sense, McCain’s plan provides a tangible solution to the energy crisis. Furthermore, McCain realizes that
the government must act now if it is to ensure that companies expand using clean coal. Th
erefore, he has
committed $2 billion annually to advance clean coal.
24

With this investment, companies can incorporate
clean coal early and set a foundation for clean development. McCain also reaffirmed that he will expand
solar and wind energy sources in t
he United States.
25

John McCain will guarantee more energy resources.
His plan incorporates a variety of specifically targeted forms of energy, showing that his plan is better than
Obama’s plan
-
which has not been as forthright with promises of expansion.

J
ohn McCain’s energy plan is superior to Obama’s because offshore drilling will have a realistic
effect on the cost of gas. Barack Obama’s opposition to McCain’s offshore drilling policy centers on the
lack of results that drilling would produce.
26

It is tru
e that drilling will not have an effect on oil reserves for
at least ten years; however it most certainly will have an effect on the price of gas.
The Economist

points
out that “To promise exploration…even though oil would not be produced for years, would
bring down
prices today, through the mechanism of expectation on the futures market.”
27

Furthermore, the fact that
offshore drilling wouldn’t have an effect on oil for another ten years is even more of a reason to hurry up
with offshore drilling now.
28

The a
ttacks on John McCain have neglected the nature of both a speculative
market and foresight. Offshore drilling will have a realistic impact in lifting a burden for Americans
struggling to afford transportation. The most telling development in support of off
shore drilling
surprisingly comes from Barack Obama himself. Obama’s new energy position now favors offshore
drilling as part of the comprehensive energy solution.
29

While this solution is not to the same extent as
McCain’s plan it shows that even the Obama

campaign realizes that offshore drilling is both critical and
effective.

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Obama’s energy plan is superior to McCain’s

Rising oil prices and global warming are both immediate concerns on the collective psyche of
America today. Coping with acquiring energy a
nd dealing with the environmental externalities associated
with it have put added pressure on the government to act, as the decisions made in this area may very well
determine the view the public has on the administration in office. There has been no clear
er example of this
than the 2008 presidential election, where John McCain is looking to find more energy and Barack Obama
is trying to find energy solutions. Finding energy solutions is no simple task, and it seems that Barack
Obama is most likely to be a
more effective champion of these solutions than John McCain. Barack
Obama’s selection of Joe Biden reaffirmed that Obama is committed to energy. Biden is well known for his
repeated calls for the senate to take major steps in making energy renewable and cl
eaner.
30

Barack Obama
is proposing wholesale reform to the energy agenda in the United States. Clearly, Obama’s energy plan is
superior to McCain’s for precisely this reason.

Obama’s energy plan is superior to McCain’s because America needs a candidate who
will work
with the private sector. John McCain promises offshore drilling and a tax credit to consumers to purchase
green vehicles. Both neglect the current nature of the energy crisis. Offshore drilling represents three
percent of oil reserves in a countr
y that uses 25 percent of the world’s oil.
31

This drilling will not bring any
tangible solution to the energy problems in the United States. McCain stresses removing environmental
restraints on foreign and offshore drilling. Even if major new oil fields wer
e found, they would have no
effect on supply for at least a decade. Moreover, offshore drilling doesn’t account for climate change or
conservation, and at the end of the day the environment and gas prices would be worse off than before.

32

The tax credits M
cCain is offering is only for consumers who buy zero emission cars or for 10 percent of
wages spent on research and development. This gives energy companies no incentive to research. Obama’s
plan of working with companies on research and development and cr
eating five million new clean energy
jobs, actually gives companies the incentive to move forward. Richard K. Lester, an energy
-
innovation
expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, explains that “The best chance we have
-

perhaps the
only chance
-

is to accelerate the introduction of new technologies for energy supply and deploy them on a
very large scale.”
33

The solution cannot be more oil; rather it should be finding a tangible solution. America
needs a plan that focuses on working with the privat
e sector to find these solutions.


Obama’s energy plan is superior to McCain’s because Obama best works with the private sector.
New technology is critical to a renewed American energy portfolio, but getting companies to act is a
tremendous hindrance in th
is endeavor. There is no competitive justification to go green, nor is there major
support from shareholders, so companies choose not to invest in research and development for clean
technologies. Barack Obama’s plan recognizes this necessity, and it gives
companies capital investment
and aid in engaging in critical research and development projects. Obama will invest $150 billion over 10
years on low carbon energy sources, double R&D spending on biomass, solar, and wind resources. He
would also facilitate c
ommercialization of plug
-
in hybrids and invest in low
-
emissions coal plants.
34

Obama clearly is taking aggressive steps to make legitimate changes in the energy field by jumpstarting the
companies that will develop critical technology. McCain’s plan pales i
n comparison. McCain offers a $300
million prize for the car company that develops a next generation car battery and promises $2 billion
annually to advancing clean coal.
35

A $300 million prize is not nearly enough for a car company to commit
its own money
to research and development, nor is $2 billion sufficient in changing the entire electricity
outlook of the United States. Major change must come; Obama’s plan brings that change by working
closely with the companies that will develop technologies for the
future.


Obama’s energy plan is superior to McCain’s because windfall taxes will bring short
-
term relief.
John McCain has gone on the offensive with Obama’s energy plan due to the lack of relief that Obama’s
plan provides. McCain went so far as to say “An
ybody who says that we can achieve energy independence
without using and increasing existing energy resources either doesn’t have the experience to understand the
challenge we face or isn’t giving the American people straight talk.”
36

This attack has been h
ighly
successful in reducing Obama’s credibility with the working class. However, it is a highly inaccurate
argument. Barack Obama will provide immediate relief at the pump by providing a $1000 rebate to families
to pay for high energy costs. Obama will pa
y for this by reinstating a windfall tax on the record profits of
oil companies.
37

This works in a very clear fashion, as it will allow working families to deal with rising
energy costs in an effective manner. The Obama plan even eliminated the spending loo
pholes that made the
original 1980’s windfall tax ineffective.
38

The McCain attack seems to be politically effective yet
substantively inaccurate.

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Sarah Palin Will Help McCain Win the Election


The day after Barack Obama delivered his speech after accepti
ng the nomination of the
Democratic Party, John McCain announced his running mate, Alaskan Governor Sarah Palin. The
nomination came as a surprise to most people who were expecting the choice of more prominent
Republicans like Mitt Romney. McCain's polli
ng showed the Democrats' class
-
warfare strategy was
resonating with voters. That knocked out Mitt Romney. "There was no way we could nominate a ticket
with 11 houses between them," said one Republican insider, recalling the uproar when McCain couldn't
reme
mber how many homes he owns.
39

"McCain recognizes a fellow maverick when he sees one and he's
a risk
-
taker," a source said. "The more they talked, the more he liked her and the more comfortable he got
with her." Campaign insiders acknowledged there was dis
sent over
Palin
, but McCain stood firm.
40

With
the 2008 election there is now a guarantee that history will be made, either there will be the first African
-
American president or the first female Vice
-
President. The selection of Sarah Palin will help the M
cCain
campaign win the election.

The selection of Sarah Palin will reopen the sore left by the Democratic Party when Obama chose Joe
Biden as his running mate instead of Hillary Clinton. The announcement was designed to
boost the ticket's
appeal to indepe
ndents and disgruntled Hillary Clinton Democrats. After McCain introduced the self
-
described "hockey mom."
Palin

went straight after Clinton loyalists, stealing from Clinton's line that with
18 million votes, her primary race put "18 million cracks" in th
e glass ceiling. "It turns out the women of
America aren't finished yet, and we can shatter that glass ceiling once and for all,"
Palin

told a cheering
crowd in Dayton, Ohio.
41

"This shows that John McCain has the finger on the pulse," said Will Bower, 36,
an ardent Clinton supporter and co
-
founder of a Democratic group opposed to Obama called PUMA (Party
Unity My A
--
). "And he's picking up the ball where the DNC and Obama have dropped it."
42

There is a
potential 18 million votes that may hold sway over the
election. The fact that Palin is a woman is not the
only reason why she was a wise choice, she has a history of standing up to the big oil companies and
Washington.


Sarah Palin’s record shows she has challenged Big Oil in her state. Yesterday, McCain in
troduced
a Republican who, in a decade in Alaska politics, upended the GOP establishment by standing for clean
government. Welcomed inside an entrenched power structure, she blew the whistle on sleazy dealings and
stood up to Big Oil power players. She ref
used to accept money from Washington for the notorious Bridge
to Nowhere.
43

McCain hailed Mrs
Palin,

who is a lifelong hunter and gun rights advocate, for her "strong
principles, fighting spirit and deep compassion''. He declared: "She's exactly who this c
ountry needs to help
us fight the same old Washington politics of me first and country second.''
44

Palin is a clear advocate for
change, which is a direct response to the, “Four more years of the last eight years,” slogan that the
Democratic Party is fond
of saying. McCain realizes he needs to get away from the Bush administration as
much as possible. Palin is big step in that direction and has the record to back it up. Although the
promise of change is needed in this election, Palin also has the kind
of values and morals that appeal to the
right.


Sarah Palin’s lifestyle is the model of conservative living. Married to an oil
-
field production operator
on Alaska's North Slope, she presents an image of the American family that many will identify with. He
r
oldest son enlisted in the Army last Sept. 11 and will deploy to Iraq this Sept. 11. And she has credibility
with the pro
-
life right: She's an evangelical Christian who refused to abort her infant son after learning he
would be born with Down syndrome.
45


This will help McCain’s campaign by appealing to the far right that
was unsatisfied with the nomination of McCain.
Palin

served two terms on the Wasilla City Council before
being elected mayor in 1996. One of the first things
Palin

did was reduce her sal
ary and fire key city
officials she deemed disloyal, Alaska newspapers reported.
46

Her honesty and ability to change for the
better make Sarah Palin a valuable addition to the McCain campaign and will help secure the votes needed
to win the election in 200
8.



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Sarah Palin Will Not Help Win McCain the Election


John McCain’s surprising announcement of Sarah Palin as his running mate drew quick criticism.
Many people were quick to point out the similar choice of Dan Quayle by George H.W. Bush in 1988.
"I
want to believe this is a game
-
changer, but when I close my eyes I see New Orleans in 1988," said a
dumbstruck Republican operative, recalling the convention where Vice President George H.W. Bush
tapped Dan Quayle. "Democrats will have a field day typecast
ing her as Quayle in a pantsuit." That's not
entirely fair to
Palin.

She's capable and engaging, and her hockey
-
mom personal narrative is far more
compelling and appealing. Still, she's even more untested than Quayle, who had 12 years in the House and
Sena
te when Bush chose him as sidekick.
Palin

has less experience in big
-
league government jobs than
Barack Obama, and decades less than Biden.
47

With this surprise nomination, McCain effectively changed
the morning talk of the announcement from Obama’s nomina
tion speech to who exactly Sarah Palin is and
what she can do. Sarah Palin is a virtually unknown politician who has been serving as governor of Alaska
for only two years, beating Frank Murkowski in the primary and then her democratic opponent. Her lack
of experience and a pending investigation are things that will be detrimental to the McCain Campaign.

Sarah Palin’s inexperience makes her a bad choice for the McCain Campaign because she has no
record to back her up. McCain wants and needs a game
-
changer

--

someone who can transform the race
and appeal to women who feel disenfranchised by the Democratic primary results
.

He has decided to put
the former part
-
time mayor of a town of fewer than 9,000, with zero foreign policy
experience,

a heartbeat
away fr
om the presidency, undermining one of his central campaign messages
--

experience.

Furthermore,
he has chosen a staunchly pro
-
life running mate
--

a clear non
-
starter for a large majority of the women he
so desperately needs if he is to win in November.
48

McCain has made a serious misstep choosing someone
that few people had heard of. Being from Alaska she is so far removed from the rest of the United States.
The former mayor of Wasilla, has no national security
experience.

She has been governor only two
years.
And her instincts on domestic and security policy are troubling. While we sit on only 3 percent of the
world's oil reserves,
Palin

thinks we can drill our way out of our oil addiction by exploiting the Arctic
National Wildlife Refuge. When we should

be protecting the climate, she is suing the United States to
prevent protections for polar bears threatened by global warming. When we need to clean up Washington,
she is vocally defending Sen. Ted Stevens.
49



Sarah Palin’s inexperience isn’t the only thi
ng that may deter voters; she’s also involved in a
scandal in Alaska involving her sister and an Alaskan State Trooper. Alaska State Trooper Michael
Wooten, once married to
Palin's

sister, is at the center of a scandal her state's legisla
ture is investigating.
The $100,000 probe will determine whether
Palin

abused her power by firing Alaska Public Safety
Commissioner Walt Monegan after he refused to terminate Wooten. The Alaskan trooper and
Palin's

sister
went through a messy divorce, with

the
Palin

family lodging a number of complaints about Wooten's
behavior in 2005. A 2006 state police investigation concluded Wooten used a taser on his stepson, illegally
shot a moose, drank beer in his patrol car and threatened
Palin's

father would "eat
a f
-----

lead bullet" if he
intervened in the case. The GOP's presumptive vice presidential nominee says Monegan's July firing was
unrelated to his decision to keep Wooten.
Palin

said Monegan was dismissed because she wanted the public
safety department to

move in a new direction. Monegan has said his firing followed pressure to fire Wooten
from the governor's husband, Todd, her former chief of staff and other top officials.
50

This kind of
investigation can be hazardous to any campaign. Dealing with the inv
estigation may also cost Palin
valuable time on the road campaigning and getting her little
-
known name out. With hard work ahead and
learning the workings of Washington Palin will have a tough time learning how to run the country.


At 72 John McCain will
be the oldest person in history to become president if he should win.
Palin would not know how to run the country if McCain were to fall ill or die. This will be on the minds of
voters come election day.
McCain,

who has said repeatedly on the campaign t
rail that his running mate
should have the qualifications to immediately step into the role of commander in chief. Mr.
McCain's

words on the matter have had more than usual resonance this year because of his age and hopes to be the
oldest person ever elect
ed to a first term, and his history with skin cancer. Ms.
Palin

appears to have
traveled very little outside the United States. In July 2007, she had to get a passport before she visited
members of the Alaska National Guard stationed in Kuwait, according
to her deputy communications
director, Sharon Leighow.
51

With McCain’s health in question and a relative newcomer to politics in the
next position, voters might be deterred from voting for the Republican Candidate. Sarah Palin was not a
wise decision and
will not help win the election.



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Obama’s Selection of Joe Biden As Vice President Will Help
His Presidential Run

Sen. Barack Obama returned Saturday to the spot where he began his presidential run to present his
newly picked running mate, Sen. Joseph R.

Biden Jr. of Delaware, a man with "a distinguished record and a
fundamental decency. Joe Biden is that rare mix," the Illinois Democrat said. "For decades, he has brought
change to Washington, but Washington hasn't changed him. He's an expert on foreign
policy whose heart
and values are rooted firmly in the middle class." He touted Mr. Biden's blue
-
collar upbringing in an Irish
Catholic family in Scranton, Pa., a narrative that will be repeated regularly as the reaches out to voters in
the swing state of
Pennsylvania, and to Catholics and working
-
class voters who have been reluctant to back
Mr. Obama
.
52

With November ever looming, Obama hopes to garner votes in his favor with his choice of
running mate. Joe Biden’s six terms as a senator and foreign polic
y expertise brings to the Democratic
ticket what critics say are Obama’s weakest points. With his choice of running mate, Joe Biden will help
Barack Obama in his run for president.

Joe Biden’s political experience is one of many assets that will help Obam
a win the election in 2008.
He was sworn into the Senate in 1972 and has been serving ever since. This is a big contrast to Obama’s
life in the Senate, which was only one term. Biden has also been the chairman for the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee,
which recently sent him the troubled area of Georgia just returning before the
announcement of his nomination.
53

Voters say the biggest gap between Obama and McCain is foreign
policy leadership, "People who were probably leaning toward Obama were a little
nervous, this makes
them more comfortable," political analyst Stu Rothenberg said of the Biden pick.
54

There are only four
senators more senior, although there are 44 who are older, including Senator John McCain. The upside of
this is that Biden is a Democ
rat senior statesman who appeals to more conservative Democrats, and whose
foreign policy expertise is unrivalled in the Senate, where he is chairman of the Committee on Foreign
Relations. John McCain, his junior in the Senate, will be hard
-
pressed to unde
rmine his credentials.
55

Along with his political expertise, Biden’s upbringing appeals to many voters.

Biden's potential appeal to white, blue
-
collar Democrats
--

those who did not support Obama during
the primaries and remained wary of his candidacy
--

w
as also important in Obama's selection of the
Delaware senator. The newly minted partners made no secret of such a goal. As they shared the stage for
the first time as the Democratic ticket, they invoked Biden's native Scranton, Pa., no fewer than five tim
es,
and Obama called the 65
-
year
-
old Biden the "scrappy kid from Scranton." It was a less
-
than
-
subtle plug for
the small northeastern Pennsylvania town that became a touchstone for the primary campaign of Obama's
chief Democratic rival, Hillary Rodham Clin
ton. She often cited her family's roots in Scranton to argue that
she, more than Obama, understood the travails of hard
-
working Americans. With Biden, Obama hopes to
acquire some Scranton credibility
--

not only in the crucial battleground of Pennsylvania
but in other states
where Democrats can ill afford to lose working
-
class support, such as Ohio, Virginia and Florida. "It's nice
that you can get a twofer, with one of the heaviest hitters on foreign policy in the Senate and also get
someone who has the ca
pacity to reach these lunch
-
bucket voters," said Democratic strategist Bob Shurm.
56

Senator McCain’s campaign started with their attacks shortly after the 3 A.M. announcement with an
ad featuring comments about Obama made by Sen. Biden saying "I think he ca
n be ready, but right now I
don't believe he is. The presidency is not something that lends itself to on
-
the
-
job training."
57

The McCain
camp is saying that this nomination is a sign of weakness that Obama’s nomination goes against the image
he’s been crea
ting since the beginning of his political career. This is not entirely detrimental to Obama’s
campaign, it shows’s Biden’s lack of fear to be honest, and will be a benefit to Obama in the months
leading up to the election. Biden's emotional style and wil
lingness to speak his mind have always made
him popular with both core Democratic voters and the press. It is likely to help him appeal to parts of the
electorate that Obama has been having trouble attracting. They include the blue
-
collar, working
-
class
De
mocrats in states such as Ohio and Pennsylvania, who embraced Clinton but who have been lukewarm
on Obama. Biden's straight talking and his middle
-
class background will do much to bring those voters
home to Obama. Senior Democrats have flocked to praise th
e choice of Biden, including Hillary Clinton,
whose supporters could claim, has been cruelly snubbed by Obama.
58

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Obama’s Selection of Joe Biden as Vice President Will Not
Help His Presidential Run


Barack Obama made his announcement for his presidential
running mate; he has named Joe Biden
(D) Delaware. By choosing Joe Biden, Barack Obama has
-

according to the conventional wisdom
-

added
vital experience and foreign
-
policy wisdom to his campaign. What he's really done is add an exclamation
point to the t
riumph of cynical, win
-
at
-
all
-
cost politics. Remember: This was supposed to be a very
different kind of contest. John McCain
-

the maverick. Barack Obama
-

the once
-
in
-
a
-
generation leader.
This was supposed to be a campaign that would rival Lincoln
-
Douglas

for substance. But the past few
months have shown how hard it is to break old political habits. Senator McCain has gone negative, big
-
time. It's working. Senator Obama has become more mainstream. Now he's picked Senator Biden, the
ultimate Washington insi
der, and someone who can fight back hard. It all adds up to what could be the
dirtiest, ugliest campaign of the past 80 years. 2008 is a campaign that's become more politics as usual than
change we can believe in.
59

Joe Biden will not help Barack Obama with

his Presidential run.


Joe Biden is very well known for what he has said, and that’s not a good thing. His political
gaffes have haunted him since his first run for president. His own bid for the Democratic nomination in
1987 was derailed when he was f
ound to have plagiarized a key passage of a speech from Kinnock, then
the Labour leader. At the Welsh Labour party conference in 1987 Kinnock said: "Why am I the first
Kinnock in a thousand generations to be able to get to university? Was it because our pr
edecessors were
thick? "Does anybody really think that they didn't get what we had because they didn't have the talent or the
strength or the endurance or the commitment? Of course not. It was because there was no platform upon
which they could stand." Fou
r months later, on his campaign trail, Biden made a speech saying: "Why is it
that Joe Biden is the first in his family ever to go a university? Why is it that my wife... is the first in her
family to ever go to college? "Is it because our fathers and moth
ers were not bright? Is it because they
didn't work hard? My ancestors who worked in the coal mines of north east Pennsylvania and would come
after 12 hours and play football for four hours. "It's because they didn't have a plat form on which to
stand."
60

These are the kinds of things that can ruin a campaign. On any given day, there is a good chance
that he will say something that could destroy the Democratic ticket or at least hurt its chances in November.
The media will be on gaffe watch with fine
-
tuned

antennae for Biden to be off
-
message.
61

With his
noteworthy blunders, Biden will have a tough time helping win the swing states.


Joe Biden will not help Obama win the election because he holds no sway in the swing states.
After the last two elections swi
ng states have become more important than ever. Obama did nothing that
will help him in a swing state. Biden has no following in a key state or among any particular voter group
that will help Obama appeal to the center, nor does Biden reinforce Obama's ap
peal as an agent of change.
All previous Biden attempts to build support with voters outside his native Delaware have been spectacular
failures.
62

Another problem is that Biden does not bring a swing state with him, as Indiana's Senator Evan
Bayh could have

done. He is also a Washington insider, which could hurt Obama's claim that he wants to
change the system. Finally, choosing a man
-

rather than Clinton or Kansas governor Kathleen Sibelius
-

might aggravate women voters.
63

Some supporters of Hillary Clint
on are going to be staging protests at the
Democratic National Convention.


Biden will not help Obama win the election because the decision not to have Hillary Clinton on
the bill will split up the Democrats. HILLARY Clinton's disgruntled supporters will
mount a protest in
Denver today in defiance of Democrat plans to unify the party, as its nominating convention to showcase
Barack Obama begins. Senator Clinton's angry backers are planning a protest and candle lighting in her
honor in a downtown park in th
e Colorado capital where the convention is being held. They are upset
veteran Senator Joe Biden was chosen as Senator Obama's running mate instead of the former first lady.
Republican presidential candidate John McCain yesterday sought to capitalize on the

Democrats' divisions,
releasing an attacking advertisement featuring Senator Clinton. The ad suggests Senator Obama has
snubbed her by not choosing her as his vice
-
presidential nominee because she criticized him during their
nominating contest The McCain
camp's voiceover says: ``She won millions of votes, but isn't on the ticket.
Why? For speaking the truth.''
64

This can very well split the Democrats enough that the Republican will
come out on top in the 2008 Election.

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The United States Should Not Support
The Full Acceptance Of
Georgia Into NATO


On April 1, 2008 President Bush delivered a speech in Bucharest calling for the expansion of
NATO to include the countries of Georgia and Ukraine. Since then Russia has put troops in the bordering
cities if Osseti
a and neighboring villages.
65

NATO

foreign ministers strengthened their ties to Georgia on
Tuesday and called for Russia to observe a cease
-
fire and withdraw its troops immediately, vowing that
until it does the alliance ''won't continue with business as u
sual'' in its relations with Moscow. NATO failed
to agree on any specific punitive measures, despite pressure from the United States that
NATO

at least
threaten Russia with unspecified ''consequences,'' and pleas from the Czech Republic, Poland and
NATO's

Baltic members that it take a tough stand.
66

Given the growing tension in the region, German diplomats,
say it is not in Europe's interests to talk about bringing Georgia or Ukraine into
NATO

if it means spoiling
the relationship with Russia. They add tha
t geopolitically and economically Russia is much more important
than Georgia. Some
NATO

officials agree. But Russia's recent actions have not deterred
NATO

countries
from closing ranks about Georgia.
67

Russia

made it clear it would not accept the admission

of Baltic States
or former members of the
Soviet Union to NATO.

In 1999,
NATO

admitted three former members of the
Soviet bloc. In 2004, seven more joined, including the three Baltic States, which had been members of the
Soviet Union

proper. Vladimir Puti
n complained. But
NATO

persisted, courting Ukraine and
Georgia.
How would Washington react if
Russia

forged defense pacts with Canada and Mexico? Disgraceful as
Russian behavior in
Georgia

has been, it's not hard to understand Moscow's point of view.
68

In o
rder to
ensure the peace of the region,
The United States should not support the full acceptance of Georgia into
NATO.


The United States should not support the full acceptance of Georgia into NATO because it will
increase Russia’s involvement with Iran’s
nuclear aspirations.
As builders of Iran's $800 million nuclear
power reactor, Russia has long resisted imposing sanctions to halt Iran's program, which the US says is a
cover to make an atomic bomb. Washington has convinced Moscow to support

three previous sets of
Security Council sanctions. But US efforts to launch a fourth set of sanctions
-

begun last week, as Iran all
but ignored a US
-
European deadline on a nuclear deal
-

may get lost in the shrill US
-
Russian tussle in the
Caucasus. "Thi
s will make any hope of cooperative effort on Iran much more difficult," says Michael
McFaul, a Russia and Iran expert at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Support on Iran, he says, is
"without question" the biggest strategic casualty of the renewe
d US
-
Russia tension.
69

The United States should not support the full acceptance of Georgia into NATO because it would
be too difficult to defend the region from Russian aggression.
The notion of collective defense is a more
complicated matter now that
NATO

has expanded to include 26 countries, foreign policy experts said,
including former Soviet republics like Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, not to mention the Czech Republic
and Poland. Although some said that
NATO

might at least try to rustle up a defense f
or those countries if
they were attacked, the concept of collective defense falls apart completely in the case of Georgia and
Ukraine, both smack in Russia's backyard and sphere of influence, even if they were
NATO

members.
70


The United States should not s
upport the full acceptance of Georgia into NATO because Georgia
is already engaged in a long
-
term plan with NATO. Fast
-
tracking Georgia’s acceptance would only lead to
increased aggression from Russia. The better path is for what’s already happening in th
e region. The cease
-
fire negotiated last week by French President Nicolas Sarkozy and signed over the weekend by Russian
President Dmitry Medvedyev, called for Russian troops to return to their positions of Aug. 6, before they
flooded from Russia through t
he separatist zone of South Ossetia and into undisputed Georgian cities and
towns. The demand in
NATO's

Tuesday declaration for a Russian withdrawal covers troops who crossed
from Russia as part of the war. It does not cover several hundred Russian soldie
rs who were stationed on
disputed Georgian land as peacekeepers prior to the escalation.
NATO

hopes that U.N. action will result in
an international peacekeeping force deploying to the two disputed areas of
Georgia.
The declaration
welcomed an agreement,
reached between
Georgia

and Russia this Tuesday at the Vienna
-
based
Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, to expand a small group of unarmed OSCE military
monitors on the ground in
Georgia

from nine to 29. OSCE Chairman Alexander Stubb said
that the
monitors
--

eventually to number 100
--

would initially be deployed only in areas in
Georgia

proper
"adjacent" to South Ossetia and the other disputed enclave, Abkhazia. Calling
Georgia

a "valued and long
-
standing Partner of
NATO,
" the alliance's
declaration said a
NATO
-
Georgian commission would be formed
to help
Georgia

move toward eventual membership. But it made no mention of fast
-
tracking action on
Georgia's

application.
71


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The United States Should Support The Full Acceptance Of
Georgia Into N
ATO


Romanian President Traian Basescu has reiterated his country's support to Georgia's
NATO

bid,
stressing that Romania will support Georgia's admission to the Membership Action Plan at the
NATO

foreign ministerial summit in December 2008. Basescu made a

statement to this effect at a joint news
conference with Georgian president Mikheil Saakashvilli
in Tbilisi on 21 August, which was broadcast by
Georgian Rustavi
-
2 TV. He spoke in Romanian, with superimposed translation into Georgian.
The
Romanian preside
nt said: "Romania has not changed its position and supports Georgia's and Ukraine's
admission to the Membership Action Plan. It will not change its decision in December either when the
NATO

summit will be held to consider the possibility of granting the
MA
P

to Georgia and Ukraine.
Basescu also expressed his concern over the current Georgian
-
Russian crisis, stressing that it poses threat to
the regional stability. He said that, "Georgia's territorial integrity is important for Romania. Nothing can
justify wh
at happened. What happened in Kosovo should not be repeated. Therefore, these principles
should be upheld. Otherwise, regional security might come under threat."
72

In order to keep peace and
stability in the region The United States should support the full
acceptance of Georgia into NATO at the
summit in December.


The United States should support he full acceptance of Georgia into NATO because it will help
the stem the tide of terrorism.
Modern countries today can no longer maintain their security on the
national
level only; they have to cooperate with other states in order to help build a common security framework.
NATO members will not go to war with each other and all disputes among themselves will be solved
through democratic political practice. NATO i
s no longer a purely military organization, but a political one
that influences to a considerable degree the European security processes. It has been transformed from a
common defense entity into a collective security one. The fight against
terrorism

can
only be successful if
conducted through joint and organized actions. NATO is offering to countries great opportunities for
successful fight against
terrorism.

By joining NATO, small countries, are increasing their ability to
maintain their national securit
y. NATO is an alliance of states that have equal rights and duties within the
alliance. Decisions are based on consensus of all member
-
states. Joining NATO does not mean losing your
sovereignty or submitting to one or more bigger countries. The national
security of a country is always
highly valued. Joining NATO means that the state is facing certain financial requirements, but they are
lower than those it would have to face in case of building an independent defense system. NATO
membership provides bett
er conditions for transformation of armed forces in line with modern
requirements and needs. NATO and member states help countries that need advice on how to reform armed
forces.
73

The United States should support the full acceptance of Georgia into NATO to

help ensure the
safety of civilians. President Lech Kaczynski (Poland) and President Valdas Adamkus (Lithuania) issued a
joint statement on Monday urging the NATO leaders to urgently include Georgia and Ukraine in the
Membership Action Plan (MAP)."Russia
n activities in independent Georgia have gone far beyond any
reasonable framework for ensuring
safety

to civilians and peace negotiators and have caused an escalation
of open looting, deliberate destruction of Georgian economy, nature and environment, as w
ell as murders.
This is clear evidence of ethnic cleansing under way there," the statement says. "We regret that to
-
date
diplomatic efforts by the transatlantic community failed to meet with due understanding in Moscow and the
aggression against Georgia ha
s not been stopped," the statement goes on. "We call on the leaders of NATO
states to urgently consider granting a MAP to Georgia and Ukraine."In the face of the uncontrolled rise of
violence and use of force in Georgia we consider granting MAP to those (t
wo) countries to be the only
method of stabilizing the situation in the region, one that will bring security to ordinary people," the two
presidents said.
74

The United States should support the full acceptance of Georgia into NATO because it positively
affe
cts the economy. Along with safety, a stable economy is key for the growth and development. With
the help of NATO Georgians can prosper much in the way of how Poland is striving. Poland's foreign
policy is stamped by mistrust not only of Russia's ambiti
ons but also of hollow assurances from its own
allies.
Georgia's

lonely fight against an overwhelming Russian military did serve as an object lesson
-

a
refresher that some here said no one in Poland needed
-

on the limits of waiting for help from friends.

''We're determined this time around to have alliances backed by realities, backed by capabilities,'' said
Radek Sikorski, Polish Prime Minister.

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Success of Surge in Iraq should be copied in Afghanistan

In January 2007, at a time when the situation in
I
raq

appeared the bleakest, President George Bush
chose a bold option that was at odds with what many of his civilian and military advisers, including his
field commander, initially recommended. Mr. Bush's plan to send more than 20,000
troops

to carry out a

new counterinsurgency strategy has helped to reverse the spiral of sectarian killings in
Iraq.
75

The surge of
troops in Iraq increased the number of forces on the ground from 140,000 to 160,000, and increase of
20,000 or five battalions.
The surge was so
effective that, in July only eleven American

troops were killed,
the lowest number of fatalities for American soldiers since the war begun in 2003.
76

With the success of
the troop surge in Iraq and the talks of a pullout timetable, the United States needs
to strategize the next
step in the war on terror. Although Barack Obama opposed the troop surge, he grudgingly admits that the
surge, proposed in part by John McCain, has worked. Obama also advocates the same type of surge in
Afghanistan where violence i
s on the rise. This strategy will also prove effective in stopping the violence
as well as decreasing Taliban and Al Qadea forces and operations in Afghanistan.

Today there are 71,000 NATO
troops

in Afghanistan, yet things are getting ever worse. There we
re 10
times as many armed attacks on international
troops

and civilian contractors in 2007 as there were in 2004.
Every other measure of violence, from roadside bombs to suicide bombers, is also up dramatically.
America's principal ally at the beginning of

the war, the Northern Alliance, controlled more of the country
at the end of 2001 than President Hamid Karzai, America's current principal ally, effectively controls
today.
77

The need for a new strategy in Afghanistan is very urgent. If things do not cha
nge in the region
there could be an even longer, more drawn out conflict than the one we are facing in Iraq. The success with
the increase of troops in Iraq helps reinforce the idea of a larger force to stop the escalating violence in
Afghanistan.

Both Pr
esident Bush and John McCain have touted the success of the surge, and have been discussing
a drawing down of troops overall in Iraq. On the other side, Barack Obama has made a sixteen
-
month
timetable for a pullout of troops in Iraq.
Iraq's

prime minister
, Nouri al
-
Maliki, said Obama's withdrawal
plan sounded about right to him.
78

With the decreasing of troops, The United Stated can send troops to
Afghanistan to quell the violence and get back on track with the war on terrorism.
Michael Mullen,
chairman o
f the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has said three 3,500
-
troop

brigades are needed in
Afghanistan.

Those
forces will be available only when more are pulled from Iraq. These extra troops will be much like the
surge in Iraq, helping secure hot spots and seeking ou
t Al Qadea and Taliban forces. This will also secure
the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan, where Osama bin Laden is thought to be hiding. Pressure
will be put on Al Qadea not only from the troop surge but from the promise of increasing vigilance i
n
Kabul from President Hamid Karzai, the capital where terrorist forces have been attacking in greater
numbers.
79

This strategy will prove effective in neutralizing terrorist threat and drawing out Osama Bin
Laden, the head of Al Qadea and an extremist Mus
lim thought to have spearheaded the 9/11 attacks. With
the potential success of the surge in Afghanistan it will complete a large part of winning the war on terror
and restoring peace to the Middle East.


Critics of the Iraq troop surge say that the incre
ase of troops was not the only thing to reduce
violence and insurgency in Iraq.
Analysts suggest that the relative calm also reflects a ceasefire agreed
upon by Muqtada al
-
Sadr's Mahdi army and the uneasy alliance between Sunni tribal leaders and U.S.
for
ces.
80

While this may have played a part, most agree that the surge in troops was the correct plan of
action. US think tanks have compiled reports on
Afghanistan;

the AEI's proposals are significant because
they are closest to White House thinking. The in
stitute can also claim success for its proposals for the
surge

of
troops

in Iraq. Many of the experts who sat on the Iraq panel took part in the Afghan group. An
Afghanistan surge

is seen as the only way of ensuring that elections due in April and May nex
t year can go
ahead without Taliban intimidation leading to a boycott. The
Afghanistan

group said America should send
three extra US brigades
-
up to 12,000 men
-
into the south. The US has already said it will soon send in an
additional 3,200 US marines, s
ome to back up British
troops

in the southern province of Helmand.
81

This
surge of troops will emulate the situation in Iraq, creating a stable environment for Afghanistan to govern
itself without the threat of terrorism or being overthrown again by Al Qa
dea.





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Success of Surge in Iraq should not be copied in Afghanistan



In 2007 President George Bush proposed a plan for an increase or ‘surge’ of American troops to
Iraq to stop the escalating violence and bring peace to the region. As of July 2008 th
e surge has been
working. The deaths of American soldiers have been the lowest they have ever been since the war started
in 2003.
82

Since this surge was effective in Iraq, the United States has been looking to do the same thing in
the other war they are w
aging, against Afghanistan.
Destroying the Taliban regime after 9/11 was just and
rational. It was done in an effective and proportionate manner: over just six weeks in late 2001, with
several hundred American special operatives on the ground, American ai
r support and American allies in
the Northern Alliance. Since then, however, the mission has grown. Today there are 71,000 NATO
troops

in Afghanistan, yet things are getting ever worse. There were 10 times as many armed attacks on
international
troops

and
civilian contractors in 2007 as there were in 2004.
83

A change is needed for the
strategy to win the war in Afghanistan. Even though the troop surge was effective in Iraq, it will not be the
same for Afghanistan, it’s a much larger country and may need a
larger force than the United States will
commit to. Also there have been criticisms over how effective the actual surge in Iraq was. A surge in
troops in Afghanistan will not prove successful as the surge in Iraq.


There's now a striking disparity betwee
n
Iraq

and Afghanistan, where Taliban successes, including
a dramatic breakout of hundreds of
jihadists
from Kandahar's main jail and attacks inside the capital Kabul,
underscore the increasingly precariousness of President Hamid Karzai's government. For t
he third straight
month, more coalition soldiers were killed in Afghanistan than
Iraq

and the levels of violence in the two
countries seem headed in opposite directions.
84

This type of aggression shows that immediate action needs
to take place in Afghanis
tan if the United States plans to take control and win the war on terrorism.
However successful the Iraq troop surge was, it did not completely stop the killing of Iraqi civilians.


Iraq
is still a bloody mess. Some four million Iraqis have fled the count
ry or remain displaced
from their homes within it. Hundreds are still being killed every month. A vicious insurgency persists,
especially in the mixed
-
sect provinces north of Baghdad and around the northern city of Mosul. No solution
to the rancorous dispu
te over the now mainly Kurdish
-
run city of Kirkuk is in sight. The Iraqis have yet to
decide how to manage the oil and dish out its revenue. Above all, the newly dominant Shia Arabs have yet
fully to accommodate the aggrieved Sunnis, who ruled
Iraq

under S
addam Hussein and since its inception
as an independent country nearly 80 years ago.

85

Even though the surge in Iraq was a success, it still did
not reach the intended goal, decreasing violence over the whole country. While American soldiers are
dying le
ss often, Iraqi civilians are still dying in large numbers. This type of surge will only falter more in
those areas in Afghanistan. The size of the country is 50 percent larger and has a larger population, which
will require a larger force. Dan McNeil,
the American general who was NATO's top commander in
Afghanistan until he left in June, said shortly before concluding his tour that according to current American
counterinsurgency doctrine, a successful occupation of Afghanistan, which is larger, more com
plex, more
populous and very much less governable than
Iraq,

would require 400,000
troops.
86

Today the
number of
troops in Afghanistan

from nations besides the United States has reached more than 20,000
--

to add to the
approximately 21,000 American troops
serving there.
87

Along with the 71,000 NATO troops in
Afghanistan the grand total of troops there are 112,000. That’s drastically lower than the amount needed to
stop Al Qadea. The United States government is not about to commit a large number of troops t
o
Afghanistan after the troubles they have had in Iraq. Americans would not stand for it.

The surge may have been somewhat effective in Iraq but will not work in Afghanistan. Advocates of a
surge for Afghanistan are saying that a small increase of 15,20
0 troops will be needed.
88

This number is
below the number of troops in the surge in Iraq, which was around 20,000. This math doesn’t add up since
the number of troops in Iraq went from 140,000 to 160,000 with the surge. That is a small percentage of
add
itional troops in Iraq. As stated earlier the amount of troops needed in Afghanistan are almost three
times that of the current number of troops stationed there, not a fraction. The proposed idea of a surge in
Afghanistan will fall through and the United

States Government will just have another long, drawn out
conflict like Iraq. This will lead to more dissent among American civilians and a lack of support for the
war on terror. America cannot have another quagmire in Afghanistan like it did in Iraq, so

even if the surge
worked in Iraq, it certainly will not work for Afghanistan.

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Post
-
Olympics China will be more progressive


The powerhouse that is China recently mystified the world with what many consider to be the best
Olympics in history.
89

Overwhelmin
g displays of national pride showed that the Beijing summer Olympics
was far more than a sporting event
-

the Olympics was a claim of China’s political power. This ascension to
global recognition has been very difficult. The barrage of protests over human r
ights and pollution was
seemingly the most important issues for the games. Though many on the outside considered these signs
rather grim, the Chinese government carried on to an almost flawless Olympic games in Beijing. The
success of the Olympics reverber
ated across the country. All the while, many still are concerned about
whether or not China is ready to engage into the modern, “progressive” world. In this progressive world
there will be major developments to improve on the social and national standing o
f a country dependent
upon typical “western” standards. The progress China shows at this critical post
-
Olympics juncture may
very well reflect China’s new status in the world. Though it is unreasonable to assume that China will fully
develop in a short per
iod of time; it is definitely clear that post
-
Olympics China will be more progressive.

Post
-
Olympics China will be more progressive because China’s leaders are committed to reform.
China is a nation committed to advancing itself. Despite major problems wi
th transparency and corruption,
the government of China is still committed to wholesale empowerment of the nation of China. Indeed, on
the social front the government of China is ready to reform some major social policies.
90

President Hu
Jintao of China rea
lizes that there needs to be reform in order to be a major power that is comparable to the
current western order. Post
-
Olympics China will see the government addressing issues that have not been
up for discussion amongst policy makers for quite some time.
The legitimization of private property, the
controversial one
-
child policy, and social protection clauses are all finally going to be a part of the
government’s agenda
-

truly a first in the country of China.
91

The strides that the nation has taken over the
past decades have been tremendous. This reform is set to continue after the Olympics to a great extent.
Progress can only work insofar as the government and the people are willing to advance. Given the very
optimistic state of China progress is likely to b
e huge. The most telling example comes from President Hu
himself, he claimed that “'Hosting the Olympics is the century
-
old dream of the Chinese. It is the common
vision of the Chinese descendants both in China and overseas. It is also our solemn commitmen
t to the
world which we must honor.”
92
China is clearly ready to progress and reform.


Post
-
Olympics China will be more progressive because Chinese international relations will be
greatly improved. The face of Chinese foreign policy is typically viewed as a
self
-
serving one. However, in
order to take a place in the developed world China must adhere to what Jeffrey A. Bader of the Brookings
Institution calls “International Standards” or the progression of developing a coherent and helpful
international policy
that advances the global agenda.
93

President Hu has become substantially more
receptive to a proactive foreign policy. China’s commitment to nuclear non
-
proliferation is a key example
of this. China has been at the forefront at developing an alternative to
the Nuclear Non
-
Proliferation Treaty
and has become more active to making sure that six party peace talks with North Korea move along
smoothly.
94

Asserting China into the world order also requires a close relationship with the United States
that China is wi
lling and ready to embrace. Cheng Li of the Washington D.C. based John L. Thornton
China Center asserts that the United States and China are ready to “
pursue constructive engagement with
Beijing in strategic dialogue in the areas of trade, the environment,

energy consumption, antiterrorism, and
nuclear nonproliferation.”
95

Political progress must be both globally beneficial and strategically effective.
With both nuclear proliferation and United States policy headed in the right direction, China is indeed
goi
ng to be more progressive post
-
Olympics.


Post
-
Olympics China will be more progressive because China will undergo responsible economic
development. The rise of China in the international arena is attributed almost explicitly by the powerful
economy. In twe
nty years China will pass the United States in terms of size of economy, at the same time
the government has invested $100 billion in Latin America
-
making China one of the largest investors in
Latin America.
96

Similar investment can be seen in Africa where
China has budgeted $105 billion for
energy development.
97

This type of financial diversification represents China’s commitment to continued
growth. The means in which investment is taking place, too, is very important. In Latin America, China
will be invest
ing in private firms for multilayered economic investment. This is a very responsible way to
expand and progress. In China, the government has committed to developing the natural resources of China
so that the infrastructure of African countries can be rev
italized. President Hu is asserting continued
dominance in the economic arena. In true Olympic fashion China is continuing to expand in cooperation
with other nations.

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Post
-
Olympics China will not be more progressive

The grand success of the Beijing Olymp
ics has showed the rest of the world, beyond all else that
China is fully capable of putting on a show. From the bird’s nest to the water cube, the venues provided by
the Chinese government were spectacular. Altogether the event cost the Chinese government

$40 billion.
98

This enormous number is a testament to the commitment China showed in putting together the Olympics.
The smoothness of the games has stricken up conversation over whether or not China will become more
progressive post
-
Olympics.
99

In modern so
ciety, being progressive can be taken to mean more westernized
with respect to government and standards. The path China takes now may very well define how China will
act in the future as a new world superpower. Given the numerous failures of the current Ch
inese
government it is clear that Post
-
Olympics China will not be more progressive.

Post
-
Olympics China will not be more progressive because the government has been emboldened
by the Olympics. China is an enormous state that has historically lost credibili
ty over social problems and
human rights failures. Typically, social unrest is greeted with governmental change. Any hopes that this
would be the case in China were laid to rest post
-
Olympics. Jayshree Bajoria, an analyst at the Council on
Foreign Relation
s, noted that “the hosting of the Olympics marked the transformation of China from being
a big country in terms of size to a great and strong nation. The century
-
old dream of the Chinese is to put
behind whatever humiliation China has experienced over the
past century and regain its rightful status
befitting its size. Second, China is leveraging on Chinese culture as a unifying factor to rally the support of
the Chinese diaspora.”

100

The grand success of the Olympics has re
-
legitimized the Chinese government

in
the eyes of the people. Without a major call for change, it seems rather unlikely that the government will
have any incentive to become more progressive. Henry Paulson, the United States Secretary of the Treasury
argued that the “Chinese are proud of t
heir country’s charge towards emergence.”
101

In fact, this is true also
on an empirical level. The Pew Research Center released a report in which they noted that “China's people
ranked first among 24 nations in their optimism about their country's future, bu
oyed by the fast economic
growth and the promise of the Olympics.”
102


Post
-
Olympics China will not be more progressive because the government has failed to address
social reform issues. International problems typify foreign discussion on China, however majo
r injustice at
home is very telling of the lack of progress China has made and will continue to make. Pallavi Aiyar, a
China expert, points out that “An aging demographic, health
-
care reform, inflation and corruption are
issues that will become easier to h
ear without the overwhelming noise generated by the clarion call of the
Olympics.”
103

The harsh reality is that there has been no indication of actual change after the Olympics.
The government remains just as corrupt and social services just as fractured. Ch
ina will not become more
progressive because the government still hasn’t sought to resolve its own internal problems. In fact, the
Olympic preparation itself shows China’s lack of progressive policy. “The Geneva
-
based non
-
profit Center
on Housing Rights an
d Evictions
reports

at least 1.5 million people were displaced from their homes to
make way for the Olympics. Without alternative housing or an adequate independent judiciary to help them
obtain fair compensation when it wasn't forthcoming, many local resi
dents are still left homeless.
104

Over
one million migrant construction workers were hired from China's impoverished rural side in order to
beautify the city and accommodate the influx of visitors this month. Often working over 15 hours a day,
most laborers
faced "wage exploitation resulting from unfair or non
-
existent contracts and the denial of
basic public social services."
105

China has made almost no progress in the workers’ rights field; the
government proved this by exploiting its own people to prepare fo
r the Olympics. All of these issues were
very well hushed up during the course of the games, now that the games are over the world must face the
fact that China will not be more progressive post
-
Olympics.

Post
-
Olympics China will not be more progressive be
cause there will not be changes made in the
human rights arena. In the lead up to the Olympics, many Chinese government officials were very
concerned that the protests against China’s many human rights abuses would overshadow the effort put into
the games.

Due to some political maneuvering, the Chinese government was able to stymie the protests and
make pseudo
-
reconciliatory actions. Hu Jintao, Chinese president, suggested that democracy would be a
good idea in Myanmar and that he supported humanitarian int
ervention in Sudan. In both these countries,
China is supporting tyrannical leaders
-

and in the case of Sudan, a genocidal one
-

because of a close
-
knit
economic relationship. Hu Jintao has talked tough on these issues, yet clearly has not delivered.
106

Like
the
issues of Myanmar and Darfur, Hu Jintao has stepped up the rhetoric during the Olympics, but hasn’t
indicated any policy changes on the military abuses in both Tibet and Xinjiang. The Hu administration has
done nothing to indicate that human rights wil
l be made a priority.

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Mexico’s President Felipe Calderon’s Strategy To Stop Crime
Is Working


On August 30
th
, tens of thousands of Mexican Citizens gathered in protest in Mexico City. They
gathered to air their anger and frustration over the nation's int
ensifying crime wave and to demand
government action. Dressed in white and bearing white roses and daisies, a sea of marchers packed the
famed Paseo de la Reforma to press the nation's leaders to act to curb kidnappings, blamed in part on
renegade police,
and brutal killings said to be carried out by drug trafficking gangs and their
confederates.
107

There were protests like the one in Mexico City in every Mexican state. The recent rash in
violent crimes, such as murder, kidnappings, and robbery has caused th
e people to question the authority of
the countries’ president, Felipe Calderon. "Calderon, who was on shaky ground after the closeness of the
2006 election, increased his public opinion approval by militarizing the fight against drug
-
trafficking
violence

in Mexico," says Bruce Bagley, a Latin America expert at the University of Miami.
108

During his
term as president, Calderon’s plan has been effective at countering trafficking.

On July 2, 2006, Mr.
Calderon,

a former energy minister, won the presidential
race by a hair. In his
first nine months, Mr.
Calderon,

44, had found his footing. Out of the gate, he began tackling one of
Mexico's foremost problems: the powerful drug cartels and the violence they spread along the country's
northern border and, increas
ingly, in central states such as Michoacan and Guerrero. In December, only
days into his six
-
year term, the new president launched Mexico's largest anti
-
drug offensive, sending
thousands of troops to take on the cartels, town by town.
109

He also had his top

police official, Genaro
Garcia Luna, improve intelligence by lowering the level of police corruption.

He has ordered a substantive
overhaul of the police, including new educational requirements and higher salaries for incoming officers.
He has removed alm
ost 300 federal police commanders, replacing them with trusted officers trained at a
new police academy. U.S. counter
-
narcotics officials tend to view the key people under Garcia Luna's
command as an honest core that can be trusted with U.S.
-
acquired intel
ligence. That improved intelligence
-
sharing has led to some high
-
profile
successes

in the past year: the seizure of more than 23 tons of cocaine,
the biggest bust ever; the arrest of a legendary
cartel

figure known as the Queen of the Pacific; the
discover
y of $207 million in supposedly methamphetamine
-
related cash stashed in the walls of a Mexico
City home. The information sharing has been key in all of those.
110

His policies on crime show that he is
diligent and succeeding in Mexico’s war on drugs.

On Sept
. 1 Calderon submitted his report of the state of Mexico.
Crime, especially kidnapping but also
the drug violence that has killed more than 2,600 people this year, is
Mexico's

hottest issue. In the report,
Calderon said public safety was his top priority.
"The federal government has acted firmly and decisively to
strengthen the rule of law and guarantee public security," said Calderon, of the conservative National
Action Party. The report also showed how his anti
-
drug trafficking task force has taken down e
leven drug
kingpins. Although there have been protests, Calderon enjoys relatively high approval. The Reforma
newspaper published a poll Monday showing that Calderon's public approval had slipped slightly to 62%,
from 65% a year earlier.
111


Critics of Cald
eron say that the increase in violence and spread of fear is a result of poor decision
-
making and corruptness of the government. The daily newspaper Reforma has tallied 2,950 murders linked
to drug violence this year alone; they say their tally of 167 mur
ders last week marks the deadliest week
since Calderon took office in December 2006.Last year, there were 438 reported kidnappings, up from 325
the year before, according to government numbers.
112

Even though there has been an increase of crime, it
is direc
tly affected by the success of Calderon’s strategy. Since taking over the presidency, Calderon has
dispatched some 25,000 military and federal officers across the country where violence is at its worse. His
administration has repeatedly said it is their s
uccess in breaking down gang structures and stemming money
flows that has spawned more violence, but the message is being muffled by gruesome headlines of
beheadings and kidnappings.
113

Taking down the drug cartels does lead to retaliation, citizens of Mexi
co
just need to keep the faith that their elected officials are working on the problem, and are working to fix it.
The results of Calderon’s strategy have yet to come to complete fruition, a better Mexico for the people.



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Mexico President Felipe Caldero
n’s Strategy To Stop Crime Is
Not Working



Since the highly contested election in 2006, Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s run as
presidency has been under high scrutiny. Amidst accusations of buying votes from electorates he vowed to
reduce the surging

crime rate that has been plaguing Mexico. In recent years, the amount of murders and
kidnapping has been on the rise. With Calderon’s victory came a promise to remove the drug cartels that
are cause of the violence. Even after the deployment of thousan
ds of troops to cities all over Mexico, crime
is still on the rise. Hundreds of thousands of Mexicans demonstrated September 1
st

over rising levels of
drug
-
related brutality and gang warfare that have left at least 2,700 dead this year. The protests follo
wed a
particularly violent week that saw 130 killings including 18 decapitations, 12 of which were in the normally
peaceful Yucatan peninsula, a popular destination with tourists and home to the resort of Cancun. The
protesters demanded action against the
bloody tide of executions, shoot
-
outs and kidnappings waged by the
drug cartels that battle not only one another but government forces.
114

Calderon’s plan for reducing crime
by stopping drug trafficking is not working.


The citizens of Mexico silently prot
ested the lack of effort of the government to stem the tide of
murders and kidnappings. Dissent has been growing with the public since Calderon made a vow to stop
trafficking when he won the election in 2006. A large number of people think this promise ha
s been
broken. Some 2700 people have died so far this year across the country in gangland
-
style killings, more
than in all of 2007. Mexico has overtaken Colombia and Iraq with its kidnapping record. The recent high
-
profile kidnapping and assassination of

fourteen year old Fernando Marti on his way to school in Mexico
City, a
crime

that police were involved in, unleashed the latest wave of public anger over systemic
corruption.
115

Calderon’s strategy was to take out the cartels and then the war for traffick
ing territory and
access to the border will cease and Mexico will be a safer place, but this goes to show that now that the
government has been putting pressure on the cartels in this manner, they are growing more desperate and
more violent. . According t
o official statistics, about 65 people are kidnapped each month, or about two a
day. That figure is up 9.1% from last year. But the actual kidnapping tally is probably far higher: Many
families avoid going to the police because they don't trust them. A
cri
me

institute said recently that there
were probably more than 500 kidnappings a month
116

With police being involved in the crimes there is no
way it can be successful.

Calderon’s strategy called for extreme offensive moves but did not consider the corruption

on the
inside. The kidnapping of Fernando Marti is a prime example of the police being either bribed or
intimidated by the cartels so the drug kingpins can do what they want with no retribution. Fernando Marti
was kidnapped at a fake police checkpoint a
nd ransomed for millions of dollars. When the Marti family
paid, they later found the fourteen year old dead in the trunk of a car.
117

This kind of inside corruption
makes the citizens of Mexico fear the government as much as they fear the cartels, there i
s no where to
turn. Mexican citizens are living in fear on a daily basis. Even though the government says they have
made progress in their war on drugs, it’s not felt in the communities.

Calderon’s representatives say that action has been taken and that
drug cartels are being taken down.
The recent rise in crime is due to the fact that the cartels are on the run. His administration has repeatedly
said it is their success in breaking down gang structures and stemming money flows that has spawned more
vio
lence, but the message is being muffled by gruesome headlines of beheadings and kidnappings.
118

The
violence increase may also be due to the fact that the cartels are losing money are cutting losses by
kidnapping. Not only the rich, but all classes of soci
ety are being affected by the kidnappings. The
abduction anxieties run across a surprisingly wide swath of society. There have been cases in which
working
-
class families were ordered to pay as little as $500 to get a relative back. A report by the daily
M
ilenio newspaper said a review of federal statistics showed that only 1 in 8 kidnapping victims was a
business executive. About half were in the middle class or below, the newspaper reported. "They call it an
elitist
crime

because only the rich get kidnapp
ed, but that's not true. They'll kidnap you for $1,000 or
$2,000," said Alfredo Neme Martinez, who heads a national association of wholesale merchants.
119

The
sharp rise in kidnappings are a direct result of money being lost in drug trafficking, the cartels
are desperate
enough to kidnap anyone. Calderon’s strategy is clearly not working and making Mexico worse and
headed for disaster.

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The War in Afghanistan is Succeeding


The war in Afghanistan has steadily dwindled from the minds of many Americans as the
war in
Iraq has taken center stage. The opposite has happened for many other western nations. Afghanistan is an
international military engagement. Not only does the United States play a critical part, so too does NATO
and Pakistan. These nations are lookin
g to stabilize the Afghanistan. From opium trafficking to a regional
spillover to even troop casualties, the progress made in Afghanistan has a fundamental effect on the
international community as a whole.
120

Success in Afghanistan is not by any means singul
ar; it has a
reverberating impact on many levels of the globe. Post
-

9/11 progress is an indication of global safety. The
war in Afghanistan is a war against drugs, terrorism, and security. Tackling these problems is a major
challenge. Nevertheless, the pr
ogress in these areas has been quite impressive. Thus, the war in Afghanistan
is succeeding.

The war in Afghanistan is succeeding because there must be major improvements in
developmental areas. Pre
-

United States invasion, Afghanistan lacked formal law a
nd infrastructure.
Naturally, the quality of life was at an appallingly low level. To succeed in Afghanistan there must be an
increase in the quality of life via improvement in developmental areas.
The Times of London
makes clear
that “Success in Afghanist
an will never be achieved by military arms alone. Building infrastructure and
prosperity is essential if the country is to ever achieve long
-
term stability.”
121

This type of prosperity is the
gauge of success in Afghanistan. For, if there is no clear discuss
ion on these issues there cannot be a
developed Afghanistan. Robert Zoellick the president of the World Bank furthers this argument by
lamenting that “With rising food prices and military problems
-

the only way to salvage Afghanistan is by
instilling legit
imate infrastructural changes in Afghanistan.” He continues that there must also be progress
in agriculture and an eradication of the opium crops.
122

Long
-

term stability in Afghanistan can only be
ascertained through these infrastructural projects and tacti
cal military goals. Afghanistan can succeed if
there is sufficient progress in developmental areas.


The war in Afghanistan is succeeding because there have been major improvements in
developmental areas. Developing stable energy sources in Afghanistan is

a very difficult task given the
regional dangers of the Taliban. Nonetheless, there have been major strides in powering individual regions.
Three major hydro
-
dam turbines have recently been installed in the Hemland province of Afghanistan.
These dams are
powerful enough to power both the Kandahar and Hemland provinces. Furthermore, these
dams also provide useful irrigation tools to make the land more susceptible to farming.
123

The war in
Afghanistan is clearly succeeding because of the useful quality of life

tools being instilled in Afghanistan.
Even more importantly are the great social strides in Afghanistan. There are more than six million children
going to schools
-

35 percent of whom are girls, up from 5 percent in 2001. Nearly 80 percent of the
populatio
n can access basic health services. The amount of trained soldiers in the military is now up to
88,000, well on its way to the goal of 133,000.
124

This progress is absolutely enormous. The fundamental
change Afghanistan has undertaken is truly impressive. Th
is isn’t to say that the mission in Afghanistan is
fully accomplished. Rather, that Afghanistan is clearly succeeding in the post
-
international commitment to
waging a war against the Taliban. In both the infrastructural and social arenas Afghanistan has pr
ogressed
exponentially from its original position. On the issue of opium, Afghanistan is moving in the right direction
as well. More than half of Afghanistan’s provinces have been declared opium free, that is to say 18 f 34
provinces are opium free

up from

13 last year.
125

The war in Afghanistan is succeeding because Afghanistan does not need more troops for
stabilization. The primary justification for the problems in Afghanistan is typically associated with a lack of
a troop influx. The lack of a coherent in
ternational coalition and the preoccupation the United States has
with Iraq serve as major reasons for this. Both John McCain and Barack Obama want to bolster U.S. and
NATO troops in Afghanistan.
126

This argument centers on the belief that Afghanistan is fai
ling; this isn’t at
all the case. Jeremy Shapiro, an expert on civil military relations at the Brookings Institution, notes that the
only way for a full military takeover in Afghanistan is to inject somewhere between 300,000 and 600,000
troops into the cou
ntry. He continues by analyzing the military stalemate in Afghanistan: the Taliban and
Al Qaeda cannot compete militarily with U.S., NATO, and Afghan forces and the U.S., NATO, and
Afghan forces cannot compete with suicide bombers.
127

The current situation i
n Afghanistan indicates clear
success and not failure for this reason. Because of the military stalemate, when the government of
Afghanistan becomes empowered military conflict will dwindle. The strategic position in Afghanistan is
now not an added militar
y one; rather it is sustaining troop numbers and enabling the government. This is
far from the situation over the past two years showing that in Afghanistan there is success.

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The War in Afghanistan is not Succeeding


Al Qaeda remains the most notorious t
error outfit in the world. Successful attacks perpetrated by
this organization range from New York to Madrid to Nairobi. Nearly successful attacks have an even
further breadth of influence. Stopping Al Qaeda is by no means a goal that is restricted to the
United States;
it is a goal of many developed nations because the threat Al Qaeda presents is global. In 2001 the United
States was attacked by Al Qaeda, the US followed up by invading Afghanistan, the central hub of the
organization. Upon entering in Afgh
anistan dual problems were to be tackled: dealing with both Al Qaeda
and the Taliban. To help tackle this problem an international task force quickly joined. The implications of
the war in Afghanistan are global in nature and success will be viewed as such
. Unfortunately, the military
alliance is fractured
128
and progress is not being made at the level the many expected by now. This lack of
progress indicates that the war in Afghanistan is not succeeding.

The War in Afghanistan is not succeeding because Afgha
nistan needs a commitment from major
international players. Unlike the invasion of Iraq, the United States attack on Afghanistan was viewed as
justifiable for many in the international community. The allegiance to the United States in the Afghanistan
war w
as present primarily in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the country of Pakistan.
In order for this war to succeed it will require a powerful commitment from these players. Joanna Nathan of
the International Crisis Group argues that the ch
allenge lies in Afghanistan’s rocky territory and random
target selection. Tracking operatives has become very difficult, and has allowed the Taliban to remain an
active force within that country.
129

Having the manpower to cover area is pivotal if the Taliba
n are to be
eradicated once and for all. A united international front could eradicate the upper echelons of the Taliban
through strategic precision in attacks. This is also a major issue for the key player in the global arena
-

the
United States. Both John
McCain and Barack Obama recognize that Afghanistan must have the troop load
shot up, despite the fact that they disagree on the best method to do this. Similarly, both candidates want a
more assertive Pakistan as well as a cohesive NATO.
130

Afghanistan must
be a truly international effort.
The nation is rife with problems and only a legitimate and large commitment from the international
community can effectively bring mass reform to Afghanistan.


The war in Afghanistan is not succeeding because major interna
tional players lack a commitment
to help Afghanistan. At the forefront of military action in Afghanistan is the United States. The dedication
to the war in Afghanistan has steadily dwindled leaving a crippling effect on progress in that country.
Simon Hend
erson, a Baker Fellow and director of the Gulf and Energy Policy Program at the Washington
Institute for Near East Policy Studies, states that preoccupation with Iraq has led to low troop numbers,
correspondingly weakening military commitment.
131

NATO, too,
has had conflict. The NATO mission is
substantially broken; the Germans want to pull out, while domestic conflict in Great Britain and France
could also threaten the NATO commitment from these countries.
132

NATO is no longer a viable and
committed force to A
fghanistan. The most important nation to success in Afghanistan is Pakistan. Pakistan
has experience with the terrain and the ability to infiltrate strategically in a way that the United States and
NATO could never muster. Most of the Afghanistan insurgenc
y is coming from Bajour, North Waziristan,
and Baluchistan; In all of these areas Pakistan isn’t sending a commitment of troops, rather they tend to
remain in the relatively calm areas of Afghanistan.
133

Without the necessary global commitment there will
con
tinue to be no legitimate success in the country of Afghanistan.


The war in Afghanistan is not succeeding because corruption undermines Afghan progress. The
rhetoric amongst politicians claims that while the military combat operations are having some dif
ficulty
there has been success on the infrastructural front. Citing progress in schools and more energy sources,
134

many believe that Afghanistan is succeeding. While it is certainly true that there has been some movement
in the right direction there are sti
ll enormous problems. The military coalition has engaged in numerous
raids on Taliban strongholds, yet they are no closer to shutting down the Taliban.
135

Primarily because of
the unsecured areas of Waziristan where Pakistan continues with inaction despite U
.S. military funding.
Corruption on the highest levels of government offsets the progress being made. One can hardly associate
this corruption with anything even reminiscent of success as the number one military target is still as strong
as ever. Though br
inging education and healthcare to the Afghan people is very important, the military
reason for intervention in Afghanistan was to eradicate the Taliban and Al Qaeda, neither of which has
come true after seven years. Corruption has permeated beyond just up
per level government officials, major
corruption at the local and district levels, undermines progress and cripples the rights of people.
136

The war
in Afghanistan is not succeeding because there hasn’t been holistic military success in the two most critical

areas.

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Richard Sisk (2008 Aug. 30) MAC'S RISKY ROOKIE. SHE'S IN FOR WOMEN'S VOTE . HE'LL
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Richard Sisk (2008 Aug. 30) MAC'S RISKY ROOKIE. SHE'S IN FOR WOMEN'S VOTE . HE'LL
TRAIN HER ON SECURITY
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Daily News Staff (2008 Aug. 30) A MAVERICK’S MAVERICK
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44

Toby Harndin

(2008 Aug. 30) FEMININE TOUCH LIFTS MCCAIN’S CAMPAIGN
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Daily News Staff (2008 Aug. 30) A MAVERICK’S MAVERICK
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Corky Siemaszko (2008 Aug. 30) MEET JOHN MCCAIN’S MOOSEBURGER
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EATIN’, SALMON
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FISHI
N’, GUN
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TOTIN’ PICK FOR RUNNING MATE
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47

Thomas N. Defrank (2008 Aug. 30) BRILLIAN MOVE OR FEMALE QUAYLE
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48

Michael Feldman (2008 Aug. 30) ASSESING PALIN
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Douglas E. Schoen(2008 A
ug. 30) ASSESING PALIN
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Micheal Cooper and Elisabeth Bumiller (2008 Aug. 30)
ALASKAN IS
McCAIN'S

CHOICE; FIRST
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S. A. Miller (2008 Aug.24)
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53

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56

Peter Wallstein (2008 Aug.
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57

Michael Kranish (2008 Aug. 24)
Foreign policy got Biden the VP nod Six
-
term senator brings
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58

Paul Harris (
2008 Aug. 24)
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-
presidential candidate Joe Biden adds age, experience and expertise in foreign affairs to Obama's ticket
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59

Jerome Armstrong (2008 Aug. 25)Obama’s VP pick: a
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Ed Rogers(2008

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65

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