USER CENTRED DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN EDUCATIONAL FORCE-FEEDBACK HAPTIC GAME FOR BLIND STUDENTS

natureplaygroundAI and Robotics

Nov 14, 2013 (3 years and 5 months ago)

47 views

USER CENTRED DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN
EDUCATIONAL FORCE
-
FEEDBACK HAPTIC GAME
FOR BLIND STUDENTS

Maria
Petridou
, Peter Blanchfield, Reham Alabbadi

Tim Brailsford



School of Computer Science & IT

University of Nottingham

Introduction

Maria Petridou

2

The University of Nottingham


Current research

-
Haptic

sense technology for assisting visual impairment

-
Design & development of an
Audio
-
Haptic Learning Environment for
Learning about 3D
Shapes

-
Promote
social interaction
&
communication channel



Blind
people are still excluded from accessing certain types of
information

-
Difficult
to learn and to be taught
geometry

-
No access to digital
graphics




Braille displays and text
-
to
-
speech systems

-

Give access to digital text




Integrating game technology into education and learning

-

Some significant impact on learning and cognitive process


Haptics

Maria Petridou

3

The University of Nottingham


Refers to the sense of touch




Ancient
Greek word of


ἁπ
τικός


-

verb

άπτω




Ability of a person to
sense, feel, recognise and interact



Non
-
visual
haptics



perceive haptically (user moves actively)



In computer interaction haptic sense is enable, when

-
User moves the mouse or hits the keyboard



Haptic Simulation Applications



-


Medicine


Remote Diagnosis, UI for
blind


-

Entertainment


Games & Virtual
Reality



-

Education


Training, Getting a “feel of things




-

Arts


Virtual Art Exhibits, Concert
Rooms, Museums


The Importance of
Haptics

Maria Petridou

4

The University of Nottingham



It uniquely bidirectional information channel to the brain



(Manav 2010)



Quantitative Task Performance


(
Hasser

1998
)



Multimodal Feedback


(
Delus

2001)
&
(
Akamatsu

1994
)



User Satisfaction



(
Serafin

2007) & (Brewster 2007) & (Chang 2005
)



Non
-
visual Interaction



(
O’Modhrain

1997) & (Petrie H. 1998)



Human Computer Interaction and VE

Maria Petridou

5

The University of Nottingham



Relatively little assistive technology has been developed for blind
users




Research and technology has at best remained
stable

or
declined




Society has become electronically based




Screen Display


commonly used
interface




People with visual handicap:

-

Excluded from this
e
-
society




Most recent force
-
feedback interfaces

-

Allow blind users to interact with 3D virtual reality environment



Maria Petridou

6

The University of Nottingham


Most recent force
-
feedback
interfaces


-

Allow users
to interact with 3D virtual reality environment




PHANToM

-

produce correct tactile cues



CyberGrasp

&
CyberGlove



lightweight exoskeleton



Nintendo Wii joystick


motion sensing



PlayStation Controller
-

vibration



Xbox 360 Milo Project


Gesture Recognition & Virtual Interaction



Novint’s Falcon








Human Computer Interaction Devices


Maria Petridou

7

The University of Nottingham



Novint’s Falcon

-

Consumer’s 3D device


users feel what’s happening

-

To be a predator of the mouse

-

Mobile, ergonomic design

-

Consumers’ affordable



Evaluation of Novint’s Falcon by blind
users?



-

test devices robustness


-

level of successful interaction


-

easy adaptation
to the grip



-

brainstorming





Feedback



-

easily

conceptualise the game mechanically



-

importance of
audio

feedback and instructions


-

preferably bigger grip


-

multiple points of interaction










The Novint’s Falcon


Maria Petridou

8

The University of Nottingham


The Novint’s Falcon


Image
source:
Manav Kataria

Maria Petridou

9

The University of Nottingham



(interactive) Haptic
-
Audio Learning Environment





P
layful, adventures & exciting multimodal learning environment




Enable blind students to learn about 3D shapes




T
est knowledge of basic geometrical concepts

-
Geometry



main theory of space






requires systematic and thinking
reasoning






content rich in visual representation




2D illustrations and reproduction of 3D objects



Tutorials and Help available









iHALE


Phase One

Maria Petridou

10

The University of Nottingham

Phase Two

Maria Petridou

11

The University of Nottingham

Phase Three

Maria Petridou

12

The University of Nottingham

Phase Four

Maria Petridou

13

The University of Nottingham

Phase Five

Maria Petridou

14

The University of Nottingham

Maria Petridou

15

The University of Nottingham



Collaboration of all stakeholders

-

Allow brainstorming and opinions/views

-

Novel helpful and valuable ideas

-

offer valuable insights




Involving users throughout the design and the development

-
receive immediate feedback

-

find out what is
fun

for blind students




iHALE

-
Transform difficult and challenging work into a game

-

Form a communication channel with sighted peers/teachers

-

Shared understanding of teaching material

-

Promote independent study



What is fun and joy for teenagers with visual impairment?





How can a playful and enjoyable environment form a successful learning
channel for these children?









Conclusion


Maria Petridou

16

The University of Nottingham



Characteristics of the final game



Competition with other peers


Competition with their own previous results


Distinct tactile cues


Positive sound for every correct answer


Negative sound for every wrong answer


Time count down notification


Audio instructions


Classification e.g. first in the school, region etc


Reward e.g. get into finals and receive a present







Conclusion


Maria Petridou

17

The University of Nottingham





Questions

Email: petridou.m@gmail.com








Thank You