Standardization in complex systems - Smart Grid CO-intensive fossil fuels are to be replaced as quickly as possible in the whole world for climate protection reasons. A lot of governments worldwide have an energy policy that consists of a bundle of measures aimed at significantly raising resources and energy efficiency while increasing the proportion of power generated from the conversion of renewable energies, especially large-scale off- and on-shore wind farms and decentralized photovoltaics.

mundanemushroomsElectronics - Devices

Nov 21, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Standardization in complex system
s

-

Smart Grid


CO
2
-
intensive fossil fuels are to be replaced as quickly as possible in the whole world for climate protection
reasons. A lot of governments worldwide have an energy policy that consists of a bundle of meas
ures aimed at
significantly raising resources and energy efficiency while increasing the proportion of power generated from the
conversion of renewable energies, especially large
-
scale off
-

and on
-
shore wind farms and decentralized
photovoltaics.

The
Smar
t Grid
is the solution for the future electricity market by optimizing the grid performance, prevent
outage and allow all the consumers (private and industry) to manage their energy usage. The
Smart Grid

uses
sensors, meters, digital control

systems to mon
itor and control the energy flow from production to the consumers
(prosumers).

Especially the
electrical network is composed of a high number of very distributed nodes that are tightly coupled
and operating in real time. Since all the parts of this network

have organically grown over many years, even
decades, figuring out where intelligence needs to be added is
highly

complex.

Increasing this complexity is the fact that m
any Smart Grid project managers are trying to use standards together
that were develop
ed by different SDOs (Standards Development Organizations). Often standards may look like
they match but because they deal with concepts at many different levels and from different view points they
actually do not.

The major challenge is

now how
to integr
ate
standards
from a variety of different
systems
worldwide. There is a
huge need for interoperability standards that will
e.g.
allow utilities to buy pieces of equipment from any vendor
knowing that they will work with each other and with existing equipme
nt at every level.
This is not only about
compatible
interfaces


one plug fitting with another


it is the
need
for
interoperation at a
ll levels in a given
system. This does not
only
mean to
speak the same language
. This
also
means
to understand each othe
r's

underlying

"thought" processes.

To cope with the challenge of developing standards for such a complex system t
he European Commission has
created the mandate M/490
. The
m
andate
has the objective to develop
and

update a set of consistent standards
withi
n a common European framework and

to integrate
a variety of digital computing and communication
technologies and electrical architectures, and associated processes and services, that will achieve interoperability
and will enable or facilitate the implement
ation in Europe of the different high level Smart Grid services and
functionalities as defined by the Smart Grid Task Force that will be flexible enough to accommodate future
developments.

In general t
he
mandate uses a new approach:
D
eveloping a 100% fully

detailed description of standardization for
a Smart Grid

is likely to
take
many years and would be obsolete
when finished,
due to
the
fast developing smart
technologies. So the
s
cope
of this mandate is
to give a first look at the
standards and possible ga
ps and
,

as a
second step,
to develop a
general
framework
with tools
to cope with the standardization and organizational
challenges
of a Smart Grid
.
The Smart Grid Coordination Group
(SGCG)
of CEN, CENELEC and ETSI
and
four specialized
SGCG
Working Groups
h
a
ve been created for this mandate and the resulting tasks. All four
groups develop new techniques and new approaches for handling complexity in Smart Grid Standardization. One
of these four Working Groups

(WG)
, the
WG
“Sustainable Process
es

has been pick
ed to illustrate the approach
and
methodology
of these groups.

The
WG
“Sustainable Process
es”

has analyzed and created methods based on the Use

Case Methodology. Use
Cases were developed in Software engineering
to allow scalable process
-
descriptions in a
easy
-
to
-
Use and easy
-
to
-
read format for complex systems. The Working Group
adopted this

methodology and, along with collecting
more than 450 Smart Grid related Use Cases, described how to facilitate standardization and also access
to
s
tandardization

in gen
eral with Use Cases
.


The
WG

“Sustainable Processes” is integrating the Use Case
-
Methodology also into the Smart Grid Architecture
Model (SGAM) which
is

supposed to give an overall flexible framework for the standardization.

The SGAM
with it’s layers separ
ates clearly the domains and zones and uses the third dimension for the interoperability
aspect. In this way single interoperability issues can be reviewed on their specific layer without loosing the
overall coherence. This transparency and flexibility cre
ates a overall
sustainable
SGAM
.


These examples of the SGCG illustrate the
how efficient standards for interoperability are
coping with such
highly complex systems like a Smart Grid and
while maintaining
freedom and innovation for the benefit of
manufactu
rers and the utilities
.



CV Dr. Bernhard Thies

Dr.
-
Ing. Bernhard Thies studied Power Engineering at RWTH Aachen. He then worked as a scientific assistant
under Prof. Dr.
-
Ing.
Klaus Möller in the Institut für Allgemeine Elektrotechnik und Hochspannungstech
nik at
RWTH Aachen, where he also obtained his doctorate.

In 1991 he was made a member of the Management Board of ABB Trafo BB GmbH, in charge of the
distribution transformer product segment in Brilon. In 1997 he also assumed responsibility for the global
market
coordination of distribution
transformers within ABB.

In 1999 Dr. Thies became Deputy Managing Director of the DKE (German Commission for Electrical,
Electronic & Information

Technologies of DIN and VDE).

In May 2007 he was appointed Managing Direc
tor of the DKE and also Chairman of
the Board of Directors.

In October 2008 Dr. Bernhard Thies started to hold lectures at the RWTH Aachen “Protective Measures and
Equipment in Power Supply Systems and Electrical Installations” (Master
-
Studies

Electrical P
ower
Engineering.)

Dr. Bernhard Thies is not only Secretary of the German National Committee of the IEC and of CENELEC, but
he also represents German interests in various Managemen
t Committees in CENELEC and IEC.